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THE

CANDY BOOK
EVERYTHING

---

YOU NEED

TO · KNOW

ABOUT MAKING . .. ......... ........ .

Fondant Candies
Chocolate Candies
Fudges
Caramels
Divinities and Nougats
Taffies and Kisses
Brittles and Hard Candies
Uncooked Candies
Maple Candies
Coconut Candies
Marzipans

,

Glaceed Fruits and Nut.
EDITED BY

Ruth Berolzheimer
D IRECTOR. C U LI NARY ARTS I NSTITUTB

ASSOCIA TE

EDITORS

E.dna L . Gaul· Ethel Marie McDon~ld
Helen Lucy Kinney· Madeleine Jasper
A nn H eiberg· Louise Willey
Published by
Consolidated Book P ublishers
153 N. M ichig a n A venue. Chicago. Ill.
Printed in U. S. A.

1955

I N DEX
B R ITT L E S AND HARD
CANDIES • .• . .. . ..... . 36
Almond Butter Crunch . . 36
Barley Sugar....... .. .. 36
Black Walnut Crunch... . 38
Brittled Almonds. :... ... 36
Butter Brickle . ........ . 38
Butterscotches
36
Ginger Bars . . . •.•. .' ... . 36
Horehound Candy . . ..... 36
Loll ypops .. .. • . . . . . . . . 38
Maple Brittle . . . .. ...... 38
Peanut Brittle. .. . ..... . 38
Popcorn Brittle .... ... . . 38
Rice Flake Candies ..... . 37
Hobgobl ins . .. .. . . .. . 37
Spiced Chocolate Squares .. 38
Stick·Jaw .... . . . . . .... . 36
Trop ical Nuggets . .. . • ... 36

COCONUT
Coconut
Coconut
Coconut
Coconut
Coconut
Coconut

CANDY
CHART

TEMPERATURE

9

CAN 0 YMAKING
EQUIP·
MENT • ••••• ••• • • ....

5

CAN 0 YMAKING
INGRE·
DIENTS •••• • ••• • ••.. .

7

CARAMELS
Brazil Cream Caramels .. .
Brown Sugar Caramels .. .
Chocolate Molasses Caramels ..... ...... . . .
Honey Rum Caramels .. .
Ine xpensive Milk Caramels
Maple Nut Caramels .....
Nut Dreams .. ...... .. . .
Tutti-Frutti Candy.. ... . .
CHOCOLATE CANDIES . ...
Chocolate
Almond
and
Raisi n Balls. . ... . ....
Chocolate Almonds .. ... .
Chocolate Bars. . . . . . . . . . .
Chocolate Bonbons •. • ••. ~
Chocolate Dates. .. .. ....
Chocolate Marshmallows..
Chocolate Nougatines .... .
Choco late Peanut Bars . . .
Chocolate Popcorn Balls ..
Dip ped Coconut Fudge . . .
Homemade Coating Choco·
late .........•......
Pointers on Dipping Chocolates • •• • • • • • • • • . . .

28
28
28
28
30
28
30
30
30
21
21
21
23
21
22
22
23
23
23
21
21
21

CANDIES .. . .. . .
Caramels .... . . ..
Cones . .. .... , ..
Dainties . .... . ..
Drops .. ... . .. ..
Squ ares .... ....
Straws .•. . . '" .

42
42
42
42
42
42
42

DIVINITIES AND NOUGATS
Caramel Divin ity ........
Ca ramel Nougat. ... .....
Chocolate Divinity ...... .
Chocolate Nougat .....• ..
French Nougat ... . ... . . .
Honey Nut Divinity ..... .
Nougat Montelimar . ......
Sea Foam ... ...••......
Standard Divinity . •. ... . .

31
31
32
31
32
32
31
32
31
31

FONDANT CANDIES .. .. . . .
Bas ic Fondant . . ...•. ....
Burnt Almond Bonbons . . .
Butter Fondant . ....... .
Chocolate Fondant. . .... .
Coconut Balls . .. .•••. .. .
Creamed Grapes ........ .
Do's and Don 't's, Why's
and
Wherefore's 0 f
Fondant Making . • .....
Fruit Fondant . .. ... .. . .
How to Handle Fondant . .
Jam Sandwiches . .. ... .. .
Maple Fondant ... . ..... .
Maple Nut Creams . ..... .
Maraschino Bonbons .. . . .
Nut Creams ....... .... .
o I d·fashioned Rib bon
Creams ...•...•.. .. ..
Pineapple Bonbons., .. . .. .
Sp iced Cocoa Rou nd s .. . . .
To Prepare Fondant. fo r
Dipping .. . .... .... . .
To Shape Bonbons .. .... .
Things to Make with Basic
Fondant . . .... . ..... .

16
16
18
16
20
18

FUDGES
Almond Fudge . . ... . ... .
Baked Fruit Fudge . .... .
Caramel Cream Sq uares ..
Chocolate Fudge ., ..... .
Chocolate Maple Fudge , ..
Cocoa ' Fondant Fudge ... .

19

16

19
16

19
16
16
17

19
20
20
20
17
17
18
24
24
27
27
24
24
26

Coffee Panocha. . . .... ...
Condensed Milk Candy .. .
Fudge Pinwheel s . . ... .. ..
Malted Milk Nut Dainty ..
Maple Panocha. . . . . . . . .
Molasses Fudge... .......
Nut Kisses.... .........
Panocha ,... ... . . ... .. .
Ribbon Fudge ..... . . .. . .
Sour Cream Candy .. . . . . .
Whipped Cream Fudge .. .
Wh ite Fudge .. ....... ...

25
26
24
27
25
25
27
25
24
24
27
24

GLACEED FRUITS AND
NUTS
Cand ied Grapefruit Peel . .
Cand ied Orange Peel .....
Glaceing Fruits and Nuts . .
Honey Glaceed Cherries . . .
Marrons Glaces . ... ... .. .

45
46
46
46
45
46

MAPLE CANDIES. ..... . ..
14·Minute Maple Candy. .
Maple Brittle ... .. . .. ...
Maple Creams....... ...
Maple Molasses Gems. .. .

41
41
41
41
41

MARZIPANS .. ... ... .... . 43
Golden Marzipan •• •. .... 44
Make - Up - and - Use - Lat r
Marzipan . . . . • •• •. .. . 44
Marzipan Goodies . .. . .. . . 44
Harlequin Balls . ..... . 44
Marzipan Bars ....... . 44
Marzipan Still·Lifes .. . . 44
Pears . • __• • • • .. .. ... 44
Potatoes • . • ••• . • . •. . 44
Strawberries •• •.... . . 44
Stuffed Fruits . _...... . 44
Stuffed Nuts. '. .. ... . . . 44
Simple Cooked Marzipan .. 43
Uncooked Marzipan . . . . . . 43
MISCELLANEOUS .... . .. . 47
Acorns .. ... . • . .... ... . 47
Candy Cups . . ••... . . . .. 47
Gumdrops . . . • . ........ 48
Molasses Popcorn Balls . . . 47
Opera Creams .. : . . .. . . . . 47
Orange Dainties . . . ..... . 47
Pralines
48
Rainbow Candy ..... . . . . 48
Turkish Paste . • ..••• •• . 48

INDEX -Continued
SIRUP TESTS .. . . ........

8

TAFFIES AND KiSSES. . . .
Brown S u gar Molasses
Kisses ... ... •••• • • • •
Chocolate Taffy . . . .. .. . .
Cream Kisses .. . .. ..... .
Honey Peppermint Taffy..
Nut Taffy...... .. ......
Old-fash ioned Molasses Taffy . • . •• . • ...• • ••••••
Peanut-Butter Taffy......
Salt·Water Taffy.... . ....
~Taffy Apples............
White Taffy . . ... .......
Wintergreen Kisses......

33

33
34
34
33
33
33

UNCOOKED CANDIES .....
Baltimore Layer Candy...

39
40

33
34
34
34
34

Chocolate Easter Egg . . . ..
Chocolate Fruit Bars .. . ..
Coconut Kisses . ..... . ...
Frosted Fru it. . . . . . . . . . •
Fruit Creams ... . . . . . ...
Gingerees . • .. .. . . .. • ..
Peppermint Creams. . . .. .

39
39
39
39
40
40
40

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

6

WHAT
EVERY
CANDYMAKER WANTS TO
KNOW .. .. .... .. .. ...
Crystallized Mint Leaves ..
Crystallizing . . ... .• • . . •
How to Blanch and Chop
Almonds •• . . • .. . ... •
How to Blanch Pistachio
Nuts ..•• • • • •• • • •• • .

10
12
12
10
10

How to Clarify Stock Sirup
How to Color Almonds ...
How to Color Coconut. . .
How to Color Sugar .... .
How to Make Brilliantine .
How to Prepare Chestnuts .
How to Spin Suga r.. .. . .
How to Stuff Dates .. . ...
Orange Sugar ... . .. '" . ••
Pulled Sugar . ..........
Royal Icing for Decorating
Candies .........••••
Salted Almonds..........
Stock Sirup. ... . ........
To Prepare Figs and Prunes
for Stuffing. . • . . . . . • •
To Send Candy by Mail . .
Vanilla or Clove Sugar.. .

For the beautiful illustrations in this book, we want to pay
appropriate tribute to the following who helped so generously:
ANGELUS·CAMPFIRE COMPANY
BRAZIL NUT FUND
CALIFORNIA FRUIT GROWERS
EXCHANGE
CORN PRODUCTS REFINING
CO PAN Y
BAKER'S DOT CHOCOLATE

GAPER CATERING COMPANY
GENERAL FOODS CORPORATION
H. J. HEINZ COMPANY
HERSHEY CHOCOLATE
CORPORATION
IRRADIATE D EVAPORATED
MILK INSTITUTE

JOHN F. JELKE COMPANY
NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL
PET MILK COMPANY
THE BORDEN COMPANY
THE JUNKET FOLKS
THE STEVENS HOTEL
CARNATION COMPANY

12
10
10
10
15
10
14
12
15

13
15
10
12
12
12
10

CANDYMAKING EQUIPMENT
CANDY

MARZIPAN MOLDS

BARS

CARAMEL CUTTER
COPPER KETTLE (Heavy, Deep)
CRYSTALLIZINC TRAY AND

WIRE RACKS

MEASURINC CUP
N/EASURiNC SPOONS

I\4ETAL BARS
NOUCAT FRAN4E

DIPPINC FORKS AND RINCS
ECC BEATER

PADDTES

FOOD CHOPPER
FUNNEL

PASTRY BRUSH

PANS

HOOK FOR PULLINC CANDY
KNIVES
MARBLE SLAB
Candy bars are made of steel and
to form various sized
spaces on the marble slab, into

are Arsed

which are poured caramel

and

taffy mixtures. They can be

ar-

to hold any quantity

of

ranged

A

candy hook is very useful, l!bor-saving and inexpenslve. Candy is improved by being pulled on
a hook, as the pulling makes it
lighter in color and fluffier.
A caramel cutter consists of a
metal framework filled in with
transverse and Iongitudinal metal
bars, which, when pressed on the
surface of caramel or taffy, mark
rt into a number of small squares.
The squares are then cut out wrth
a knife.

Crystallizing trays are shallow
pans fitted with wire racks to
hold candies and prevent their

rising during crystallizing. A
crystallizrng tray is usually fourteen inches long and ten inches
w,de.

Dipping forks are made of w,'e
with two or three prongs or a loop
at the end, and used for lifting
the dipped candies out of the
coating mixtures. They are very
marble slab is not absolutely
necessary, but it is convenient
and useful. When candy is poured
out on a piece of mai'ble, it coo s

enameled tray may be used.

ters from

an

0' to 50", and reads

from the top downward. The advantages of the saccharometer
are imrnense, not only as a matter

of economy, but as a guide to the
candymaker, who cannot work
w th certainty witl^out knowing
the degrees of boiling.'For example: The thread, Iarge or small,
marks 25"; the pearl, 30'; the
blow, 34'; the feather, 36'; the

50'. After this last degree
the sugar has become so thick
that the saccharometer can no
lorger be rsed. Tl-e remainrng

ball,

degrees, the crack and caramel,

must be determined by other
-ihe
tests. ln order to use
saccharometer to test sirup you must

have a narrow glass vase, or a
glass test tube, or a tall bottle
about an inch and a half in dlameter. Pour some of the sirup into

the tube, wet the saccharometer
it into the boiling sugar

and drop

and

nexpensive.

A

quickly. A iarge piatter or

The saccharometer is often used
for ascertaining the specific gravity of liquids. lt is rnade of glass
containing quicksilver, the same
as the thermometer, and is divided into degrees or scales. The
scale on the saccharometer regis-

candy.

i

PASTRY TUBES AND BACS
PLATTERS AND BOWLS
ROLLINC PIN
RUBBER MATS

it wlll indicate the densitv of

the sugar.

A gooil canily therrnotneter
will saae its purchase price
in many successtul butches
ol candy

SACCHAROMETER
SAUCEPANS AND DOUBLE
BOI LERS

SCALES

scrssoRS
SIEVE (Fine Mesh)
SPATULAS
SPOONS, LARCE

SUCAR SCRAPER
THERN/OMETER

WAXED PAPER AND
WAFER PAPER

.Tt.
f:.,t

6

CANDYMAKING EQUIPMENT

A starch tray is used when mold.ing fondants, liqueurs,

fruit jellies,

or other candies in starch. Any
large flat box or biscuit pan will

do for this. Three

inches by

twenty inches is a

convenient
size. Fjll the box with clean, dry,
sifted cornstarch. Smooth the
starch with a f lat stick; then

A sugar scraper

is made of a strip

of strong metal or tin rolled

at

lt

is

one end to form a handle.

to scrape up the sugar on
the slab or platter. A broadused

bladed spatula may take its place.

make the required impressions
on it with small plaster molds
Nougat frames are made of wood,
and used for moldlng nougat and

other candies of like consistency.
Rubber mats are used for the
molding of fondants. They come

in

innumerable designs, and the
candies cast in them are perfectly
shaped and delicately molded.
Saucepans may be made of cop-

per, iron, granite, enamel, or
aluminurn. They must be lSept
clean inside and outside. Two
small lipped pans, holding adout
one pint each, are convenient for
melting fondant and

for

glued to a piece of wood. They
may be made with a cork. a prece
of sealing-wax, a thimble, a marble, a glass stopper, or the tip of

the finger. The piece of

wood

should be longer than the box or
pan. Pour or pipe in the candy

A

mixture, filling each mold level
with the top of the starch. When
set, pick up the candies and dusl

the heat at exactly the

off the starch.

Keep the starch

dry and clean in trn boxes. lt
should always be dried and sieved

before

use.

other

minor operations.

confectioner's thermometer is
required for candymaking, so that
the sirup may be removed from
correct

temperature. Such thermometers
are made of wood, nickei, brass
or copper, and the degrees on
them should mark not less than
320"F. A thermometer should always be iowered gently into the
boiling sugar.

When not in use,

it

should be

kept hanging up on a nail

or

hook.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES
All
A

of brightly polished tin,
which may be procured at the
sheet

cost of a few cents, will be found
useful for dropped chocolates.

Spatulas

are flat,

pear-shaped

of metal or hardwood, and are used for stirring
paddles made

and beating mixtures or for scraping out pans. They are useful

little utensils, and often used
place of spoons.

in

Measures

Are

Level

I tablespoon
I cup ..
Vzcup.
V+

cup

3

.

1/z ounce butier ..
1/z pound butter or sugar

..
1 pound butter or sugar ..
I pound molasses
I pound corn sirup
i pound chocolate
I pound peanuts .
33/+ ounces English walnuts
i pound coconut .
5 ounces brown sugar
5Yz ounces confectioners' sugar ,.
4Vz ounces cocoa .

4

teaspoons

16 tablespoons
Btablespoons

ounces almonds

1 tablespoon

.......
.......

I

cup

2

cups

11/zcups

1tA cups
16 squares

..... .. 2Tz cups
1 cup
B cups
cup
cup
cup
cup

a

CANDYMAKING INGREDIENTS
ANCELICA

Brown sugars consist of

BUTTER

coarser part

BAK]NC SODA
BROWN SUCAR
CORN SIRUP

Confectioners' sugar is a specially
pulverized sugar suitable for
icings or {rostings, and is used in
candymakrng also. Maple sugar
is obtained from the sap of the
sugar-mapie tree, and makes delicious candy. All sugars, especially confectioners' sugar, shouid
be kept in a dry place.
Small quantrties of glucose are
used to prevent the sugar from

CHOCOLATE

CREAM OF TARTAR
CHFRRI

the

of the sugar, and are
suitable for some kinds of candy.

ES

CRFAN/

CORNSTARCH
COCONUT
DATES

FXTRACTS
ECCS

FOOD COLORS

granulating during boiling. The
best candy is produced with 85
per cent sugar and 15 per cent

FICS

FRUITS, Fresh and Candied

CiNCER, Preserved and Candied

gl ucose.

COLDEN SIRUP

Cream of tartar of tartaric acid
mdy tal.e rhe place of g,ucose in
some recipes, as they also tend to
prevent granulation.

cEl ATr\
Cr UCOSE

CUM

ARABIC

1

HONEY
J

Food colors for use in candies are
now easily prccured at reasonable

ELLY

LEN/ONS

pr'ces. These co'ors vary

I/APLE SIRUP
MAPLE SUCAR

strength and quality, according to
the various makes The amount

N/OLASSES

o[ coo" to be useo r an/

MILK: Fresh,

Evaporated,

Condensed

g:ver
case depends upon the shade de-

si

red

N/ARSHMALLOWS
NUTS
PRUNES
PRESERVES

POPCORN

RAISINS
SUCAR
SP

ICES

VI NECAR

Candy
made

of the

of

sugar,

better grade is
with the addition

of

various colors, flavors, nuts,
sorrelimes {ar,
starch, and glucose, all of the
best grades. The food value of
candy may be expressed by the
amount of sugar contained, but

fruits etc. and

the wholesomeness of the other
be taken into

ingredients must
account.

.n

*r{
tt

;'r[q$d

;,;ig4rS

The use of flavoring extracts

is

universal throughout the civilized
world. They are necessary in the
preparation of homemade candres.
Therefore rt is supremely important that they be of the highest

purity and quality. lnferior ex_
tracts will result in flavoriess candies that are a drsappointment.

Nuts generally used are sweet
and bitter almonds, black and
English walnuts, filberts, peanuts,
chestnuts, pine nuts, pistachio
nuts, Brazil nuts, butternuts, pecans, and hickory nuts. When

cracking nuts, each nutlshould be
held in such a position that the
shell wiil be crushed alongdefin-

ite

I

ines.

Cocoa

butter is used to enrich

poor qualiiy of chocolate

a

and

jt to the right coating contency.
Butter used in candymaking must
be pure and wholesome and free
from salt.
bring
sis

Skilllul handling ol the
simplest ingred,ients will
produce a fine assotnnent
ol canilies

it
fl

i

-'%

SIRUP TESTS
THE BLOW

THE CARAMEL

This is the {irst workable degree
to which sugar is boiled. Dip the
spocn or a skimmer into th"

Sugar boiled to ihe carame stage
is slightly dark ln color. lt breaks
when tested, malinq a nc s-. ] ke

sugar, shake

it, and blow thrcugh

the hoies: if sparks of light

or

bubbles be seen, you may be sure
Sugar ma), be boiled on an ordinary range. gas, gasoline, o l, oi-

or in a chaf ng
,.h A ,ug"r themo- .r ,-

electrrc stove,

usually used fcr test ng the bo lrng sugar, but other rneens may
be used, such as the f ngers only,
a pe lt a ed 'ron spoon. a r ;ece
of bent wire, or a sharp piece of

of the

blow.

THE FEATHER
When the boiling slrgar

reached the {eather stage, rt may
-.65i'y be blowr frorr the wire ospoon in long shreds.

The following scale will serve as
a guide for amateurs who are not

with the

THE THREAD
the sirup and appy it to

y,our

thumb, on parting them, you will
f ind a thread whrch will break at
a ittle distance, and remain as
a drop on the finger, thrs is the

thiead lf the

it

thread
is the great thread.

be

'THE PEARL
When you separate yor,rr f inger

and thumb and the
reaches from one

When a boil ng solution of sugar
and lrater has passed tlie soft-

ba

1eg

-e rt ra)

.

eadr

)

giain

ess g ucose or some krnd of
acid is added. The canger may
be guarded against a so b-v me ting the sugar very thoroughly
before a ow ng the s rup to boil,
un

b.v brushing or sponging the
des of the pan during bci ing,
so as to dissove an,,, ha d particles or crysta s form ng there
Cream of tartar is the ac d u:ua11y
useC tc preveni the granu ation
of the sirup. lf too iarge a quantity is used, it w ll cause the
sugar to change colcr q'.lic< y, and
the cand es made or covered with
it are I kely io be soft and sticky.
The cream of tartar should not
be added until all the scum has
been remoi,ed {rom the bcil ng
sugar and the sides of the pan
s

you do not use a therrri:meter,
dip the tip of your forefinger lnto

longer,

cold water-under tt tc preveni its
burning. The prcducttcn of caramel s attended with some difficu t'/. and great attentlcn ls ne-

cr

thermome-

lf

small

lift

frorn heat, an.i s p a pan of

cessa i),

has

wood.

acquainted
ter:

breaking glass When bc etl,

it

to

thread
the other

without breaking, lt is the small
pearl; if the finger and thumb be
stretched to therr utmost extent,
and the thread remain unbroken,
jt is the large pearl. This stage
may also be recognized by the
bubbles on the boilrng sugar,
whrch are round and raised; but
this test is not always sure.

THE BALL
The soft-ball degree is tested by
making a small bu b cf sugar
betvreen the fingers while it ls
coo ng in a gass or colo nate'.
or by obtainrng icng, featherl,
pieces frcm the spoon

or

skrm-

ne'. Wner the bulb oi suga.
larger and harder, it is known as
the hard ball.

THE CRACI(
lf some of the sugar breaks witir
a slight noise and will not stick
to the teeth, it is at the softit again, and f
when tested it will qurckl), sei
hard and will eas ly snap when
crack stage. Boil

pressed,

it is at the hard

degree Sugar at this stage

crack
passes

rapidly to caramel, and will burn
if not attended to at once.

c

eansed fronr crystals Boiling

sugar ntended for pu lrng or such
purposes is all the better for the
aCCitjon of a ieaspconfu o{ glucose with the cream of tartar.

Pure sugar and water shows no
tendency to boil over. A I impuritres or scum on the surface
shculd be removed as soon as the

sirup boils, and then the boiling

should be a owed to proceed
quickly til the required degree

is

r-.ached

F-

---------l
SIRUP TESTS

CANDY TEMPERATURE CHART
from

"Terminology Used in Food Preparation"
Published by American Home Economics Association

Temperature

Stage ot

concentraltion
d,esired,

Prod.uct

Thread

Sirup

centration

F,
230 to

Degrees

234

Fondani

Soft ball

Fudge
Panocha

o! erup dt

sea leael (indicati,ng con-

to.
240

234

d,esired,)

Behauiot

ll0

to
112

il2

to

I 15

d,t

stoge desired,

Degrees C.

The sirup spins a two-inch thread
when dropped from fork or spoon.
The sirup when dropped into very
cold water forms a soft ball which

flattens on removal.

Firm ball

Caramels

244 to
248

llB

to

120

Marshmallows
Nougat
Popcorn bails

Hard ball

cold waier forms a firm

ball

which does not flatten on removal.

i

Divin ity

The sirup when dropped into very

250 to

121 to

The sirup when dropped into very

265

i30

cold water forms a ball which is
hard enough to hold its shape,

Sait-water taffy

yet plastic.
Bu

tterscotch

Soft crack

Taf f ies

210 to

132 to

290

r43

300 to

149 to

310

154

The sirup when dropped into very
cold water separates into threads
which are hard and brittle.

The sirup when dropped into very
cold water separates into threads
whrch are hard but not brittle.

i
I
t
:.

t
I
a

Brittle

Hard crack

Barley Sugar

Clear liquid

320

r60

The sugar liquefies.

Caramel

Brown Ilquid

338

170

The liquid becomes brown.

.ffi
#$ffi

..ii


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