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76 GRAND STREET NEW YORK NY 10013

AERIALS:
Project Proposal

DARIA STINTON

February 2003

PHONE (212) 343 7300 WWW.DEITCH.COM

Aerials, installation shot

**pictured Aerial 1 (Mexico City)

Aerials is conceived of as an exploration of the simultaneity of the human condition
across class boundaries. Traditionally these boundaries have been reified by the
isolating factors of physical geography, but with the accelerating development of
communication technologies, in particular the advent of satellite television and the
Internet, these geographic delimitations seem increasingly archaic. Organized loosely
around the 'Four Worlds' of the Industrialized West, (post)-(ommunist East, Global
South, and the Indigenous Peoples: Aerials is a consideration of the world whose
definitions of identity increasingly find themselves challenged by new alliances forged
through migration, communication, and cooperation.
The installation will involve the arrangement offour sets of diptychs, each
considering the anonymous and abstract nature of both the urban centers, in which
the world's population increasingly conglomerates and digital technologies through
which they interface. Organized around a central unmarked compass, the four
diptyches will be installed bent at ninety-degree angles on freestanding scaffolding
(** See Installation Floor Plan). While mirroring the familiar navigational device, the
paintings nonetheless provide no arbitrary reinsertion of coordinates. Rather, the

similarity of all representational material culled from these cosmopolitan centers serves
only to further obscure any traditional sense of a geographic relationship between the
four. Incidentally, the alternation of the digital abstraction and the representational
paintings will create another compositional feature. As each representational painting
faces directly into the abstract component of the diptych situated opposite, dialouge
between representational components becomes mediated through the digitized Other.

Aerials muses on the opportunities and issues of the emerging global culture.

Aerial 1 (Mexico City) acrylic on canvas

8' x 13' 2003

INSTALLATION FLOOR PLAN

AERIALS at Deitch Projects
(not to scale)

I

PAINTING SUPPORTS

69

COMPASS

D.

A. Washington
B. Beijing

C. Dehli
D. Mexico City

76 GRAND STREET NEW YORK NY 10013

WE'RE STILL HERE:
Project Proposal

DARIA STINTON
September 2004

PHONE (212) 343 7300 WWW.DEITCH.COM

on a surface, painting expresses an interaction between an environment and the
humans who live within it.

We're Still Here consists both of paintings I have created and an installation of
contemporary graffiti collected from a recently gentrified warehouse near my studio in
Williamsburg. My paintings, constructed using traditional materials, attempt to explore
the connection between the anonymity of digital detritus on the Internet and the
physical precedent graffiti sets for these new anonymous markings in virtual space. Set
outside the installation in the consistent white light of the gallery these paintings,
executed only by my hand, fulfill the expectations our contemporary ideas about
art-making and authorship demand. By contrast, the collected scraps of drywall
reference the cultural creation that happens outside institutional walls, or maybe in the
context of this conversation on them. These palimpsests are the products of an
indeterminate number of people. Their creation not able to be assigned to a singular
person, points instead to the social production of culture.
In a 20' by 20' space under the shifting colors of LED lighting, the salvaged graffiti is
presented separately from the traditional paintings, which hang on the exterior (**see
installation shot). Rather than existing as my paintings do, in a context that emphasizes
a notion of trans-historical communication, these marked fragments of drywall are
subjected to a situation of constant Aux that mirrors their precarious and non-archival
existence in the world. We're Still Here is a meditation on forms of cultural expression
that present themselves outside the institutional framework and to what extent the
desires and actions expressed in these forms share common ground with the
traditional practices of art.

76 GRAND STREET NEW YORK NY 10013

DARIA STINTON

PHONE (212) 343 7300 WWW.DEITCH.COM

BIOGRAPHY
Born, New Haven, CT
Lives and works in New York City

EDUCATION
2001
1999
1997

MFA Painting, Yale University, New Haven, CT
BFA Painting, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY
BA Anthropolgy, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
2003

Aerial, Deitch Projects, New York

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
2003

(Dis)belief, Artists Space, New York, NY
Anima/Botanica, Curated by Chloe Seymore, Branch Gallery, New York

2002

Painting Report, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, New York
Painting as Paradox, Artists Space, New York, NY

2001

Spunky, Exit Art, New York

BIBLIOGRAPHY
2003

Jones, Maureen. Daria Stinton: Aerials, Brooklyn Rail, September 2003.

2002

Eleely, Peter. Painting Report, Frieze, Nov/Dec 2002: 105.
Hespers, James. Painting with a Conscience, The Boston Globe, March 15,2002.

76 GRAND STREET NEW YORK NY 10013

DARIA STINTON

PHONE (212) 343 7300 WWW.DEITCH.COM

ARTIST STATEMENT
I've always been intrigued by snap-shots and documentary photography and all their uses, the enigmatic mark that the photograph can make on our personal and cultural consciousness. My early experiences traveling initiated this preoccupation with the photograph. Striving to never fulfill the stereotype
of the Ugly American, my family's travel was centered around my mother's Fulbright Grants and her
efforts in education reform in the Developing World. Nonetheless, our travels always included the
requisite Nikon cameras strapped around our necks. Even at the young age of ten, I was aware of the
dangers inherent in this sort of relationship, especially concerning the possibility of playing the condescending role of 'amateur ethnographer.' With this in mind, my interest in photographs never developed
into a photographic practice per se. I still maintain a cluttered archive of both physical and digitized
images spread through various hatboxes and hard drives, maintaining a presence that sustains my
practice through its lulls and doubts, but to turn these disparate pieces into an organized index always
seemed like a violent action against the image. This has always been the starting point for my practice:
the image-as-relic, not the image-as-document.
The traditional dialogues between the painted image and photographic image have never interested me
much though. The photographs do not provide me with reference material or with a platform to talk
about an 'image-saturated' world (as in the work of Gerhard Richter or Luc Tuymans), nor do they provide
me with representations to be subverted in the form of a collage (as in the work of Martha Rossler or
Thomas Hirschhorn). While those approaches have always seemed to give a negative connotation to the
volume of images produced by our technologically advanced society, I've never believed volume to be
inherently negative. Instead, I've always approached the photographs as possible points of departure for
the works I seek to construct. The bones of my images are collected and constructed from the myriad of
lifestyles and identities which are being created, practiced, recorded, and disseminated everyday
through photographic technologies. I believe these fragments of the everyday, pouring in from all
corners of the world, provide us with the pieces of a better possible future. As many painters before me
have done, I look to the past in an attempt to create a vision for the future.
-April 2003

BIOGRAPHY
Born in 1974 in the suburbs of New Haven, CT, Daria Stinton's childhood experiences of travel and
education in locations such as Ghana and Tanzania opened her to the cross-cultural empathy central in
her work. Inspired by these early interactions, Stinton went on to complete an initial BA in Anthropology
at Bard in 1997. She earned a second degree, a BFA, from Pratt in 1999, and completed her education
with an MFA from Yale in 2001. She is currently represented by Deitch Projects, and lives and works in
New York.
-June 2003


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