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NWP 3 04.1 Helicopter Operating Procedures .pdf


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Title: nwp3-04.1 - LOCATED ON DISC 3 - HELICOPTER OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS

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U.S. NAVY
U.S. MARINE CORPS

HELICOPTER

NWP 3-04.1
MCWP 3-24.1

OPERATING

PROCEDURES
AIR-CAPABLE

FOR
SHIPS

THIS PUBLICATION IS REQUIRED FOR OFFICIAL
USE OR FOR ADMINISTRATIVE OR OPERATlONAL
U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES. OTHER REQUESTS
FOR THIS DOCUMENT MUST BE REFERRED TO
COMMANDER, NAVAL DOCTRINE COMMAND, 1540
GILBERT STREET, NORFOLK VA 2351 l-2785.

l 04llLPOO98650*

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS
HEADQUARTERS U.S. MARINE CORPS

1 (ReverseBlank)

AND

ORIGINAL

NWP 3-04.1
MCWP 3-24.1
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
NAVAL DOCTRINE COMMAND
1540GILBERT STREET
NORFOLK VA 235 1l-2785
February 1998
LETTER OF PROMULGATION
1. NWP 3-04.l/MCWP 3-24.1, HELICOPTER OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS, is an
Unclassified naval warfare publication. It shall be handled by Department of the Navy holders in accordancewith
the administrative procedurescontained in NWP l-01.
2. NWP 3-04.1/MCWP 3-24.1 is effective upon receipt and supersedesNWP 42 (Rev. J)/FMFM 5-34, SHIPBOARD HELICOPTER PROCEDURES FOR AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS, which shall be destroyedwithout report.
3. Disclosure of this publication or portions thereof to foreign governmentsor international organizationsshall be in
accordance with NWPl-01.

‘--

J. E. RHODES
Lieutenant General, U. S. Marine Corps
Commanding General
Marine Corps Combat Development Command

G. S. HOLDER
Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy
Commander,Naval Doctrine Command

3 (ReverseBlank)

ORIGINAL

NWP3-04.1
MCWP 3-24.1
February 1998
PUBLICATION NOTICE

ROUTlNG

1. NWP 3-04.1/MCWP 3-24.1, HELICOPTER OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR AIRCAPABLE SHIPS, is available in the Naval Warfare Publications Library. It is ef%zctiveupon
receipt.
2. Summary of revision:
a Subject areasthat am rewritten include night vision devices,handling of aviation ordnance,
helicopter rope suspensiontraining, and LPD 4/AGF 11 expandedflight deck operations.
b. The launch and recovery wind envelopesin Appendix B are completely redone.
c. Numerousother additions and correctionsare madeto improve the usefulnessof the manual.

Naval Warfare Publications Custodian

I

1
Naval warfare publications must be-made readily available to
all usersand other interestedpersonnelwithin the U.S. Navy. I

I

Note to Naval Warfare Publications Custodian
This notice should be duplicated for routing to cognizant personnel in accordancewith NWP 1-O1.
5 (ReverseBlank)

ORIGINAL

Helicopter Operating Procedures
for Air-Capable Ships
CONTENTS
Past
No.

CHAPTER 1 - RESPONSIBILITIES AND TRAlNlNG REQUIREMENTS
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.1.5
1.1.6
1.1.7
1.1.8
1.1.9
1.1.10
1.1.11
1.1.12
1.1.13
1.1.14
1.1.15
1.1.16
1.1.17
1.1.18
1.1.19

RESPONSIBILITIES .....................................
Command Relationships ......................................
Command Relationship With Marine Helicopter Squadron/Detachment.............
Ship’s Commanding Officer. ...................................
Officer of the Deck .......
................................
Ship’s Operations Officer/Combat SystemsOfficer .......................
Combat Information Center Officer ................................
Chief Engineer ...........................................
Damage Control Assistant .....................................
Air Officer .............................................
Aviation Officer ..........................................
Aviation Coordinator .......................................
Helicopter Control Officer .....................................
Landing Safety Officer ......................................
Flight Deck Officer ........................................
Landing Signalman Enlisted. ...................................
Vertical ReplenishmentOrganizational Responsibilities .....................
Aviation Safety Officer ......................................
Ship’s Medical Officer/Independent Duty Corpsman .......................
Ship’s Supply Officer .......................................

..1- 1
l-l
l-1
l-2
l-3
l-4
l-5
l-5
l-5
l-5
l-6
l-6
l-7
l-7
l-8
l-8
l-8
l-9
l-9
l-9

1.2

TRAINING

..l- 9

1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
1.3.5
1.3.6
1.3.7
1.3.8
1.3.9
1.3.10
1.3.11
1.3.12
1.3.13
1.3.14
1.3.15
1.3.16

TRAINING SHIP’S PERSONNEL ................................
Commanding Officers/Executive Officers ............................
Air Officer/Helicopter Control Officer ..............................
Flight Deck Officer and VERTREP Cargo Supervisor ......................
Officer of the Deck .......................................
Tactical Air Controller. .....................................
Chief Engineer ..........................................
Aviation Fuels Officer ......................................
Damage Control Assistant ....................................
Crash and SalvageCrew/Crash and RescueParty and SceneLeader ..............
Landing Signalman Enlisted. ..................................
Air Tactical Controllers KIC Personnel .............................
FlightDeck Crews and Hookup Men ..............................
VERTREP Cargo Handling Crew ................................
Ship Searchand RescueOrganization ..............................
Ship’s Company Brief ......................................
Aviation PersonnelBrief ....................................

..........................................

7

l-9
l-9
l-9
l-9
l-10
l-10
l-10
l-10
l-10
l-10
l-l 1
1- 11
l-11
l-l 1
l-l 1
l-l 1
l-12
ORIGINAL

Page
No.

CHAPTER 2 - SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

-

2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY ...............................
General Safety Measures ...................................
...............................
Hazards of Foreign Object Damage
......................................
Rotor Blade Dangers.

2.2
2.2.1

SHIP MANEUVERING......................................2Hovering Helicopters ......................................

2
.2-3

2.3

AIRCRAFT HANDLING ....................................

.2-3

2.4

AVIATION FUEL HANDLING

2.5

HELICOPTER FIRE PARTY ..................................

.2-3

2.6

MISHAP INVESTIGATION

..................................

.2-3

2.7
2.7.1
2.7.2
2.7.3

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ................................
General Information .......................................
Aircraft Emergencies ......................................
Flight Deck Emergencies ....................................

.2-3
.2-3
.2-4
.2-5

2.8
2.8.1
2.8.2
2.8.3
2.8.4
2.8.5
2.8.6

HAZARDS.............................................2
Weapons/Chaff Hazards .....................................
Sonic Boom Concussion .....................................
HazardousOperations ......................................
Static Discharge Hazard .....................................
Hazardsof ElectromagneticRadiation to Personnel ......................
Electromagnetic Interference ..................................

2-6
.2-6
.2-6
.2-7
.2-7
.2-7
.2-7

................................

.2-l
..2- 1
.2-l
.2-l

.2-3

-

CHAPTER 3 - PLANNING AND PREPARATION FOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS
3.1

INTRODUCTION.........................................3-

1

3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2

HELICOPTER LIMITATIONS .................................
Inherent Limitations .......................................
Operational Limitations .....................................

.3-l
.3-l
.3-2

3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3

SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS .................................
Logistics .............................................
Helicopter Maintenance .....................................
Corrosion Control ........................................

.3-2
.3-2
.3-2
.3-2

3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4

HELICOPTER FACILITIES CERTIFICATION ........................
Air-Capable Ship Certification .................................
General Requirements ......................................
Levels and Classes........................................
Hotline Action Desk .......................................

.3-3
.3-3
.3-3
.3-3
.3-4
-

ORIGINAL

8

3.5
3.5.1
3.5.2

HELICOPTER OPERATIONS ON READY RESERVE FORCE
AND COMMERCIAL VESSELS ...............................
Training Evolutions .......................................
Guidelines..
.........................................

3.6

OPERATIONSWITHNON-U.S.NAW

3.7

NIGHT OPERATIONS .....................................

.34

3.8
3.8.1
3.8.2
3.8.3

COLD-WEATHER OPERATIONS ..............................
Environmental Considerations. .................................
Maintenanceand Servicing ...................................
Flight Operations ........................................

.34
.34
.3-5
.3-5

3.9

AIRCRAFT/CREW ALERT CONDITIONS ..........................

.3-5

3.10
3.10.1
3.10.2

ADMINISTRATIVE HELICOPTER SUPPORT .......................
Scheduling and Briefing .....................................
Weather Support .........................................

.3-6
.3-6
.3-6

3.11
3.11.1
3.11.2
3.11.3
3.11.4

PLANNING FACTORS. ....................................
Responsibility for the Air Plan .................................
AirPlanContents ........................................
Flight Clearance .........................................
Post-Deployment “Fly-Off’ Policy ...............................

.3-7
.3-7
.3-8
.3-8
.3-8

3.12

U.S. NAVY INTERSERVICE AND BITERNATIONAL
HELICOPTER OPERATIONS .................................

.3-9

SHIPS .......................

.3-4
.34
..3.4
.34

CHAPTER 4 - GENERAL HELICOPTER OPERATIONS
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5

FLIGHT DECK MARKINGS. .................................
Landing Lineup Line and Circle .................................
Vertical Replenishment“T” Line ................................
Vertical ReplenishmentBall and “T” Line ...........................
Vertical ReplenishmentDash Line ...............................
Helicopter In-Flight Refueling Marking. ............................

.4-l
.4-l
.4-l
.4-l
.4-l
.4-l

4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4

VISUAL LANDING AIDS ...................................
Vertical ReplenishmentLighting Equipment ..........................
Landing-ConQured Lighting Equipment ............................
Helicopter Landing SystemAdditional Lighting Equipment ..................
Accessory Visual Aids. .....................................

.4-l
.4-5
.4-7
4-10
4-10

4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2

OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS ............................
Safety. ..............................................
Searchand RescueRequirements ................................

4-10
4-10
4-10

4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2

PREOPERATIONAL PROCEDURES .............................
Time Schedule ..........................................
Flight Quarters ..........................................

4-12
4-12
4-12

9

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

4.5
4.5.1

STOWAGE OF HELICOPTERS ................................
Tiedown Requirements .....................................

4.6
4.6.1
4.6.2
4.6.3
4.6.4

MOVEMENTOFAIRCRAFT.................................4-13
Brakeri&r ............................................
Movement Safety Rules .....................................
LaunchPreparation ....................................
Recovery TiedownProcedures .................................

4-13
4-14
.,.4-l
5
4-15

4.7
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
4.7.4

AVIATION FUELING (JP-5). .................................
General safety Precautions ...................................
Fueling On Deck ......................
Helicopter In-Flight Refueling. .................................
JP-5 Fuel Analysis ........................................

4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-26

4.8
4.8.1
4.8.2
4.8.3
4.8.4
4.8.5
4.8.6
4.8.7

LAUNCH/RECOVERY PROCEDURES ...........................
LaunchProcedures ........................................
Troubleshooter Signals .....................................
RecoveryProcedures ....................................
Safety Precautions ........................................
Additional Preparationsfor Night Operations ..........................
Flight Quarters Clothing .....................................
Wind and Deck Limitations ...................................

4.9
4.9.1
4.9.2
4.9.3

SHIPBOARD HELICOPTER CONTROL STATIONS ....................
Communications .........................................
Emission Control ........................................
Military Air Distress Frequency .................................

4.10
4.10.1
4.10.2
4.10.3
4.10.4
4.10.5
4.10.6
4.10.7
4.10.8
4.10.9
4.10.10
4.10.11
4.10.12
4.10.13
4.10.14
4.10.15

AVIATIONORDNANCE
.................................
PersonnelCertification .....................................
Aviation OrdnanceSafety Supervisors .............................
Hazardsof ElectromagneticRadiation to Ordnance/Radiation
Hazards Safety Precautions ...................................
EmergencyProcedures .....................................
WeaponsHandling and Movement ...............................
Assembly and Disassembly ...................................
Staging ..............................................
Loading .............................................
Arming ..............................................
Downloading and Dearming. ..................................
Unexpendedand Hung Ordnance ................................
Aircraft Maintenanceand Servicing of Loaded Aircraft ....................
Light Airborne Multipurpose System/UndersurfaceWarfare ..................
Hangaring Aircraft With Ordnance ...............................
Munitions ............................................

4.11

ENGINE TURN-UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-39

4.12

SHIPBOARD NIGHT VISION GOGGLE OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40

ORIGINAL

10

4-12
4-12

.;

.................

4-26
4-26
4-27
..4-2 7
4-28
4-29
4-30
4-30
4-30
4-30
4-32
4-33
..4-3 3
4-33
4-33
4-33
4-35
4-35
4-35
4-35
4-36
4-36
4-37
4-37
4-38
4-38
4-39
4-39

Page
No.

4.12.1
4.12.2
4.12.3
4.12.4
4.12.5
4.12.6

Authority For Night Vision Goggle Operations . . . . .
Requirementsand Limitations of Night Vision Goggles
Training and Qualification for Night Vision Goggles . .
Night Vision Goggle Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shipboard Lighting Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aircraft Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . 440
. . . 4-40
. . . 4-40
. . . 4-42
. . . 4-42
...443

CHAPTER 5 - HELICOPTER TRANSFER AND GENERAL UTlLlTY OPERATIONS

-

5.1

SCOPE OF OPERATIONS ...................................

.5-l

5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4

PREPARING FOR TRANSFER OPERATIONS .......................
PersonnelTo Be Transferred ..................................
Cargo To Be Transferred ... ., ................................
Briefing of Handling Crew ...................................
RecommendedProceduresand Equipment to Discharge Static Electricity

.5-l
.5-l
.5-3
.5-3
.5-5

5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3

TRANSFER PROCEDURES ..................................
Transfer of Personnelby Hoist. .................................
Transfer of Material by Hoist ..................................
Transfers Involving Submarines.................................

5.4
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.4.5
5.4.6
5.4.7
5.4.8

MISCELLANEOUS EVOLUTIONS ..............................
Radiological ReconnaissanceOperations .............................
Mine Reconnaissance ......................................
Photography ...........................................
Radar Calibration ......................................
Gunfire Spotting .......................................
Special External Load Operations ................................
Special Recovery Operations ..................................
Helicopter Rope SuspensionTraining ..............................

..........

.5-5
.5-5
.5-7
.5-7
.5-8
5-8
5-10
5-10
5-11
: : 5-11
5-l 1
5-l 1
5-l 1

CHAPTER 6 - AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL DOCTRINE
6.1

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL DOCTRINE (AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS) ..............

6.2
6.2.1
6.2.2
6.2.3

RESPONSIBlLITlES ......................................
Pilot .........................................
Operations Officer ........................................
Combat Information Center Watch Officer ...........................

6.3
6.3.1
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.5
6.3.6
6.3.7

CONTROL.............................................6Controlled Airspace .......................................
Control Criteria .........................................
Visual Meteorological Conditions Minimums .........................
SeparationCriteria ........................................
Electronic Control ........................................
Tactical Direction ........................................
Advisory Control ........................................
II

.6-l
.6-l
..‘.....6-

1
.6-l
.6-l
1
.6-l
.6-2
.6-2
.6-2
.6-2
.6-2
.64

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

6.3.8
6.3.9
6.3.10
6.3.11
6.3.12
6.3.13
6.3.14

Positive Control .........................................
Electronic Emission Control ...................................
Control of RadioCircuits ....................................
VoiceProcedures .........................................
Flight ClearanceRequirements .................................
Departing Aircraft ......................................
Control of Departing Helicopter .................................

.6-4
.64
.64
.
.6-4
...6-4
.6-5

6.4
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.4.3

DEPARTURE PROCEDURES (AIR-CAPABLE SHIPS) ...................
Day Visual Meteorological Conditions .............................
Instrument Meteorological Conditions or Night Operations ..................
Departure CommunicationsProcedures.............................

.6-5
.6-5
.6-5
.6-5

6.5
6.5.1
6.5.2
6.5.3
6.5.4
6.5.5

ARRIVALPROCEDURES ...................................
Approach Criteria (Air-Capable Ships) .............................
Marshal...............................................6
Air Surveillance Radar or Self-Controlled Radar Approach ..................
Missed Approach and Wave-off (Air-Capable Ships) .....................
Helicopter Approach Minimums ................................

.6-5
.6-6
-6
.6-6
.6-9
.6-9

6.6
6.6.1
6.6.2
6.6.3

COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL ...............................
Voice CommunicationsProcedures ...............................
EmergencyLow-Visibility Approach Procedures .......................
Smokelight Approach ......................................

.6-9
.6-9
.6-9
6-10

6.7
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
6.7.4
6.7.5
6.7.6
6.7.7
6.7.8

AIRCRAFT EMERGENCIES .................................
Basic EmergencyProcedures ..................................
Lost Communications and Emission Control ..........................
Lost Aircraft Procedure .....................................
Lost Communications During Instrument Flight Rules .....................
Lost Communications While on Filed Flight Plan .......................
Communications or Navigation Aids Failure During Approach ................
Emergency Landing .......................................
Emergency Signals .......................................

6-10
6-13
6-13
6-13
6-13
6-13
6- 13
6-14
6-14

CHAPTER 7 - AMPHIBIOUS AIR OPERATIONS
7.1
7.1.1
7.1.2
7.1.3

PLANNING REQUIREMENTS ................................
Training Responsibilities .....................................
PersonnelResponsibilities ....................................
Air Plan ............................................

.7-l
7-l
.7-l
..7- 1

7.2

INTEGRITYWATCH

..7- 2

7.3
7.3.1
7.3.2
7.3.3
7.3.4
7.3.5

AIRCRAFT FLIGHT OPERATIONS .............................
General...............................................7Flight Quarters ..........................................
Primary Flight Control ......................................
PrelaunchProcedures ......................................
Preflight Inspection .......................................

ORIGINAL

....................................

12

.7-2
2
.7-2
,7-2
.7-2
.7-3

Page
No.

7.3.6

Engine Starting. .........................................

.7-3

7.4
7.4.1
7.4.2
7.4.3

VISUAL FLIGHT RULE PROCEDURES ...........................
VFRDeparture...........................................7VFRDescentandApproach ...................................
DELTAPatterns .........................................

.7-3
3
.7-3
.7-3

7.5

INSTRUMENT FLIGHT RULE PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3

7.6
7.6.1
7.6.2

NIGHT OPERATIONS .....................................
Night Lighting ..........................................
Night Emission Control Recovery Procedures .........................

7.7
7.7.1
7.7.2
7.7.3
7.7.4
7.7.5

................................
AIRCRAFTEMERGENCIES
..................................
Basic Emergency Procedures
Emergency Landings ......................................
Emergency Visual Signals ....................................
Control Responsibility ......................................
Failure of Communications or Navigation Aids During Approach ................

..7- 5
.7-5
.7-5
.7-5
.7-5
7-5

7.8
7.8.1
7.8.2

..7- 5
.7-5

7.8.3
7.8.4
7.8.5
7.8.6
7.8.7
7.8.8
7.8.9
7.8.10
7.8.11
7.8.12

ORDNANCE .........................................
Ship and SquadronResponsibilities ...............................
Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to
Ordnance and Radiation Hazards Safety Precautions .......................
Emergency Procedures .....................................
WeaponsHandling/and Movement ...............................
Assembly and Disassembly ...................................
Staging...............................................7
. ......................................
Loading .....
Arming...............................................7Downloading and Dearming ...................................
UnexpendedWeapons ......................................
Aircraft Maintenanceand Servicing of Loaded Aircraft .....................
Munitions ............................................

7.9
7.9.1
7.9.2

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS .................................
Medical Casualty Handling on the Flight Deck .........................
Bingo ...............................................

7-10
7-10
7-10

7.10
7.10.1
7.10.2
7.10.3
7.10.4
7.10.5
7.10.6
7.10.7

LPD 4/AGF 11 EXPANDED FLIGHT DECK OPERATIONS ................
Planning Requirements .....................................
Operating Matrix. ........................................
Flight Deck Landing/Parking Restrictions ...........................
Flight Operations ........................................
.‘ ..................................
Night Operations .....
Aircraft Emergencies ......................................
Ordnance Operations ......................................

7-10
7-10
7-10
7-10
7-14
7-14
7-14
7-14

7.11

AMPHIBIOUS EXTERNAL CARGO PROCEDURES ....................

7-14

13

.74
.74
.74

7-6
.7-6
.7-6
.7-6
-6
..7- 7
7
.7-8
.7-8
7-9
.7-9

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

CHAPTER8

-

VERTlCAL REPLENISHMENT PROCEDURES

8.1
8.1.1

CONCEPT OF VERTICAL REPLENISHMENT. .......................
Vertical ReplenishmentDeck Markings ............................

.8-l
.8-l

8.2
8.2.1

VERTICAL REPLENISHMENT HELICOPTERS ......................
Number of Helicopters Used ..................................

.8-l
.8-2

8.3
8.3.1
8.3.2
8.3.3
8.3.4
8.3.5
8.3.6

..................
FACTORS AFFECTING VERTICAL REPLENlSHMENT
Wind................................................8Ship Stationing. .........................................
k ..................
Ship-ProducedInterference ................
Temperatureand Atmospheric Pressure. ............................
Helicopter Pilot Fatigue .....................................
Helicopter Fuel Loading .....................................

.8-2
2
.8-2
.8-6
.8-6
.8-6
.8-6

8.4

ORGANIZATTON.........................................8

8.5
8.5.1
8.5.2
8.5.3
8.5.4
8.5.5
8.5.6

VERTICAL REPLENISHMENT OPERATIONS .......................
CargoStaging..
.......................................
Communications .........................................
Load Transfer Procedures ....................................
Fueling ..............................................
Night Vertical Replenishment ..................................
Other Applications ........................................

.8-6
..8- 7
.8-7
.8-9
8-12
8- 12
8-13

8.6
8.6.1
8.6.2

SUBMARINE VERTICAL REPLENISHMENT
Attack Submarines ........................................
SSBN Submarines ........................................

.......................

8-13
8-13
8-13

8.7

SAFETY .............................................

CHAPTER 9 -

-6

8-13

LIGHT AIRBORNE MULTIPURPOSE SYSTEM iLAMPS
Mk 11
.
I
OPERATIONS

9.1

SH-2F/G HELICOPTER ....................................

.9-l

9.2

AVIATION DEPARTMENT ..................................

.9-l

9.3

IN-PORT MAINTENANCE AND TRAINING

9.4

HELICOPTER FIRE PARTY ..................................

9.5

AIRCONTROL..........................................9-

9.6
9.6.1
9.6.2
9.6.3

GENERAL OPERATING AND SHIPBOARD PROCEDURES ...............
Movement of Helicopter .....................................
EngineTumups..
......................................
. .................
Mandatory Requirementsfor Engagementof Rotors ....

9.7
9.7.1

FLIGHT OPERATIONS ....................................
Launch and Recovery Procedures ................................

ORIGINAL

14

........................

.9-2
.9-2
2
.9-2
.9-2
..9- 5
.9-5
.9-5
.9-5

-

-.

9.7.2
9.7.3

communications..........................................9
Instrument Approaches .....................................

d
.9-6

9.8

ALERTCONDITIONS

.9-6

9.9

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ................................

9.10

TRAlNTNGANDWORKUP...................................9

9.11
9.11.1
9.11.2

LAMPS DETACHMENT CROSS-DECK EVOLUTIONS ..................
One-Planeto One-PlaneCross-Deck Transfer .........................
One-Planeto Tw@lane Cross-Deck Transfer .........................

CHAPTER 10 -

.....................................

.9d
-6
.9d
.9-7
.9-7

LIGHT AlRBORNE MULTIPURPOSE SYSTEM (LAMPS Mk 1111
OPERATIONS

10.1

SH-6OB HELICOPTER .....................................

10-l

10.2

AVIATION DEPARTMENT ..................................

10-Z

10.3

IN-PORT MAINTENANCE AND TRAINING

10-Z

10.4

HELICOPTER FIRE PARTY ..................................

10.5

AIRCONTROL.........................................lo-

10.6
10.6.1
10.6.2
10.6.3
10.6.4
10.6.5

SHIPBOARD OPERATING PROCEDURES .........................
General..............................................10Flight/Hangar Deck Procedures .................................
Hangar Operations ........................................
Blade Folding/Spreading ....................................
Launch and Recovery Procedures ................................

10-3
3
10-3
lw
lw
10-4

10.7
10.7.1
10.7.2

EMERGENCY MANUAL DECK HANDLING ........................
Manual Deck Handling Pre-checks ...............................
Emergency SH-60B Handling ProceduresWith Operable Recovery Assist,
Securing, and Traversing System ................................
Emergency SH-60B Handling ProceduresWith DegradedRecovery Assist,
Securing, and Traversing System .................................
Emergency SH-60B Handling ProceduresWith Manually OperatedRapid
Securing Device .........................................
EmergencySH-6OBHandling proceduresWith InoperativeTail Guide System .........
Emergency SH-60B Handling ProceduresWithout Recovery, Assist,
Securing, and Traversing System ................................

lo-5
10-S

10.7.3
10.7.4
10.7.5
10.7.6

........................

10-Z
2

10-7
10-7
10-7
10-8
10-9

10.8

COMMUNICATIONS

....................................

lo-11

10.9

ALERT CONDITIONS ....................................

lo-12

10.10

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ...............................

lo-12

10.11

TRAINING AND WORKUP .................................

IO-12

I5

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

10.12
10.12.1
10.12.2

LAMPS DETACHMENT CROSS-DECK EVOLUTIONS .................
One-Planeto One-PlaneCrossdeck Transfer. ........................
One-Planeto Two-Plane Cross-deckTransfer ........................

CHAPTER 11 -

lo-12
IO-12
10-13

HS DETACHMENT OPERATIONS

11.1

SH-60F AND HH-6OH HELICOPTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-l

11.2

AVIATION DEPARTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-l

11.3

MAINTENANCEANDTRAINING

11.4

HELICOPTER FIRE PARTY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2

11.5

AIRCONTROL

11.6

SHIPBOARD OPERATING PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1l-2

11.7

COMMUNICATIONS

11.8

ALERT CONDITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1l-2

11.9

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1l-3

11.10

TRAINING AND WORKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3

11.11

DETACHMENT CROSS-DECK EVOLUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1l-3

CHAPTER 12 -

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-l

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . 1l-2

AIRBORNE MINE COUNTERMEASURES OPERATIONS

12.1

INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 12-l

12.2

COMMAND RELATIONSHIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-l

12.3
12.3.1
12.3.2

COMMAND RESPONSIBILITIES ..............................
Mine CountermeasureCommander ...............................
Airborne Mine CountermeasuresSquadronCommanding Officer ...............

12-l
12-l
12-l

12.4
12.4.1
12.4.2
12.4.3
12.5

SHIPBOARD OPERATIONS. .................................
Airborne Mine CountermeasuresEquipment ..........................
Airborne Mine CountermeasuresOperationsFrom an LPD ..................
Airborne Mine CountermeasuresOperationsFrom an LHA/LPW LHD ............
OPERATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ...............................

12-2
12-2
12-2
12-2
12-2

CHAPTER 13 -

VERTICAL ONBOARD DELIVERY PROCEDURES

13.1

CONCEPT OF VERTICAL ONBOARD DELIVERY

13.2

CH-53E HELICOPTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-l

13.3

PREPARATIONS FOR VERTICAL ONBOARD DELIVERY SERVICES . . . . . . . . . 13-l

ORIGINAL

16

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-l

-

Page
No.

13.4
13.4.1
13.4.2
13.4.3

SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS .................................
Shore-BasedMissions ......................................
Other Than Home-Field, Shore-BasedDetachments ......................
ShipBased Detachments ....................................

13-l
13-l
13-l
13-2

13.5
13.5.1
13.5.2
13.5.3

VERTICAL ONBOARD DELIVERY OPERATIONS ....................
Internal Cargo Transport ....................................
External Cargo Transport ....................................
Aircraft Recovery ........................................

13-2
13-2
13-2
13-3

13.6

SAFETY .............................................

13-3

CHAPTER 14 -

COAST GUARD OPERATIONS

14.1

CONCEPT ............................................

14-l

14.2

OPERATIONS WITH COAST GUARD HELICOPTERS ..................

14-l

14.3

OPERATIONS WITH COAST GUARD CUTTERS .....................

14-l

APPENDIX A - HELICOPTER OPERATIONS CHECKLIST
A.1
A.l.l
A.1.2
A.1.3
A.1.4

GENERAL.............................................lOfficer of the Deck Air OperationsChecklist ...........................
Combat Information Center Air OperationsChecklist ......................
Helicopter Control/Flight Deck Officer Checklist ........................
Sample Flight Briefing Sheet ...................................

1
1-l
l-3
l-4
l-8

APPENDlX B - NAVY/MARINE CORPS/COAST GUARD HELCOPTER
SPECIFICATIONS AND LAUNCH AND RECOVERY WIND
LIMITATIONS
B.l

CONTENTS..

.........................................

B.2

LAUNCH AND RECOVERY WIND LIMITATIONS

B.3

FLEET HELICOPTERS

B.4

INTEROPERABILITY MATRICES ..............................

B-l
....................

....................................

B-3
B-4
B-4

APPENDIX C -ARMY/AIR
FORCE/NATIONAL GUARD HELICOPTER
SPECIFICATIONS
c.1

OTHER DOD HELICOPTERS .................................

APPENDIX D - FLIGHT DECK CLOTHING ................................

17

C-l
D-l

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

APPENDlX E -WEAPONS
LOADlNG/STRlKEDOWN/DOWNLOADlNG
ANDRECOVERYGUIDE.................................
APPENDlX F -TESTING

E-l

LABORATORIES - JPd FUEL , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-l

APPENDlX G - U.S. NAW/MARlNE CORPS/COAST GUARD HELICOPTERS
PASSENGER EGRESS DlAGRAMS
G.l

UH-1 ...............................................

G-l

G.2

SH-2..

G-l

G.3

SH-3 ...............................................

G-l

G.4

CH-46 ..............................................

G-l

G.5

CH-53 ..............................................

G-7

G.6

W-53

..............................................

G-7

G.7

SH-60B ..............................................

G-7

G.8

USCG HELICOPTERS .....................................

G-7

..............................................

APPENDIX H - SHIPBOARD SAFETY/SITE SUITABILIM
APPENDlX I -SHIPBOARD

CHECKLIST

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . H-l

PROCEDURES FOR HELICOPTER EMERGENCIES

INDU(.....................................................

. . . . . . . . . I-l
Index-l

18

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Page
No.
CHAPTER 1 - RESPONSlBlLlTlES
Figure l-l.

ChainofCommand

AND TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..l-2

CHAPTER 3 - PLANNING AND PREPARATlON FOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS
Figure 3-l.
Figure 3-2.
CHAPTER4
Figure 4-l.
Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-6
Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-9.
Figure 4-10.
Figure411.
Figure 4-12.
Figure 4-13.
Figure 4-14.

Predicted Cold-Water Survival Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-6
Alertcooditions.......................................3-7
- GENERAL HELICOPTER ,OPERATlONS
Typical Landing Procedures ...............................
Typical Vertical Replenishmentand Helicopter In-Flight Refueling
........................................
Typical Visual Landing Aids Installation for Vertical Replenishment
Decks ..........................................
Stabilized Glideslope Indicator Tricolor Beam ......................
TypicalFlightDeckWithVisualLandingAids.
.....................
SearchandRescueRequirements .............................
North Island (Wiggins) Helicopter In-Flight Refueling Rig ...............
NATO High-Capacity Helicopter In-Flight Refueling Assembly in
StandardNATO and U.S. Navy Configurations .....................
Sample Fueling Station Bill ................................
NATO High-Capacity and North Island Rig Helicopter In-Flight
Refueling Hose Layout ..................................
NATO High-Capacity Assembly Attached to Helicopter Hoist Hook ..........
Command and Display Signals ..............................
Flaghoist Signals ......................................
Visual Signals Between Ship and Helicopter Under Emission Control
or Lost Communication Procedures ............................

.4-2
..u
...4-6
.4-8
.4-9
4-11
4-19
4-20
4-22
4-21
4-25
4-31
4-33
4-34

CHAPTER 5 - HELICOPTER TRANSFER AND GENERAL UTILITY OPERATIONS
Figure 5-l.
Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-3.
Figure 54.
Figure 5-5.

RescueGear and Flotation Gear/Headgear ........................
U.S.CoastGuardRescueBasket ........................
StowageMethodfortheGroundingCableandWand
..................
Submarine Transfer Locations. ..............................
SubmarineTransfer Signals ................................

1 ....

.5-3
.54
.5d
.5-9
5-10

CHAPTER 8 - AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL DOCTRINE
Figure 6-l.
Figure 6-2.
Figure 6-3.
Figure 64.
Figure 6-5.

Control Area and Control Zone Dimensions .......................
Approach Chart Air-Capable Ships Tacan (Helicopter) .................
Approach Chart Air-Capable ShipsNon-Directional Beacon (Helicopter) .........
Emergency Low-Visibility Approach Pattern .......................
Lost Communications Emergency Squawks .......................
19

.6-3
.6-7
6-8
6-l 1
6-14
ORlGlNAL

Page
No.

CHAPTER 7 - AMPHIBIOUS AIR OPERATIONS
Port/StarboardDELTA Pattern ..............................
Helicopter Night Lighting Procedums...........................
LPD-4/AGF 11 ClassExpandedFlight Deck Gperating Matrix .............

Figure 7-l.
Figure 7-2.
Figure 7-3.

CHAPTER 8 -VERTICAL

Figure 8-3.
Figure 8-4.
CHAPTER9

-

Figure 9-l.
Figure 9-2.
Figure 9-3.
Figure 9-4.
CHAPTER 10 Figure 10-l.
Figure 10-2.
Figure 10-3.
Figure 104.
Figure 10-5.

REPLENISHMENT PROCEDURES

Typical Ship Stationsand Vertical ReplenishmentPatterns ...............
Typical Night Vertical ReplenishmentCargo PrestagingDiagram
(Single Landing Area Available) .............................
Mk 105 Hoisting Slings For Return ............................
SSBN SubmarineVertical ReplenishmentMarkings ...................

Figure 8-l.
Figure 8-2.

.7-3
.7-4
7-l 1

.8-3
.8-8
8-l 1
8- 14

LIGHT AIRBORNE MIULTIPURPOSE SYSTEM (LAMPS Mk I)
OPERATIONS
Maneuvering Restrictions During Flight Operations ...................
Typical Sequenceof Events for Flight Operations ....................
LAMPS Mk I ShipboardEmergencyProcedures .....................
Typical LAMPS Mk I At-Sea Workup Schedule .....................

.9-8
9-10
9-l 1
9-23

LIGHT AIRBORNE MULTIPURPOSE SYSTEM (LAMPS Mk Ill)
OPERATIONS
Maneuvering Restrictions During Flight Operationsand LAMPS
Mk III ShipboardCommunication SystemIndications .................
Typical Sequenceof Events for Flight Operations ...................
Recovery Assist, Securing,and Traversing Flight Deck StatusLight
Signals ..........................................
LAMPS Mk III ShipboardEmergencyProcedures ...................
Typical LAMPS Mk III At-Sea Workup Schedule ...................

10-14
10-16
10-17
10-18
10-29

APPENDIX B - NAWlMARlNE CORPS/COAST GUARD HELICOPTER
SPECIFICATIONS AND LAUNCH AND RECOVERY WIND
LIMITATIONS
Figure B-l.
Figure B-2.
Figure B-3.
Figure B-4.

Figure B-5.

ORIGINAL

General Launch and Recovery Envelope .........................
AH-1Tiedown .......................................
AH-1WCobra .......................................
AH- 1W Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1,PortApproach ..............................
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach ..............................
Sheet3:Spotl,StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet4:Spot2,StarboardApproach ...........................
Sheet5:Spots3to6 ...................................
AH-1 W Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 36 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ...............................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope ..........................
20

B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
.B-10
B-11
.B-12
B-13
B-14
B-15

Page
No.

Figure B-6.

Figure B-7.
Figure B-8.
Figure B-9.
Figure B-10.

Figure B-l 1.

Figure B-12.
Figure B-13.
Figure B-14.
Figure B-15.
Figure B-16.
Figure B-17.
Figure B-18.
Figure B-19.

Figure B-20.

Figure B-2 1.
Figure B-22.
Figure B-23.

AH- 1W Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 4 1 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1,PortApproach ..............................
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach ..............................
..........................
Sheet3:Spotl,StarboardApproach
Sheet4:Spot2,StarboardApproach ...........................
UH-1 Tiedown .......................................
UH-1N Iroquois ......................................
...........
UH-lNLaunchandRecoveryEnvelopeforIX514ClassShips.
UH-1N Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1,PortApproach ..............................
Sheet2:Spot2,PortApproach .............................
...........................
Sheet3:Spotl,StarboardApproach
Sheet4:Spot2,SbrboardApproach ...........................
.............................
Sheet5:Spot3,StemApproach
Sheet6: Spot 4, Stem Approach .............................
Sheet 7: Spot 5, Stem Approach .............................
.............................
Sheet8:Spot6,StemApproach
UH- 1N Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 36 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ...............................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope ..........................
UH- 1N Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 4 1 Class Ships
Sheet l:Spots 1 and2,PortApproach ..........................
......................
Sheet2:Spotsland2,StarboardApproach
H-2 Tiedown ........................................
SH-2F/G SeaSprite ....................................
SH-2FIG Engage/DisengageGeneral Envelope ......................
SH-2F/G Engage/DisengageEnvelope for DD 963 Class Ships .............
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor ADILCCILPDILSD
Class Ships .........................................
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor AE 26 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port and StarboardApproaches .........................
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope ..........................
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor T-AFS l/AGF/AOR
Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach, Daytime .............................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach, Daytime ..........................
Sheet3: Port Approach, Nighttime ............................
Sheet4: StarboardApproach, Nighttime .........................
Sheet5: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach .................
Sheet6: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor AOE 1 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ...............................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach .................
Sheet4: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor CG 47 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Stem Approach .................................
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope ..........................
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelope for CGN 36 Class Ships ...........
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DD 963 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ...............................
21

B-16
B-17
.B-18
B-19
B-20
B-21
.B-22
B-23
.B-24
B-25
B-26
B-27
B-28
B-29
B-30
B-31
B-32
B-33
B-34
.B-35
B-36
B-37
B-39
B-40
B-41
B-42
B-43
B-44
B-45
B-46
B-47
B-48
B-49
B-50
B-51
B-52
B-53
B-54
B-55
B-56
B-57
B-58
ORlGlNAL

Pcrgc
No.

Figure B-24.
Figure B-25.

Figure B-26.

Figure B-27.
Figure B-28.

Figure B-29.
Figure B-30.
Figure B-3 1.
Figure B-32.

Figure B-33.
Figure B-34.

Figure B-35.

Figure B-36.
Figure B-37.

Figure B-38.

ORIGINAL

Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach. .................
Sheet4: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelope for DDG 5 1 Class Ships ...........
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DDG 993 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2:SwboardApproach ..............................
Sheet3:SternApproach ................................
Sheet4: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach .................
Sheet5: DegradedRecovery Envelope, S&board Appmach ..............
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor Non&UT FFG 7 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2:SwboardApproach ..............................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port and StarboardApproaches ........
SH-2F/G Launch andRecoveryEnvelopesfor RAST-CapableFFG 7 ClassShips
Sheet 1: Stem Approach .................................
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Stem Approach .................
SH-2F/G Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor WHEC 715 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach ..................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ...............................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope,Port Approach .................
Sheet4: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
H-3 Tiedown ........................................
H-3SeaKing .......................................
H-3 Engage/DisengageGeneralEnvelope ........................
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor AE 26 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum ......................
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 20,000 lb Maximum ......................
Sheet3: Gross Weight of 21,000 lb Maximum ......................
Sheet4: DegradedRecovery Envelope ..........................
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor CG 47 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Gross Weight of 19,008lb Maximum ......................
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 20,000 lb Maximum ......................
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor CGN 36 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum ......................
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Daytime ....................
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope,Nighttime ....................
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DD 963 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum, Port Approach .............
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 20,000 lb Maximum, Port Approach .............
Sheet3: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum, StarboardApproach ..........
Sheet4: Gross Weight of 20,008 lb Maximum, StarboardApproach ..........
Sheet5: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach .................
Sheet6: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
SH/UH-3H Launch and Recovery Envelope for DDG 5 1 Class Ships ..........
H-3 Launch and RecoveryEnvelopesfor DDG 993 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum, Port Approach .............
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 20,800 lb Maximum, Port Approach .............
Sheet3: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum, StarboardApproach ..........
Sheet4: Gross Weight of 20,000 lb Maximum, StarboardApproach ..........
Sheet5: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach .................
Sheet6: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach .............
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor Non-RAST FFG 7 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
22

B-59
B-60
B-61
B-62
.B-63
.B-64
B-65
B-66
B-67
.B-68
B-69
B-70
B-71
B-72
B-73
B-74
B-75
B-76
.B-77
B-79
B-80
B-81
B-82
B-83

__

B-84
B-85
B-86
B-87
B-88
B-89
B-98
B-91
B-92
B-93
B-94
B-95
B-96
B-97
B-98
B-99
B-100
B-101
B-102

-

Page
No.

Figure B-39.
Figure B-40.
Figure B-41.
Figure B-42.

Figure B-43.
Figure B-44.
Figure B-45.
Figure B-46.
Figure B-47.
Figure B-48.
Figure B-49.
-

Figure B-50.
Figure B-5 1.
Figure B-52.
Figure B-53.

Figure B-54.
Figure B-55.

Figure B-56.
Figure B-57.

B-103
Sheet 2: StarboardApproach ..............................
B-104
: ...........
Sheet3: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach ....
B-105
Sheet4: Degraded Recovery Envelope, StarboardApproach .............
H-3 Launch and RecoveryEnvelopesfor RAST-CapableFFG 7 ClassShips
B-106
Sheet 1: Stem Approach ................................
B-107
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Stem Approach ................
B-108
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor IX 514 Class Ships .............
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LCC 19 Class Ships
B-109
Sheet1:GrossWeightof18,OOOto19,OOOIb,PortApproach .............
B-l 10
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 18,000to 19,000lb, StarboardApproach ..........
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor TAO 187 Class Ships
B-111
...........
Sheet 1:GrossWeightof19,OOOIbMaximum,PortApproach
B-112
Sheet2: Gross Weight of 19,000to 20,008 lb, Port Approach
Sheet3: Gross Weight of 19,000lb Maximum, StarboardApproach ’ : : : : : : : : : B-113
B-l 14
Sheet4: Gross Weight of 19,000to 20,008 lb, StarboardApproach .........
H-3 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor WHEC 7 15 Class Ships
B-l 15
Sheet 1: Stem Approach ................................
B-l 16
Sheet2: Degraded Recovery Envelope, Stem Approach ................
B-117
H-46 Tiedown ......................................
B-118
H-46 SeaKnight .....................................
B- 119
H-46 Engage/DisengageEnvelope ...........................
B-120
H-46 Engage/DisengageEnvelope for A0 177 Class Ships ..............
B- 121
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelope for A0 177 Class Ships ............
CH-46DW Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor AOE 6 Class Ships
B-122
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B-123
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelope for AOR Class Ships
B-124
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B-125
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
B-126
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelope for CG 47 Class Ships .............
B-127
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelope for DDG 5 1 Class Ships ............
H-46E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
B-128
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
B-129
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
B-130
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-131
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-132
Sheet5: Spots3 and 5, StarboardApproach ......................
B-133
Sheet6: Spot 4, Port Approach .............................
B-134
Sheet7: Spot 6, Port Approach .............................
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 36 Class Ships
B-135
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B136
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 41 Class Ships
B-137
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
B-138
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
B-139
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-140
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
H-46 Engage/DisengageEnvelopesfor TAO 187 Class Ships
B-141
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B-142
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
H-46 Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor TAO 187 Class Ships
B-143
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B- 144
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
23

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

Figure B-58.
Figure B-59.
Figure B-60.
Figure B-61.
Figure B-62.

Figure B-63.
Figure B-64.
Figure B-65.

Figure B-66.
Figure B-67.

Figure B-68.
Figure B-69.
Figure B-70.
Figure B-7 1.

Figure B-72.
Figure B-73.
Figure B-74.
Figure B-75.
Figure B-76.
Figure B-77.

H-53 Tiedown ......................................
CH-53AID SeaStallion .................................
RH-53D SeaStallion. ..................................
H-53A/D Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
.........................
Sheetl:Spotsland2,PortApproach
......................
Sheet2:Spotsland2,StarboardApproach
H-53A/D Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 41 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
CH-53E Super Stallion .................................
MH-53E SeaDragon. ..................................
H-53E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet5: Spot 3, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet6: Spot 4, Port Approach .............................
Sheet7: Spot 5, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet8: Spot 6, Port Approach .............................
H-53E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 36 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Day Envelope, Port Approach .........................
Sheet2: Day Envelope, StarboardApproach ......................
H-53E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LSD 4 1 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
H-53E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor TAO 187 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
TH-57 Tiedown .....................................
TH-57C SeaRanger ...................................
TH-57C Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor IX 5 14 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
Sheet3: Stem Approach ................................
SH-60 Tiedown .....................................
SH-60BIF SeaHawk. ..................................
SH-60BIF Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor AE 26 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Day Only, Port Approach ...........................
Sheet2: Day Only, StarboardApproach ........................
SH-6OB/FLaunch and Recovery Envelopesfor AOE 1 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Day Only, Port Approach ...........................
Sheet2: Day Only, StarboardApproach ........................
SH-6OB/FLaunch and Recovery Envelopesfor AOE 6 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
SH-6OB/FLaunch and Recovery Envelopesfor CG 47 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Recovery Assist Envelope ...........................
Sheet2: Free Deck and Clear Deck Envelope .....................
24

B-145
B-146
B-147
B-148
B-149
B-150
B-151
B-152
B-153
B-154
B-155
B-156
B-157
B-158
B-159
B-168
B-161
B-162
B-163
B-164
B- 165
B-166
B-167
B-168
B-169
B-170
B-171
B-172
B-173
B-174
B-175
B-176
B-177
B-178
B-179
B-180
B-181
B-182
B-183
B-184
B-185
B-186

Page
No.

Figure B-78.
Figure B-79.

Figure B-80.

Figure B-81.
Figure B-82.
Figure B-83.

Figure B-84.
Figure B-85.
-

Figure B-86.
Figure B-87.
Figure B-88.
Figure B-89.
Figure B-90.

Figure B-91.

Figure B-92.
Figure B-93.

SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor CGN 36 Class Ships
B-187
Sheet 1: StarboardApproach ..............................
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach .............
B-l 88
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DD 963 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Recovery Assist, Free Deck, and Clear Deck
B-189
Sheet2: Recovery Assist, Free Deck, and Clear Deck Degraded&t&i
’ *’ ’ ’ ’ .
Recovery Envelope ...................................
B-190
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DD 963 (Non-RAST) and
DDG 993 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B-191
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
B-192
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DDG 993 Class Ships
Sheet 1: DegradedRecovery Envelope, Port Approach. ................
B-193
Sheet2: DegradedRecovery Envelope, StarboardApproach ..............
B-194
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor DDG 5 1 Class Ships .........
B-195
SHdOB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor MST-Capable FFG 7
Class Ships
Sheet 1: Recovery Assist, Free Deck, and Clear Deck Envelopes,Day
Envelope (Moderate Pitch and Roll) ..........................
B-196
Sheet2: Recovery Assist, Free Deck, and Clear Deck Envelopes,Day
Envelope (High Pitch and Roll) .............................
B-197
Sheet3: Recovery Assist, Free Deck, and Clear Deck Envelopes,Night
Envelope .........................................
B-198
Degraded RAST Recovery Envelope ..........................
B-199
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor IX 5 14 Class Ships ..........
B-200
SH-6OB/F Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
B-201
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
B-202
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-203
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-204
Sheet5:Spots3,4,5,and6,StemApproach
B-205
.....................
HH-60J Tiedown (Coast Guard) .............................
B-206
HH-60J Jay Hawk (Coast Guard) ............................
B-207
HH-65A Secondaryand Heavy Weather Tiedowns (Coast Guard) ...........
B-208
HH-65A Dolphin (Coast Guard) ............................
B-209
MH-47E Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1, Port Approach .............................
B-210
Sheet2: Spot 2, Port Approach .............................
B-21 1
Sheet3: Spot 1, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-212
Sheet4: Spot 2, StarboardApproach ..........................
B-213
OH-58D Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor Non-RAST FFG 7
Class Ships
Sheet 1: Port Approach .................................
B-214
Sheet2: StarboardApproach ..............................
B-215
MH-60K Launch and Recovery Envelope for RAST-Capable FFG 7
Class Ships ........................................
B-216
MH-60K Launch and Recovery Envelopesfor LPD 4 Class Ships
Sheet 1: Spot 1 Day,Port Approach ..........................
B-218
Sheet3: Spot 1 Day, StarboardApproach .......................
B-219
Sheet4: Spot 2 Day, StarboardApproach .......................
B-220

25

ORIGINAL

Page
No.

APPENDlX C -ARMY/AIR
FORCE/NATIONAL GUARD HELICOPTER
SPECIFICATIONS
Figure C-l.
Figure C-2.
Figure C-3.
Figure C-4.
Figure C-5.
Figure C-6.
Figure C-7.
Figure C-8.
Figure C-9.
Figure C-l 0.
Figure C-l 1.
Figure C-12.
Figure C-13.
Figure C-14.
Figure C-15.
Figure C-16.
Figure C-17.
Figure C-18.
Figure C-19.
Figure C-20.
Figure C-21.
Figure C-22.

AH-1s Tiedown ......................................
AH-IS Cobra. .......................................
....................................
UH-lH/VTiedown
UH-lH/V Iroquois .....................................
UH-IMTiedown ......................................
UH-IMIroquois ......................................
HH3EIHTiedown. ....................................
; ................
HH3E/H Jolly Green Giant ...............
......................................
OH-6A Tiedown
OH-6A Cayuse. ......................................
CH47A/B/CYD Tiedown .................................
CH-47A/B/C/D Chinook .................................
HH-53B/C Tiedown ....................................
HH-53B/C/H SuperJolly Green Giant ..........................
CH-54A/B Tiedown ....................................
CH-54NB Skycrane ....................................
OH-58A/C Tiedown ....................................
CH-58A/C Kiowa .....................................
UH-60A Tiedown .....................................
UH-60A Black Hawk ...................................
AH-64A Tiedown .....................................
AH-64A Apache ......................................

C-2
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6
C-7
C-8
C-9
C-10
C-11
C-12
C-13
C-14
C-l 5
C-16
C-17
C-18
C-19
C-20
C-21
C-22
C-23
-

APPENDIX D - U.S. NAWlMARlNE CORPS/COAST GUARD HELICOPTERS
PASSENGER EGRESS DIAGRAMS
Figure G-l.
Figure G-2.
Figure G-3.
Figure G-4.
Figure G-5.
Figure G-6.
Figure G-7.
Figure G-8.
Figure G-9.
Figure G-10.
Figure G-11.
Figure G-12.
Figure G-13.
Figure G-14.

ORIGINAL

UH- 1 EmergencyExits and Equipment ..........................
SH-2 EmergencyExits and Equipment ..........................
SH-3A, SH3D EmergencyExits and Equipment .....................
SH-3G and HH-3A EmergencyExits and Equipment ..................
UH3A EmergencyExits and Equipment .........................
CH-46 EmergencyExits and Equipment .........................
CH-53 EmergencyEquipment, Exits, and Entrances ...................
CH-53 Evacuation Exits on Water ............................
CH-53 EmergencyExits and EntranceDoors .......................
MH-53E EmergencyEquipment, Exits, and Entrances ..................
MB-53E EvacuationExits on Water ...........................
SH-6OB/FEmergencyEntrancesand Exitsd .......................
HH-60J (USCG) Entrancesand Exits ...........................
HH-65A (USCG) EmergencyEntrancesand Exits ....................

26

G-2
G-3
G-4
G-5
G-6
G-8
G-9
G-l 1
G-12
G-13
G-15
G-16
G-18
G-20

RECORD OF CHANGES
Change No. and
Date of Change

Date of Entry

27

Page Count Verified
by (Slgnature)

ORIGINAL

RECORD OF CHANGES
Change No. and
Date of Change

Date of Entry

Page Count Verified
by (Signature)

-

ORIGINAL

28

Bibliography
NAVAIRINST 10348.3,Maintaining Quality and Limiting Contamination of Aircraft Fuels

ATP 1, Vol. II, Allied Maritime Tactical Signal and
Maneuvering Book

NAVAIRINST 13800.2, Aircraft Landing and Recovery Equipment, Including Visual Landing Aids and
Aircraft Support Systems;Proceduresand Responsibilities for Certification of

ATP 10, Searchand Rescue
ATP 16, Replenishmentat Sea
ATP 17, Naval Arctic Manual

NAVOCEANCOMINST 3 140.1 Series, U.S. Navy
Oceanographicand Meteorological Support System
Manual

AXP 5, NATO Experimental Tactics and Amplifying
Tactical Instructions

NAVORDSYSCOMMST 10345.4, Aircraft Ground
Refueling Hose, Preparation for Use; Proceduresfor

EXTAC 1000, Maritime Maneuvering and Tactical
Procedures

OPNAVINST 3 120.28,Certification of Aviation Facilities in Naval Ships Operating Aircraft

EXTAC 1001, International HOSTAC
EXTAC 1002, International HOSTAC, Technical
Supplement

OPNAVINST 3 120.32, Standard Organization and
Regulations of the U.S. Navy

EXTAC 1003,Replenishmentat Sea
OPNAVINST 3 120.35, Helicopter Certification Requirements for Air Capable Ships
-

NATOPS Flight Manuals (available for specific type
aircraft)

OPNAVTNST 3710.7, General Flight and Operating
Instructions

NAVAIR 00-80R-14, NATOPS Aircraft Firefighting
and RescueManual

OPNAVINST 3750.6, Navy Aircraft Accident, Incident, and Ground Accident Reporting Procedures

NAVAIR 00-80T- 105, CV NATOPS Manual

OPNAVINST 4630.25 (DOD REG 4515.13), Air
Transportation Eligibility

NAVAIR 00-80T- 106, LHA/LPH/LHD
Manual

OPNAVINST 463 1.2, Management of Department of
Navy (DOD) Airlift Assets

NAVAIR 00-80T-110,NATOPS Air Refueling Manual

NATOPS

OPNAVINST 4790.2, Naval Air MaintenanceProgram

NAVAIR 00-80T-112, NATOPS Instrument Flight
Manual

OPNAVINST 8600.2, Naval Airborne WeaponsMaintenanceProgram

NAVAIR OO-80T-113, Aircraft Signals NATOPS
Manual

APP 2, Helicopter Operations From Ships Other Than
Aircraft Carriers (HOSTAC)

NAVAIR 5 1-50AAA-1, Installation Details for
Flight Deck Lighting, Visual Landing Aids
(VLA) Components

APP 2 Supp 1, Helicopter Operations From Ships
Other Than Aircraft Carriers (HOSTAC) - Pilot’s
Handbook

NAVAIR 5 1-50ABA-1, Visual Landing Aids on Air
Capable Ships

ATP 1,Vol. I, Allied Maritime Tactical Instructionsand
Procedures

NAVAIR 51-50ABA-3, Visual Landing Aids on LHA
Class Ships
29

ORIGINAL

NAVAIR 5l-50ABA-4, Visual Landing Aids on LPH
Class Ships

Amphibious Assault Ship Aviation Facilities Bulletin
No. 1

NWP 6-01, Basic Operational Communications
Doctrine

Air-Capable Ships Aviation Facilities Bulletin No. 1
General Specificationsof Ships of the Navy

NWP l-l 1.1, Characteristics and Capabilities of U.S.
Navy Combatant Ships

NAEC-ENG-7576,
Resume

NWP 4-01.4, Replenishmentat Sea

Shipboard Aviation Facilities

NAVORD OD 44617, Underway ReplenishmentGrdnanceHandling Equipment and Transfer Units

Joint Pub 3-50, National Searchand RescueManual

NAVSHIPS Technical Manual (Aviation Fuel System),
Chapter 9130

NWP 3-50.1, Navy Searchand Rescue(SAR) Manual
NWP 3-02.1, ShiptoShore Movement

NAVSUPPUB 505,Preparationof HazardousMaterials
for Military Air Shipment

NWP 3-l 5 series, Mine CountermeasuresOperations

USCG COMDTMST M37 10.2, Shipboard Helicopter
Operational Procedures

NWP 3-5 1.1, Electronic Warfare Coordination
NWP 55-8-SAR, Navy Searchand RescueInformation
Document (SAR TACAID)

30

Glossary
A

approach control. A control station in AOCC/HDC
that is responsiblefor controlling air trafIic from marshal until handoff to final control.

airborne stores. Items intended for carriage internally or externally by aircraft, including racks,
launchers,adapters,and detachablepylons, which are
not normally separated from the aircraft in flight,
such as tanks, pods, nonexpendabletraining weapons, and targets.

arming. An operation in which a weapon is changed
from a safe condition to a state of readiness for
initiation.
armlng area. An axa in which a weapon is armed;
when forward-fling weapons are armed, an area
aheadof the aircrafi must be cleared and maintained
clear until a&r launch.

airborne weapons. Items intended for caniage internally or externally by aircraft, which are normally
separatedfrom the aircraft in flight, such as missiles,
rockets, bombs, mines, torpedoes,pyrotechnics,ammunition, and guns.

aviation ship. A CV or CVN.

air-capable ship. All ships other than CVKVN or
LPH/L.HA/LHD from which aircraft can take off,
be recovered, or routinely receive and transfer logistic support.

base recovery course (BRC). The ship’s magnetic heading for aircraft recovery.

air-pable
ship certification. Requirementfor aircapable ships to be formally inspectedand certified
to be able to provide proper, adequate,and safeaviation facilities and to meetthe applicablerequirements
of Air-Capable Ships Aviation Bulletin No. 1.

bingo. An order to an aircraft to proceed immediately
to a divert field. Bearing, distance, and destination
will be provided. Also, a term usedby pilots to denote
the point at which fuel becomescritical and return is
imperative.

air operations. A section of the operations department that is responsible for coordinating all matters
pertaining to flight operations, including the proper
function of AOCC/HDC.

bridge information display system (BIDS). A
visual meansof communication by light betweenthe
LSO, bridge, CIC, and HCO.

B

buster. An order used by a ship controller to direct a
helicopter to proceed at maximum speed.

air operations control center (AOCC). Collocated
with HDC in an LPIWLI-WLPD andresponsiblefor air
open&ionswhen not in an amphibiousobjectivearea.

C

air tasking order (ATO). A daily order prepared by
a task force or joint air commander that details the
operations of all aviation units under his command.

CHARLIE. A signal for aircraft to land aboardthe ship.
A number suffix indicatestime delay before landing.
clear-deck recovery. Conventional landing on a
RAST-equipped ship that does not usethe hauldown
cable or the RSD.

alternate marshal. A marshalestablishedby AOCC/
HDC and given to eachpilot prior to launch with an
altitude and an EAT.

compressor stall. Loss of turbine engine power
commonly associated with FOD and/or encrustation due to extended exposure to salt spray.

ambient temperature. Temperature outside at any
given pressurealtitude, preferably expressedin degreescentigrade.

control area. A circular airspace around an LPH
LPD/LHA/LHD with a radius of 50 nm that extends
upward from the surface to unlimited altitude and is
under the cognizanceof HDC/AOCC for TACC.

amphibious assault aviation ship. An LPH/LHD
or LHA.

31

ORIGINAL

DELTA. A signal for aircraft to hold and consetvefuel
at altitude and position indicated.

control (radar)
advlsory. The tactical control of aircraft by a designatedcontrol unit in which the aircraft receivesdirections and recommendations, but the aircraft
commander is not relieved of the responsibility for
his own safety and navigation.

density altitude. Pressurealtitude in feet MSL corrected for temperatum.The higher the ambient air
temperature, the higher the density altitude, resulting in a decrease in helicopter performance.

close. The tactical control of aircraft by a designated
control unit, whereby the aircraft receivesorders affecting its movements.The pilot will not deviatefrom
instructions given him unless given permission or
unlessunusualcircumstancesrequire him to take immediate action for the safety of the flight. In either
case,the pilot will inform the controller of the action
taken. This type of control requires two-way radio
communicationsand radar contact. The controller is
responsiblefor the safety of the aircraft, and the pilot
must be informed whenever he is not held on the
radarscopefor periods in excessof 1 minute or five
sweepsof the radar and, as a result, is being dead
reckoned. The ultimate safety of the aircraft is the
primary responsibility of the pilot.
positive. The tactical control of aircraft by a designated control unit, whereby the aircraft receives orders affecting its movements which immediately
transfer responsibility for the safe navigation of the
aircraft to the unit issuing such orders.

departure control. A control station in AOCC/HDC
that is responsiblefor the orderly flow of depart&
tdtiC.

downloading. An operation that removersairborne
weaponsor storesfrom an aircraft.
E
emissions control (EMCON). Tactical restriction
on RF, microwave, or acoustictransmissions.
emergency expected approach time (EEAT). The
future time, assignedprior to launch, at which an aircraft is clearedto depart inbound or penetratefrom a
preassignedfix underlost communicationsconditions.
emergency final bearing. A magnetic bearing,
extension of landing lineup line for emergency
recovery.

control zone. A circular airspacewith a radius of
5 nm around the ship that extendsupward from the
surfaceto, and includes, 2,500 feet, unlessotherwise
specified for special operations,and which is under
the cognizanceof the air officer during VMC. The air
officer/HCO/FDO/LSO, as appropriate, shall exercise control over aircraft arriving and departing and
shall provide clearanceover all aircraft entering.

emergency low visibility approach (ELVA). An
emergency procedure used with air-capable ships
when approachminimums arelessthan 200-foot ceiling and l/2-mile visibility.
emergency marshal. A marshal established by
AOCC/HDC and given to each pilot prior to launch
with an altitudeand an EEAT.The emergencymarshal
radial shallhavea minimum of 30” separationfrom the
primary marshal.

D
dearming (safing). An operation in which a weapon
is changedfrom a stateof readinessfor initiation to a
safe condition.

expected approach time (EAT). The future time
at which an aircraft is clearedto depart inbound from
a preassignedfix. Aircraft shall departandcommence
approach at assignedtime if no further instructions
are received.

dearming area. That area in which a weapon is demed; when fonvard firing weapons are dearmed,
the area ahead of the aircraft must be cleared and
maintained clear until weaponsare dearmed

F

deck status light. A three-coloredlight (red, amber,
green) controlled from PriFly. The light displays the
statusof the ship to support flight operations.

ORIGINAL

32

father. A brevity code for tacan.
feet dry. Over land.
feet wet. Over water.

-

final bearlng. The magnetic bearing assigned by
AOCC/HDC for final approach; an extension of the
landing area centerline.

HERO safe ordnance. Any ordnance item that is
sufficiently shieldedor otherwise protectedsothat all
EEDs/CADs contained by the item are immune to
adverseeffects (safety or reliability) when the item is
employed in its expected shipboard RF environments,provided that the generalHERO requirements
are observed.

final control. The station that is responsiblefor controlling traffic to the approachminima.
flight deck director (FDD). The FDD is responsible for on-deck handling of SH-60B helicopters.

HERO susceptible ordnance system. Any ordnancesystemproven (by tests) to contain EEDs and
CADS that can be adverselyaffectedby RF energyto
the point that the safety and/or reliability of the system is in jeopardy when the system is employed in
expectedshipboardRF environments.

flight deck status and signaling
system
(FDSSS). A visual means of communication by deck
status light between the LSO and the bridge, CIC,
HCO, and helicopter.

HERO unsafe ordnance. Any ordnanceitem is defined as being HERO unsafewhen its internal wiring
is physically exposed;when testsarebeing conducted
on the item that result in additional electrical connections to the item; when EEDs/CADs having exposed
wire leadsare present,handled, or loaded, when the
item is being assembled/disassembled;or when the
item is in a disassembledcondition. Ordnance items
that fall into the above classification may be exempted from being classified as HERO unsafe ordnance as the result of HERO tests conducted to
determine specific susceptibility.

flight level. Altitude expressed in hundreds of feet
determined by setting 29.92 in the aircraft pressure
altimeter; that is, FL 230 equals23,000feet in relation
to the standardatmosphericpressureof 29.92.
free-deck recovery. Recoveryto a RAST-equipped
ship using the RSD without the use of the hauldown
cable.
G
ground resonance. A condition of geometric imbalance in helicopters caused by offset dynamic
forces when the helicopter makes improper contact
with the deck. If allowed to continue, destruction of
the helicopter is imminent. Improper tiedowns aggravate the onset of ground resonance.

hover. A condition of flight in which all relative or
actual movementhas ceased.
hung ordnance. Airborne weapons that cannot be
fired or dropped becauseof weapon, rack, or circuit
malfunction.

H
helicopter control station (HCS). A shipboard
aircraft control tower, or, on ships not equippedwith
a control tower, the communications installation
which servesas such.

I
instrument meteorological conditions (MC).
Meteorological conditions expressedin termsof visibility, distancefrom cloud, and ceiling, less than the
minima specified for VMC. Under IMC, IFR mustbe
complied with.

helicopter direction center (HDC). The controlling agencyin an LPD/LHA/LPH/LHD that is responsible for dispatch and control of aircraft in an
amphibiousforce.

inbound bearing. The magnetic heading assigned
by AOCC/HDC that will ensure interception of the
final bearing at a specific distance from the ship.

helicopter emergency egress lights system
(HEELS). A self-contained battery-poweredsystemof
luminous strips outlining emergencyexits designed
to aid in emergencyegressof passengers.

K
helicopter landing system (HLS). A system installed on some ships to assistwith helicopter recovery. Includes: BIDS, FDSSS, and RAST system.

KILO report. A pilot-coded report indicating aircraft
mission readiness.

33

night vision goggles (NVG). An image intensification system worn by an individual in order to enhanceor improve vision at night.

L
landing force operational
reserve material (LFORM). A package of contingency supplies prepositioned on amphibious warfare ships
consisting of Class I (rations), Class III (trioxade), Class III (A) (aviation fuel), Class III
(W) (petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)), and
Class V (W) (ground ammunition) designated to
support operations of embarked landing force
and Navy support element (NSE).

nonprecision approach.
Radar-controlled ap
proach or an approachflown by referenceto navigation aids in which glideslope information is not
available.
0

landing safety officer (LSO). The officer responsible for RAST operations,normally a LAMPS Mk
III qualified naval aviator.

operational necessity. This term applies to missionsassociatedwith war or peacetimeoperationsin
which the consequencesof an action justify the risk
of loss of aircraft and aircrew.
optimum wind

lift off. To take off or leave the deck in a controlled
condition of flight.
loading. An operation that installs airborne weapons
and storeson or in an aircraft and may include fuzing
of bombs and stray voltage checks.
loading area. That area in which replenishment of
airborne weaponsor storesand other armament items
on or in an aircraft is conducted. When handling
weapons in this area, all fuzxesand initiators shall
remain safe and all gun chambersclear.

optimum wind for normal operations. Winds down
the lineup line at approximately half the maximum
speedallowed by the applicable wind envelopesin
Appendix B.
optimum wind for a single-engine landing. Relative wind as close as possible to being down the
lineup line at the maximum windspeed allowed by
the appropriatewind envelopein Appendix B.
optimum wind for up-the-stern approaches
(SH-SOB). Winds 10” to 20’ off the port bow at onehalf the maximum speedallowed.

M
marshal. A bearing, distance, and altitude fix designated by AOCC/HDC from which pilots will
orient holding and from which initial approach
will commence.

optimum wind for AFCS/SAS/BOOST or any
flight control failure or degradation. Winds in
the appropriateemergencywind envelopegiving the
most stabledeck.

marshal control. A control station in AOCC/HDC
that is responsible for the orderly flow of inbound

P

tli3ffiC.

parrot. A brevity code for aircraft transponder.
mission load allowance (MU). A pre-positioned
contingencypackageof V ClassV (A) (aviation ammunition) that is Navy-controlled material designated to support aviation operationsof the embarked
landing force.
mother. Commonly usedterm to define ship of origin
or ship providing control.

pigeons. Vectors provided by ships’ aircraft controllers or ASTACs to a specified destination.
pilots landing aid television (PLAT). A closedcircuit TV presentation of air operations on a flight
deck.
P/M/C. Passengers,mail, and cargo.

N
pogo. A brevity code used in communication fre
quencychangeassignmentsto “return to
.*’

night vision device (NVD). Any device (NVG,
FLIR, low-light Tc, etc.) that aids an individual’s
vision at night.

ORIGINAL

POPEYE. A pilot term used to indicate that his aircraft hasenteredIMC.

34

precision approach. A radar approach in which
range, azimuth, and glideslope information is provided to the pilot.

unexpended weapons. Airborne weapons that
have not been subjectedto attempts to fire or drop,
arepresumedto be in normal operating condition, and
can be fired or jettisoned if necessary.

pressure altitude. The indicated altitude of a pressure altimeter at an altimeter setting of 29.92 inches
of mercury.

V
vertical onboard delivery (VOD). Logistics movement of high-priority passengeers/mail/cargo
to/from
aviation and air-capable ships, normally by the CH53E helicopter.

primary flight (PriFly) control. The controlling
agencyon aviation ships,amphibiousassaultaviation
ships, and ai-rcapable ships that is responsible for
ATC around the ship.

vertical replenishment (VERTREP) control The
station responsiblefor contmiiing the movement of
cargo,passengers,and mail by VERTREI?

R
rapid securing device (RSD). A part of the RAST
system that secures the SH-6OB helicopter to the
deck. It also provides a meansof traversing the helicopter to/from the hangar/flight deck.

visual meteorological
conditions
(MC).
Weather conditions in which VFR apply, expressed
in termsofvisibility, ceiling height, andaircraft clearancefrom cloudsalong the path of flight. When these
criteria do not exist, IMC prevails and IFR must be
complied with.

A ship-to-shore HF radio net, used for
flight following and administrative traffic concerning
aircraft.

Raspberry.

W
recovery assist (RA) recovery. Recovery to a
RAST-equipped ship using both the hauidown cable
and the RSD portions of the RAST system.

wave-off. An action to abort a landing, initiated by the
bridge, primary flight control, the LSO/LSE, or the
pilot at his discretion. The responseto a wave-off
signal is mandatory.

recovery, assist, securing, and traversing
(RAST) system.The RAST system is used in
LAMPS Mk III capableships.

Winchester.

Out of ammunition or stores.

z

T
tactical direction. A form of nonradar control in
which tactical information is passedto an aircraft by
the controlling unit, but the aircraft commander is
responsiblefor navigation and safety.

ZIPLIP. A condition which may be prescribed during
flight operations during VMC conditions under
which positive communications control is waived
and only radio transmissionsrequired for flight safety
are permitted.

35

List of Abbreviatons

and Acronyms
CATF. Commanderamphibious task force.

A
ACU. Aircraft control unit.

CC. Control console.

ADF. Automatic direction tinder.

CCO. Combat cargo officer.

AFFF. Aqueous film-forming foam.

CCR. Closed circuit refueling

AIC. Air intercept controller.

CCTV. Closed circuit television.

AMCM. Airborne mine countermeasures.

CDC. Combat direction center.

AOCC. Air operationscontrol center.

CIC. Combat information center.

AOSS. Aviation ordnancesafety supervisor.

CLF. Commanderlanding force.

APP. Auxiliary power plant.

COMSEC. Communications security.

APU. Auxiliary power unit.

CSAR. Combat searchand rescue.
D

ASM. Antiship missile.
ASO. Acoustic sensoroperator,aviation safetyofficer.

DCA. Damagecontrol assistant.

ASR. Air surveillance radar.

DCC. Damagecontrol central.

ASST. Antiship surveillanceand targeting.

DCO. Damagecontrol officer.

ASTAC. Antisubmarine warfare/antisurface warfare
tactical air controller.

DR. Dead reckoning.
E

ATACO. Air tactical control officer.

EAC. Expectedapproachclearance.

ATC. Air traffic control.

EEAT. Emergencyexpectedapproachtime.

ATD. Actual time of departure.

EED. Electro-explosive device.

ATO. Air tasking order, air transfer officer, air transportation officer, airborne tactical officer.

EMCON. Emission control.

AVWX. Aviation route weather forecast.

EMI. Electromagneticinterference.
EOB. Electronic order of battle.

B
BIDS. Bridge information and display system.

EOD. Explosive ordnancedisposal.

BRC. Base recovery course.

ES. Electronic warfare support measures.
ESMO. Electronic support measuresoperator.

C

ETA. Estimatedtime of arrival.

CAD. Cartridge-actuateddevice.
36

ORIGINAL

LFORM. Landing force operational reservematerial.

ETR. Estimated time of recovery

LOI. Letter of instruction.

F
-

FAF. Final approach fix.

LOX. Liquid oxygen.

FDD. Flight deck director.

LSE. Landiig signalman enlisted.

FFO. Flight deck officer.

LSO. Landing safety officer, landing signal officer.
M

FDSSS. Flight deck statusand signaling system.
FUR. Forward-looking infrared.

MAD. Magnetic anomaly detector.

FOD. Foreign object damage.

MAP. Missed approachpath.
MCM. Mine countermeasures.

H
HCO. Helicopter control officer.

MDA. Minimum descentaltitude.

HCS. Helicopter control station.

MEDEVAC. Medical evacuation.

HDC. Helicopter direction center.

MET. Mobile environment team.

HERO. Hazards of electromagneticradiation to

MEU. Marine expeditionary unit.

Ordnance.

MLA. Mission load allowance.
HERP. Hazards of electromagneticradiation to
personne1.

MOU. Memorandum of understanding.

HIFR. Helicopter in-flight refueling.

MSC. Military Sealift Command.

HLS. Helicopter landing system.

MSL. Mean sealevel.

HRS. Horizon reference set.

MWB. Motor whale boat.
N

HRST. Helicopter rope suspensiontraining.

NATOPS. Naval air training and operatingprocedures
standardization.

HTP. Hydraulic test panel.
I

NHC. NATO high capacity.
IAF. Initial approach fix.

NI. North Island.

IFF. Identification friend or foe.

NSW. Naval special warfare.

IFR. Instrument flight rules.

NVD. Night vision device.

ILS. Instrument landing system.

NVG. Night vision goggles.

IMC. Instrument meteorological conditions.

0

IMRL. Individual material readinesslist.

OCE. Officer conducting the exercise.

LAMPS. Light airborne multipurpose system.
OIC. Officer in charge.
ORIGINAL

37

OMI. Operation and maintenanceinstruction.

SIF. Selective identification feature.

OOD. Officer of the deck.

SLCP. Ship’s loading characteristicspamphlet.

OPAREA. Operating area.

SO. Sensoroperator.

OPSEC. Operational security.

SOP. Standardoperating procedure.

OTC. Officer in tactical command.

SPIE. Specialpurpose insertion and extraction.

P

SPINS. Special instructions.

PIM. Position and intended movement.

SPR. Single-point pressurerefueling.

PLAT. Pilot’s landing aid television.

SSTG. Ship’s service turbine generator.

PMS. Plannedmaintenancesystem.

SUW. Surfacewarfare.
T

PQS. Personnelqualification standards.

TAO. Tactical action officer.

R

TOAS. Tactical oceanographicatmosphericsummary.

RADHAZ. Radiation hazard.
RAST. Recovery assist,securing, and traversing.

TPO. Transfer petty officer.

REMRO. Remote radar operator.

TYCOM. Type commander.

RHIB. Rigid hull inflatable boat.

U

ROE. Rules of engagement.

UNREP. Underway replenishment.

RRF. Ready reserveforce.

USCG. U.S. Coast Guard.

RSD. Rapid securing device.

USW. Underwater warfare.

S

V

SAM. Surface-to-air missile.

VERTREP. Vertical replenishment.

SAR. Searchand rescue.

VFR. Visual flight rules.

SBO. Steeringbar operator.

VLA. Visual landing aids.

SCR. Self-controlled radar.

VLF. Very low frequency.

SE. Support equipment.

VMC. Visual meteorologicalconditions.

SEAL. Sea-air-land.

VOD. Vertical onboard delivery.

SENAV. Senior naval aviator.

VOR. VHF omnidirectional range.

SGSI. Stabilized glideslope indicator.

38

ORIGINAL

PREFACE
Pacific fleet units and stations submit mcommendations to:

NWP3-04.l/MCWP3-24.1 sets forth the mandatory
operational procedures and training requirements for
helicopter operationsfrom air-capableships.Much of the
inhmati~hasbeenexbactedfiwnexistingtacticaipublicationscovering specificoperationsin which helicopter
operations are an integral part. This manual is intended
to provide shipboard personnel with a ready reference
for all helicopter operations.Where this manual differs
from the applicableaircraft NATGPS flight manual,the
NATOPS flight manual shall take precedence.

CommanderNaval Air Force
U.S. Pacific Fleet
Box 1210
Naval Air Station, North Island
San Diego, California 92 135
Atlantic fleet units and stationssubmit recommendations to:

It is recognizedthat tactical situationsnot specifically
addressedin this publication may arise. In these cases,
local procedures must be developed or related procedures contained herein modified to ensurea sape, efficient evolution.

CommanderNaval Air Force
U.S. Atlantic Fleet
Naval Air Station
Norfolk, Virginia 23511
All other units and CONUS shore activities submit
recommendationsto:

In developing this publication, every effort has been
made to incorporate the most recent fleet-developed
methodsand proceduresand naval systemscommands’
materials and equipment. However, the specifying
herein of new or different materialsand equipmentdoes
not constitute either a procurement,alteration, or installation directive.
.-

CommanderNaval Air Force
U.S. Pacific Fleet
Box 1210
Naval Air Station, North Island
San Diego, California 92135

Throughout this publication, referencesto other pubii&ions imply the effective edition.

Coast Guard units and stationssubmit reconuuendations to:

Report any page shortageby letter to Director, Navy
Tactical Support Activity (copy to Commander,Naval
Doctrine Command).

Commandant(G-OAV-2)
U.S. Coast Guam
Washington, DC 20593-0001

ORDERING DATA
Recommendationsfor improving this manual are invited from U.S. Marine Corps commands as well as
individuals. Forward suggestionsto:

Order a new publication or change, as appropriate,
through the Navy Supply System. U.S. Marine Corps
commandsorder copiesthrough the Marine Corps Publication Distribution System (MCPDS) using PCN 143
00005100.

Commanding General
Doctrine Divison (C423)
Marine Corps Combat Development Command
3300 Russell Road, Suite 3 18
Quantico, Virginia 22134-5021

Changesto the distribution and allowance lists (to
add or delete your command from the distribution list,
or to modify the number of copies of a publication that
you receive) must be made in accordancewith NWP
i-01.

In addition, forward two copies of all recommendations to:
Director
NAVTACSUPPACT
Washington Navy Yard BLDG 200
901 M Street SE
Washington DC 20374-5079

RECOMMENDED CHANGES
Recommendedchanges to this publication may be
submitted at any time using the accompanyingformat
for routine changes.

39

ORIGINAL

(c-m

1

I

RECOMMENDED
CHANGE TO:

DATE:
(PUSllt%llONNllMSERIRWlSlONICMNGE)

LOCATION:
PW

ww

(FIG.No.)

WNE)

I

MODIFY

DELETE

ADD

TYPE OF CHANGE:

FIGURE

TM-

EXACT CHANGE RECOMMENDED:
SUPPLYROUGHSKElCNOR

WEADMTK)NALlWETSCNEEMD.ONEMRBATIMTOClCHANOEIL.IFFKURE18TbBEAD#D.
~~E.FFI~ISTOBECHANOED,lNCLUDEALURKEOUPCOPY~~~FKUI~.

RATIONALE:
SUBMIlTED

BY:
(oRlGlNAToR SEGUENCE No.)

(POINT OF CONTACT)

(PHONE-lOENTlPlDSNORCOW)

ACCEPTED

PRA ACTION:
REMARKS:

(ORIGINAllNG COWMND)

(USE-

MODIFIED

SHEETS IF NEEDED)

(PRA FOINTOF CONTACT)

CONFERENCE

REJECTED

(PHOt4E-IDENWYB!3NORCOW)

DATE:

CONFERENCE

AGENDA

PAGE

ORIGINAL

40

ITEM NO.:

OF

FM

ORIGINATOR

TO

COMNAVAIRPAC SAN DIEGO CAkJJJ//

INFO

COMNAVDOCCOM NORFOLK VA//N3/N34//
COMNAVAIRLANT NORFOLK VA//JJJ//
NAVAIRSYSCOM WASHINGTON DC//JJJ//
NAVTACSUPPACT WASHINGTON E//TT40//

CLASSIFICATlON//N03510//
MSGID/GENADMINl(Organization

ID)lt

SUBJAJRGENT CHANGE RECOMMENDATlON FOR NWP 3-04.lmACWP 3-24.1//
REFIAIDOCINWP l-01//
~/(cOfr?fMK#

/?8pfF3S8ntative)/

RMKS/
1. IAW REF A URGENTCHANGE IS RECOMMENDED FOR NWP 3-04.1/MCWP 3-24.1
2.

PAGE

PARA NO

3.

PROPOSED NEW TEXT (hc/ucb C/asMcation)

4.

JUSTIFICATION

LINE NO

FIG NO

41

ORIGINAL

and
Commander
Naval Air SystemsCommand
Code 551
Washington, DC 20361

An operating procedure, practice, or
condition that may result in injury or deathif
not carefully observedor followed.

URGENT CHANGE RECOMMENDATlONS
When items for changesare consideredto be urgent
(as defined in NWP 1-O1, and including matters of
safety), this information shall be sent by message(see
accompanyingsamplemessageformat) to Commander,
Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, with information
copiesto Naval Doctrine Command,Naval Air Systems
Command, Navy Tactical Support Activity, and all
other commandsconcerned,clearly explaining the proposedchange.Information addresseesshould comment
asappropxiate.See NWP l-01.

An operating procedure, practice, or
condition that may result in damage to
equipment if not carefully observed or
followed.

An operating procedure, practice, or
condition that is essentialto emphasize.

URGENT CHANGE NUMBERING SYSTEM
WORDING
Urgent changeswill bearasequencenumber for identification purposes. Urgent change sequencenumbers
will be continued in order over the life of this manual
and will not be returnedto “one” eachtime a revision is
issued.

The concept of word usage and intended meaning
which hasbeenadheredto in preparing this publication
is as follows:
"Shall” has been used only when application of a
procedureis mandatory.

CHANGE SYMBOLS

“Should” has been used only when application of a
procedureis recommended.

Revisedtext in changesis indicated by a black vertical line in either margin of the page,like the one printed
nexttothis pamgraph.The changesymbol showswhere
there has been a change.The changemight be material
added or information restated.A changesymbol in the
margin by the chapternumber and title indicatesa new
or completely revised chapter.

“May” and ‘need not” have been used only when
application of a procedureis optional.
‘Will” has been usedonly to indicate futurity, never
to indicate any degreeof requirementfor application
of a procedure.

WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, AND NOTES
‘The following definitions apply to ‘WARNINGS,”
“CAUTIONS,” and “Notes” found throughout the
manual.

ORIGINAL

42

CHAPTER

1

Responsibilities and
Training Requirements
1.1 RESPONSIBILITIES

who is directedto conductthe specialoperation.That is,
he shall act in the samecapacity as a CLF, and shall be
responsibleto the commander of the special operation
for the conduct of assignedtasksin the samemanner as
a CLF in the CATF/CLF relationship in an amphibious
operation.

The information within this chapter is intended to
assiststaffs, ship commanding officers, squadroncommanding officers, helicopter squadron/detachmentpersonnel, and ship personnel in the training and
preparation for safe and effective helicopter operations.
Commanding officers shall ensure that key personnel
are familiar with the information contained herein and
in OPNAVINST 3 120.32.
1.1.1 Command Relationships. The commanding
officer/OIC of a Navy helicopter squadron/detachment
shall report to the ship’s commandingofficer or air wing
commander as directed by the appropriate TYCOM.
Organized aviation units, regularly attachedto and embarked in a ship, shall retain their basicorganizationand
shall be assignedto the air department or air wing as
appropriate. On ships not having an air department or
air wing, the helicopter detachmentOIC shall have department head status (see Figure l-l). For command
relationships for MCM unit, seeChapter 12.
1.1.2 Command Relationship
With Marine
Squadron/Detachment.
Marine helicopter squadrons/detachmentare normally embarkedin
amphibiousair-capableships for amphibiousoperations.
Joint Pub342 setsforth theprinciplesgoverningthe command relationship. The command relationshipnormally
appliesfrom initial embarkationuntil final debarkation.

In addition, the following specific relationships between the commanding officer of the amphibious aircapable ship and the commanding officer/OIC of a
Marine helicopter squadron/detachment, as set forth
in NWP 3-02.1, will apply at all times when Marine
helicopters are embarked on the ship.
1. U.S. Navy Regulations set forth the authority of
the ship’s commanding officer with respectto the
aircraft embarked in or operating from his ship.
During amphibious operations, the helicopter
units are under the command of the CLF and are
not underthe operationalcontrol of the ship’s commanding officer. However, the ship’s commanding officer retains certain authority over the
embarkedhelicopter units, which includes, as applicable, those items listed in paragraph 1.1.3.

Helicopter

2. To ensureefficient operations,the following matters
relating to the operationof Marine helicoptersfrom
a ship must be coordinatedby the helicopter unit
commanderand the ship’s commandingofficer:
a. Pilot qualifications and limitations

Specific commandrelationshipsfor individual operations and exercisesshould be defined in the applicable
governing directive, operation order, or operation plan.

b. Aircraft limitations
c. Schedulingofhelicopters, pilots, andcrewmen

A Marine helicopter squadron/detachmentmay embark to conductspecialoperations,suchasdisasterrelief,
rescue,andevacuationoperations.Whenthecommanding
officer/OIC of a Marine helicopter squadron/detachment
is directed to embark aboardan amphibiousaircapable
ship for sucha specialoperation,he reportsto the officer
l-l

d. Pilot briefings
e. Arrival/departure and en route position reports
f. Fuel statusreports
ORIGINAL

.

.

SHIP’S
COMMANDING
OFFICER

HELICOPTER SQUADRON’S
COMMANDING OFFICER

.

OPERATIONAL AND
SAFETY

.

SHIPS
ExEaJTlM
OFFICER
.

----

ADMlNlSTRATlVE

SHIP’S
DEPARTMENT
HEADS

1

AVIATION OFFICER
HELICOPTER DETACHMENT
OFFICER IN CHARGE
I
HELICOPTER DETACHMENT

Figure l-l. Chain of Command
g. Maintenance statusreports.

8. Ship’s responsibilitiesin the loading of equipment
and cargo

Final resolution of any difference that may arise in
connectionwith the foregoing restswith the commander
of the special operation.

9. Handling and loading of ammunition andbulk fuel
in the vicinity of helicopters

1.1.3 Ship’s Commanding Officer. The ship’s commanding officer is responsiblefor safehelicopter operations involving his ship. U.S. Navy Regulationssetforth
the authority of the ship’s commanding officer with respectto the aircraft operating from his ship. This authority and responsibility includes, but is not limited to, the
following:

10. Knowledge of aircraft limitations
11. Arrival/departure and en route position reports
12. Informing helicopter pilot of ship’s aviation fuel
status/capabilityand providing a fuel sampleprior
to any helicopter refueling operation

1. Launch/recovery control

13. Ensuring that aviation fuel systemis flushed, sampled, and tested on a daily basis when underway
or wheneverflight operationsareanticipatedwhile
anchoredor pierside

2. Air traffic control in the vicinity of the ship
3. Landing signal control

14. Ensuring that all flight deck personnel comply
with physical standardscontained in the Manual
of the Medical Department, U.S. Navy

4. Control of flight deck operations
5. Controlof hangardeckoperations(whereapplicable)

15. Ensuring that the immediate operational commanderis cognizantof any degradationin helicop
ter facilities certification or deficiencies in
properly trained and/or qualified flight quarters
personnel

6. Servicing helicopters as required
7. Ship’s responsibilitiesin the manifesting,briefing,
and loading of personnel
ORIGINAL

l-2

16. Ensuring that the agency from which helicopter
services are requested is informed of the ship’s
certification level and class,if different from those
listed in NAEC-ENG-7576, and any &gradation
to the facility that would affect safe operations

Berthing for helicopter detachments aboard aircapable ships should be as follows.
1. Officers - embarked pilots shall be assigned
stateroomscommensuratewith their rank.

17. OPSEC/COMSEC posture.

2. Chief petty officers - CPO quarters.
3. Enlisted personnel- berthed in a common compartment located as near the helicopter facility as
possible and feasible, located so as to be undisturbed by other personnel carrying out the ship’s
normal routine. Berthing is to be in accordance
with the latest OPNAV instruction.

1.1.3.1 Commanding Officers of Shlps With an
Embarked Helicopter Detachment. Commanding officers of shipswith an embarkedhelicopter detachment shall be additionally responsiblefor:
1. Instructing or reviewing pilots and crews in safety
of flight operationsrelatedto shipboardoperations

Organization for air-capable ships is given in Figure
l-l. Except for AMCM squadrons,the OIC is placed
under the operationalcommandof a ship’s commanding
officer and is responsibleto that commandingofficer for
the accomplishmentof specific missions. At the same
time, the OIC is directly responsibleto his parent command to ensurethat squadronpolicies and doctrine are
carried out. A ship’s commandingofficer should ensure
that any organizationalor operationalproblemsthat may
arise are handled with this understanding. The ship’s
administrativeresponsibility to the detachmentincludes
officer and enlistedrecords,medical and dental records,
pay records, and other administrative tasks essentialto
the function of the detachment.

2. Ensuring pilots are current in their NATOPS/
instrument rating and are currently qualified on
day/night shipboard launch/recoveryoperations
3. Providing for servicing and repairing helicopters
on board ships
4. Heavy weather protection of helicopters
5. Being aware of pilot limitations and pilot/crew
fatigue factors
6. Pilot briefings

Becauseof limited facilities and spaceaboard ship,
normal maintenancewill be limited to routine inspections, minor repairs,and replacementof parts that do not
require special tools or equipment.Heavy maintenance
(i.e., changingmajor componentsand conducting major
inspections)normally will be performed in port where
the helicopter and maintenancecrew can be flown to an
air station to take advantageof more complete maintenancefacilities.

7. Maintaining statusreporting.
1.1.3.2 Helicopter Detachment Personnel Assigned to Air-Capable Ships. Helicopter detachment personnel assignedto aircapable ships shall not
be assignedadditional or collateral duties. The requirement of the helicopter to fly or to be immediately ready
to fly around the clock puts the helicopter detachment
personnel on a 24-hour call basis. The OIC must have
sufficient flexibility to schedulemeals, work, rest, and
training periods to meet this commitment. Similarly,
liberty for the detachment personnel should be controlled in accordancewith the ship’s policy by the detachmentOIC, who is cognizant of the full workload of
theedetachment.

1.1.4 Officer of the Deck. The OOD shall coordinate ship and helicopter operations. Helicopter control
responsibilitiesof the OOD include the following:
1. Keep the commanding officer and executive
officer informed on the status of helicopter
operations.

1.1.3.3 Command Responsibilities on Air-Capable
Ships. The helicopter detachment manning, as provided by the air TYCOM, is normally only to the level
necessaryto perform the detachment mission and to
maintain the assigned helicopters and related equipment. As such, helicopter detachment personnel shall
not be assignedadditional or collateral ship duties that
will conflict with their primary dutiesof flying andmaintaining a 24-hour readinessposturewhile underway.

2. Inform all departmentsconcernedof expectedreceipt or delivery of personnel, mail, freight, or
HIFR operations.
3. Ensure that a qualified lookout is assigned/tasked
to maintain a constantvisual watch on the helicop
ter while airborne and within visual range of the

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ORIGINAL

13. Notify the HCO prior to courseand speedchanges
during all phasesof helicopter deck and over-deck
operations.

ship (normal underway bridge watch may be
used). Such lookouts shall be provided with an
approved signal device to drop in the water in the
eventof a man overboardor aircraft mishapduring
helicopter operations.

14. Grant permission to commence flight operations
when HCO reports “Manned and ready**and permission has been obtained from the commanding
officer as appropriate.
15. Ensure completion of the OOD air operations
checklist. (Appendix A provides a sample
checklist.)

Pyrotechnic devices should not be used in
marking aircraft accident sites to preclude
igniting aviation fuel.

16. Ensurethat the HCO is advisedin a timely manner
of all information that might affect the safety and
efficiency of flight deck operations.

4. Display required signals (seeChapter4).
5. Ensure that the rescueboat is fully prepared and
that the boat crew is detailedand availableat short
notice for launch, if required.

17. Provide surfacesummaryplot information andupdatesto the VERTREP control officer during all
VERTREP evolutions.

6. Maintain communications with the flight operations area,CIC, rescueboat stations,and DCC.

18. Sound flight quartersas per paragraphA. 1.1 (Ap
pendix A) and ensure the word is passedperiodically as indicatedtherein regarding restrictions
on smoking, dumping trash, etc.

7. Maneuvertheshipto providefavorablerelativewind
conditions(seeAppendix B for wind limitations).

1.1.5 Ship’s Operations Officer/Combat Systems Officer. The operationsofficer is responsiblefor
mission assignmentand control of airborne helicopters.
The operationsofficer’s responsibilities include:

8. Maintain a steady course and speedduring rotor
engagement/disengagementand launch/recovery
operations, or at any time an aircraft is being
moved/repositioned on the flight deck until the
helicopter is clear of the ship or properly secured
to the deck.

1. Prepare an EOB as required by embarked units
with ES capability.

Note
2. Provide complete mission briefing sheetsto the
pilot and air tactical control officer as required.

See Chapters 9 and 10 for maneuvering restrictions when conducting flight operations.

3. File flight plans with the local ARTCC or appropriate agency in accordancewith OPNAVINST
3710.7, and provide positive control of flight following and handoff procedures.

9. Maintain the flight deck in readinessfor an emergency helicopter landing.
10. Ensure that obstructions such as guns, antennas,
cranes,flagstaffs,andlifelines arelowered,trained
clear, or unrigged, as appropriate.

4. Ensure all personnel are briefed on OPSEC and
COMSEC.

11. Ensure the statusof auxiliary equipment exhaust
discharging in the vicinity of the flight deck is not
altered and tubesare not blown while the helicopter is in proximity to the ship. The aircraft commander shall be notified of the current status of
operating equipment that may affect the aircraft.

5. Establishcommunicationsbetween the helicopter
and air controller in CIC. This circuit should be
monitored on the bridge.
6. Ensure that all personnelassignedto a helicopter
firefighting team or to a billet that placesthem on
the helicopter deck during flight quarters receive
training in helicopter firefighting via a CNOapproved courseof instruction.

12. Pass permission to move, engage, disengage,
launch, or recover the helicopter.

ORIGINAL

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1-4

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shall ensure the proper training of air controllers and
lookouts.

7. Ensure that designatedemergencyair distressfrequenciesare monitored at all times during helicop
ter operations.
-

1.1.7 Chief Engineer. The. chief engineer on aircapable ships (air officer, when assigned)shall be responsible for the maintenance and operation of the
ship’s aviation fueling system and shall ensure that
safety precautions are observed during fueling operations (seeChapter4). He/sheshall ensurethat fuel quality standardsand surveillance thereof are maintained
andthat adequatesafetyprecautionsam observedduring
fueling operations. On ships equipped with the RAST
system, the chief engineer shall be responsible for all
associatedequipment.As DCO, he/sheshall ensureonly
qualified personnel are assignedto the helicopter firefighting team.

The operation officer shall provide pilots and OOD
With:
1. Time of takeoff and estimatedtime of return.
2. Mission of flight
3. PIM of the ship and other ships as pertinent at the
time of takeoff.
4. Bearing and distance of destination at time of
launch. (Bearings passed must be specified as
magnetic or true.)

1.1.6 Damage Control Assistant The DCA on aircapableships is responsible for supervision of all firefighting evolutions concerning helicopter operations.

5. Bearing and distanceof nearestland or other ships
capable of operating aircraft. (Bearings passed
must be specified as magnetic or true.)

1.1.9 Air Officer. In air-capableshipsthat havean air
department,the head of that departmentshall be designated the air officer. This officer is normally a naval
aviator,usually a designatedhelicopter pilot. In addition
to those duties prescribed elsewhere by regulations,
he/shewill be responsiblefor the supervisionand direction of launch and recovery operations,and for the servicing and handling of aircraft.

6. Recognition signals and procedures.
7. Environmental data.
8. Communications frequenciesto be employed.
9. Magnetic variation in the operating area.

The air officer shall ensure that, in addition to the
formal training required by the type commander, all
required personnelreceive the training necessaryto acquaint them with peculiarities of the specific aircraft
models being deployed. Particular emphasis shall be
placed on both special aircraft handling requirements
and flightcrew rescueprocedures.

10. Certification statusor restrictions of own and destination ship(s).
11. Minimum and maximum altitudes and altitude
separation,if required.
12. Low-visibility operating procedures.

1.1.9.1 Specific Duties. The air officer will be responsiblefor the proper performanceof the functions of
his department,which include:

13. Hostile, potentially hostile, or unfriendly forces in
the area of operations.
14. ROE applicable to the mission, as required.

1. Aircraft launch and recovery, servicing, and handling, including visual traffic control related to
theseoperations

15. Any data on flight restrictions (e.g., buffer zones,
sensitiveareas,restrictedprohibited airspace,nonfree flying areas, hazards to flight, etc.) in the
planned area of operations.

2. Crashsalvageandaircraft tirefighting asappropriate
3. Operation, daily inspection, and care of aircraft
handling equipment, including tractors, towbars,
and firefighting vehicles

1.1.6 Combat Information Center Officer. The
CIC officer on an air-capable ship shall be responsible
for the control of aircraft while airborne, except during
actual launching and recovery, when the helicopter is
under the control of the HCO/LSO. He/sheshall ensure
completion of the CIC air operationschecklist. (Appendix A provides a sample checklist.) In addition, he/she

4. The care, stowage,and issueof aviation fuels and
lubricants;the operation,maintenance,and security
of the systemspertainingthereto;andthe keepingof

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ORIGINAL

fuel records and the daily submission of a fuel
report to the commanding officer

5. Advising the commanding officer on the stateof
training and readinessof the aviation department

5. Control of aircraft in the landing pattern and on
launching until control is assumedby the operations officer or other aircraft control authority.

6. Coordinating maintenance,cleanliness,and preservationof assignedspaces
7. Briefing appropriatepersonnelon proper helicopter rescuetechniquesand helicopter rescueequip
ment that may be employed

1.1.9.2 Safety Precautions. In those parts of the
ship in which aircraft and flammablesassignedto the air
department are stowed or handled, the air officer will
ensurethat applicable safety precautionsare posted in
conspicuousplaces and that personnel concerned are
instructedand drilled frequently and thoroughly in these
safety precautions.

8. Advising the commanding officer on the conduct
of flight operations, including flight schedules,
and on improvementsin all facetsof air operations
9. Morale, discipline, and welfare of assigned
personnel

1.1.9.3 Organizational Relationships. The air
officer reports to the commanding officer for the conduct of flight operationsand to the executiveofficer for
all administrative matters.

10. Maintaining custody and ensuring replacementof
detachmentIMRL equipment
11. Providing all required aircraft accounting reports
in accordancewith air TYCOM directives.

1.1.9.4 Assistants to the Air Officer. The assistant air officer, when there is one, reports to the air
officer. The following officers report to the air officer,
or through the assistant,as appropriate:

1.1.10.2 Organizational Relationships.
The
aviation officer is responsibleto the commandingofficer
for the accomplishmentof specific missions.He/she is
responsible to the executive officer in administrative
matters. The aviation officer reports to the squadron
commandingofficer through the ship’scommandingofficer. He/she is also responsibleto his/her parent command for carrying out squadronpolicies and doctrine.

1. Flight deck officer
2. Hangar deck officer
3. Aviation fuels officer.
1.1.10 Aviation Officer. On air-capable ships that
have a Navy helicopter detachmentembarked,an aviation departmentwill be organized.The OIC of the helicopter detachmentwill be the departmentheadand will
be designatedthe aviation officer. In addition to those
duties prescribed elsewhereby regulations,he/shewill
be responsible for the specific missions of embarked
aircraft.

1.1.10.3 Assistants to the Aviation Officer. In
shipsthat have an aviation department,the aviation coordinator, HCO, FDO, LSO, and LSE shall be responsible to the aviation officer for the performance of
assignedduties. Officer membersof the helicopter detachmentshall be responsibleto the aviation officer for
the performance of assignedduties as provided in OPNAVINST 3 120.32.

1.l .lO.l Specific Duties. The aviation officer will
be responsible for the proper functions of his department, which include:

1.1.11 Aviation Coordinator. On ships where no
air officer is assigned,an aviation coordinator shall be
designated.The aviation coordinator is a member of
ship’s company who is the primary point of contact for
coordinatingroutine aviation mattersincluding training/
qualifications of flight quarter personnel and maintenanceandupkeepof the aviation facility andequipment.
He/she advises and assiststhe aviation officer (when
embarked),helps coordinate maintenanceand training
with departmentsresponsiblefor support of flight quarters, and keepsthe commanding officer advised of the
condition of the aviation facility and any degradationto
the ship’s readinessto conduct air operations. He/she

1. Safety of aircraft, flight deck, and aviation department personnel
2. Maintaining and servicing the helicoptersand associatedequipment assignedto his department
3. Supervisinghelicopter operations
4. Training personnel involved in helicopter operations and aircraft support

ORIGINAL

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coordinates with the helicopter detachment to ensure
smooth integration with the ship during embarkation.
The aviation coordinator shall be thoroughly familiar
with this publication, Air-Capable Ship Aviation Facilities Bulletin No. 1, and TYCOM directives concerning
air operations and readiness.
1.1.12 Helicopter Control Officer. On air-capable
ships that have no aviation department,the HCO shall
be designated in writing by the commanding officer.
HCOs shall be graduatesof the appropriate helicopter
indoctrination course, unless they are designatedhelicopter pilots.

8. Exercisecontrol over the helicopter during launch
and recovery and over-deck operations.
9. Ensure that only those personnel essential for a
particular evolution are presenton the flight deck.
10. Ensure that an FOD prevention walkdown is
completed prior to commencementof each flight
evolution.
11. Ensurethat passengersto be embarkedin the helicopterare manifestedandbriefed, haveproper cranial protection and emergency flotation devices,
and havereceiveda flight emergencybriefing with
a copy of the pertinent helicopter emergencydiagram from Appendix H.

The HCO is responsiblefor all aircraft operating under VFR in the ship’s control zone.In VMC, this responsibility may be extended beyond the control zone to
include all aircraft that havebeenswitchedto the HCO’s
control frequencyin preparation for a visual descentand
approachto landing. For specialoperationssuchaspostmaintenance or flight demonstrations, the HCO may
exercise control outside the ship’s control zone. Additionally, he/she is the control zone clearing authority,
and agenciesdesiring to operateaircraft within the control zone shall obtain the HCO’s approval prior to entry,
except in emergency or tactical USW operations. The
clearanceshall include:
-

7. Ensure that safe flight deck procedures are observedand that all flight deck personnelare prop
erly attired in accordancewith paragraph2.1.1.

12. Ensure proper completion of the HCO checklist.
(Appendix A provides a samplechecklist.)
13. Coordinate all movement, permission to start engines, rotor engagements/disengagements,and
launch/recoveryof the helicopter with the OOD on
the bridge.

1. Operating instructions as required for avoiding
other traffic

1.1.12.2 Organizational Relationships. The HCO
(FDO if assigned)shall be responsiblefor training and
qualifications to the aviation officer or to the weapons
officer/first lieutenant/combatsystemsofficer when the
aviation officer is not embarked.

2. Information concerning hazardousconditions
3. Altitude and distancelimitations to which aircraft
may be operating.

1.1.13 Landing Safety Officer. The LSO shall be
qualified in accordancewith the model NATOPS and
designatedin writing by the commanding officer of the
ship. He/she is normally a naval aviator. During RAST
flight deck evolutions, the LSO controls flight operations with the HCO acting as a safety observer. LSO
responsibilities shall include:

1.1.12.1 Specific
Duties. The HCO shall be responsiblefor the following:
1. Supervise all transmissionsfrom the HCS to the
bridge, CIC, LSE, and helicopter.
2. Superviseall flight operations.

1. Manning the RAST control station during RAST
launch and recovery and originating all transmissionsto thebridge, CIC, HCO, FDD, andhelicopter

3. Man the HCS during flight quarters.
4. Originate all transmissionsfrom the HCS to the
bridge and helicopter.

2. Ensuring that all RAST preoperationalchecksare
completed

5. Ensurethat the flight deckcheckofflist is completed.
3. Ensuring that all safety precautions applicable to
the ship and aircraft are enforced.

6. Obtain “Manned and ready” reports from the LSE,
crash party, and fueling team and report ready for
launch, recovery, or refueling operations to the
bridge.

l-7

ORIGINAL

5. Advise the VERTREP cargo supervisorof the replenishment order and changes thereto so the
proper cargo can be brought up to the deck and
positioned.

Note
Enlisted personnel may be qualified as
RAST operators (traverse only) for moving
the helicopter in and out of the hangar.

6. Determine from the helicopter pilot or other detachment pilot the maximum load the helicopter
can lift, and pass this information to the cargo
supervisor. This shall be accomplished prior to

1.1.14 Flight Deck Officer. On air-capableshipson
which the physical location of the flight deck and the
HCS are such that the safety of flight operationswould
be enhancedby an additional supervisor on the flight
deck, an FDO should be designated.In this case, the
FDO shallbe responsibleto the HCO for assignedduties
and shall provide a safety backup for the LSE.

takeoff.

7. Assist the HCO in coordinating all helicopter administrative flights and transfersscheduledduring
the replenishmentoperation.

1.1.15 Landing Signalman Enlisted. The LSE is
responsiblefor visually signaling to the helicopter,thus
assistingthe pilot in making a safe takeoff and/or approach and landing to the ship. He is responsible for
directing the pilot to the desired deck spot and for ensuring general safety conditions of the flight deck area,
to include control of the flight deck crew. His signalsare
advisory in nature, with the exception of wave-off and
hold, which are mandatory. He is responsible to and
performs his duties under the supervisionof the air officer, FDO, HCO, aviation officer, or LSO as appropriate. He shall be designatedas PQS qualified, in writing,
by the commanding officer.

8. Keep the bridge informed of the progress and
statusof the operation, including number of lifts
remaining and the estimatedcompletion time.
The HCO or FDO may perform the duties of VERTREP control officer.
1.1.16.2 Vertical Replenishment Cargo Supervisor. The VERTREP cargo supervisor is responsible
to the VERTREP control officer (HCO or FDO, as ap
propriate) for cargo handling, assembly,packaging, as
well as accounting for returned handling equipment.
The cargo supervisormay be directed to provide assistance for cargo placementon the flight deck. He/she is
responsiblefor weighing and marking all loadsandshall
ensureload weights are within the limits dictatedby the
VERTREP control officer.

1.1.16 Vertical Replenishment Organizational
Responsibilities. The following personnel shall be
assignedfor VERTREP operations.
1.1.16.1 Vertical Replenishment Control Officer. The VERTREP control officer is responsibleto the
HCO for cargo organization and supervision of cargo
movement relative to the overall VERTREP transfer
process.He/sheprovides necessarydirections for cargo
spotting, determinesthe placementof loadson the flight
deck,and determinesthe methodof assemblypackaging
for transfer. The VERTREP control officer will be responsible for the following specific duties aboard the
transferring ship.

1.1.16.3 Vertical Replenishment Hookup Man.
For VERTREP operations,the hookup man is the only
personon the flight deck near the helicopter while it is
hovering to pick up cargo. His/her primary responsibility is to ensurethat the load to be hooked up is rigged
correctly and that the pendantend is placed on the helicopter cargo hook. Amphibious external cargo procedures are contained in Chapter 7 and NWP 4-01.4.
1.1.16.4 Vertical Replenishment Load Spotter.
The receiving ship may provide a load spotter.The load
spotter’s responsibility is to indicate the desired drop
location to the pilot and crew of the VERTREP heliwp
ter. The LSE shall not act as load spotter.

1. Provide necessary directions for cargo spotting
and determine placement of loads on the flight
deck and the methods of assemblypackaging for
transfer.
2. Maintain a surfacesummaryplot of the immediate
area.

1.1.16.5 Static Discharge Grounding Man. During external cargo/VERTREP operations with the H53E helicopter,the staticdischargegrounding man shall
assistthe hookup man on the flight deck by grounding
the cargohook with the approvedstaticdischargewand.
Grounding will be made prior to the hookup man contacting the cargo hook with the pendant/externalsling
eye.

3. Scheduledeliveries to the various shipsin accordancewith the overall UNREP/VERTREP plan.
4. Advise the HCO to alert each receiving ship via
the helicopter control circuit prior to commencing
the transfer (when within UHF range).
ORIGINAL

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