NikaskanSyntax 121515 .pdf

File information


Original filename: NikaskanSyntax-121515.pdf

This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by , and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 16/12/2015 at 00:17, from IP address 107.15.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 370 times.
File size: 111 KB (2 pages).
Privacy: public file


Download original PDF file


NikaskanSyntax-121515.pdf (PDF, 111 KB)


Share on social networks



Link to this file download page



Document preview


Syntax 
 
Word Order: 
Word order in Nikaskan is subject, object, verb (SOV), but the case system allows for some 
freedom for nonconfigurationality. The language tends to be head­initial, and is pro­drop. For 
example, noun modifiers like adjectives follow the noun that they accompany, but demonstrative 
particles always appear before the noun. Adverbs can follow or precede the main verb, and can 
take almost any position in a clause; however, in standard speech and prose adverbs usually 
follow the verb. 
 
Copulae​

Nikaskan has a zero­copula construction system for identifying, naming, or describing noun 
phrases. The copula subject is always in the nominative case, and in the present tense the copula 
predicate is always in the accusative case. For example:  
átilon háčár 
hole­nom.sg.in bottomless­acc.sg.in 
The hole is bottomless 
 
It should be noted that this zero­copula construction is only used for the purposes listed above. 
Constructions of location, position, or accompaniment that would use the English verb ​
to be 
along with any preposition do not function with a zero­copula in Nikaskan. For example, it is not 
grammatical to say ​
átilon jákom​
 to mean ​
the hole is in the sand​
. In these cases, a separate verb 
is used, the equivalents of ​
to sit, to stand, ​
or ​
to lie​

 
The future and past tenses also utilize this zero­copula. In the absence of a verb, tense is shown 
through the case of the copula predicate. In the future tense, the predicate is in the dative case, 
while, in the past tense, it appears in the nominative. In the past tense, when the predicate is an 
adjective and the subject is a noun with at least one other adjective already modifying it, the 
predicate is fronted to disambiguate. In other situations it follows the subject. For example: 
átilon háčáron
the hole was bottomless 
šántiton átilon háčáron
the bottomless hole was dark 
átilon hačarí
the hole will be bottomless 
átilon hačaron šántití
the bottomless hole will be dark 
 
The distal tense does not follow this same pattern of syntactical constructions. In the distal tense, 
and ​
only​
 in the distal tense, there is a verb copula used for describing, identifying, naming, or 
attribution. This distal copula is the most irregular verb in Nikaskan, and its forms are: 

 

 

Singular 

Plural 

1st Person 
 

nol 

makrá 

2nd Person 
 

nas 

nektá 

3rd Person 
Animate 

eprá 

eppais 

3rd Person 
Inanimate 

eppú 

eppútá 

 
Nol​
 acts as a transitive verb, meaning the subject is marked nominative and the predicate is 
marked accusative. The verb also breaks regularity by always preceding the copula predicate. 
This is the only time that Nikaskan syntax requires SVO word order. For example: 
úkkepám eprá abrákit 
sun­nom.sg.an be.3s.an.dist bright­acc.sg.an 
The sun was bright long ago​
 / ​
The sun will be bright in the distant future 


Document preview NikaskanSyntax-121515.pdf - page 1/2

Document preview NikaskanSyntax-121515.pdf - page 2/2

Related documents


nikaskansyntax 121515
syerjchep language
mikeposter
a short course on some grammar basics
mining linked data
spanish

Link to this page


Permanent link

Use the permanent link to the download page to share your document on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or directly with a contact by e-Mail, Messenger, Whatsapp, Line..

Short link

Use the short link to share your document on Twitter or by text message (SMS)

HTML Code

Copy the following HTML code to share your document on a Website or Blog

QR Code

QR Code link to PDF file NikaskanSyntax-121515.pdf