PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



Sublimating Hoodies Impressions February08 .pdf


Original filename: Sublimating_Hoodies-Impressions-February08.pdf

This PDF 1.5 document has been generated by QuarkXPress(tm) 6.5, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 06/06/2011 at 17:16, from IP address 97.67.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 804 times.
File size: 2.1 MB (8 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


HANDS ON >>

HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING >>
HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING
HANDS ON

SCREEN PRINTING >>
HANDS ON

Sublimating Hoodies in
>>
All the Wrong
Places
TECH TIPS
HANDS ON

SCREEN PRINTING
HANDS ON
TECH TIPS
HANDS ON

Unusual decoration placements, such as the inside of a hoodie, can set your design apart
from the competition’s and boost your bottom line.
The hoodie has invaded the marketplace;
you see them everywhere, from sport club
fundraisers to hip, urban boutique racks.
Apply some creativity to decorating hoodies and you can be out in front of the trendiest retail fashions with a high-margin item
your customers will love. In particular, you
can produce these high-dollar decorations
by sublimating hoodies with unusual placements and techniques.
This article will show you how to decorate blank hoodies in styles that are right in
step with youth fashion at retail.
All of the designs applied to the hoodies
in this article were printed on Beaver Tex
Print XP Plus transfer paper using an Epson
9800 wide-format inkjet printer equipped
with Sawgrass Artanium sublimation inks.
The garments, which have the look and feel
of cotton, are 100% spun polyester and really show off the vibrant color and intricate
detail that sublimation can produce with
virtually no “hand” at all.
Each hood can be pressed
at the same time as you
press the front and back

of each garment. Or, you can print the body
of each garment first and then go back and
press all of the hoods. I prefer to do it that
way — press the hoods all at once after the
front and backs are done — but your design
will dictate which way is best for you.
Note: If you don’t want your strings sublimated, tuck them inside the hoodie before
pressing. Plastic fasteners or tips will melt in
the press, so make sure they stay out of the
press, or, if that’s not possible, wrap them as
described on p. 86.
For the most part, I printed all of these
designs on 11" x 17" transfer paper (the
9800 prints media up to 44 inches wide)
and used a 20" x 17" iDek heat press. Most
transfers were pressed for 50 seconds at
390°F using moderate pressure. Hoodies’
fabric weight can accommodate strong
pressure, so do not be afraid to use more
than normal, especially if a design goes over
pouch seams, which are very thick.
Optimal time, temperature and pressure
will vary among presses and garments, so do
pre-production tests to find the best settings
for your equipment. (See sidebar, p. 90.)

It took 11 sheets of
11" x 17" transfer paper to give this
hoodie its all-over print. A larger,
20" x 17" heat press, made production speedier.

82

Impressions >> February 2008

VENGEANCE HOODIE
This white, pullover hoodie (bottom, left)
got an all-over print, which is a very hot
look today. All-over prints are much easier to do than you might think.
First, measure the garment, making
sure the sleeves are fully extended, and
create a template in your design
software. This will be your placement
guide as you create and print your
design. To be sure all areas are covered
when pressed, extend the design
approximately one-half inch outside
the template lines.
To begin, I position my design within
the hoodie template, divide the file into
11" x 17" blocks and send each of those
to the printer. I use my desktop inkjet to
print a thumbnail of the completed
hoodie design and refer to it when pressing the transfer sheets.
If you are not comfortable creating a
template, you can print full sheets of
your design, making sure to print
enough sheets to cover your garment.
This method ensures every area of the
hoodie is printed, though there is some
ink waste. Also, if you want particular
elements to print on the sleeves, you
need to pay close attention to where various elements of the design print within
the “block.”
All-over prints are a breeze if you are
lucky enough to use a large-format inkjet
printer and a large heat press. But you can
do them even if your shop uses a desktop
inkjet and regular-size heat press — it just
requires a few more hits on the press.
Generally, my first rule of thumb
when restricted by small paper and press
size is to create my design without any
type of repeating, symmetrical pattern.
This allows for some flexibility when
pressing because the transfer sheets
don’t have to line up precisely.
impressionsmag.com

By Kim Stryker,
Contributing Writer

FOOTBALL ZIPPER HOODIE
A football booster club ordered some
hoodies for a fundraiser. I designed an
all-over print (right) that was easy to
produce since the footballs were randomly placed. These hoodies were a hit,
and what made them a hot
item was repeating the
print on the inside of
the garment.
the
Printing
inside of the garment is easy to do;
I simply turned
the hoodie inside
out and pressed it
just like the outside. My experience with sublimating the inside of a
fleece garment is that
colors will print slightly
lighter than the same transfer
sublimated to the outside. So, if you
need to achieve a bold color on an inside
print, extend the press time or use
slightly darker and/or brighter shades in
your design. Sometimes, a combination
of both achieves the best result. If you
are trying to achieve a specific look,
experiment first.

This all-over print,
both inside and out, was a great
fundraiser item for a football
booster club.

FRANKLIN VARSITY
HOODIE
Sublimating
the
sleeve is a popular
look right now and,
for sports teams,
personalizing garments with each
player’s number
is a simple way
to add value.
Pe r s o n a l i z a t i o n
was taken a step
further with this
group of hoodies by
sublimating the team
member’s number inside a
football along with the
team’s title, "2007 State
Champions" at the nape of the neck.
Getting creative with this type of
enhancement can set your garment’s
design apart from the competition’s and
ultimately increase your bottom line.
impressionsmag.com

This design includes the team mascot
on the back, and personalized prints down the
sleeve and at the nape of the neck.

February 2008 << Impressions

83

HANDS ON >>

HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING >>
HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING
HANDS ON
SNOWBOARD
HOODIE
SCREEN
PRINTING

PRINTING
TheSCREEN
bright colors

>>
HANDS
produced by sublimation
printing ON
are perfect for graphics that
appeal to the extreme sports
community, such as this snowboard-themed hoodie design.

TECH TIPS >>
HANDS ON

mag.com
Directory of Services
>> Industry News
>> Decorated Apparel Business
>> Screen Printing
>> Embroidery
>> Digital Decorating
>> Promotional Products
>> Events
>> The Impressions Newsletter
>> The Impressions Product Guide
>> Promotional Impressions
>> Catalog Central
>> GarmentGuide.com
>> Info Action
>> Forum
>> Reports & Analysis
>> Publications
>> Impressions University
>> Imprinted Sportswear Shows
>> Promotional Apparel Expo

84

Impressions >> February 2008

Impressionsmag.com/news
Impressionsmag.com/business
Impressionsmag.com/screenprinting
Impressionsmag.com/embroidery
Impressionsmag.com/digitaldecorating
Impressionsmag.com/promoproducts
Impressionsmag.com/events
Impressionsmag.com/newsletter
Impressionsmag.com/productguide
Impressionsmag.com/promoimpressions
Impressionsmag.com/catalogcentral
GarmentGuide.com
Impressionsmag.com/infoaction
T-shirtForums.com
Impressionsmag.com/reports
Impressionsmag.com/pubs
Impressionsmag.com/university
ISSshows.com
Promoapparelexpo.com

action sports
Kids into HANDS
ON love
hoodies with unusual graphic
placement and the bright colTECH TIPS
ors achieved with sublimation
HANDS
ON
inks. The pullover hoodie
shown here was printed with
vivid color inside the hood, down
one full sleeve, on the opposite
sleeve’s cuff and waistband and, finally,
with text on the front and another
graphic over the pouch.
I used a random pattern of
bright colors and abstract
shapes to accent the inside
of the hood. To print it, I
turned the hood inside out
and pressed twice — one
transfer on each side of the middle
seam. On each press, the graphic was
allowed to slightly overlap the seam.
Again, using a random pattern required
no exact matching.
The length of a garment’s sleeve will
determine the number of presses needed
to cover the entire area. This hoodie, a
men’s size medium, required only two
presses using 11" x 17" sheets. I printed
the design on two 11" x 17" sheets and
trimmed the paper at an angle to fit the
sleeve’s width. I used the trimmed
excess to press over the remaining sleeve
and cuff area. This procedure was
repeated on the back side of the sleeve.
Keep in mind that if you have a pattern
that must be matched, it is likely that
more presses will be required.
>> Industry News
Impressionsmag.com/new
The waistband was doneImpressionsmag.com/busi
much the
>> Decorated Apparel Business
same
wayPrinting
— I began by printing
the
>> Screen
Impressionsmag.com/scre
design
on two 11" x 17" Impressionsmag.com/emb
sheets and
>> Embroidery
trimmed
them to fit the width
of the
>> Digital Decorating
Impressionsmag.com/digit
waistband.
I like
to leave anImpressionsmag.com/prom
additional
>> Promotional
Products
1
1
⁄4 to
⁄2 inch so the graphic hangs
over the
>> Events
Impressionsmag.com/even
edge
ofImpressions
the waistband.
This ensures
that
>> The
Newsletter
Impressionsmag.com/new
the
edges
of
the
waistband
are
pressed.
>> The Impressions Product Guide Impressionsmag.com/prod
aligning
the paperImpressionsmag.com/prom
with the
>>When
Promotional
Impressions
>> Catalog Central
Impressionsmag.com/cata
waistband’s
top seam, it is important
to
>> GarmentGuide.com
smooth
the fabric and flattenGarmentGuide.com
any bulges.
>> Infosure
Actionyour graphic is lined
Impressionsmag.com/infoa
Make
up with
>> Forum
T-shirtForums.com
the
seam and has not crept up
onto the
>> Reports
& Analysis
Impressionsmag.com/repo
body
of the
garment.
>>The
Publications
Impressionsmag.com/pubs
snowboard graphic for
the front
>> Impressions
University
was
scaled to
fit within Impressionsmag.com/univ
the pouch
>> Imprinted Sportswear
ISSshows.com
dimensions.
Again, Shows
since this
graphic
>> Promotional Apparel Expo
goes
over the pouch seams, Promoapparelexpo.com
it required
increased pressure when pressing.

mag.c
Directory of Servi

impressionsmag.com

HANDS ON >>

HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING >>
HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING
HANDS ON

SUBTLE
STRINGS
SCREEN
PRINTING

>>

SCREEN PRINTING
HANDS ON

>>

TECH TIPS
HANDS ON

can be
Sublimated strings
HANDS
ONthe accent
that makes your design stand out from
others. The strings shown here were
TECH TIPS
printed quickly and done with leftover
HANDS ON
scraps of transfers used to decorate the
rest of the garment.
If a hoodie’s strings have plastic
fasteners or tips, they will melt under
the press. The safest way to avoid
melted plastic is to arrange the garment so the plastic hangs off the edge
of the press plate. If it is impossible
to press your design without having
the plastic fasteners under the press,
encase them in thick fabric. The heat
will be absorbed by the fabric and
will not melt the plastic.
Many plastic fasteners can be
removed from the string and replaced
after printing. This may work best for

When you have plastic tips or
fasteners, use about this much excess fabric, wrap
it into a ball, and insert the plastic into the center of
the roll (opposite).

Use Info•Action #50 at impressionsmag.com

86

Impressions >> February 2008

impressionsmag.com

T O P TI P S

• Make sure you smooth the garment
out, pulling it apart so little to no
wrinkles pop up.
• When sublimating a zippered hoodie
– be careful! The metal becomes
very hot under the press.
• If your design continues onto the
hoodie’s cuffs and bottom band,
if at all possible, do a test run to
make sure those areas get
enough pressure.
• Create a design without any type of
repeating symmetrical pattern. That
allows for greater flexibility when
aligning sheets of transfer paper
when pressing the garment.
• From your desktop printer, print
a thumbnail of the completed
hoodie design. This is an excellent
visual reference to use as you
press the garment.

Use Info•Action #59 at impressionsmag.com
impressionsmag.com

February 2008 << Impressions

87

HANDS ON >>
DIGITAL DECORATING >>
HANDS ON
SCREEN PRINTING >>
HANDS ON
TECH TIPS >>
HANDS ON

HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING
HANDS ON
you, but don’t forget
to take
into
SCREEN
PRINTING
of time
account the amount
HANDS
ON this
process will take. If it’s faster, I enclose
each plastic fastener in a wrap of
TECH TIPS
thick fabric.
HANDS
ON
When sublimating any drawstring, I
begin by pulling each side tightly,
which causes the hood to contract and
allows more of the string to be exposed.
Position the strings across the press and
place a blank piece of paper under the
strings so excess ink doesn’t transfer
onto your press.
For strings, I line up several scraps of
transfer paper printed with the colorful
design and place them on top of each
string, overlapping if necessary. Make
sure your graphic goes right up to the
edge of the fastener or tip of the string.

Be careful not to melt plastic tips or
fasteners. Make sure you wrap any plastic tip
in thick excess cloth, as shown on the string
on the left, and then slip some paper under the
strings so excess ink from the transfer doesn’t
dirty your press.

Use Info•Action #38 at impressionsmag.com

88

Impressions >> February 2008

Use Info•Action #56 at impressionsmag.com
impressionsmag.com

GO ING BE YOND W H IT E
Do not be afraid to incorporate a photo into a
design on ash or heather fleece when printing
with sublimation inks. It works best with photo
images that are strong in color, such as this one
of a snowboard design. It also helps that there is
minimal flesh color and the face is not the focal
point of the image.
This design has no symmetrical pattern that
must be precisely matched, so printing a full
back, over the sleeve and on the back of the
hood is easy. It was done in three presses —
two for the back and one for the hood. The
green lines that go over the shoulder seam were
intentionally blurred in the design so they did not

Sublimation
printing can

have to match up perfectly when pressed across

reproduce photo
images even on ash
or heather garments.

the shoulder seams.

Use Info•Action #51 at impressionsmag.com
See us at ISS Orlando
impressionsmag.com

Use Info•Action #52 at impressionsmag.com See us at ISS Orlando
February 2008 << Impressions

89

HANDS ON >>

HANDS ON

DIGITAL DECORATING >>
HANDS ON
SCREEN PRINTING >>

DIGITAL DECORATING
HANDS ON
SCREEN PRINTING
HANDS ON

turn the
Once sublimated,
HANDS
ONstrings over
and repeat.
I am a strong believer in experiTECH TIPS
menting and practicing before using
HANDS ON
any new technique or undertaking a
large project. You will save a lot of
frustration, time and money by ordering an extra hoodie that is only used
for this purpose. Once you learn the
optimal settings for your press, creating unique hoodie styles will be
simple and profitable.

SUBLIMATION SPELLED OUT

Kim Stryker is creative director for Vapor
Apparel and a former graphic artist for
Sawgrass Technologies. She has won
numerous awards for her graphics arts
and fine arts work, and has designed for
celebrities, including Morgan Freeman,
Tim Robbins and Tom Hanks.

press brings the polyester up to a temperature just below its melting point. That

>>

For more information on sublimation or
to comment on Kim’s article, e-mail
marketing@vaporapparel.com.

Use Info•Action #53 at impressionsmag.com

90

Impressions >> February 2008

The sublimation process begins by printing sublimation ink (technically
it's dye,
TECH
TIPS
placed on aON
not pigmented ink) onto a sheet of transfer paper. The paper is thenHANDS
polyester garment that is loaded face up on a heat press set to about 400°F.
The shirt stays under heat and pressure for about 35 seconds. (Times and
temperature settings vary according to the type of polyester garment.)
The fact that the image first prints to paper means sublimation can produce a very
detailed image. In addition, the durability and wash-fastness of the image are unsurpassed because the method actually re-dyes the fabric on a molecular level. The heat

"opens" the polyester fibers and vaporizes the ink/dye, which is injected, or
sublimated, into the fiber. When the heat comes off the shirt, the molecules "close"
as the shirt cools down. You cannot feel where the print starts and stops — the image
literally has no hand. In other words, you cannot feel any difference between printed
and unprinted portions of the garment.
—This excerpt first appeared in Impressions September 2007, “DTG or
Sublimation? Which is Right for Your Shop?” by Contributing Writer Mark Collins.

Use Info•Action #54 at impressionsmag.com

Use Info•Action #55 at impressionsmag.com
impressionsmag.com


Related documents


sublimating hoodies impressions february08
performance apparel gets fashionable impressions august07
fit to print outdoor business april06
what retailers really want sgia april11
oki procolor 920wt led white toner transfer printer
grays hockey


Related keywords