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Kodiak Research Final Poster .pdf


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What’s Washed in?: A Historical Comparison of
Beached Bird Data in the Gulf of Alaska
Drew Lyons, Thomas Pham, Jessica Latimer, Liz Mack, Jane Dolliver, and Julia Parrish
Methods

Kodiak Island Survey Sites

North Pacific and Alaska

Objectives

• Used beached bird data collected in the Gulf of Alaska by USFWS personnel (19751979 & 1981-1984) and monthly beached bird surveys conducted by trained
volunteers in the COASST program (2005-2012).
• Frequency of USFWS surveys varied by site. Surveys were unidirectional line
transects. Carcasses found were identified, and sex, age, and condition were
recorded when possible.
• COASST Surveyors walked a zig-zag pattern, scanning the beach from the surf line to
vegetation line. For wide beaches (>6m), surveyors searched for birds on both passes
(to turnaround, and back) of the beach. Birds were measured, tagged, identified,
photographed and identification was verified by an expert a posteriori.
• Surveys from both data sets included: location (lat/long), beach length (range of
0.16-2.1 km, average length of 0.95 km), number of birds found, lowest possible taxa
for each carcass, number of surveyors, and presence of oil on beach and on birds.
• Two data points were removed due to a “small beach” effect which produced a
disproportionately high encounter rate. Surveys including wrecks (>20 birds of the
same species) were also removed from the data.
• To measure diversity, Shannon Wiener Indices were calculated for historic and
COASST data. Terrestrial bird species were removed for this analysis.
• To more precisely compare historic and current data, an area on the east side of
Kodiak Island with high local geographic overlap (USFWS sites - 76 surveys and 6
sites; COASST sites - 84 surveys and 13 sites) was used (see map).
• Mean monthly encounter rates (carcasses/km) over all years and sites were
calculated for the COASST and historic data for the Kodiak Island spatially restricted
dataset using SAS (Statistical Analysis System). Survey effort over years, and months,
was graphically examined to explore causality.

• Electronically preserve historic data on resident and migrant
marine birds collected by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in
the Gulf of Alaska in the 1970s and 1980s.

Results and Conclusions

COASST

16
60
14
50
Number of Surveys

Seabird distribution and abundance can be used as indicators
of the health of the coastal ecosystem, in that higher numbers
of birds, and bird species, indicate diverse, healthy systems. In
this study, we compared historic surveys conducted by U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service (USFWS) personnel and current beached
bird data collected through the Coastal Observation and
Seabird Survey Team (COASST) to determine if patterns of
seabird abundance and diversity, as proxied by beached bird
encounters, have changed in Kodiak Island and more broadly
along the Alaskan coastline.

Historic

18

70

Number of surveys

Introduction

20

80

40
30

12
10
8
6

20
4
10

2

0

0
1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1984

2010

2011

2012

Jan

Feb

Mar

Year

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Month

Figure 3. Yearly survey frequency on Kodiak Island from
historic USFWS (1975-1984) and COASST (2010-2012)
survey datasets.

Figure 4. Monthly survey frequency on Kodiak Island from
historic USFWS (1975-1984) and COASST (2010-2012) survey
datasets.

To determine whether the shift in diversity pattern in the Kodiak data
was present across the entire dataset, we also calculated Shannon
Wiener Indices. Species diversity in the historic Gulf of Alaska data set
(Shannon Wiener Index=2.3297) was not significantly different from
the COASST data set (Shannon Wiener Index 1.9401; t = 0.26, df=78,
p=0.80). Instead, the abundance and order of the top 3 species was
the same, and the less prevalent species fluctuated among several
groups (Figure 5).
300

Historic

COASST

250

200

150

100

Although the top 3 species remained constant, in the spatially comparable
Kodiak Island sites, species diversity (Figure 1) was higher in the historic data
set (1975-1984, Shannon Wiener Index =2.54) as compared to the COASST
data set (2010-2012, Shannon Wiener Index=0.5367 (t=1.94, df=38, p=0.03).

• Compare historic data with current data collected in the same
locations by the COASST program in order to observe changes
in seabird diversity and abundance.

50

0

4

18
16
Historic
14

3.5

12

3
Encounter Rate (Birds/km)

10

2.5

8
Number Found

Figure 5. The species distribution of beached birds found in the Gulf of Alaska across both historic USFWS surveys (1975-1984) and
COASST surveys (2005-2012). All species where 1 or less birds were found, as well as terrestrial species were removed. There were
three occasions that constituted wrecks, one in historic and two in the COASST data, that were removed.

COASST

6
4

COASST
Historic

2

Future Directions

1.5

2
0

1

0.5

Species

0
Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Survey Month

The Glaucous -winged Gull (left) and Common Murre (right) are two frequently found
seabirds common to both the historic USFWS data and the COASST data. Photo Credit:
Troy Guy.

Acknowledgements:
Special thanks to Kent Wohl and USFWS for providing the historic Gulf of Alaska
beached bird surveys, COASST for access to its extensive database, the COASST
volunteers of the Gulf of Alaska region for collecting the data used in the analysis
and comparison to historic data, and COASST student interns Monisha Ray and
Summer Wang for helping with data entry.

Figure 1. The species distribution of beached birds found on
Kodiak Island across both the historic USFWS data (19751984, 19 birds) and the COASST data (2010-2012, 63 birds).
All terrestrial species found were removed

Figure 2. Average (+/- standard error) encounter rate (birds/km) by
month on Kodiak Island from historic USFWS (1975-1984) and
COASST (2010-2012) surveys.

Beached bird encounter rate (Figure 2) in the Historic data set was high over
the fall and winter, dropping to nearly zero in spring and summer. Current
encounter rate patterns are very different; displaying a flatline except for
small peaks in April and September. These differences were not a result of
effort differences across months or year (Figures 3 and 4); and suggest a loss
of diversity and a concomitant change in presence, especially in winter.

• Examine other regions of overlap between USFWS and COASST in
the dataset
• Inspect potential factors for changes in encounter rate and species
composition on seabirds on Kodiak Island including:
o The Exxon Valdez oil spill
o Changes in fisheries practices and production during this time
range, including bycatch
o Climate change and its subsequent effect on migration
patterns and alterations of habitats
o Saxitoxin levels in bivalves and occurrences of paralytic
shellfish poisoning
o Open vs. closed landfills


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