PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



ThrinaxodonFinal .pdf


Original filename: ThrinaxodonFinal.pdf

This PDF 1.5 document has been generated by / Skia/PDF m54, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 02/09/2016 at 04:08, from IP address 50.170.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 229 times.
File size: 526 KB (13 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


Drew Lyons 
Micah Mansfield 
Animal Design Project #1 
 
Thrinaxodon 
 
Thrinaxodon, a synapsid cynodont, was a small, mammal­like reptile that lived 
253 million years ago in the late Permian. It disappeared during the extinction event 245 
million years ago at the end of the ​Olenekian portion of the Triassic​ period. The 
discovery of Thrinaxodon was important as a transitional fossil in the evolution of 
mammals. 

 
Cladogram showing the relationship of Thrinaxodon to mammals (Botha and 
Chinsamy, 2005). 
 
Fossils of Thrinaxodon were found in modern day South Africa and Antarctica, 
providing strong evidence that Thrinaxodon once roamed an area that combined these 
land masses because the physiology of Thrinaxodon suggests it could neither swim 
long distances nor fly.  Current day separation of fossils by a vast ocean helped 
scientists understand plate tectonics and the existence of a supercontinent called 
Pangea. 

 
Pangea: Image taken ​http://www.metafysica.nl/wings/wings_3a.html​.  The inserted 
black box shows the location where Thrinaxodon fossils were found and where it likely 
lived during the Late Permian and Early Triassic periods. 
 
Thrinaxodon was 30 to 50 cm in length, 10 cm tall, had a large, flat head and 
legs somewhat characteristic of fossorial animals that splayed out slightly from the 
torso, creating a 15 cm wide stance.  Indentations in fossils of its skull provide strong 
evidence that Thrinaxodon had whiskers.  Whiskers are a very beneficial adaptation for 
predators at night because it would allow the animal to better sense its surroundings in 
low light conditions, giving it a competitive advantage over its prey and other predators 
that compete for similar resources.  If it had whiskers then there may have been fur as 
well, indicating that it was homeothermic since fur functions to insulate the animal from 
the outside conditions, so the animal’s temperature is being driven more by internal 
processes.  Being one of the earliest mammal­like organisms with fur, it was most likely 
less dense than the fur modern mammals have (prehistoric­wildlife.com, 2011).   
Thrinaxodon had many mammalian­like adaptations that in ways allowed it to 
function in similar ways as modern day mammals, suggesting it was a distant ancestor 

of mammals.  Key morphological innovations allowed for increased metabolic rates and 
its survival through the Permian­Triassic extinction event.  These included features in 
Thrinaxodon’s skeleton such as the addition of lumbar vertebrae on the spine and the 
shortening of thoracic vertebrae, one additional occipital condyle, the presence of a 
masseteric fossa, and a hardened secondary palate.  The segmentation of the spine 
allowed for increased weight bearing and movement in the lower back.  Segmentation, 
in combination with the absence of ribs in the lower abdomen, suggests the presence of 
a diaphragm.  The ribs now form a chest cavity that houses the lungs and provides an 
attachment surface for the diaphragm, which allows for increased respiration efficiency 
and minimum energy expenditure due to breathing (Cowen, 2000).  The addition of an 
occipital condyle functioned to increase articulation with the atlas vertebrae and 
permitted more movement, which allowed it to be more aware of its surroundings and 
potential predators. The masseteric fossa presented a larger surface area for muscle 
attachment on the dentary bone to make chewing and processing food more efficient, 
which in turn leads to a faster metabolism.  One of the most important adaptations, 
especially for carnivores, is the presence of the hardened secondary palate that allowed 
for breathing through the nose while chewing, which is important in order to take down 
struggling prey or chew for a longer period of time while still maintaining the ability to 
breathe (prehistoric­wildlife.com, 2011).  Thrinaxodon also possesses the beginnings of 
a brain case, which is shown by the epipterygoid bone expanding to alisphenoid­like 
proportions, as well as nasal turbinates, which are “convoluted bones in the nasal cavity 
that are covered by olfactory sense organs” (Cynodontia).  The teeth of Thrinaxodon 
display the mammalian traits of thecodontia (teeth present in the socket of the dentary) 
and differentiated teeth.  In its tooth differentiation, the three cusped post canines that 
Thrinaxodon was named after were important so it could thoroughly chew its food and 
decrease the time of digestion.  This also suggests a faster metabolism that was more 
like modern mammals, as well as an important evolutionary step towards the 
tribosphenic molar (Estes, 1961).  Due to this increased metabolism, Thrinaxodon was 
eurythermic, meaning it was able to function in a broad range of temperatures, and was 
essentially homeothermic.

 
Dimensions of Thrinaxodon: Hand drawn based on paper by Estes (1961). 
 
Being able to tolerate a wide range of temperatures was extremely important for 
the survival of Thrinaxodon.  The late Permian and early Triassic periods in which it 
lived had the hottest and most arid conditions the Earth has experienced.  The 
supercontinent Pangea fully formed at the end of the Permian, which led to both higher 
sea levels and warmer inland temperatures (Natural History Museum).  Enormous ash 
plumes from volcanic eruptions and large volumes of CO​2​ released resulted in a 
greenhouse effect that increased global temperatures.  This resulted in large forest 
die­offs because photosynthesis does not function optimally above 35​°​C, and plants 
cannot sustain themselves for long at temperatures above 40​°​C (Sun et al., 2012). 
There were also extensive marine extinctions due to anoxic conditions, and the loss of 

most large terrestrial animals due to lack of food and the inability to tolerate extreme 
temperatures and dryness (Natural History Museum).  The discovery of extreme 
abundances of fossil fungal cells in land sediments at the Permain­Triassic boundary 
suggests fungi were decomposing the remnants of a mass extinction event of 
gymnosperms and coal­generating floras (Visscher H, 1996), leaving the majority of 
plant life that survived to be characterized by “weedy” traits, with almost no forest 
remaining.  This was especially prevalent around the equator, where conditions were 
the harshest and temperatures were the hottest.  This was the Permian­Triassic mass 
extinction event, and Thrinaxodon was able to survive it. 
Thrinaxodon was fossorial and able to thermoregulate by utilizing its burrowing 
capabilities.  Several of its adaptations made it a very effective burrower, such as a flat 
top of the skull that could be used for patting down the roofs of a tunnel as it dug, thus 
making the burrow more structurally sound.  The lumbar vertebrae increased the 
mobility of the lower spine and allowed it to turn around in the tighter spaces found in 
burrows.  Furthermore, it had a body that was proportionally longer than wide, making it 
easier to travel down narrow tunnels.  By burrowing, Thrinaxodon was able to escape 
the hot temperatures during the day, therefore preventing itself from overheating.  It also 
evolved nasal turbinates as an adaptation to extreme arid conditions. Nasal turbinates 
retain moisture well when exhaling as well as moisturizing the dry air when inhaling, 
which leads to less net water loss, as shown by the graph below (Chinsamy­Turan, 
2012).   

 
Figure showing effectiveness of nasal turbinates reducing evaporative loss 
(Chinsamy­Turan, 2012). 
 
A small animal like Thrinaxodon has a large surface area to volume ratio, 
suggesting it had a high metabolic rate per kilogram.  Staying in its burrow during the 
day would avoid direct exposure to solar radiation, which would allow it to remain much 

cooler and minimize its water loss.  Thrinaxodon would hunt for small lizards and 
invertebrates at night rather than during the heat of the day, maximizing its chances of 
surviving the harsher conditions that characterized the Permian­Triassic extinction and 
the early Triassic.  As a small carnivore, it did not depend on large amounts of plants 
that were not available due to the environmental conditions.  Instead, it was able to prey 
on smaller organisms that were more successful during these extreme environmental 
conditions.   
Although the time period had high seasonality, fossil records show that, “all the 
Thrinaxodon limb bones exhibit fibro­lamellar bone to varying degrees, which indicates 
that this animal deposited bone at a relatively rapid rate” (Botha and Chinsamy, 2005). 
This sustained rate of growth suggests that there is no state of torpor or hibernation to 
avoid certain unfavorable seasons.  Fernandez et al. (2013) were able to find a 
fossilized Thrinaxodon that was curled up in a burrow.  Fossilized alongside it was an 
injured amphibian Broomistega, which leads researchers to believe that there was an 
intruder tolerated in its burrow.  The most plausible explanation to this finding was that 
Thrinaxodon was probably in a brief state of aestivation.  Aestivation is a state of 
dormancy characterized by inactivity and a lowered metabolism found in animals that 
live in regions with hot temperatures and arid conditions.  Since there are no lines of 
arrested growth present in Thrinaxodon’s bones, it is thought that aestivation was a 
short but frequent occurrence.  Therefore, we speculated that Thrinaxodon only 
aestivated in the burrow during the day when it would have to compensate for high 
outside temperatures.  By doing this it would be able to decrease its metabolic rate and 
heat gained from the environment.   
In order to find Thrinaxodon’s approximate body mass, we were able to use the 
brain mass
encephalization quotient (EQ= .055(body mass)
3/4 ).  The EQ of a typical mammal is around 1, 
and most reptiles are about 1/10 of the value.  According to Jerison (1973), the EQ of 
Thrinaxodon was that of a typical reptile, EQ equals 0.1.  From a paper by Rowe et al. 
(2011) that analyzed CT scans of early cynodont fossils, including those of 
Thrinaxodon, we determined that the endocranial volume is 1.462 ml.  Assuming the 
brain is mostly water, and that it took up the majority of the endocranial space, then the 
weight of the brain would be about 1.462 g.  Using the equation from Jerison (1973) 
with c equaling body mass and s equaling brain mass in grams, we were able to solve 
3/4
3/4 = 265.82 ,  
using EQ = .1 = 1.462g(s)
.055c3/4 , 1.462 g = .0055 c  ,  c
c =  265.824/3 = 1709.15 g.  Based on the Thrinaxodon skull that was scanned by Rowe 
et al. (2011), its mass would be around 1709 g.   

 
CT scan of Thrinaxodon skull (Rowe et. al., 2011). 
 
 

 
(http://bio.sunyorange.edu/updated2/pl%20new/55%20CYNODONTS.htm) 
 
 
To calculate basal metabolic rate (BMR) we used the calculation E =  M 3/4 , as 
they are essentially homeothermic and their metabolic rate is not as dependent upon 
outside temperature as reptiles.  The typical difference between the active metabolic 
rate of a reptile and a mammal is 15 to 20 fold (Bennett), but as there are many 
mammalian features that contribute to the increased metabolism of Thrinaxodon, we 
assumed that its active metabolic rate (AMR) would be on the slightly lower end of the 
range of 20 ­ 70% that we were presented in class (although we calculated both the 
lower and upper bound).  Therapsids, a monophyletic group containing Thrinaxodon, 
“improved their breathing enough to maintain a fairly high basal metabolic rate 
(diaphragm, perhaps the ribs of Thrinaxodon)... they were not erect athletes the way 
dinosaurs were, and they could not support sustained high speed because of Carrier’s 
Constraint” (Cowen, 2000).  Thrinaxodon did, however, evolve more upright motility 
(shown by more erect posture in diagram above) than other cynodonts.  Their widened 

ribs, short legs, and “femur angled 55 degrees outward, but capable of dorsoventral 
movement on angled humeral head” (Cynodontia).  They were likely to move only in 
short bursts due to the difficulty of breathing while undergoing sideways body flexion 
(the morphological problem known as Carrier’s Constraint).  We estimated their 
maximum sustainable rate (MMR) to be on the lower end of the metabolic scope 
because of these factors.  According to Peterson et al. (1990), most sustained 
metabolic scopes (ratio of MMR:RMR) fall between 1.5 and 5, and the sustained 
metabolic scope of a lizard that falls in the same size category as Thrinaxodon was 
measured at around 1.7.  With the breathing innovations possessed by Thrinaxodon 
and its improved skeletal structure, we estimated it to be above the ectotherm 
measured by Peterson et al. (1990), but below most of the mammals also listed on their 
table.   
Thrinaxodon Metabolic Rates Chart 
 
  

cal hr​­1 

J hr​­1 

kJ hr​­1 

BMR 

1494.7 

6277.8 

6.28 

RMR (105% BMR) 

1569.4 

6591.7 

6.59 

Lower AMR (120% BMR) 

1793.7 

7533.3 

7.53 

Upper AMR (170% BMR) 

2541.0 

10672.2 

10.67 

MMR (220% BMR) 

3288.3 

13811.2 

13.8 

 
 
Burrowing is Thrinaxodon’s most effective way of thermoregulation.  By 
burrowing and staying in the hole during the day, it creates its own microclimate that 
allows it not only to protect itself from solar radiation, but also to cut down the loss of 
water through evaporation in an extremely arid climate, as it reduces its need to lose 
water in order to cool itself.  Based on the hot and arid nature of at least some of the 
year (there was high seasonality that brought a lot of rainfall during part of the year in 
the Early Triassic), Thrinaxodon most likely experienced conditions similar to that of a 
modern desert.   
“The hottest microclimates in the biosphere coincide largely with the driest 
microclimates.  Animals inhabiting hot deserts therefore face the competing 
demands of thermostasis, which calls for the evaporative loss of water from 
the body to the environment, and of hydrostasis, which calls for the bodily 
retention of water that is environmentally scarce” (Hoffman, 2007). 

 
We assumed a daytime temperature of 38​°​C because a paper published in 
Science Magazine by Sun et al. (2012) stated that “​critically high temperatures may also 
have excluded terrestrial animal life from equatorial Pangea, and with SSTs [sea 
surface temperatures] approaching 40°C the land temperatures are likely to have 
fluctuated to even higher levels. Our compilation of tetrapod fossil occurrences reveals 
them to be generally absent between 30°N and 40°S in the Early Triassic”.  With almost 
no terrestrial life living between 30°N and 40°S, Thrinaxodon was able to occupy some 
of the more extreme environments at latitudes of around 60°S, since it was in the upper 
area of the inhabitable land mass and most likely still had to deal with higher 
temperatures. 
 
  

H​c​ = 
20.5(1709g)​0.574​(T​b​­T​a​) 
(J hr​­1​) 

H​rad 
(J hr​­1​) 

H​e 
(J hr​­1​) 

H​meta 
(J hr​­1​) 

H​net 
(J hr​­1​) 

* Day @ 27.53​°​C 
(in burrow) 

­3632.1 

~0 

 ­134.6 

3766.7 

 0 

* Night @ 23​°​C 
(active) 

­10290.7 

~0 

­381.5 

10672.2 



Day @ 38​°​C 
(active) 

11760.8 

12864.8 

­381.5 

10672.2 

34916.3 

Night @ 25​°​C (in 
burrow) 

­7350.5 

~0 

 ­134.6 

3766.7 

­3718.4  

 
If we were to use assumptions made from the findings of Fernandez et al. (2013) 
that Thrinaxodon is an animal that aestivates but for only relatively short periods of time, 
then its metabolic rate when it aestivates during the day would be lower than its BMR. 
For aestivating animals, typically the metabolic rate decreases substantially.  In a 
certain species of frog, aestivation causes a 40% decrease in BMR, which is the lower 
limit of metabolic rates while aestivating amongst various species.  We assumed this 
lower limit as Thrinaxodon’s metabolic rate during aestivation, since it did not lower its 
metabolic rate substantially enough, or long enough, to temporarily slow down its bone 
growth. 
In order to determine how Thrinaxodon remained in heat balance despite the 
warmest temperatures on record, we calculated total heat flux by finding the sum of 


Related documents


thrinaxodonfinal
2007 lalouette colinet et al febs
mdma pdf
197 thermo2013
2018 colinet et al jeb
1 s2 0 s0306987700912568 main


Related keywords