FAN Regional Coordinator Job Description March 2014 .pdf

File information


Original filename: FAN Regional Coordinator Job Description March 2014.pdf
Title: Microsoft Word - FAN Reg Cap Coord March 13 2014 for Trail Times v2.doc
Author: mike

This PDF 1.6 document has been generated by PScript5.dll Version 5.2.2 / Acrobat Distiller 8.1.0 (Windows), and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 14/03/2014 at 00:08, from IP address 50.92.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 1274 times.
File size: 3.5 MB (6 pages).
Privacy: public file


Download original PDF file


FAN Regional Coordinator Job Description March 2014.pdf (PDF, 3.5 MB)


Share on social networks



Link to this file download page



Document preview


FAN Regional Capacity-Building Coordinator
The Family Action Network (FAN) of the Lower Columbia Society requires contract support
for the position of Regional Coordinator (RC) to implement its strategic priorities.

Contract Deliverables 2014 – 2016

Overview
The FAN Board of Directors is looking for a personable, innovative community development
professional to support us in building a unique regional “network” that will support optimal
life experiences for families with young children in the Lower Columbia. The RC will be
responsible for participating in our identified priority projects either in a lead or supporting
role; for helping us nurture key relationships that solidify the “network”; and for raising
awareness of the importance of the early years and of FAN itself.

Primarily, the RC will:
ƒ

Take the lead on coordinating the following priority projects:
- Plan, coordinate, evaluate, and grow FAN’s biannual ASQ Screening Day event.
- Develop, in conjunction with website design professionals and community
stakeholders, the FAN one-stop website; oversee public launch and celebration of
the website.
- Work in supporting and/or community relations roles with other FAN project
contractors who are responsible to the FAN Board

ƒ

Assist in delivery of key messages related to priority projects.

ƒ

Support key stakeholder relations, including provision of opportunities for participation,
input and ongoing collaboration.

ƒ

Respond to and represent FAN in Board-approved regional activities, meetings, issues
and events.

ƒ

Facilitate annual parent and/or stakeholder surveys.

ƒ

Work closely with the FAN Board and Board committees; provide administrative support
to the FAN Board, as needed.

Qualifications and Experience
We are looking for an experienced community development professional, with a minimum of 3
years experience. A university degree or equivalent combination of proven experience and postsecondary education, with focus in one or more areas of Leadership, Community Development,
Social Work, Early Childhood, Project Management, Health Services, preferred.

Demonstrated Skills / competencies in:
Leadership, organizational and project management, written and oral communications,
public relations and media skills, grant-writing / fund-raising, entrepreneurism, capacitybuilding.

Knowledge of:
Participatory Community Development, group processes, working with a non-profit
Board, social sector issues, primary health care.

Contract Budget
The RC is expected to work approximately 25 hours/week for 45 weeks per year, on a flexible
schedule. Contract price is based on $35/hour for a total annual fee of $38,500.
The contractor is expected to start work in early May 2014.
This is an annual contract, renewable for up to 2 years, based on satisfactory performance
review. Contract extension beyond this date will depend on ongoing revenue-generation
activities.
The RC will be responsible to the FAN Board of Directors, will provide his / her own office space
and equipment, and be willing to travel throughout the Lower Columbia region and maintain a
visible and accessible presence. A travel budget is also available.

Application Process
Applicants are requested to submit a resume along with a cover letter that illustrates their
experience, competencies and abilities to successfully meet FAN’s deliverables to
FAN.lowercolumbia1@gmail.com. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. Application
deadline is 4 pm on Friday, April 4th.

For more info e-mail: FAN.lowercolumbia1@gmail.com
FAN gratefully acknowledges support from the Columbia Basin Trust.
Read on for more info on FAN, our strategic priorities, goals and projects.

Strategic Plan 
• • • 
 

 

FAN’s Vision
 

The Lower Columbia is a leading region in child‐friendly development in Canada. 
 
In our region, families feel welcome, connected, supported and able to contribute meaningfully 
to civic life; and community stakeholders collectively invest in ensuring that children grow up 
in safe, healthy, happy and inclusive environments. 

FAN’s Mission
 

FAN’s mission is participatory, collaborative, child‐friendly community development in 
which we 
ƒ

nurture community capacity and a climate of investment that results in the success of 
children and their families;  

ƒ

plan and take action for making available seamless, integrated supports, services and 
programs to families with young children;  

ƒ

know about, and provide meaningful support, as needed, to every family in our region 
with a young child; and 

ƒ

strengthen our regional economy by attracting and retaining committed residents. 

 

 

“The quality of a child’s life depends on decisions made everyday in households, 
communities and in the halls of government. We must make those choices wisely, and 
with children’s best interests in mind. If we fail to secure childhood, we fail to reach our 
larger goals for human rights and economic development. As children go, so go nations. 
It’s that simple.”                
FAN Strategic Plan 2013‐2018 y 5 
 

Strategic Plan 
• • • 
 

       

 

 

‐ Carol Bellamy, Former (1995‐2005) Executive Director of UNICEF 

FAN’s Guiding Principles
 

The work of FAN is guided by the following principles: 
ƒ

Children are a shared community treasure, so we create and nurture active partnerships, 
with shared goals. 

ƒ

Families have input into decisions that affect them today and in the future, and 
participate directly in guiding and implementing our work. 

ƒ

Proportionate universality is important. This means making sure that all families have 
access to supports and resources to promote healthy development and tailoring 
approaches to meeting the needs of the most vulnerable families. 

ƒ

We increase our capacity by building on our strengths as individuals, organizations, 
communities, and as a region. WE build on existing assets and good news stories. 

ƒ

We are regionally focused in a way that honours and addresses the unique needs and 
cultures of each of our communities. 

ƒ

Where possible, we bring value to, rather than duplicate, the work that other agencies 
are doing. 

ƒ

We explore together – we try things and learn as we go; and look for possibilities and 
solutions that go beyond individual agencies. 

ƒ

When we speak and act as members of FAN we speak with a collective voice. 

ƒ

We invest maximum resources in activities that directly benefit young families; and 
minimize our administrative costs. 
 

The evolution of culture is ultimately determined by the amount of love, 
understanding and freedom experienced by its children... Every abandonment, every 
betrayal, every hateful act towards children returns tenfold a few decades later upon 
the historical stage, while every empathic act that helps a child become what he or 
she wants to become, every expression of love toward children heals society and 
moves it in unexpected, wondrous new directions.  
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        ‐ Lloyd deMause, Psychohistorian 

FAN Strategic Plan 2013‐2018 y 6 

FAN listened to the voices of the parents of the Lower Columbia, rolled their sleeves a little higher and set to
work. And so it is that at this very moment, the members of the Family Action Network are working to create
family friendly spaces in our communities, including washrooms with change tables and breastfeeding spaces.
They are working to create family learning events. In fact, they meet regularly to determine just exactly how to
create the very best place to raise children, for
ultimately, that is their number one goal.

“We really want a place to simply hangout together, you know, a drop-in place
where my kids can play with other kids
and I can meet other parents,” the
parents nearly yelled from the rooftops.

So, watch for FAN. Watch
as they grow and learn.
Stay tuned, their story (and
yours!), to be continued…

PARENT SURVEY RESULTS REGIONAL SUMMARY 2012
Total number of responses by community: Trail: 115; Rossland: 41; Fruitvale: 50; Warfield: 13; Montrose: 12
Other Communities: 11 Total number of responses: 242
If you were to imagine a family friendly community, what would MOST help you?
A free drop-in space/play area to hang out, meet others etc.
Public washrooms with change tables
Employers who are family friendly (e.g. flexible hours, daycare)
Access to quality daycare
Lending library, books and toys
Accessible professionals (e.g. physical therapy)
Information and referrals to programs and services
Workplace flexibility and family oriented support
Access to recreation facilities for low income families
Childcare services for short periods (e.g. while attendng a course)
Parenting courses, information, support
Family support groups
Access to transportation for family programs
0

COMMUNITIES
TOP CHOICES

Trail 78%
Rossland 81%
Fruitvale 88%

YOUR FAMILY
HAS A FAN!

74%
78%
80%

It is FAN’s goal to know of, and
be in a position to meaningfully
support, as needed, every young child, and
his/her family, in our region.

10
70%
76%
78%

20

30

40

50

Warfield 77%
Montrose 92%
Other 82%

60
62%
75%
64%

70

80

67%

FAN is striving to promote
awareness of the importance of
early years, and create equal opportunities for
healthy development of young children.

For more information contact FAN.lowercolumbia1@gmail.com.

er

towel, or nydlon
Talgkpa
e of raw. in
iecho
p
e
rg
abo
la
ut
a
how
w
absy fee
Tape
l
yourthibng
ow
h
S
.
le
(so
b
ft,
ic
rou
x
ta
gh
,
to
slip
n
pe
to a
ry)
o
.
n
large
witnhfee
le tio
g
ls
go
in
od
k
,
to scribbLo
too
a
.
m
ake turns
crayons. T paper. It’s
n the
marks o4–8
month
paints
also fun to
with water.

e
an old purs
wagon or
ur
o
Y
.
s
ng thing
ts
for collecti
c
je
b
go
tice puttin
c
ra
p
n
d
a
e
c
s
toddler
also be u
of it. It can
t
u
o
d
n
a
in
s.
vorite item
to store fa

Children need
regular checks too!
onths

16–20 m

The importance of checking development

A favorite pull
round one
toy often is a small
rap tape a developmental
WRegular
checks are an essential part of early
f yarn to
an
f a piece o
ler old
o
d
d
wa
n
go
d
d
a
n
n
or
to
e
an
le
r
d
u
pu
e
o
rse
ne
ey
Makfor
childhood
and development.
ff like agrowth
by
etng
co
llec
int”g sthi
make it sti ot at the other end.
Gently rubutd
your
baby
patin

s.
r
You
o
r
o
t
kn
toddle
r ocan
e pgain
pra argpaper
e elbow
puidttin
put a large
ew
with
a soft
cloth,
obkjec
ts
string larg
g a lactic
d
t
in
il
s
e
h
u
c
c
r
u
u
in
b
and
o
r
ounylon.
trofbab
Why
for
s. Makedevelopment?
It acan
Have y screen
alsl oo be usevde
bow
you
tly rubor
Gentowel,
s, or bead
ait.ndyTalk
n
h
o
s
tt
a
u
.
ru
h
b
b
l
i,
il
to
n
w
store
favthings
ori
te
f Cheerios
ddler
pap
macaro
, r.a Y
cloth
how
feel
rertos.
a soft
withabout
ouitem
e out oprovides
c
la
k
c
e
e
th
n
  
S

creening
a snapshot of your child’s development
f wateTalk
f
o

eo
an edible
n.asin
rough,
slippery).
16–
l, or20nylo
towe(soft,
mo“nth
ng” the sid orch.
ti
p
n
fu things
s
the front p
ut howfeels
aboLotion
  24–3•0 m Toonthmake
sure your child is growing and developing like he
e, ortoo.
cfeel
fengood,
seh,, aslipp
u
o
h
ery).
(soft, roug
or she should
Wrap tap
eonaro
s un
thd,
d one
too.
ok “about
n feels
Lotio
–24 mgoo
4–8
Make a bo child. Save
en2d0months
of a piece of yarn to
your problems
   • It helps
me” forfind
azine early, before they get big and
make it stiff like a needtilenand
ner, play
in
d
g
aves, mag
le
a
,
e
s
r
o
re
g
tu
ic
in
p
mont
okot at
4–8pu
because
little
are easier to get around than big
t ahhslarg
h your
te food,
ile ceokn
witd.
W
favoriroadblocks
mere pull
Asthe
favorite
oth
a
a
g
en
f

o
s
s
e
le
g
t
r
a
u
o
s
P
im
e
.
re
s
to
o
e
Have
k
ta
m
oow
theyo“ur child str
toying
often
apsmall
ones!
moeisreelb
r child ma
slarg
who harite
wings you
. Try
sktto
s
ra
s
macar
d
glue onto
le
on
d
s
ild.i,Abu
pull
n
a
h
a
h
c
favo
ns,
A
or
o
wagonanor
an
old. Ma
purse
whads
album, or
ke ize
dbe
to
o
h
waist an edible ne
p
ther.
a
-s
in
togeready
   th
aanchild
for school
ll e
•e Imt helps
a sma
sam
aceofte
geer
toy
ouisnt of
forckl
collecting
Your
sin
d staplebe
Ch
uisthings.
ios. filled
r
e
th
p
a
nds
p
f
o
,
s
ts
e
p
e
e
u
purs
c
h
old
s
r
an
or
on
wag
toddler
putting
30 mocan
sses oobjects .
nth
s practicegla
   • Makess follow-up for children who need early intervention
reely 24–
r rmilk
gs.eYou
oused
thin
cting
onth
colle
in
and
out
of
it.
It
can
also
for
36–48 m
with juicbe
eps.
services
easy.
cts
obje
putting
practiceitems.
toler
store
canfavorite
todd
Ma
s
used
beou
boalso
practice
nth
ok “ab
can
mItoa
out36of
t
8ke
in and
–4it.
g hands,fun,
in
h
  
L

earn
about
follow-up activities for parents to use at
16–20 months
s

a
w
r
e
me
” for
Aft
yos.ur child. Save
item
umbers
n
d
to store favorite
n
a
rs
e
pictures, leaves,uma
riting lett
our child
whome
e yine
inned
nco raggaz
,
E
e
hs
m
a
16–20 mont
n
dding or th pread
u
ll
p
image
fu
r
in
s of aone
e
h
fav
Wrap tape
around
ori
arnfood,
es s
to lete
one
our and drawings your child
hed potato or
masare
ndt teleph What
a
,
end
of
a
piece
of
yarn
to
s
ma
s
kes
.
the
et ASQ-3 and ASQ:SE screens?
Pu
re
e
d
h
d
s
a
ie
y and them in a photond
singing or
on a cook . Licking
a
um,aor
to
arou
make
it stiff
likealb
aone
needle
and
in
glu
p tape
e
Wra
it
on
to
e
rd
M k
boacaregiver-completed
er. sta
byarn
she
ets
pap
nuknot
cuttingor
ur child to n P
tople
arentscreening tools that
yoer.
eermofand
put
at the
other
piec
alarge
tog
ofaof
end
eth
Askend.
.
e
m
llowed!
re
a
a
a
g
is
u
g
o
rs
in
y
e
m
g
n
y
e
n
fi
h
and
rh
dlelargeyelbow
a nee
Have
child
string
stiff
ou w
ityour
36–
mak
48e mo
nths like
encourage parental/caregiver
involvement
back tor end
s.
petaatt itthe
nths
o.n the bu
kno
macaroni,
buttons,
orothe
beads.
r Make
a large re
o
put
r
0–66 mo
a
6
c
e
th
in g large elbow
ridingstrin
nS
eries of questionnaires for children ages 1 month to 5 ½
aneedible
necklace
out of Cheerios.
your child
Hav
After washii,ng
s s. Make
th
n
han
bead
o
or
ds,
m
ons,
pra
butt
0
ctic
aron
e
mac
48–6
years
24–30
months
writin
g lettle
ers
and
of Cheerios.
outers
numb
lace
neck
an edib
in pudding or thinned
months

ASQ – 3
ma24–3
ASQ:SE
shed0 po
tatMake
oes spr
a book
ead “about
on a cookHo
ie she
et
ldme”
orbayour
for
your
   • Communication
   • Social-emotional
by inchild.
your Save
cutting boso
ut lap and
Gently rub your baby
ard
“abomagazine
.pictures,
Lic
ftly
Mak
shekin
akaegboo
aleaves,
rakttle
on one side
   • Gross motor skills
development
fin
. Save
allohis
with a soft cloth, a pa
r child
we
d!for
me”
images
favorite
he
ad,ofyou
thaen
asy gers is of
the food,
per
e
  
Fine
towel, or •
magazin
other sidres,
your
child
makes.
nylon
e.
Shleav
. Talkmotor skills
ak
modrawings
ees,
nths pictu
slo
wly Put
! 60–66and
,
food
about how
riteglue
favo
a te
st,
thematinfiraimag
photo
album,
or
thesenof
  
solving
fas
s feel
•th Pingroblem
r. Yo
ur onto
Put
es.
(so
mak
ft,
ba
child
r
by
ro
you
ug
ings
wi
sheets
of
paper
and
staple
together.
h,
ll
search for the
sliersonal-social
and draw
ppery).
  
P
• go
Lotion feels
or glue onto
m,
no
albu
ise
withtohis
a pho
in
them
od
, too.
ey
es
.
36–48 months
staple together.
and
er
ts4ofmopap
shee1–
Co.
nths

e
y.
y
e
g

e

onths

12–16 m

!

36–48 months

After washing hands, practice
Tapeletters
a large
writing
and
pienumbers
ce of drawing paper
to
a tabhing
le.
han
in
pudding
or Sh
thinned
owds,
r was
Afte
yoprac
ur batice
by how
to
sc
rib
num
ble
and
rs
wi
mashed
potatoes
spread
lette
th
ng
largebers
writi
nontoxic
ons. or
ned
thin
Ta
ke
on
a ay
cookie
sheet
ding
tuor
pud
in cr
rns making
m
ar
ks
on
toes
th
cutting
board.
pota Licking
e paspre
mashed
per. ad
It’s
fu
to shee
paintt or
kie
fingers
isnallowed!
onalsaocoo
with
ter.rd. Licking
boa
ingwa
cutt
60–66 months
is allowed!
ers
fing
12–1
6 mo
nths

60–66 months

Make your toddler an
outdoo

Parents
can provide their expert knowledge and be full partners
4–8 months
in the screening process. It’s also a great way to bond with kids
and learn more about their development.
A favorite pull
toy often is a small
Children love
because
its just plain fun! Some questions
wagonASQ
or an old
purse
fo
r
co
llecting thingso
are
quick activities,
feels like playtime.
s. Yoscreening
ur
toddler can practice
putting objects
in and out of it. It ca
n also be
used
The
next
FAN
Ages
and
Stages screening day will be held in the fall.
to sto
re favor
ite items.

If 16
you
are interested in having your child screened, please email
–20 months
FAN.lowercolumbia1@gmail.com.
Wrap tape around


Related documents


fan regional coordinator job description march 2014
hssco needs assessment 2016 2017
oec oca keeping babies safe c4v1
chosa year end card 2017
cas e newsletter size 3 11
mc resource guide 2 2016

Link to this page


Permanent link

Use the permanent link to the download page to share your document on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or directly with a contact by e-Mail, Messenger, Whatsapp, Line..

Short link

Use the short link to share your document on Twitter or by text message (SMS)

HTML Code

Copy the following HTML code to share your document on a Website or Blog

QR Code

QR Code link to PDF file FAN Regional Coordinator Job Description March 2014.pdf