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Serving Columbus and Fall River

Saturday, March 26, 2016 | 1

Columbus Journal

Saturday, March 26, 2016 | www.wiscnews.com/columbusjournal

PHOTOS BY LISA CESTKOWSKI, COLUMBUS JOURNAL‌

Courtney Reimer, right, tattoos Shelby Schoenherr at Atattood Art in Columbus Monday. Reimer, originally from Wyoming, has worked at Atattood Art since August of last year.

A NEW ATATTOOD
Tattoo shop moves into bigger space as artist/owner expands his client base
LISA CESTKOWSKI
Columbus Journal‌

J

erad Halverson was always into art.
“Even when I was little, I always had a coloring book,” said Halverson, who’s still putting his
artistic talents to use, but these days his canvas is
the human body.
Halverson has owned the Atattood Art tattoo shop in
Columbus for over five years and recently moved into a
new building at 120 E. James St. that will allow him to
spread out, display his favorite artwork on the expansive
walls and continue to grow.
“I love this building,” Halverson said. It has high
ceilings, an arched front doorway and big windows
that flood the space with light. His father and brother
remodeled it to suit his needs, painting the walls and ceiling, installing four
tattoo booths and putting in a wood
floor, keeping the historic look of the
building while bringing it up to modern standards.

Starting small‌

Halverson got his start in another
(now closed) Columbus tattoo shop
called Electric Ink, which was run by
Will Scherbarth. The first few times Halverson went
into Electric Ink, he was just a client getting tattoos.
But the more he watched Scherbarth work, the more
he knew he wanted to learn the trade himself.
Scherbarth agreed to take him on as an apprentice,
and after six months, Halverson decided to open his own
shop, first in a small building on Ludington Street, then
into slightly larger digs on James Street, and finally, in
January, into his new home, across the street from his
former location. He designed his own logo, which is displayed in the shop windows, and is gaining a reputation
as a tattoo artist for his full-color, detailed work.
“I’ve been on a rose kick lately,” Halverson said. “Full
color roses are really fun to do.”
Every tattoo he draws is a little different. He often
Halverson

Jerad Halverson, owner of Atattood Art, looks at drawings on his computer. Halverson does some of his artwork
with colored pencils and paper and some of it in Photoshop.
incorporates skulls or other graphic elements into his
rose drawings, and he likes to use color. Lots of color.
Today’s tattoos are bigger and bolder than older style
tattoos, Halverson said. In fact, he often gets asked to
cover up small tattoos that look dated, which he can do
by strategically placing the new design over top of the
old one and using color to draw attention away from
any parts that aren’t completely masked.
Please see TATTOO, Page 6

Columbus couple hopes to win
duet wheelchair bike for their son
LISA CESKTOWSKI
Columbus Journal‌

‌ ix-year-old Maddox KlossS
ner loves nothing better than
being outside with the wind
in his hair as he’s pushed on a
swing or goes for a ride.
But for Maddox, who has cerebral palsy and Lennox-Gastaut
Syndrome, a form of epilepsy,
moving anywhere requires assistance.
That’s why his parents, Beth

and Andy Klossner of Columbus, are hoping to get a special
duet wheelchair bike for him
through the Friendship Circle
Great Bike Giveaway.
The bike they want has a traditional seat in the back where
mom or dad can sit and pedal
from and a modified wheelchair in the front that Maddox
can ride in.
“He loves being outside and
he loves motion,” Andy said of

RELIGION 8
SPORTS 11-12

$1.25
00
1



Volume 162, Issue 16



his son, who is non-verbal but
smiles and laughs when he’s
happy — like when he’s riding
on his grandparents’ pontoon
boat or being pushed along in
the special running chair his
parents were able to buy thanks
to the generosity of the Jason
Luther family, which holds a
fundraiser each year to benefit
causes they believe in.
Please see BIKE, Page 6

If you go
What: Atattood Art
Where: 120 E. James St., Columbus
Phone: 920-350-0027
Website: www.atattoodart.com
Hours: 12 p.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Saturday

The Great Bike Giveway
What: The Great Bike Giveaway is a campaign by Friendship Circle that seeks to give
adaptive bikes to children with special needs.
When: Voting will end at 12 p.m. Wednesday,
March 30.
Vote: To vote for Maddox or to make a donation, go to https://www.friendshipcircle.org/
bikes/2016/02/maddox-k/

Maddox Klossner, 6, of Columbus is entered
into the Friendship Circle Great Bike
Giveaway, which crowdsources funding
for adaptive bikes and then gives them to
children with special needs.
SUBMITTED‌

OBITUARIES | PAGE 2
„„ LAVINA FREY, 85, COLUMBUS

A Capital Newspapers publication • Copyright 2016

Follow us online:

www.facebook.com/ColumbusJournal

twitter.com/cbusjournal

2 | Saturday, March 26, 2016

Columbus Journal

Columbus Journal
The Columbus Journal is published weekly. Home delivery in Columbus
and Fall River includes the weekend edition of the Beaver Dam Daily
Citizen and the Monday issue. Subscription price is 26 weeks at $32 or 52
weeks at $63.20. Mail rates of the Columbus Journal only are 26 weeks
for 29.60 and 52 weeks for $59.20. Business office is located at 805 Park
Ave., Beaver Dam WI 53916. Hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5
p.m. General information number is 920-887-0321. For subscription
information, call our Customer Care Center at 866-884-2126.
Editor: Lisa Cestkowski
cj-news@capitalnewspapers.com
Display advertising rep: Kara Premo-Rake - 920-356-6772;
kpremo-rake@capitalnewspapers.com
Classified advertising reps: 920-356-6777
or 920-356-6778
News copy deadline - Wednesday at 12 p.m.
Display advertising deadline - Wednesday at 4 p.m.
Classified advertising deadline - Tuesday at 3 p.m.
Office hours: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Member WNA
Capital Newspapers’ office is located at 805 Park Ave., Beaver Dam, WI.
Phone: 920-887-0321

OBITUARY
Lavina Frey
‌Lavina M. Frey, 85, Columbus, passed away peacefully on
Wednesday, March 16, 2016, at her home.
Lavina was born the daughter of Frank and Evamae (Crossman) Allsage Sr. on Nov. 22, 1930, at their home in Fall River.
She was a graduate of Fall River High School. Lavina was married to Melvin J. Frey on Nov. 5, 1949, at the Allsage home in Fall
River. Lavina, along with her husband Melvin, farmed many
years in the Columbus/Fall River area. She will be missed by
her family, friends and her special companion, her dog, Lola.
Lavina is survived by her children, Maurice (Karen) Frey,
Keith (Sharon) Frey, and Patti (Rick) Johnson, all of Columbus;
her former daughter-in-law, Patricia Frey of Beaver Dam; her
grandchildren, Andrew Frey, Vicki (Stu) Herbst, Eric Carney,
Michael Frey, Nicole (Justin) Schueler, and Ashley Johnson;
step grandchildren, Jennifer Schultz, Julie (Benito) Ortiz, and
John Uhlman; great-grandchildren, Dylan Herbst and Hannah
Herbst; step great-grandchildren, Isabella, Arany and Anael
Ortiz; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.
She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Melvin in 2009; and her brothers, James, Lawrence and Frank Jr.
Private family funeral services were held Monday, March 21,
at Koepsell-Zeidler Funeral Home, Columbus, with the Rev.
Robert Moberg officiating.
Lavina’s family expresses special thanks to the Dean Oncology Department in Columbus, especially Dr. Frontiera and the
nurses for their heartfelt care and concern.
Koepsell-Zeidler Funeral and Cremation Services in Columbus is serving the family. Online condolences may be made at
www.koepsellfh.com.

Fall River man gets
4 years for stabbing
JONATHAN STEFONEK
Capital Newspapers‌

‌A Fall River man was sentenced March 16 to four years
in prison for a stabbing at
C.J.’s Bar a year earlier.
Columbia County District Attorney Jane Kohlwey,
largely agreeing with the
Department of Corrections
pre-sentencing investigation
report, requested that Judge
Alan J. White sentence Jeremy
Grueneberg, 39, to six years
in prison and three years of
extended supervision for aggravated battery and to withhold sentencing on a charge
of misdemeanor disorderly
conduct.
On Dec.18, Grueneberg
pleaded no contest to both
counts.
“While it might be argued at
some level that the defendant
hasn’t had violent history before, he has had burglary, he
has had disorderly conduct,
and resisting or obstructing
an officer and operating a vehicle while intoxicated,” she
said. “He is up to operating
while intoxicated as a fourth
offense. Those types of repeat
offenders at some level are just
as dangerous to the public as
someone who directly attacks
someone.”
On March 14, 2015, Fall
River police were called to
C.J.’s Bar at about 10:15 p.m.
where a man had been attacked, with a stab wound to
the chest. Witnesses told police the man had been there
for his birthday. He had arrived with a group of friends
at around 4 p.m. and that at
the same time, Grueneberg
had been drinking there. The
group left for food and came
back at about 7 p.m. and
Grueneberg was still there.
Later Grueneberg approached
the man and asked him if he
wanted to step outside.
Witnesses reported hearing
a yell and the man pulling up
his shirt, with blood pouring
out of his chest, then Grueneberg ran out of the bar.
An officer with the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office reported going to Grueneberg’s
home across the street from
the bar, finding a knife on the
corner of the property and
then locating Grueneberg
behind the home.
“Very fortunately, the
wound did not turn out to be
nearly as serious as it could
have been,” Kohlwey said in
court, then reading from the
medical report: “Dr. Walsh
indicates that critical care
was provided 45 minutes to

this patient,
then he says
the reason
is ‘the high
probability
of sudden,
clinically
significant
Grueneberg deterioration in the
patient’s condition required
the highest level of preparedness.’”
Although the wound was
to the left side of the man’s
chest, the blade missed the
heart, lungs and any other
organs.
“He (Grueneberg) is extremely remorseful for his
conduct. He didn’t fight
anything, he is ready to accept whatever the court gives
him,” said defense attorney
Mark Lawton. “But I would
also note that his record is
largely quite old. For instance,
the burglary charge is 21 years
old.”
Lawton said Grueneberg
had been regularly employed
— owning his own business
— and that the court received
letters of support describing
him as a loving, involved family member.
“I have come to terms
with what I have done,” said
Grueneberg, offering his
apologies to the victim and
anyone else he had hurt.
“You had opportunities to
get treatment for this problem,” said White. “A lot of
these treatments are not what
I would consider to be the gold
standard, but you could have
made different choices. You
could have tried to stay in
alcohol or drug treatment of
some sort and try to make an
effort to do it.”
At the end the victim was
stitched up with minimal effort, though White pointed
out, “but for the grace of God,”
the knife struck where it did,
and if it had varied by almost
any degree, the proceedings
would likely have been a case
of homicide.
“I don’t get any satisfaction sentencing someone
like yourself, with a daughter, to prison, and I certainly
don’t get satisfaction sending
someone to a lengthy 25- or
30-year prison sentence for
manslaughter, but somebody
has to do something.”
White handed down a
seven-year sentence on the
first count, with four years in
prison and three years of extended supervision, with two
years probation for the charge
of disorderly conduct.

THE WEEK AHEAD

Egg hunt, children’s activities
will be held at Fireman’s Park

‌The Columbus Recreation Department will hold
its annual Easter egg hunt at the Fireman’s Park Pavilion Saturday, March 26, with events from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
The egg hunt itself will take place at 1:30 p.m.
on the grass. Egg patches will be divided up by age
group: special needs, 0 to 2, 3 to 5 and 6 to 12.
The day’s activities will also include make-it-andtake-it crafts, face painting, Doodlebug the Clown
and games and prizes. Pony rides will be available for
$3. Alpine Photography will take photos of children;
for $15, parents will receive a high resolution photo
and CD with full copyright release. Concessions will
be available for purchase from the Masonic Lodge.
Bring a basket to carry your goodies.

March 31 Books & Beer to feature
writers of ‘On the Road’ mysteries

‌The sister-in-law author duo Peggy Joque Williams and
Mary Joy Johnson, who write together under the pen name
M. J. Williams in their “On the Road” mystery series, will be the featured guests at the
next Books & Beer at 7 p.m. Thursday, March
31 at The Black Kettle, 139 N. Ludington St.,
Columbus.
The “On the Road” series features a retired
couple, Emily and Stan, who travel in an inherited, secondhand RV, solving the mysteries they encounter. “On the Road to Where
the Bells Toll” is available for purchase at the Black Kettle
for $10 as well as at online retailers in both paperback and
e-book. You can learn more about M. J. Williams at www.
ontheroadmysteries.com.

Dodge County will host
Alice interview activities
LISA CESTKOWSKI
Columbus Journal‌

When Dodge County

last hosted Alice in Dairyland interview activities
in 1981, Debbie Crave
won the crown and began
her year-long term as a
spokesperson for Wisconsin agriculture.
Thirty-five years later,
Crave is still promoting the
state’s ag industry, albeit
in a slightly different way.
These days she’s the vice
president of Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese near
Waterloo.
On Friday, Crave got to
revisit her past role as she
welcomed the six top candidates for this year’s Alice in Dairyland title to the
Crave Brothers Farmstead,
where the family — including Debbie’s husband
George and his brothers Charles, Thomas and
Mark — owns 1,700 cows
and 2,700 acres, in addition to the on-site cheese
company.
“We’re thrilled to host
you,” Crave said. “We’re
thrilled that the program has continued and
has been such a great
time-honored tradition for
Wisconsin agriculture.”
Prior to being introduced to the media in a
short ceremony inside the
farm shop, the six candidates got a tour of the
farm, which emphasizes
conservation and sustainable practices.
“The Crave Brothers
Farmstead is all about
family, sustainable and
green energy and promoting everything good about
dairy farming,” Crave said,
adding that Dodge County
is a great place to be a dairy
farmer. “It has a wonderful county fair which I’m
hopeful the new Alice in
Dairyland will be at and a
great dairy youth group, as
well as many other support
and community people.”
Alice in Dairyland is a
one-year, full-time public relations position with
the Wisconsin Department
of Agriculture, Trade and
Consumer Protection. The
new Alice will be crowned
Saturday, May 7, at Watertown High School, after
two days of activities in
Dodge County.
Candidates for the 69th
Alice in Dairyland are
listed below.
„„ Jenna Braun, Mayville, is a field representative for a local canning
company, where she works
with area farmers to raise
peas and sweet corn. She
developed a passion for
agriculture while raising state-certified seed
potatoes on her family’s
fifth-generation
corn,
soybean and potato farm.
Braun graduated from
North Dakota State University with a bachelor’s
degree in agricultural
communications and a
minor in food safety. As a
freshman in college, Braun
served on the State FFA
Officer team. She continues to volunteer with FFA
students and enjoys working with and promoting all
facets of agriculture.
„„ Victoria Horstman,
Sparta, grew up working
on her family dairy. In
May 2015, she earned her
bachelor’s degree from
UW-Oshkosh in journalism and public relations.

PHOTOS BY LISA CESTKOWSKI, COLUMBUS JOURNAL‌

Debbie Crave, vice president of Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese and a former Alice in
Dairyland, welcomes the six candidates for the 69th Alice in Dairyland to the farm.

Candidates for the 69th Alice in Dairyland include, from left, Jenna Braun, Mavyville;
Victoria Horstman, Sparta; Kristin Klossner, New Glarus; Anna O’Leary, Evansville; Emily
Selner, Denmark; and Joanna Wavrunek, Denmark.

If you go
The public is welcome to attend three events during the
Alice in Dairyland Finals in Dodge County:
Candidate Discussion Panel, Friday, May 6, Barn at
Windy Pine, Waterloo, 5:30 p.m. ($15).
69th Alice Finale Banquet and Program, Saturday, May
7, Turner Hall, Watertown, Social Hour at 4:30 p.m. Banquet at 5:30 p.m. ($25)
69th Alice Finale Program Only, Saturday, May 7, Watertown High School, 7 p.m. Afterglow reception to follow ($5).
For more information and tickets, visit aliceindairyland.com.

There she was active in the
Public Relations Student
Society of America and
was a member of Kappa
Tau Apha National Honor
Society. As a candidate for
the 69th Alice in Dairyland, she plans to focus her
efforts on educating others
on the processes by which
food is grown, processed
and eventually consumed.
„„ Kristin Klossner, New
Glarus, resides on her family’s 257-acre dairy farm.
She currently is a sales
associate at the West Revenue Generation Services
in their financial sector.
Klossner graduated from
the University of Wisconsin-River Falls with a
bachelor’s degree in secondary education and
minors in dairy science
and athletic coaching.
Klossner grew up showing
livestock through 4-H,
FFA and the Wisconsin
Holstein Association and

gives back to these organizations today by serving on leadership boards,
coaching dairy bowl and
hosting the John Klossner
Memorial Fitting Contest
at the Green County Fair.
„„ Ann O’Leary, Evansville, grew up showing Jerseys and Holsteins at the
county, district and state
level. She was heavily involved in the Rock County
Jr. Holstein Association
and the Rock County 4-H
program and served as the
2009 Rocky County 4-H
Fair Queen. O’Leary studied biology and neuroscience at Carthage College
and graduated with All
College Honors in May
2014. She currently works
at Epic as a corporate recruiter, volunteers with the
Rock County 4-H Program
and serves on the Carthage
College Alumni Council.
„„ Emily Selner, Denmark, hopes to apply her

diverse experience in the
agricultural and food industry as Wisconsin’s
agricultural ambassador.
Growing up, Selner was
active on her family’s dairy
farm, where they milked
registered Holstein cows.
In May, she’ll complete her
bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics and
life sciences communications from the University
of Wisconsin-Madison. At
UW-Madison, she is president of UW’s Association
of Women in Agriculture,
chaired the World Diary
Expo Cheese Stand and is
active in Collegiate Farm
Bureau. She currently
works at the Wisconsin
Cheesemakers Association. She plans to attend
law school in the future to
become an attorney serving Wisconsin’s agriculture industry.
„„ Joanna Wavrunek,
Denmark, is the fifth generation of her family involved in the farming industry. Her passion for agriculture led her to serve as
the State FFA reporter and
work as a facilitator for the
National FFA Organization. She graduated from
the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh majoring in
communication studies
with an emphasis in rhetoric and public advocacy.
Wavrunek currently works
on her family’s dairy farm
and at WIXX as a radio
00
personality.
1

Saturday, March 26, 2016 | 3

Columbus Journal

Pantry offers
food assistance

‌The
Columbus/Fall
River Food Pantry serves
Columbus and Fall River
residents, by appointment
only, on Thursdays from 4 to
6:45 p.m. The pantry is located in the back of the Columbus Area Senior Center.
If you’re in need of assistance in March, call St.
Jerome Catholic Church at
623-3753. In April, call Columbus Community Church
of the Nazarene at 608234-1655.
If your call is not answered, leave a message.
Messages are checked daily.

Voters can hear from candidates
at Fall River, Columbus forums
‌The Columbus/Fall River
Rotary Club will hold two
forums prior to the April 5
election to allow voters the
chance to hear from candidates in local races.
A Fall River School Board
Forum will be held Tuesday
March 29 at 6 p.m. in the
Fall River School multipurpose room. Candidates
Ember Schultz and Ashley
Morton will speak.
Incumbent board member Wendy Corlett is unable
to attend.
A Columbus City Council
Forum will be held Wednes-

day March 30, at 7 p.m.
in the City Hall Council
Chambers.
Participating will be:
District 1 candidates Rick
Royem (running unopposed
for a one-year term, for
the seat vacated by former
Alderman Aaron Adams)
and Regan Rule (running
unopposed for a full, twoyear term) and District 3
candidates Andy Traxler
and JD Milburn, running
for a two-year team to replace Alderman Michael
Clark, who is not seeking
re-election.

COLUMBUS CITY COUNCIL ELECTION | DISTRICT 3

Milburn tries to spend Voters’ guide
time, talents making
the city a better place

Four seats on the Columbus
City Council will be up for
election April 5.

‌ ame: JD Milburn
N
Address: 128 ½ W.
James St., Columbus
Contact: jdmilburn50@
gmail.com, 608-957-6080
About the candidate:
At the present time I’m
involved with three businesses, two in commercial,
residential and senior housing development and a digital marketing web development firm which assists
small business and communities in understating
the importance of a digital
footprint. The marketing
firm is executing business,
neighborhood and community development efforts
across 15 U.S. towns and two
communities in two other
countries.
My prior work experience
includes:
The downtown business
specialist for the state of
Wisconsin for over 16 years,
executing over 20 downtown business recruitment
campaigns and consulting
with over 2,500 businesses
in one-to-one situations.
Within the team, I assisted
to create 4,599 new businesses, 20,492 jobs and
over $935 million in new
tax base, and over $1.244
billion in downtown public and private investment.
Prior to this engagement
I operated a financial services firm, was a manufacturing plant owner and was
an investment, commercial
and retail banker for over 13
years.
I have served six years as
the church chairman of Columbus Assembly of God,
assisting the congregation
in purchasing a building.
I have served as an officer
for Columbus Downtown
Development
Corporation (CDDC) since I moved
to Columbus in 2008. I

have
two
beautiful
grown children who
attended
the
great
Columbus public
schools.
JD Milburn
I have organized and participated
in the Fall Festival for over
seven years.
I have co-organized the
holiday parade when it was
potentially cancelled for
four years.
I organized the CP Rail
Holiday Train event which
attracted over 5,000 people
to Columbus, Wisconsin,
last year, and reached over
1.2 million people through
digital, newsprint and radio
advertising.
I have also served on the
Root for Columbus committee, planting, weeding
and assisting with landscaping Davies Park next to
the Amtrak Station.
I have been a volunteer
firefighter for Columbus for
more than four years.
Created the success of
Visit Downtown Columbus
Wisconsin, a Facebook page
that has many contributors
and reaches a broad based
audience.
Behind the scenes we
have invested many dollars
in targeted marketing. Antiques, historic, agribusiness and community. The
site is collaborative.
https://www.facebook.
com/VisitDowntownColumbus/
Other community sites
CDDC has created.
I have personally mapped
over 200 businesses in the
Columbus area so people
can find places, businesses,
parks, parking, city offices
and area assets. This has

Candidates for three of those
seats will run unopposed:
In District 1, incumbent Rick
Royem will run for a one-year
term and incumbent Regan
Rule will run for a two-year
term. In District 2, incumbent
Rod Melotte will run for a
two-year term.
The only race that voters will
have to decide is in District
3, where JD Milburn and
Andrew Traxler will face off
to fill the seat currently held
by Michael Clark, who is not
seeking re-election.
created much needed digital
and voice signage.
Why is he running?
I believe in the 3 T’s:
TIME, TALENT and TREASURES.
We spend our Time, Talent and Treasures on the
things we love.
I have spent much of my
time, talent and treasures to
make Columbus, Wisconsin
a better place unselfishly as
a volunteer.
The main reason for running for office is the heart
of our community will be
separated with road construction. It will be a tenuous time, but I hope to
help contribute to social,
economic, and civic place
making as Columbus embraces the reconstruction
of its main artery. I created
a website to place resources
on. https://jamesstreetreconstructionc.wordpress.
com/
I want to give of my
knowledge of municipality
resources, and place making.
I am and will continue to
be a public servant, emphasis on servant, as I do “THE
WORK FOR THE PEOPLE
OF COLUMBUS.”
Campaign websites:
http://jdmilburnwi.blogspot.com/
https://www.facebook.
com/JDMilburnColWI

The things we care about the most are the things we

just can’t afford to lose.

Book club to
meet April 11

Columbus Recycling Center
opens for the season today

The Columbus Recy‌
cling Center will open for
the season on Saturday,
March 26. The complete
2016 Department of Public Works calendar will
be included in the April
Columbus Water & Light
billing.
The recycling center
will accept the following
items: leaves, grass clippings, brush, yard waste,
oil and vehicle batteries.
The center will not accept the following items:
TVs, microwaves, computers, electronics, LP

‌“The Devil in the White
City: Murder, Magic, and
Madness at the Fair that
C h a n ge d
America”
will
be
the April
selection
for
the
Columbus Public
Library’s
Book Club for Adults.
The club will meet to
discuss the nonfiction
book written by Erik Larson on Monday, April 11,
from 7 to 8 p.m.

tanks, landscape fabric,
rocks, railroad ties, boards
or 2-by-4’s or wood chips.
The center will also
dispose of appliances for
a fee, which must be paid
at City Hall prior to coming to the recycling center.
Washers, dryers, stoves
and dishwashers require
a $15 fee paid at City Hall
prior to disposal. Refrigerators, freezers, dehumidifiers and air conditioners require a $30 fee
paid at City Hall prior to
disposal. Please display
your resident tag.

Traxler wants to make sure city
protects assets, spends wisely
‌ ame: Andrew Traxler
N
Address: 137 E Mill St.
Contact: andy.traxler@
gmail.com, 608-334-7883
About the candidate:
I have been married to
my wife, Rachelle Traxler,
for over 10 years. I moved
to Columbus in 2010 and
have fallen in love with our
city. I have been working at
the State Bar of Wisconsin
as a member records and
information specialist for
10 years. I work specifically
with attorney’s licenses,
which requires the ability
to analyze and understand
complicated
Supreme
Court licensing rules and
regulations. I also assist in
managing over 25,000 attorney records, work with
our social media accounts
and our web innovation
team.
I was appointed last year
to the Columbus Tourism
Committee, then more
recently nominated and
elected as the chairperson
of the newly formed Columbus Tourism Commission and I currently serve in
this position.
Why is he running?
When Rachelle and I
bought our home, we chose
Columbus because of its
family-friendly neighborhoods, affordability, amenities and historic character. Columbus is special,
from its historic homes and
downtown to its newest
housing and commercial
developments. Columbus
has many beautiful parks,
two stunning golf courses,
an aquatic center that attracts people from outside
the area and by far the most
antique retailers in the region. We have wonderful
restaurants, a variety of

fast food
options,
two grocery stores
and many
retail establishments. We
Andy Traxler are also the
home of
the closest Amtrak station
to the Madison area and
the ever growing Canadian
Pacific Holiday Train. All
of this is connected by five
intersecting state highways
that bring people through
our community. I want to
see this special character enhanced by balanced
growth that is appropriate
for Columbus.
I love Columbus and the
quality of life that it offers!
And most of all the great
people that call Columbus
home.
I don’t claim to be a politician nor do I claim to
know everything. I am just
a regular guy, a homeowner
and taxpayer that loves Columbus and wants it to be a
great place for us all to live.
Over the last few weeks
I have been walking the
streets of District 3, knocking on doors and listening
to our residents’ concerns.
The message is clear!
Residents want confidence that the city of Columbus is fiscally responsible by having a balanced
and responsible budget
while delivering on core
necessary
community
services. They want our
infrastructure
repaired
and replaced. They want to
feel good about how their
tax dollars are spent, that
they are getting the most
out of each dollar, and that
we are continually looking

for simple and pragmatic
solutions to the challenges
we face.
I share the same concerns many of our citizens
have regarding our city assets — parks, roads, public
safety, jobs, sustainable
growth and education.
I will strive to protect
our city assets, and I will
continue to adhere to the
five-year street plan that
the city has adopted. It is
critical that we continue
to address and fund future
street projects on a consistent basis.
I pledge to study issues
diligently, listen to our
residents, lead responsibly,
advocate for transparency
and open communication
to move Columbus forward. As your Alderperson
I will follow up and respond
to all issues. I want you to
know that every voice in
our city matters, and every
citizen should feel empowered to participate in our
local government. I will be
a tireless advocate in City
Hall by asking the tough
questions, analyzing information, data and making informed decisions on
your behalf. In short, I will
work for you, the taxpayer.
Again, I have truly enjoyed speaking with residents as I knock on doors
and will continue to do so.
I understand people have
busy schedules and if we
have not yet met, I invite
you to please contact me
at your convenience if you
have any questions or concerns to share with me.
Campaign websites:
www.facebook.com/
TraxlerForColumbus or
http://traxlerforcolumbus.
tumblr.com/

Retirement may be
far off, but the April 18
deadline for IRA
contributions isn’t.
To learn more about the
advantages of an Edward Jones
IRA, call or visit today.

Matthew Faust, AAMS®
Financial Advisor

137 W James Street
Columbus, WI 53925
920-623-4142

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(920) 623-5700
www.richardsinsurance.com

Easter Week

Pick an Egg

and receive a surprise with your visit

EASTER IS MARCH 27 TH
Toys • Activity Pads • Puzzles

Stuffed Animals
and Much More!

Sharrow’S downtown
Cards & Gifts
100 S. Ludington, Columbus • 920-623-2701
Hours: Mon-Fri; 8am - 5pm • Sat; 8am - 3pm

4 | Saturday, March 26, 2016

Get ads in now
for July 4th Book

‌The Columbus July 4th
Organization is busy collecting advertisements for
the annual July 4th Book
which promotes activities in
town over the holiday. The
ad deadline to be in the book
is Friday, April 1.
If you have received the
ad book information, please
submit your ad information
and payment by April 1.
If you have not been contacted and would like to be
in the book, please contact
Roger Venden at 920-3827823.

Columbus Journal

Headlamps
needed in low
visibility

Church to serve
family breakfast

Legion Auxiliary
provides supplies
to schools midyear
‌The American Legion Auxiliary of Columbus recently
provided local schools with
school supplies midyear as a
community service project.
Receiving supplies were Columbus Middle School and St.
Jerome Catholic School.
Some other projects of the
American Legion Auxiliary
include: Badger Girls State,
USO, Americanism Essay contest, treats for Columbus Club
SUBMITTED‌
House, donations to Camp American Legion Auxiliary President Jean Sennhenn,
American Legion and Home- left, presents school supplies to Columbus Middle
School Assistant Principal Cori Denk.
less Womens Veterans.

SNO-BLAZERS SUPPORT SALVATION ARMY

St. Joseph’s Catholic

Church, 1935 Highway V,
East Bristol, will hold its annual family breakfast from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on
Sunday, April 3, in the parish dining room.
The menu includes
scrambled eggs, French
toast, sausage, applesauce,
sweet rolls, coffee, milk or
orange juice. The price is $7
for adults and $3 for children ages 4-11. Kids under
4 can eat for free. This is a
matching funds event by
the Catholic Order of Foresters.

‌The Columbus Police Department reminds drivers
that the Wisconsin state
law regarding when cars
must have their headlamps
on has been amended. The
old law required headlamps
to be on just during hours of
darkness. The new law also
mandates their use during a
period of limited visibility.
Columbus Police officers
will be issuing warnings in
lieu of citations for the first
six months of this amended
law.

MAILBAG
Library Friends
appreciate support

LISA CESTKOWSKI, COLUMBUS JOURNAL

The Columbus Fall River Sno-Blazers snowmobile club raised $2,000 at its white elephant
sale in January and donated the funds to the Columbia County Salvation Army. From left
are Claudette Bacon, Salvation Army Kettle coordinator; Edie Illinski, Salvation Army board
member; Cindy Humphrey, Sno-Blazers secretary; Harley Woodward, Sno-Blazers treasurer;
David Weisman, Sno-Blazers president; and John Brozek, Sno-Blazers member and Columbia
County director for the Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs.

They are not only a financial success but
a very enjoyable way of getting the community involved in the city’s future. Supporting the Friends of the Columbus Public
Library helps fund not only today’s needs
‌The Friends of the Columbus Public Library started out their year in style! January but tomorrow’s too!
Again, thank you all for attending, and
30th they had a half-price book sale at the
our next project is the bi-annual book sale.
Columbus Library. It was well attended
In conjunction with the city’s celebration
giving readers a break from the winter’s
of Arbor Day, the Friends will once again
dreary weather. St. Patrick’s Day was celhave a huge book sale downstairs at the
ebrated early by the Friends and the South
Columbus Willing Workers 4-H Club with Fireman’s Park Pavilion. This year we are
trying something new with the sale starting
a dine out night at Culver’s.
on Friday night and continuing Saturday.
The Friends would like to thank everyMore information will be coming soon!
one who attended these events. The 4-H
Watch for it!
members are so energetic and full of life it
Linda Parpart,
makes you smile just to see them! EveryPresident
one pitches in to help make these events as
Friends of the Columbus Public Library
much fun as possible.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
‌The Columbus Journal welcomes and encourages letters to the editor on subjects of interest
to our readers. The use of any material is at the discretion of the editor. All letters must bear
the signature of the letter writer and letters will not be published unsigned. Letters should
not exceed 500 words. Email letters to the editor at: cj-news@capitalnewspapers.com.

Astico Park storm damage cost $46K Classes will teach participants how to make
TERRI PEDERSON
Capital Newspapers‌

J‌
UNEAU | The Dodge
County Board of Supervisors
received $46,000 in insurance recovery funds to cover
damage at Astico County
Park caused by a straightline windstorm that swept
through the area last summer.
At their meeting March
15, board members agreed to
transfer the funds to help pay
for repairs, clean up and lost
revenue that resulted from the
storm. The July 13 windstorm

also caused a lot of damage in
Columbus.
“The direct cost to the city
of Columbus was just over
$337,000,” Columbus City
Administrator Patrick Vander
Sanden said.
“What we don’t know was
how much it cost the community when you add what
private property owners had
to pay to clean up their own
issues,” Vander Sanden said.
“The storm did not reach the
damage levels to warrant a
FEMA designation for a di-

saster area – so we didn’t ask
people to submit their costs.
If it were a FEMA declaration,
we would have done that.”
Astico Park was closed
from mid-July until Labor
Day weekend due to the damage to facilities and the large
number of downed trees.
The 100-acre park, which
consists of developed and
natural areas, has campsites, and closure meant the
county did not collect camping fees for a large portion of
the season.

stained glass, thaumatropes and puppets

On Saturday, April 2

and Sunday, April 3 Kane
Browskowski will be teaching Stained Glass classes
at The Workshop. This set
of classes is sold out, but
hopefully more will be on the
schedule in the near future.
Thaumatropes and Puppets will be the Exploring
Creativity class for the week,
offered on Thursday, March
31 and Friday, April 1 from

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Columbus
920-623-9905

Stop & see the
Wise Guy today!

M-F 6am-6pm & Sat 6am-Noon

Tyler Brozek
ManagEr

eugene o’Brion

Sunday, March 27th, 10am-2pm

5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.
to noon. There will be no
Open Studio on Sunday,
April 3 due to the Stained
Glass class. The cost for
Open Studio is $5.
The Workshop is located
at 128 W. James St. in Columbus. For more information or to register for classes,
visit www.workshopcolumbus.com or call 920-3196956

3:30 to 5 p.m. Participants
will make thaumatropes,
toys that visually combine
two pictures in one image.
Children will also have the
chance to create short puppet shows. The cost is $12
or one punch on a six-class
pass.
Open Studio time for The
Workshop in the week ahead
are Thursday and Friday,
10 a.m. to noon and 3:30 to

wiseguysautorepair.com

Columbus Recreation

is now accepting registrations for

SPRING

fall river, Wisconsin

2016
SOCCER PROGRAM

Adults $16.50 / Children 4-12 $8
Mondays & Thursdays
Featuring Broasted Chicken or
BBQ Pork Ribs & Smelt
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Professional Coaches from
Challenger Sports to teach
the game of soccer!

NEW

SPRING SESSION
Saturdays from April 13th - May 21st
Ages Pre K through 4th grade
For more information contact Amy Jo Meyers at
Columbus Recreation: 920-623-5936

Deadline: Saturday, April 4th

Order BaBy ChiCks!

Easter Sunday

Buffet
March 27th

Broasted Chicken, Swedish Meatballs,
Baked Ham and Shrimp.
Includes a full salad bar, dinner rolls,
real mashed potatoes, Gravy, Stuffing
and Veri-green beans along with a big
variety of homemade desserts and
treats for the kids.
Serving from 11am - 2:30pm
Reservations on the hour.

Adults - $14.50
Children 10
& under - $6.50
5 under - Free
Reservations
are appreciated
Closed Easter
Sunday Night

call us today!

484-3414

AlsoAvailable:
Chicken, Duck &Turkey Feed

Including Chicken Layer & Chicken Starter Feed

20% Starter Crumble Medicated 50# $15 17% Layer Crumbles 50# $13
17% Grower Crumbles 50#............................$13 16% Layer Pellet 50# .........................................$12
18% All Flock Mini Pellets 50# .....................$14 Cracked Corn 50# .................................................. $6
22% Duck/Goose Starter Mini Pellets 50# ....$16 Hen Scratch 50# ..................................................$11
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Serving the area since 1968
107 South Main Street, Fall River (downtown) 920-484-3414

visit us at www.casinosupperclub.com

00
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Saturday, March 26, 2016 | 5

Columbus Journal

ELECTION 2016

STATE SPELLING BEE

Three candidates vie
for two seats on Fall
River School Board
‌In the Fall River School
District, three candidates
are running for the two
School Board seats that
will be on the ballot April
5. Candidates include incumbents Ember Schultz-Roughen and Wendy
Corlett and challenger
Ashley Morton.
School Board members
serve three-year terms.

Ember Schultz‌

About
the candidate: I have
lived in Fall
River most
my life and
attended
school here
kindergarEmber
ten through
Schultzhigh school
Roughen
graduation.
I also have a
son who is currently a 6th
grader at Fall River Middle
School.
Why is she running?
We have faced several
challenges during my time
on the board, not only our
district but statewide.
However, I consider every challenge a learning
experience in which I can
improve both myself as a
board member as well as
help improve our school
district. We have also overcome many challenges and
with that have seen many
great accomplishments. I
am proud of our school and
the path that we are on.
The thing I was surprised
by most when I became a
member of the board three
years ago was the amount
there is to learn in the position. After several years I
finally feel like I have really
gotten a handle on it all. I
think my experience of this
past term will greatly help
me in moving forward. We
are headed in a great direction. We have great administration and staff in place,
our budget is looking better
than it has in recent years,
the morale of the school
continues to increase and
most importantly we are
able to continue to offer
a variety of courses with
aligned curriculum to help
the students succeed in
today’s competitive world.
While all of this is true and
more, there is always more
to strive for. The school is
the foundation of our community.

Wendy Corlett‌

Address: 106 Niehoff
Drive, Fall River
About the candidate:
I have lived in Fall River
for almost 30 years. I have
three children and they
have graduated from Fall
River School.
I have a degree in Business Management and
Human Resource certification. I am an Accounting Specialist with the De
Forest Area School District.

I have been employed in
the school district setting
for over 16 years. My experience with the school
district budgets and processes is a valuable asset in
running for school board. I
continuously attend workshops and webinars to stay
current with the changes in
law and understand how it
affects the finances of the
school district.
I have been active in the
following groups/fundraisers: Parent Support Group,
Booster Club, Booster
Brunch and Pirate Foundation
Why is she running?
I am running for my third
term because I care about
the education and success
of the students and families
in Fall River! I understand
that the cost of education
continues to increase and
the limited funds that we
receive from the state/
federal government cannot support what we need
to provide success for all
students. My goal is to
put your taxpayer dollars
to good use in the classrooms. I will continue to
make good decisions based
on the needs of the district.

Ashley Morton‌

Address:
242 Sleepy
Hollow Rd.,
Fall River
About
the candidate:
My name
is Ashley
Ashley Morton M o r t o n ,
and I graduated with a double major in
elementary education and
special education from the
University Wisconsin-Eau
Claire. I now have my masters in education, and have
been a special education
teacher in Wisconsin for
the past 23 years. I am currently in my 19th year as a
6th grade cross categorical
teacher in the Waunakee
Community School District.
Why is she running? I
have three children in the
Fall River School District.
I want to use my expertise to assist with the development of policies and
strategies that ensure our
students receive the best
possible education that enables them to be successful
in pursuing their dreams.
I will work to make sure
our staff receives the leadership, training and necessary supports in this
time of limited resources
that will allow them to set
high expectations for our
students and provide students the skills and strategies needed to meet or
exceed those expectations.
Accomplishing this will
mean our district remains
strong and continues to be
an attractive community to
young families.

St. Jerome accepting
2016-17 enrollments
‌St. Jerome School is now
enrolling for the 2016-17
school year. Financial aid and
scholarships are available.
St. Jerome School admits
students of any race, color,
national and ethnic origin
to all the rights, privileges,
programs and activities
generally made available
to students at the school.
It does not discriminate on

the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in
administration of its educational policies, admission
policies, scholarship and
financial aid programs, and
athletic and other school
administered programs.
For more information call
the school office 623-5780,
or go to www.SJcolumbus.
org/school.

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AMBER ARNOLD, CAPITAL NEWSPAPERS‌

Abigail Adams, a seventh grader at Columbus Middle School, spells a word during the Badger State Spelling Bee at
Madison Area Technical College’s Mitby Theater in Madison March 18. The bee, which lasted about four hours, was
eventually won by Veronica Goveas, a seventh-grader from North Middle School in Menomonee Falls. The runner-up was
Nathan Jarrett, an eighth-grader from Lincoln Middle School.

Be ready for disaster, emergency
‌For most of us, when crisis hits, we look to those in
healthcare, police and fire,
emergency medical services
and our local utilities to
handle the problem. But in
the event of a disaster, being
dependent on others may not
be the first line of defense in
keeping ourselves and our
loved ones safe.
Karen Sell, RN, has served
as the Emergency Preparedness chairperson at Columbus Community Hospital
for the past 20 years. Sell
urges community members
to take the proper steps to
prepare themselves for loss
of water, power, heat, shelter
and communication, when
disasters happen.
“In a disaster, 911 will prioritize calls,” said Sell. “There
may be trees down, roads
blocked, and it could be days
before anyone can move or
get to you. Those services
we take for granted every day
may not be accessible.”
Sell serves as the secretary
for the Columbus/Fall River
Preparedness Group and is
a member of the Region 5
Healthcare Coalition, which
includes
representatives
from healthcare, police, fire,
EMS, emergency managers and public health. “We
share ideas and develop an
understanding of what each
department or agency does in
a disaster situation. Everyone
then knows what their place

is in an emergency,” explained
Sell.
“Developing a disaster plan
for your family is not much
different,” said Sell. “You are
identifying the resources you
need and responsibilities you
will have in a disaster.”
Sell encourages community members and businesses
to visit Do1Thing.com. Do 1
Thing is a non-profit organization that wants to help
build stronger communities.
The website offers a 12-step
program, with one step to
complete each month, in an
effort to prepare individuals,
businesses and communities
for all hazards and to become
disaster resilient.
“If you do these things to
prepare, when you have to
respond, you are going to
know what you need to do,”
said Sell. “And it’s manageable. Even if you aren’t able
to complete all 12 items, if you
can do just six of the 12, you
are off to a good start.”
For the month of March,
Do1Thing.com offers this
step: sheltering.

Identify the best
storm shelter‌
Choosing the best place in
your home or workplace to
shelter from a tornado isn’t
always easy. Many newer
buildings don’t have a really
good shelter area. Use these
rules of thumb to find the

best tornado shelter possible:
„„ Stay away from windows and skylights.
„„ Shelter “down and in.”
Put as many walls between
yourself and the outside as
you can (think of the ceiling
as a wall).
„„ Avoid rooms with large
ceiling expanses.
„„ Find an area large
enough for everyone to stay
comfortably for at least 45
minutes.

vision or radio to find out
if your area is affected and
what steps to take. Never
call 911 to get information
about an emergency. Only
call 911 if you are injured or
need assistance.
If you are told to shelter
in place you should close all
doors and windows and shut
off fans and air conditioners.
Take your family to a room
with as few doors and windows as possible.

Learn how to safely
shelter in place‌

Make a go bag‌

In an emergency like a
chemical spill, you may be
told to “shelter in place.”
This means to make the place
where you are a safe place to
stay until the danger has
passed. Shelter in place orders are given when it would
be dangerous for you to go
outside.
Warning sirens may be
used to warn people that it is
not safe to be outside. Emergency responders may go
door to door in the affected
area. They may also use
loudspeakers from police or
fire vehicles to give instructions. Information will also
be given over television and
radio using the Emergency
Alert System.
The first thing to do when
a chemical spill or similar
event occurs is to get information. Turn on the tele-

Emergency shelters will
be opened when people are
displaced from their homes.
In most areas emergency
shelters are operated by the
American Red Cross.
Red Cross will provide: a
cot to sleep on, meals and
bottled water, a nurse for
basic medical care and information about the disaster
from public officials.
You may need to bring:
„„ Pillow and blanket
„„ Your own medication
and medical supplies (or a
list of what you are taking,
dosage, and doctors’ names)
„„ Identification
„„ Change of clothes
„„ Cards or magazines
„„ Comfort items
Weapons, alcohol and pets
(except for service animals)
are not allowed at shelters.
For questions, please visit
Do1Thing.com, or contact
Sell at ksell@cch-inc.com.

6 | Saturday, March 26, 2016

Columbus Journal

Tattoo

Bike

Continued from Page 1

Continued from Page 1

All of Halverson’s work
is custom designed. When
clients come in with a picture of another tattoo or a
photo off the internet, he
uses it as inspiration but
makes his own drawing,
in his style. “I don’t want
to be ripping anybody else
off,” he said.
“Sometimes I draw.
Sometimes I work on the
computer on Photoshop,”
Halverson said. When he
wants to show a client a
design concept, it’s easier
to mock it up in Photoshop.
“I can take a rose and
PHOTOS BY LISA CESTKOWSKI, COLUMBUS JOURNAL‌
bump up the contrast, or Jerad Halverson moved into his new space at 120 E. James St. in January. He designed
darken or lighten it, or add his business’s logo and has a new sign for the front of the building that he’s waiting for
a background to it,” he said. approval to hang.

“We have been very blessed
to get a lot of support from
people in our community,”
said Beth, who teaches sixth
grade language arts at Columbus Middle School.
She’s hoping that that support will continue with people
going online to vote for Maddox in the Great Bike Giveaway, which crowdsources
funding for adaptive bikes
and then gives them to children with special needs.
Maddox is in kindergarten at Columbus Elementary School, where he has
a full-time assistant who
works with him throughout
the day.
Despite his special needs,
he’s able to communicate
with his family and caregivers,
by vocalizing and, when he’s
asked a question — like “Do
you want to go in your swing
now?” — by tapping his head
on the questioner’s hand in
response.
He’s also learning how to
communicate using a button
that mounts to his wheelchair
and hooks up to an iPad. It will
be a long process until he’s
really able to use that system,
Beth said, but she’s excited
about the technology that
exists today to help kids like
Maddox express themselves.

His clientele‌

Halverson’s typical client
is a woman between 18 and
about 40 or 45 years old.
“My style attracts more
women than men,” Halverson said. “They like the
bright, bold colors that I
work with. And girls love
roses.”
The oldest client he’s
ever worked on was a
79-year-old woman from
Las Vegas who wanted to
get a big magnolia tattooed
on her back shoulder.
“She was really cool,”
Halverson said. “I tattooed her daughter and
her granddaughter too.
They came in together and
all wanted to get tattoos to
celebrate her birthday.”
Probably his most memorable client, though, is the
one who he worked on at a
convention in Chicago last
weekend — who fainted in
the middle of the process.
What does a tattoo
artist do when his client
passes out? “I just got him
a candy bar and a soda and
made sure he was all right,”
Halverson said. “The guy’s
blood sugar had dropped.”
The client was OK afterward, but Halverson decided it was best to call the
session done, even thought
the tattoo wasn’t. Halverson said he’ll schedule an-

Jerad Halverson shows two drawings of a tattoo he
designed for a client, one the outline and the other the
completed version.

Shelby Schoenherr’s tattoo
is a memorial to her sister
Holly, who died in 2003 of
bacterial meningitis.

Jerad Halverson photographs his work to show clients.
Here, a picture in a book he’s made shows how he can cover
old tattoos with new ones.
other session with the guy ing in his shop, Halverson
soon to finish.
travels to tattoo conventions, where artists rent
10-foot-by-10-foot
Spreading the word‌ a
In addition to work- space, where they have just

She said her son can be
funny, and she knows there’s
a lot going on inside his mind,
even if he can’t always communicate it. “He has a very
good sense of when to laugh,”
Beth said. “You can tell that he
understands a lot.”
Maddox also has a soft spot
for his baby sister Eden, who
is 6 months old. When he
hears her making noise, he
looks to see where she is and
to see if she’s OK.
“It’s actually pretty amazing to see their interactions,”
Beth said. “He was in the
hospital for five days (with
pancreatitis), and when he
got home, they laid on the
floor and just looked at each
and were jabbering back and
forth.”
Beth said Maddox has been
a trooper dealing with all of
his health issues, and she and
Andy look forward to the day
that they can take him out
for a bike ride. While they’d
love to buy a bike for him on
their own, the adaptive model
that Maddox needs retails for
$5,500, which makes it cost
prohibitive. Winning one in
the contest would be a godsend.
“We think that being able
to take bike rides, that that’s
something we could do as a
family, because otherwise
there are a lot of family activities that we have to split up
for,” Beth said.
Beth and
Andy
Klossner of
Columbus,
with their
children
Maddox and
Eden. The
Klossners
hope to get
a special
duet
wheelchair
bike for
Maddox,
who has
cerebral
palsy and
LennoxGastaut
Syndrome,
a form of
epilepsy.

enough room to do their
work and display their art.
“You basically run your
shop out of a booth for
the weekend,” Halverson
said. “You can schedule appointments or get
walk-ups. It’s a really good
way to get your name out
there.”
It’s also a great way for
artists to meet each other,
share ideas and sell drawings or paintings they’ve
made. At the Chicago convention, Halverson bought
a lot of his fellow artists’
work to hang on the walls
of his new shop.
“We’re all in it for the
art,” Halverson said.

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Saturday, March 26, 2016 | 7

Columbus Journal

150 Commerce Drive
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608-237-0500

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8

| SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 2016

COLUMBUS JOURNAL

AMUSING MUSINGS
BY THE LADY REV

Springing
forth with
new life

S

pring is sprung and new life is springing forth all around us. First of all,
those dead-looking flower bulbs that
we planted last fall are now springing forth
from the earth as green shoots. We know
that those shoots will produce beautiful flowers in
the days ahead. The lily is
one of those flowers coming
forth from a bulb, and it is
a symbol of Easter, for it
demonstrates new life for us.
The white lily represents the
CAROL
HERMANN purity of Jesus.
Those branches and twigs
on the trees that have been
dormant all winter will soon be springing
forth with green leaves. We wonder how life
can be contained in a twig that looks completely dead and has gone through the cold
and snow of winter. And yet we know that
those leaves will soon appear. Those trees
will be beautifully dressed with green leaves.
The birds are singing and will be nesting.
The eggs they lay will soon crack open with
new life. No wonder that eggs are symbols
of Easter.
It is the butterfly that is a perfect symbol
for Easter. The caterpillar represents the
life of Jesus while on this earth. The cocoon
represents his death and time in the tomb.
The beautiful butterfly that springs out of
that cocoon represents the resurrection of
Jesus. It also represents new life for all of us.
Jesus lives! Alleluia!
Carol Hermann has served the Columbus Presbyterian Church since September of 2002. She
was ordained in 1987 and has been serving as
a minister since then. She has five children,
nine grandchildren and two great-grandsons.

MEMORY LANE
1966

1976

Fred Stare, 88, died at St. Mary’s Hospital, after a long illness. Stare was president of the Columbus Foods Corporation
and president of the Farmers & Merchants
Union Bank. Stare also was a charter member of Rotary, served as District Governor,
and served on the Columbus School Board.
Mr. Stare was an author of three books,
and had a lifelong interest in history. Stare
authored the series of articles called the
Story of Columbus that appeared in the
Columbus Journal-Republican newspaper
over a period of 12 years.
Schultz Brothers completed an extensive
remolding of both the outside and inside of
the downtown variety store. A wall was removed to make 5,600 feet of store space on
one level. Schultz Brothers has 64 stores in
the Midwest.

Plans are underway to build a new $3.7
million hospital which will be leased back
to the hospital board.
Columbus Chief of Police Al Walters was
honored by his department for his many
years of service to the Columbus Community. Walters will be retiring on April 1.

1986

headquartered in Columbus, serves 2,459
members and has 764 miles of electric line.

1996

A survey assessing park facilities by
the Columbus Parks and Recreation may
assist the Columbus Lions Club and the
city in obtaining a Department of Natural
Resources grant to install bathroom and
storage facilities in Meister Park.
Columbus Water & Light customers will
see a substantial drop in electric rates in
1996. A typical residential customer will
pay 6 percent less for power compared to
rates charged by Wisconsin Power & Light
Company.

Four Columbus High School art students submitted art work to the Wisconsin Art Education State Capitol Show. The
students included Vic DelaCruz, Jennifer
Vale, Chris McClain and Missy Loehr.
The Columbus Rural Electric Cooperative
held its annual meeting at Columbus High
School. 1986 marked the 50th annual meet- See us on our Facebook page: Columbus
ing since the founding of the cooperative. Area Historical Society. Email us at:
The Columbus Rural Electric Cooperative, columbusareahistory@gmail.com.

COLUMBUS AREA SENIOR CENTER
Monday

Thursday

10:15 a.m. — Join us for group exercise every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Tuesday

3 to 4 p.m. — Chair yoga with Meredith Harmon. The cost is $5 per class.

Wednesday

Fourth: Roger Weiner

12:15 p.m. — Penny Poker. We provide the
space. You provide the pennies and enjoyment.

Low: Harvey Pribnow

12:45 p.m. — Sheepshead. $2 to play and
cash prizes awarded to first through fourth
highest scores and a candy bar for the low
score.

First: Margaret Ringelstetter

9 a.m. — Intro to Computers. Volunteer Mike
Friday
Hanousek teaches you how to browse the in10:15 a.m. — Fun group exercise sponsored
ternet, use email and other computer basics.
by Columbus Community Hospital and led
Space is limited, so registration is required.
by Kari.
623-5918.
12:45 p.m. — Euchre. $2 to play and cash
10:15 a.m. — Exercise. Improve strength,
prizes awarded to first through fourth highbalance, flexibility and endurance in a fun
est scores and a candy bar for the low score
group environment led by volunteer Wilma
Lenz.
Saturday
8 a.m. — Alignment yoga with Meredith Har11 a.m. — Tea
mon. The cost is $5 per class.
12:30 p.m. — Popcorn and a Movie: “The Odd
Couple.” Two friends try sharing an apartCard winners
ment, but their ideas of housekeeping and
Sheepshead — March 17
lifestyles are as different as night and day.
First: Loren Soter
Starring Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau.
Rated G.
Second: Don McKay
Third: Don Derr

1 p.m. — Knit/Crochet Club

Euchre — March 18
Second: Don Kehl
Third: Sharon Kohn
Fourth: Denny Niesen
Low: Shirley Banetzke

Senior menus

Monday: Pork loin, mashed potatoes, tossed
salad, baked apples, sliced bread
Tuesday: Meatloaf, baked potato, mixed
vegetables, fruited gelatin, dinner roll
Wednesday: Baked chicken, twice baked
style potato, copper penny salad, ice cream
cup, sliced bread
Thursday: BBQ meatballs, au gratin potatoes, wax beans, cantaloupe slice, dinner roll
Friday: Swiss steak, mashed potatoes, corn,
carrot cake with cream cheese frosting,
sliced bread

CHURCH SERVICES
CATHOLIC

The Rev. Robert Moberg

Church office: 920-623-3625

nursery.

Tri-Parish Catholic

The Rev. Lisa Nelson

www.cbusumc.com

St. Columbkille, Elba; Holy
Family, Reeseville; St. John
the Baptist, Clyman

Sunday service: 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m.

Columbus Community

Wednesday: 6:30 worship
and healing service.

The Rev. Mike Erwin

Education and Fellowship:
9:20 a.m. to 10:20 a.m.

753 Waterloo st., Columbus

(920) 927-3102

Church office: 623-3610

Masses: Tuesday, 8 a.m. at
St. John the Baptist Church

www.faithcolumbuswi.org

Saturday, 5 p.m. at St. John
the Baptist
Sunday, 8 a.m. at Holy Family Church; 10 a.m. at St.
Columbkille

The Rev. Chris Baker
CLEO FREELANCE

The Rev. Teresa Baker

St. Stephen’s Ev. Lutheran

Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. at Holy
221 N. Main St., Fall River
Family Church
The Rev. James Bolda
Thursday, 7 p.m. at St.
Sunday Worship: 9:45 a.m.
Columbkille Church
First Friday, 8 a.m. at Holy
Family Church

Church of the Nazarene

Thursday Worship: 7:30 p.m.

he battle is over; the
victory’s won.

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Church Office 920-623-5235
www.ccc4u.org

Victory?
Death is defeated. Our sin, our missing the mark, is dealt
with.

Christ Congregational
322 Lincoln Ave., Rio

Church office: 920-484-3822

God has raised Jesus from the dead.

www.ststephensfallriver.org

The Rev. David Lussie

Jesus has gone to prepare a place for you with Him.

St. John’s Ev. Lutheran

Celebrate the victory this week in church.

Sunday worship: 10 a.m. with
children’s church.

N4141 Thompson St.,
Doylestown

www.triparishwi.com

The Rev. James Bolda

St. Patrick’s Church

Sunday Worship: 8:15 a.m.

N4077 Bruce St., Doylestown

Church office: 920-484-3822

Church office: 920-992-5112
Rio Assembly of God
N3974 Williams Road, Rio
1 Corinthians 15:19-26
Acts 10:34-43

John 20:1-18

Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24

Revised Common Lectionary © 1992 by the Consultation on Common Texts for

The Rev. Steve Kortendick

Trinity Lutheran

Sunday Mass: 9 a.m.

N2296 Highway I, Reeseville

St. Joseph’s Catholic

The Rev. Matthew Martin

514 Lincoln Ave., Rio

Sunday worship: 10 a.m.

The Rev. David Byers-Dent

The Rev. Raymond Dischler

Sunday school: 8:45 a.m.

920-484-3924

(920) 992-3343

Wednesday worship: 7 p.m.

Sunday Mass: 10:30 a.m.

Communion on the first and
third Sundays of the month

Sunday Worship & Sunday
School: 8:30 a.m.

The Rev. Shaun Hardie
920-992-5664

Church office: 608-837-3308
www.gsechurch.com
United Church of Christ
215 Lincoln Ave., Reeseville
The Rev. Charles Brizuis
Sunday school at 8:45 a.m.
Worship service at 10 a.m.
Church office: 920-927-5530
INDEPENDENT
Columbus Assembly of God
342 N. Lewis St., Columbus
The Rev. Matt Brown
Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.
Children’s church available.
Wednesday Kids Club and
Youth Group from 6:30 to
7:45 p.m.
Church office: 920-623-2977
New Testament Baptist

olivetcolumbusucc.org

Communion first Sunday.

Sunday 7 a.m. and 11 a.m.

Sunday School and adult education at 8:45 a.m.

N2232 DuBorg Road, ColumSunday Worship: 10 a.m. with
bus
Children‘s Church.
The Rev. Todd Werner
Sunday school: 8:45 a.m.
Worship service 10:30 a.m. and
Wednesday Family Night:
7 p.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
www.ntbc-columbus.org
www.rioassembly.com
Randolph Evangelical Free
St. Marks Episcopal
702 N. High St., Randolph
700 E. Mill St., Beaver Dam
Sunday Worship services
Pastor Mary Mail
9:30 a.m.
Sunday worship and EuchaChurch office: 920-326-3821
rist 9 a.m.
www.randolphefc.org
Church office: 920-885-3536
Faith Bible Church
www.stmark-beaverdam.org
107 E. Rio St., Rio
Good Shepherd Episcopal
The Rev. Mike Gormican
3416 Swansee Ridge, Sun
Prairie
Sunday Service at 9 a.m.

First Presbyterian

Child care is available.

The Rev. Mike Tess

Thursday 8:20 a.m.

Church office: 608-846-4178

321 W. Mill St., Columbus

Friday 8:20 a.m.

www.springprairie.org

The Rev. Carol Hermann

Sunday 8 a.m. traditional
service; 10 a.m. family service with Sunday School and

Confession: Saturday after
4:30 p.m. mass, or by appt.

Bonnet Prairie Lutheran

Service is on Channel 98 (or
980 digital) at 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

St. Joseph’s Catholic
1935 County V, Sun Prairie
The Rev. Robert Butz
Masses: Sunday 10:45 a.m.
St. Jerome Catholic
1550 Farnham St., Columbus
The Rev. Steve Kortendick
Masses: Saturday 4:30 p.m.

LUTHERAN
Redeemer Lutheran
610 Lincoln Ave., Rio
The Rev. Ann Walsvik
Worship service: 9 and
11 a.m. Sunday.
Adult Sunday school:
10:15 a.m.
Zion Ev. Lutheran

Fellowship after service.

Spring Prairie Lutheran
Church

Olivet Congregational UCC

N509 County Road C, DeForest

Communion 1st Sunday

The Rev. Sylvia Lee-Thompson
Sunday worship and communion: 10 a.m.

313 W. Prairie St., Columbus
Services: Sunday 9 a.m., fellowship follows

Worship and Sunday School:
10 a.m.
Sunday Communion served
on the first Sunday of every
month.
Church office: 920-623-3350
Columbus United Methodist
222 S. Dickason Blvd., Columbus
The Rev. David Byers-Dent

Sunday School: 10:30 a.m.

Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.

920-623-5140

Sunday School 10:45 a.m.

Sunday School and Adult Bible Study at 10:30 a.m.
Church office: 920-992-3274
www.fbcrio.org

N3694 Old F. Road, Rio
The Rev. Joan Wittrock
920-992-3200
Sunday worship and communion: 9:30 a.m.
www.bonnetprairie.com
PROTESTANT
Wisconsin Academy Seventh Day Adventist

812 Western Ave., Columbus

N2355 Duborg Road, Columbus

The Rev. Robert Wilke

The Rev. Jean-Marcel Clouzet

The Rev. Daniel Sims

Saturday Worship service:
11 a.m.

Sunday worship: 8 a.m. and
10:30 a.m.

Sunday, March 27, 2016
Easter Sunday

Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.

Thursday worship: 6:30 p.m.

Church office: 920-623-4438

www.zioncolumbus.org

www.wiacadchurch.org

Faith Lutheran (ELCA)

Fall River United Methodist

120 Faith Drive, Columbus

138 South St., Fall River

Church Page Sponsors
Keep this directory handy for when you
need to contact these area businesses.
Carol A. Valley, CPA, S.C.
Certified Public Accountant
134 N. Dickason Blvd.
Columbus, Wisconsin • 920-623-4905

Please Call

920-356-6777 or 920-356-6778
to be a part of this directory

Attend The Church of Your Choice
00
1

10 | Saturday, March 26, 2016

Columbus Journal

Legal Notices
DODGE COUNTY HAS PROPERTY FOR SALE.

Go online to www.co.dodge.wi.us, Departments, Treasurer, Tax Foreclosures… for appraised values and bidding criteria. If you have further
questions, contact Patti Hilker, Dodge County Treasurer, at 920-3863783.
PUB. Columbus Journal 3/5/2016, 3/12/2016, 3/19/2016, 3/26/2016,
4/2/2016, 4/7/2016, 4/14/2016, 4/21/2016, 4/28/2016, 5/7/2016
#2407314
WNAXLP

COLUMBUS HILLSIDE
CEMETERY ASSOCIATION
NOTICE

The city of Columbus and the Hillside Cemetery Board
Hereby gives notice for spring cleanup, that all Winter Wreaths
and other decorations be removed for Spring clean-up by April 1, 2016
any left will be removed and disposed of.
PUB. Columbus Journal 3/26/2016, 4/2/2016
#2414119
WNAXLP

OFFICIAL NOTICE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Notice is hereby given by the Town of Elba of Dodge County, Wisconsin,
that it will receive bids for Lawn Mowing Contracts for the Elba Park, Town
Hall and/or Bethel Cemetery until the 9th day of April, 2016, in the office
of Town Hall located at N3799 County T, Columbus, WI. Bids will be read
and reviewed at the monthly board meeting on Monday, April 11, 2016 at
8 pm. Bids can be submitted via email at or by mail at:
Town of Elba
c/o Jennifer Vujnovich, Clerk
N4744 Slade Road
Columbus, WI 53925
PUB. Columbus Journal 3/26/2016
#24130
WNAXLP

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE

Pursuant to 704.90, Wisconsin Landlord and Tenant Code, Columbus Self
Storage LLC, will hold a public auction of property being sold to satisfy
a landlord’s lien at 395 Transit Road, Columbus WI 53925. The auction
will take place at 1:00 p.m. on April 23, 2016. Property will be sold to the
highest bidder. Seller reserves the right to withdraw unit from auction.
Buyers will be responsible for removing ALL contents of purchased storage units. Property being sold includes contents in spaces of the following tenants, with brief description of contents. Units 320 & 340, Charles
Michael Moss; Household goods including furniture and bicycles. Contact
Steve Hajewski at 608 217-7245 at Columbus Storage with questions.
Follow us on facebook: www.facebook.com/columbuswistorage for up to
date auction status.
PUB. Columbus Journal 3/19/2016, 3/26/2016,
#2411993
WNAXLP

CITY OF COLUMBUS
ORDINANCE 718-15
AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL AND RECREATE CERTAIN SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 102 CONCERNING
BUILDING SEWERS

The Common Council of the City of Columbus, Columbia County, Wisconsin do hereby ordain as follows:
1.The definition of “approving authority” as set forth in Section 102-192 is
hereby repealed.
2.The definition of “building drain” as set forth in Section 102-192 is hereby repealed and recreated to read as follows:
Building drain means that part of the lowest horizontal piping of a drainage
system which receives the discharge from soil, waste and other drainage
pipes inside the walls of the building and conveys it to the sewer lateral,
beginning 5 feet (1.5 meters) outside the interface of the building wall.
3.The definition of “sewer lateral” as set forth in Section 102-192 is hereby
repealed and
recreated to read as follows:
Sewer lateral (formerly referred to in this Code of Ordinances as building
sewer) means the extension from the building drain to the public sewer
main or other place of disposal. Once constructed, the portion of the
sewer lateral located within the public right-of-way, including the connection with the actual sewer main, shall be considered an integral part of the
public sewer, and maintenance of this portion of the sewer lateral shall
become the responsibility of the City.
4.Section 102-194 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-194 Cost of Sewer Connection. All costs and expenses
incident to the initial construction, installation and connection of the sewer
lateral with the public sewer main shall be borne by the property owner.
The property owner shall indemnify the City from any loss or damage that
may directly or indirectly be caused by the initial installation of the sewer
lateral.
5.Section 102-195 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-195 Use of Old Sewer Laterals. Old sewer laterals may
be used in connection with new buildings only when the sewer laterals are
found on examination and tests by the City Engineer, or his designee, to
meet all requirements of this article.
6.Section 102-196 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-196 Materials and Methods of Construction. The size,
slope, alignment, materials of construction of sewer laterals and the methods to be used in excavating placing of the pipe jointing, testing and backfilling the trench shall all conform to the requirements of the Wisconsin
Administrative Code, the State Department of Natural Resources regulations, the Building and Plumbing Codes, and other applicable rules and
regulations of the City. In the absence of code provisions or amplification
thereof, the materials and procedures set forth and appropriate specifications of the ASTM and WPCF Manual of Practice No. 9 shall apply.
7.Section 102-197 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-197 Sewer Lateral Grade. Whenever possible the sewer
lateral shall be brought to the building at an elevation below the basement
floor. In all buildings in which any building drain is too low to permit gravity
flow to the public sewer, sanitary sewage carried by such building drain
shall be lifted by an approved means and discharged to the sewer lateral.
8.Section 102-198(a), Stormwater and Groundwater Drains, is repealed in its entirety and
recreated to now read as follows:
(a)No person shall make connection of roof downspouts, exterior foundation drains, areaway drains or other sources of surface runoff or groundwater to a sewer lateral or building drain that is connected directly or indirectly to a public sanitary sewer.
9.Section 102-199 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-199 Conformance to Plumbing Codes. The connection
of the sewer lateral into the public sewer shall conform to the requirements of the Building and Plumbing Code or other applicable rules and
regulations of the City or the procedures set forth in appropriate specifications of the ASTM and the WPCF Manual of Practice No. 9. All such
connections shall be made gas-tight and water-tight. Any deviation from
the prescribed procedures and materials must be approved by the City
Engineer, or his designee, before installation.
10.Section 102-200(a), Inspection of Connection, is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read as follows:
(a)The applicant for the sewer lateral permit shall notify the City Engineer,
or his designee, when the sewer lateral is ready for inspection and connection to the public sewer. The connection shall be made under the
supervision of the City Engineer, or his designee.
11.Section 102-201 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-201 Barricades and Restoration. All excavations for the
sewer lateral installation shall be adequately guarded with barricades and
lights so as to protect the public from hazard. Streets, sidewalks, parkways and other public property disturbed in the course of the work shall
be restored in a manner satisfactory to the City.
12.Section 102-202 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-202 User to Keep in Repair. Except as provided for
in Section 102-205 of this Code, all users shall keep their own building
sewer in good repair and protected from frost, at the user’s own risk and
expense, and shall prevent any unnecessary overburdening of the public
sewer system.
13.Section 102-203 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-203 User Use Only. No user shall allow others or other
services to connect to the public sewer system through the user’s sewer
lateral.
14.Section 102-205 is repealed in its entirety and recreated to now read
as follows:
SECTION 102-205 Maintenance of Services.
(a)The City shall maintain the public sewer within the limits of the City from
the public sewer main, and all areas within the city right of way, including
each user’s sewer lateral connection to the public main The City shall
be responsible for the expense of maintaining this portion of the public
sewer, except when a sewer lateral is damaged as a result of negligence
or carelessness on the part of the private user, in which case the building
sewer shall be repaired by the City at the expense of the private user. All
sewer services from the point of the public right-of-way to and throughout
the premises shall be maintained free from defective conditions by and at
the expense of the private user or owner of the property.
(b)If a private user notices a malfunction of its sewer lateral, the private
user, at the user’s sole expense shall be responsible for taking all steps
necessary to determine the cause of the malfunction. The private user
may contract with the City to determine the cause and location of the
malfunction. If the cause of the malfunction is located in that portion of
the sewer lateral on the private user’s property, the user shall complete
all repairs at its expense. If the source of the problem is located within
that part of the sewer lateral maintained by the City, the user shall notify
the City immediately and the City shall make the repairs to its portion of
the sewer lateral.
(c)If it is determined that the malfunction cannot be remedied without repair work being done to both the private user’s and the City’s portion of
the sewer lateral, the private user hereby consents to the City entering
the private user’s property to make the necessary repairs. The City shall
be responsible for making the necessary repairs, shall return the private
user’s property to the condition it was in prior to the repair being made,
and shall then submit an invoice to the user for the materials and labor
necessary to make the repairs to the private user’s property. The private
user shall pay the invoice within 30 days of receipt, and if the user does
not pay the invoice in a timely manner, the City may collect this invoice
as a special charge.
(d)The City shall be responsible for determining where the right-of-way
line is for each lot. If the City is unable to determine the exact location of
the right-of-way line based upon available records, the City shall retain the
services of a surveyor to survey the exact right-of-way line. The cost of the
survey work necessary to determine the right-of-way line shall be shared
equally by the City and the private user or property owner.
15.Severability. If any portion of this Ordinance or its application on any
person or circumstances is held invalid, the validity of this Ordinance as a
whole or any other provision herein or its application shall not be affected.
16. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect immediately upon its
passage and publication.
Adopted this _18__ day of __August_, 2015.
CITY OF COLUMBUS
By:/s/Kelly Crombie, Mayor
By:/s/Anne Donahue, City Clerk
PUB. Columbus Journal 3/26/2016
# 2413258
WNAXLP

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Columbus fifth graders learn how to be
prepared for disasters and emergencies
‌With severe weather season fast approaching, nearly 110 fifth graders at
Columbus Middle School learned how
to be prepared to respond in the event
of a disaster or emergency.
The students are participating in
the STEP, or Student Tools for Emergency Planning, program for the first
time.
The statewide program teaches fifth
graders how to be prepared for various
emergencies and disasters, including
tornadoes, flooding and storms. The
program also shows students how to
put together an emergency kit and
develop an emergency plan with their
families.
“With little to no warning, disasters
and emergencies can happen to anyone at any time,” said Principal Loren
Glasbrenner. “That’s why we feel it’s
so important to be prepared. We’re
excited to bring the STEP program to
Columbus Middle School and give our
students the tools and knowledge they
need to have confidence in an emergency situation.”
At the event, the fifth graders assembled their STEP emergency bags
with items donated by local businesses. The students also heard from
officials from Wisconsin Emergency
Management, Columbus Emergency
Management and AT&T, as well as

SUBMITTED‌

State Rep. John Jagler talks to fifth graders at Columbus Middle School about
emergency preparedness.
Fire Chief Randy Koehn and state Rep.
John Jagler, about actions they can
take to be prepared in an emergency
or disaster situation.
“The STEP program is a great way to
get young people excited about emergency preparedness and to take that
information home to their families,”
said Jagler.
The 2016 STEP program is supported by a $15,000 AT&T Innova-

tion & Investment Award. Since 2012,
AT&T has provided $58,000 total to
support the STEP program in Wisconsin.
Teachers are provided with all STEP
materials at no cost to the schools, including instructor guides, DVDs and
copies of student handouts. All students participating in the program
also receive an emergency kit to take
home, which includes a flashlight.

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