PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



19. Insulation 05.09.2015 .pdf


Original filename: 19. Insulation - 05.09.2015.pdf
Author: Andrew R.J. Dudgeon

This PDF 1.5 document has been generated by Microsoft® Office Word 2007, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 09/10/2015 at 14:19, from IP address 46.31.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 246 times.
File size: 504 KB (2 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


Insulation
In past years one of the most cost effective means of reducing heating bills, increasing the energy
efficiency in buildings was to increase the level of insulation within the outside walls of the building. But what is
insulation?
Insulation is a material that restricts or slows down the transfer of heat energy.
In a building two processes are involved when we consider heat energy transfer, conduction &
convection. Radiation at this point is not considered as the heat radiation from a body turns to conduction when
it reaches another body.
Metals are good conductors of heat so are not considered for insulation. Cork bark was used in the past
as a flooring insulator as it was strong enough to withstand the weight placed upon it, but Cork was heavy
because of this strength.
The best insulator as used for a long time & is still in use is air, but has the disadvantage of forming
convection currents, & needs to be contained.
Dry air being better than damp or humid air for insulation.
Air that is kept still & prevented from forming convection currents is even better!
Tip: Keep the cavity walls (brick or block) dry to increase the insulation performance.
Insulation materials have developed over the years with improvements to the restriction of energy flow
making the older types of insulation outdated.
Conduction

Heat

Heat

Air

Air

Convection Current
Sketch: Showing insulation material & air convection currents with conduction paths

Today's modern insulation material is made up of very tiny bubbles of gas surrounded by extremely thin
walls of plastic that restrict the conduction of heat energy. These materials are reasonably strong yet lightweight
so are easy to use. They are currently the best economical way to restrict heat energy in today's world.
An insulation material that has also been around for a long time & is still in use is fibreglass as well as
mineral wool & other natural fibrous materials.
These fibrous materials have been used to insulate buildings for many years with changes to the
structure of the material to improve the rigidity of the insulation.
The plastics used are generally easier to use while not causing irritation to the workers skin while
working with the materials. However they are more expensive to buy than fibrous materials.
Fibrous materials have an advantage over plastics as they can be compacted during transport,
unwrapped as installed fairly easily, especially when insulating an attic loft.
However, an insulation layer is only as effective as it is sealed. If the insulation is continuously exposed
to air movement, this will lead to a significant reduction in performance.
For example, if one were to wear a woolly jumper on a cold windy day it will not insulate effectively, but
if one were to wear a light windshield over the jumper, then it actually insulates effectively. Insulation in our
homes is very similar.

Interstitial
Condensation

Air

Air

IN

OUT

Air

Air

IN

IN

Air
Barrier

Fibre Strand Insulation

Fibre Strand Insulation

Air

OUT
Fibre Strand Insulation
Interstitial
Condensation

Air

Air

Air

Air

Air

IN

OUT

IN

IN

OUT

Air
Barrier

Polystyrene Insulation

Polystyrene Insulation

Polystyrene Insulation

Interstitial
Condensation

Air

Air

Air

Moist

Air

IN

OUT

IN

Air

OUT

Urathane Foam Insulation

Air
Barrier

Urathane Foam Insulation

Urathane Foam Insulation

Sketches showing air travel through different insulation materials

Currently adding more insulation to your property may not be the most economical way to improve the
energy performance of your building, while adding insulation to walls & floors is sometimes not physically
possible, adding insulation to the ceiling in the attic is fairly easy. However to improve the insulation
performance of the current insulation is simple, find & seal the air leaks that are robbing heat energy from
around the insulation.
The more air leaks the building has the more energy used to maintain the temperature, the more it
costs!
To improve the energy performance of the current levels of insulation you need to stop or slow down
any air movement that may be affecting your property.
By finding & stopping draughts (uncontrolled air movement) in your property you will improve your
energy performance and notice a reduction in your heating bills.
When using any insulation material it must be fitted correctly, with no gaps around the edges and if
building layers to increase thickness always stager the joints, do not allow a direct passage from warm the side
to the cold side. Prevent air from being driven over the outside surface of any fibrous insulation. Don't tuck roll
fibreglass into vertical gaps between timber frames, it will slip down over time due to building vibrations, leaving
a gap at the top with no insulation at all !
Trevor Clark 07.09.2015


19. Insulation - 05.09.2015.pdf - page 1/2
19. Insulation - 05.09.2015.pdf - page 2/2

Related documents


PDF Document 19 insulation 05 09 2015
PDF Document 14 all about air tightness 04 09 2015
PDF Document pdf building thermal insulation market
PDF Document excellent insulation processes done properly
PDF Document 6 tricks to make garage1405
PDF Document 4 architecture thermal insulation


Related keywords