PrinciplesofLearningandLearningTheory.pdf


Preview of PDF document principlesoflearningandlearningtheory.pdf

Page 1 2 34515

Text preview


 
 
PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY



requiring that the student makes those same responses but now with the addition of 
categorization – that they respond the same way to the same stimuli, regardless of order or 
organization. Rule Learning eventually comes in, the second to last piece of Gagné’s hierarchy. 
The most complex part of Rule Learning is that it requires the student to not only learn 
relationships between situations and higher concepts but to also predict future situations and 
concepts (ie, to understand social rules even if they are in a social situation that is new). 
The final part of Gagné’s Hierarchy is Problem Solving. Gagné considered this the 
highest level of learning. Because it requires entirely independent cognition and no external 
stimuli, the student has to have mastered all previous levels in order to problem solve effectively. 
In Problem Solving, the student must be able to face complicated rules and situations and not 
know the answers – instead, he or she must know ways of getting to the answers (Singley 1989). 
Gagné saw that by working their way up through the levels, students could eventually have 
mastery of the task they were studying. This method also allowed for students to move at a pace 
that worked for their own abilities, as well as letting them stop and start again at any point and 
presenting the entire learning process as a journey rather than a means to an end (Clark 2004). 
> Major Learning Theories: Bloom’s Taxonomy 
This learning theory comes from a 1956 report that came to be known as “Bloom’s 
Taxonomy,” a form of learning through instruction that takes into account the intake of 
information through Cognitive (knowledge­based learning), Affective (emotion­based), and 
Psychomotor (action­based). Much of instructional design that takes guidance from Bloom looks 
specifically at the Cognitive model of Bloom’s Taxonomy, and the six individual components 
that Bloom organizes in a hierarchy (similar to Gagné’s own hierarchy). For Bloom, the