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Perspectives 171:

Jennifer West

This publication has been prepared in conjunction with Perspectives 171:
Jennifer West, organized by Valerie Cassel Oliver, curator, for the Contemporary
Arts Museum Houston, July 15, 2010–September 26, 2010.
The Perspectives Series is made possible by major grants from Fayez Sarofim; by
The Studio, the young professionals group of the Contemporary Arts Museum
Houston; and by donors to the Museum’s Perspectives Fund:
Anonymous
Bright Star Productions Inc.
Fusion Taco
Heidi and David Gerger
Leslie and Mark Hull
Anne and David Kirkland
Karol Kreymer and Robert J. Card, M.D.
Kerry Inman and Denby Auble
Belinda Phelps and Randy Howard

Lauren Rottet
Leslie and Shannon Sasser
in Honor of Lynn Herbert
Sara Dodd-Spickelmier and
Keith Spickelmier
William F. Stern
20K Group, LLC
Laura and Rob Walls

Perspectives catalogues are made possible by a grant from The Brown
Foundation, Inc.
The Museum’s operations and programs are made possible through the
generosity of the Museum’s trustees, patrons, members, and donors.
The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston receives partial operating support
from the Houston Endowment, Inc., the City of Houston through the Houston
Museum District Association, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Texas
Commission on the Arts, and the Wortham Foundation.

Official airline of the
Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

Design: Don Quaintance, Public Address Design
Design/production assistant: Elizabeth Frizzell
Printing: EarthColor Houston
Photography: Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles, and
Vilma Gold Gallery, London
Mariah Csepanyi Photography, p. 9 (top and bottom); Rick Gardner, pp. 2, 6;
Finn West Photography, pp. 4, 8; Peter West Photography, p. 11

ISBN 978-1-933619-27-9
© 2010 Contemporary Arts Museum Houston
Contemporary Arts Museum Houston
5216 Montrose Boulevard
Houston, Texas 77006-6547
Tel.: (713) 284-8250
Fax: (713) 284-8275
www.camh.org

Cover: Jennifer West
Malia the Babysitter Guitar Hero Film..., 2008
16mm film transferred to digital video
Running time: 2 minutes, 45 seconds, looped
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los
Angeles, and Vilma Gold Gallery, London

Opposite: Jennifer West
Daisies Roll Up Film..., 2008
Running time: 5 minutes, 53 seconds, looped
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los
Angeles, and Vilma Gold Gallery, London

Perspectives 171:

Jennifer West

CONTEMPORARY

ARTS

MUSEUM HOUSTON

Jennifer West: A Fulcrum for the Leveraging Force of Rebellious,
Perverse, Beautiful Celluloid
Valerie Cassel Oliver

Jennifer West can be described most succinctly as an alchemist
working in film. Her practice is deeply rooted in the experimental
film of the avant-garde, though she is aligned more with the
structural film practice of Tony Conrad than with that of the more
venerable icons of the medium like Stan Brakhage and Stan
VanDerBeek. Early pioneers such as Len Lye and Harry Smith,
who came to define the experimental nature of the medium in the
1930s and 1940s, are also influential on West’s approach to filmmaking, which lies closer to visual art than cinema. Her works are
hypnotic and mesmerizing, giving a nod to the psychedelic era
with a healthy dose of skateboard culture thrown in. A former
student of Diana Thater and Mike Kelley at the Art Center College
of Design in Pasadena, West has emerged as the newest fulcrum
for the leveraging force of experimental film from southern
California. For this installation, her first one-person museum
exhibition, five of the artist’s projected film works are featured,
all of which use film in the context of performance, both acts
performed in front of the camera and acts exerted upon the
celluloid itself after its removal from the camera, as well as
cameraless or direct film techniques.
With growing recognition in both the United States and
Europe, West is being celebrated for her extraordinary ability not

only to build on the historical precedents of experimental film,
particularly cameraless film, but also to incise her own imprint
upon the practice of dematerializing the medium, in her case with
materials such as spray paint, nail polish, perfume, air freshener,
various foods, flowers and foliage, and bodily secretions, among
many others (her work often incorporates the residue of performances enacted before the camera). However, West’s process is an
inexact science: she produces her film works in batches, experimenting with the effects of various materials and actions upon
the emulsion over periods of time. In an interview with Sonia
Campagnola for FlashArtonline in 2008, West states, “I usually
make my films in batches of, say, ten films at a time, over a period
of six months or so. This way I can let one decompose or rot
for a period of weeks while I shoot or process others.”1 While
dematerialization does figure prominently in West’s work, it is
integral to a larger conceptual framework that the artist employs
in the creation of her films.
An astute pupil of art and visual culture, West directs her
aesthetic preoccupations toward the reclamation of iconic moments
equally in art history and in popular culture. However, rather than
embracing these iconic moments in an act of sentimental or
reverent nostalgia, West extends them through reinvention.

Shred the Gnar..., 2010, installation view, CAMH, 2010

3

Production still, Daisies Roll Up Film..., 2008

4

Her conscious strategy is to not only preserve
history and give it new relevancy, but also make it
hers. Often collaborating with performers—family
and friends—West carefully constructs the framework for the restaging of a moment’s actions in
happenings and performances. Once she has
recorded the imagery, West allows the celluloid
itself to chronicle a different action—absorbing the
remains of props or the by-products of the shoot,
including food, drinks, and even the site itself.
In her restaging of others’ work, such as Allan
Kaprow’s 1964 Household in her 2008 work Jam
Licking & Sledgehammered Film (70mm film leader
covered in strawberry jam, grape jelly and orange
marmalade—licked by Jim Shaw, Marnie Weber,
Mariah Csepanyi, Bill Parks, Alex Johns, Karen
Liebowitz, Roxana Eslameih, Chaney Trotter &
Jwest—a filmic restaging of moments from Allan
Kaprow’s “Household”) or Vera
ˇ Chytilová’s 1966
Czech New Wave film Daisies in West’s 2008 work,
presented in this exhibition, Daisies Roll Up Film
(16mm color and b&w film neg rolled with hard
boiled eggs, oranges, lemons, avocados, pickles,
green apples, milk and watermelon—a remake of
a scene from Vera
ˇ Chytilová’s 1966 film, Daisies—
rolling off the bed performances by: Mariah
Csepanyi, Finn West & Jwest, lit with black light &
strobe light), the artist has employed family, friends,
and in some instances students to transform iconic
moments by adding the perspective of contemporary critique. Her titles offer further insight into

the interplay between cultural and physical contact, reaffirming
the ideology of performance and material as integral components
of her practice. The titles also attest to the artist’s ability to bring
humor, sensuality, and a punk aesthetic rebellion to the art
historical party.
In seamlessly collapsing the process of reenactment with that
of dematerialization, West also collapses together the disciplines
of film, painting, and performance. The resulting imagery is both
representational and abstract, a spellbinding blend of moving
image and painterly gesture. West often projects her images as
site-specific installations that range from discrete images no more
than a four-foot-wide square to images of ten to fifteen feet wide.
The seductive experience of being enveloped by West’s pulsating
hues and lush compositions is further enhanced by the subconscious awareness of the flickering of film running at a speed of
twenty-four frames per second. Once complete, her films are
processed, archived, and transferred to digital videos, which are
then projected. With most films containing less than two minutes
in running time, the artist often cycles them in a continuous loop.
These site-specific presentations appear either as a single projection installation or in an installation composed of multiple projections.
This exhibition features five projection works, including Smoke,
Darts, and Mirrors Film (35mm film leader painted with candle
smoke, taped to a dart board and hit with darts dipped in habanero sauce, taped with mirrored and opalescent Mylar—throwing
darts performed by Lucrecia Roa, Mateo Tannatt, Lesley Moon,
Jen Collins, Patrick Cates, Mariah Csepanyi, Blake Bailey and
Jwest), a new work commissioned in 2010 by the Contemporary
Arts Museum Houston, presented here with an accompanying
limited edition zine; Shred the Gnar Full Moon Film Noir (35mm
film print and negative shredded and stomped on by a bunch of

Still from Daisies Roll Up Film..., 2008

5

Snowboarders and a few Skiers getting ginormous catching air
during Aspen Big Air Competition and Fallen Friends Event—
marked up with blue course dye—sprayed with Diet Coke, Bud
Lite & Whiskey – taken hot tubbing with Epsom salts, rubbed with
Arnica, K-Y Jelly, butter and Advil—full moon shot by Peter West),
2010; Lavender Mist Film/Pollock Film 1 (70mm film leader rubbed
with Jimson Weed Trumpet flowers, spraypainted, dripped and
splattered with nail polish, sprayed with lavender mist air freshener),
2009; the aforementioned 2008 Daisies Roll Up Film…; and Malia
the Babysitter Guitar Hero Film (16mm film neg rubbed with Fruit
Loops sugar cereal, pizza and soda—Guitar Hero video game performances by Malia James, Finn & Ariel West and Colette Weber
Shaw), 2008. The works, while created in a period spanning two
years, appear here as one unified installation, which highlights the
artist’s range in using film with and without the camera. Also evident
in these works is the enormous breadth of the artist’s interests,
from modern painting to New Wave cinema to snowboarding and
other recreational pursuits—all worth briefly mentioning.
In Malia the Babysitter Guitar Hero Film…, West has delivered
an ode to one of the oldest professions in American culture: babysitting. Malia James, who was actually hired by the artist at one
time to care for her children, here engages her former young
charges in a game of Guitar Hero. An accomplished musician and
photographer in her own right, James is seen with Finn and Ariel
West, as well as Colette Weber Shaw, mimicking the playing of a
guitar as part of the video game. The action is barely visible in the
recorded image, which used only the illumination provided by a
strobe light, the video game screen and glow sticks worn around
the necks, wrists, and ankles of the four participants. After recording
the guitar players, West joined the group in “performing” upon
Smoke, Darts and Mirrors Film, 2010 (left), Daisies Roll Up Film..., 2008 (right),
installation view, CAMH, 2010

the emulsion of the celluloid, rubbing cereal, pizza, and soda onto
the strips of film to create a hallucinogenic and high-octane work
that (although presented without sound) vibrates with rhythmic
sensibilities.
Likewise, West’s 2008 Daisies Roll Up Film… pulsates with
saturated hues and barely discernible images. Creating a work
that straddles the boundary between abstraction and figuration,
West employed the camera to record a reenactment of the 1966
New Wave cinema classic Daises by Vera
ˇ Chytilová. The original
film follows the antics of two young girls both named Marie, who
engage in pranks as acts of rebellion against the post-World War II
communist world in which they live. The film, funded by the
communist government of the Czech Republic, was deemed too
provocative upon its release and was subsequently banned. For
her transgression, Chytilová was prohibited from producing films
for a period of ten years. In West’s reenactment of the film, we
see the Maries being rolled in numerous blankets and quilts, then
rolled off a bed. The repetition of this action mimics the behavior
of the film’s protagonists, who engage in acts of compulsive eating.
The layering of blankets, or the effort to roll oneself into a cocoon,
provides a variation on the fall from grace after the Maries eat
from an Edenic tree. The film’s emulsion as well is treated as a
conceptual portrait of Chytilová’s Daisies. Drawing from one of
the film’s more peculiar moments—their acts of compulsive
eating—West rubs the film’s surface with half-eaten apples,
pickles, eggs, milk and other food residuals of the Maries’ feast.
Rather than condemn them with exile, West seems to embrace
their actions as the seeds of their own liberation, offering her own
feminist twist on Chytilová’s already groundbreaking gesture
toward feminist ideology in film.

7

Production still, Lavender Mist Film/Pollock Film 1..., 2009

8

In another homage to modernist culture, the 2009 Lavender
Mist Film/Pollock Film 1…, West has used direct film techniques to
produce art directly onto the emulsion of the film. The materials
listed in the title—flowers, spray paint, nail polish, and air
freshener—were all used to reconstruct, both physically and
metaphorically, the iconic painting created by Jackson Pollock
in 1950. At the height of his career, Pollock had abandoned all
traditional conventions of painting and instead was pouring,
dripping, and dribbling his works onto canvas. He created the
1950 Lavender Mist, titled as much for its overall hue as for its style
of execution, as a vast residual record of the artist’s “actions”: the
canvas, nearly ten feet long, emerged from a series of gestures
and actions that, while they left a residual imprint, culminated in
no discernible image or narrative. West has attempted to replicate
Pollock’s process, leaving no discernible image within the residue
of flowers, spray paint, nail polish, and air freshener.
Less pronounced in its use of saturated hues is Shred the Gnar
Full Moon Film Noir…, the 2010 work commissioned by the Aspen
Art Museum in which West celebrated the origins and subculture
of snowboarding. Now a popular sport worthy of the Olympic
Games, snowboarding was invented in the 1920s and came of age
in the late 1960s, but was widely banned as a legitimate sport.
It, however, gained momentum as an emerging subculture, with
many devotees illegally taking over the ski slopes in the evening
hours, guided oftentimes only by the light of a full moon.2 West
has used the footage of a full moon, as shot by her husband,
filmmaker Peter West, in this work, altering it to mimic the effects
of the moon’s revolution around the earth. The image was also
tinted with blue dye used to mark the snowboarding courses as
well as to infer the passage of time and shifts in the moon’s cycle.
West then placed the celluloid in the snow and invited snowboarders

top and bottom:
Production stills, Shred the Gnar..., 2010
right:
Film frames from Shred the Gnar..., 2010

9

attending the Aspen Big Air Competition and Fallen Friends
Event to act upon the film, snowboarding on its surface and
marking it with the residuals of a snowboarder’s life, which
included elements not only for a party—whiskey, beer, soda,
hot tubbing, and K-Y Jelly—but also for its aftermath—Advil
and Epsom salts.
In the final work, Smoke, Darts, and Mirrors Film…,
commissioned by the Museum for the artist’s 2010 debut
exhibition, West has engaged friends and family in a game of
darts. Taking the 35mm film leader, she then suspended the
film, taping several rows of the celluloid side-by-side to the
dart board, and impacted the surface using darts. Reminiscent
of Man Ray’s approach to his rayographs, which were created
without the use of a camera, West then used candle smoke,
mirrors and Mylar to imprint the emulsion.
In many respects, West’s evocative work summons the
spirit of Man Ray’s words: “I paint what cannot be photographed, that which comes from the imagination or from
dreams, or from an unconscious drive. I photograph the
things that I do not wish to paint, the things which already
have an existence.”3
NOTES
1. Sonia Campagnola, “Studio Visit: Jennifer West,” FlashArtonline.com
(February 2008),
http://www.flashartonline.com/interno.php?pagina=studio_det&id_art=60&
det=ok&title=Jennifer-West (accessed August 15, 2010).
2. For an in-depth history of the origins and rise of snowboarding, see
Susanna Howe, (SICK): A Cultural History of Snowboarding (New York:
St. Martin Griffin, 1998).
3. Philppe Sers, “Interview in Camera,” in Man Ray: Photographer (Paris:
Centre Georges Pompidou, 1981).
Still from Smoke, Darts, and Mirrors Film, 2010

10

Catalogue of the Exhibition

Shred the Gnar Full Moon Film Noir (35mm
film print and negative shredded and stomped
on by a bunch of Snowboarders and a few
Skiers getting ginormous catching air during
Aspen Big Air Competition and Fallen Friends
Event—marked up with blue course dye—
sprayed with Diet Coke, Bud Lite & Whiskey—
taken hot tubbing with Epsom salts, rubbed
with Arnica, K-Y Jelly, butter and Advil—
full moon shot by Peter West), 2010
35mm film transferred to digital video
Running time: 5 minutes, 9 seconds, looped
Commission of the Aspen Art Museum,
Colorado
Smoke, Darts, and Mirrors Film (35mm film
leader painted with candle smoke, taped to
a dart board and hit with darts dipped in
habanero sauce, taped with mirrored and
opalescent Mylar—throwing darts performed
by Lucrecia Roa, Mateo Tannatt, Lesley
Moon, Jen Collins, Patrick Cates, Mariah
Csepanyi, Blake Bailey and Jwest), 2010
35mm film transferred to digital video
Running time: 39 seconds, looped
Commission of the Contemporary Arts
Museum Houston
Smoke, Darts and Mirrors Zine, 2010
Photocopy on paper
8 ½ x 11 inches
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles,
and Vilma Gold Gallery, London

Lavender Mist Film/Pollock Film 1
(70mm film leader rubbed with Jimson Weed
Trumpet flowers, spraypainted, dripped and
splattered with nail polish, sprayed with
lavender mist air freshener), 2009
70mm film transferred to digital video
Running time: 46 seconds, looped
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles,
and Vilma Gold Gallery, London
Daisies Roll Up Film (16mm color and b&w
film neg rolled with hard boiled eggs,
oranges, lemons, avocados, pickles, green
apples, milk and watermelon—a remake of
a scene from Vera
ˇ Chytilová’s 1966 film,
Daisies—rolling off the bed performances
by: Mariah Csepanyi, Finn West & Jwest,
lit with black light & strobe light), 2008
Running time: 5 minutes, 53 seconds, looped
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles,
and Vilma Gold Gallery, London
Malia the Babysitter Guitar Hero Film (16mm
film neg rubbed with Fruit Loops sugar cereal,
pizza and soda—Guitar Hero video game
performances by Malia James, Finn & Ariel
West and Colette Weber Shaw), 2008
16mm film transferred to digital video
Running time: 2 minutes, 45 seconds, looped
Courtesy the artist, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles,
and Vilma Gold Gallery, London

Production still, Malia the Babysitter
Guitar Hero Film..., 2008

11

Biography
JENNIFER WEST
Born in Topanga Canyon, California,
Lives and works in Los Angeles
BA, Evergreen State College, Olympia,
Washington 1992
MFA, Art Center College of Design,
Pasadena, California, 2004
SELECTED
ONE-PERSON EXHIBITIONS
2010
New Year Series, Western Bridge,
Seattle
Paintballs and Pickle Juice, Kunstverein
Nürenberg, Germany
2009
Pomegranate Juice and Pepper Spray,
MARC FOXX, Los Angeles
2008
Electric Kool-Aid and the Mescal
Worm, Vilma Gold Gallery, London
Jennifer West, Art Basel Statements
30, Switzerland
Lemon Juice and Lithium & New Work,
Transmission Gallery, Glasgow
Drawing on Film, Drawing Center, New
York
2007
Occamy, MARC FOXX West Gallery,
Los Angeles
The White Room, White Columns, New
York
Yeah Film, Project Room, Sandroni Rey,
Los Angeles

2004
Hallucination, MFA Thesis Show, Art
Center College of Design,
Pasadena, California
SELECTED
PERFORMANCE EVENTS
2010
Shred the Noir, Aspen Art Museum,
Colorado
2009
Skate the Sky Film, Tate Modern,
London
SELECTED
GROUP EXHIBITIONS
2010
Just a Matter of Time, Galerie Iris
Kadel, Karlsruhe, Germany
In Full Bloom, Galleria Raffaella
Cortese, Milan
LAND, in conjunction with Calvin Klein,
Los Angeles
Supernature: An Exercise in Loads,
AMP, Athens
Kurt, Seattle Art Museum
The Cameraless Film, Schirn
Kunsthalle, Frankfurt
2009
Pictorial Abstraction, Tache-Levy
Gallery, Brussels
Video Art: Replay, Part 1: Asking Not
Telling, Institute of Contemporary
Art, Philadelphia
The Act of Drawing, VIVID,
Birmingham, England

Processed: Considering Recent
Photographic Practices, The Bertha
and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at
Hunter College, New York
Looking Through the Other End of a
Telescope, Scottsdale Museum of
Contemporary Art, Arizona
2008
Now You See It, Aspen Art Museum,
Colorado
ARTLV 08, Tel Aviv Museum of Art
Are You With Me? Small A Projects,
New York
Angles of America, Rhona Hoffman
Gallery, Chicago
Here’s Why Patterns, Misako & Rosen,
Tokyo
Drawing on Film, Drawing Center, New
York (traveled)
Video Show, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles
2007
When Words Fail, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit
Me, You, You (A Ventriloquy), Small A
Projects, Portland, Oregon
Viewfinder, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle
If Everybody Had an Ocean: Brian
Wilson, An Art Exhibition, Tate St.
Ives, Cornwell, England (traveled)
Between Two Deaths, ZKM Museum of
New Media, Karlsruhe, Germany
In Apetura, Vilma Gold Gallery, London
2006
Pacing, MARC FOXX, Los Angeles

Film frames from Daisies Roll Up Film..., 2008

12

Bibliography
ARTIST ZINES
2010
Smoke, Mirrors, Darts, and Lavender Mist.
In conjunction with Perspectives 171:
Jennifer West. Houston: Contemporary
Arts Museum Houston, 2010.
Shred the Gnar Full Moon Film Noir. In
conjunction with performance and exhibition Shred the Gnar Full Moon Noir.
Aspen, Colo.: Aspen Art Museum, 2010.
2009
Wheels Ink Ho-ho’s and Melon, Skate the
Sky Film Production Stills. In conjunction with performance and screening at
Tate Modern, London. London: Vilma
Gold Gallery; and Los Angeles: MARC
FOXX, 2009.
Pomegranate Juice and Pepper Spray
Production Stills. In conjunction with
one-person exhibition Pomegranate
Juice and Pepper Spray. Los Angeles:
MARC FOXX, 2009.
2008
Electric Kool-aid and the Mezcal Worm
Production Stills. In conjunction with
one-person exhibition Electric Kool-aid
and the Mezcal Worm. London: Vilma
Gold Gallery, 2008.
Jennifer West Production Stills. In conjunction with Jennifer West’s presentation
at Art Basel Statements 30, Switzerland.
London: Vilma Gold Gallery, 2008.
2007
The W.C. #19 (Volume 2 Number 7)
Jennifer West Production Stills (AKA
Jwest). New York: White Columns, 2007.

ARTICLES AND REVIEWS
2010
Iversen, Margaret. Chance. P. 219.
London: Whitechapel Gallery; with
Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2010.
2009
Holte, Michael Ned. “Pop Right Now:
Jennifer West in Twenty-four Frames.”
Kaleidoscope (Summer 2009): pp. 30–33.
Bedford, Christopher. “Jennifer West at
Marc Foxx.” Artforum (May 2009).
O’Neil Butler, Lauren. “Jennifer West.”
Artforum (May 2009), http://artforum.com/
new.php?pn=words&id=22838
(accessed August 16, 2010).
Shaw, Cameron. “Critics Pick: ‘Are You With
Me?’” Artforum (January 2009),
http://artforum.com/new.php?pn=archive
&id=21934 (accessed August 16, 2010).
Coblatz, Cassandra. SouthwestNET:
Looking Through the Other End of a
Telescope. Scottsdale, Ariz.: Scottsdale
Museum of Contemporary Art, 2009.
2008
Lack, Jessica. “A crush on film: the fine art
of smearing your subject.” Guardian,
online edition, http://www.guardian.co.uk/
artanddesign/2008/sep/23/art.exhibitio
n (accessed August 16, 2010).
Allsop, Laura. “Jennifer West: Electric
Kool-Aid and the Mezcal Worm.” Art
Review (September 2008), http://
www.artreview.com/profiles/blog/show?
id=1474022%3ABlogPost%3A955980
(accessed August 16, 2010).

Valdez, Sarah. “Substance Abuse: The
Films of Jennifer West.” Art on Paper
(May/June 2008).
Latimer, Quinn. “Working Practice:
Jennifer West.” Modern Painters (May
2008).
Kleinberg, Joanna. “Jennifer West.”
Frieze, no. 113 (March 2008).
Campagnola, Sonia. “Studio Visit: Jennifer
West.” FlashArtonline (February 2008),
http://www.flashartonline.com/interno.p
hp?pagina=studio_det&id_art=60&det
=ok&title=Jennifer-West (accessed
August 15, 2010).
Cotton, Michelle. “The Source.” In Psychonauten Kunst in Ekstase / Art in Ecstasy.
Jahresring Series. Cologne: Walter
Koenig, 2008.
2007
Fox, Dan. “If Everybody Had An Ocean.”
Frieze, no. 109 (September 2007).
Jones, Jonathan. “Still Waters Run
Deep.” Guardian, May 29, 2007, p. 23.
Farquharson, Alex. “Sixteen Takes.” In If
Everybody Had An Ocean. Exh. cat.
Cornwall, England: Tate St Ives, 2007.
Ensslin, Felix. “Jennifer West.” In Between
Two Deaths. Exh. cat., Ostfildern,
Germany: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2007,
pp. 309–10.
2005
Chan, Dawn. “In Resonance.” NY Arts
Magazine 10, no. 11/12 (November/
December 2005).

Lippens, Nate. “Resonating.” The
Stranger, September 1, 2005, p. 45.
Cassidy, Laura. “Surround Sound.” Seattle
Weekly, August 31, 2005, p. 35.
Holte, Michael Ned., ed. Celine and Julie
Go Boating. Exh. cat. Los Angles: Anna
Helwing Gallery, 2005.
2003
Hackett, Regina. “West and Macdonald
Videos Are Terrific.” Seattle PostIntelligencer, May 12, 2003, p. F1.
2002
Hackett, Regina. “Jennifer West at James
Harris.” Seattle Post-Intelligencer,
August 27, 2002, p. D4.
Hall, Emily. “Farewell Jennifer West.”
The Stranger, August 8–14, 2002, p. 54.
Fefer, Mark. “Jennifer West.” Seattle
Weekly, August 7–14, 2002, p. 46.
Hall, Emily. “Pay Attention, Please Artists
Before Eruption.” The Stranger, May
30–June 5, 2002, p. 45.
2001
Hall, Emily. “Murky/Beautiful.” The
Stranger, December 6–12, 2001, p. 55.
Fahey, Anna. “Painting’s Dead. We Think.”
Seattle Weekly, November 22, 2001,
pp. 73–74.
Hackett, Regina. “Annual strikes chord in
new digs.” Seattle Post-Intelligencer,
October 23, 2001, p. E1.
Kangas, Matthew. “Works in BAM’s Annual
Resist Traditional Categories.” Seattle
Times, October 19, 2001, p. 44.

13


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