Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.pdf


Preview of PDF document methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus.pdf

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Text preview


9/6/2016

Methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in adults: Prevention and control

or without a weekly 4 percent chlorhexidine body wash) did not result in fewer MRSA infections [102]. (See
'Decolonization' above.)
INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS — UpToDate offers two types of patient education materials, “The Basics” and “Beyond
the Basics.” The Basics patient education pieces are written in plain language, at the 5th to 6th grade reading level, and
they answer the four or five key questions a patient might have about a given condition. These articles are best for
patients who want a general overview and who prefer short, easy­to­read materials. Beyond the Basics patient education
pieces are longer, more sophisticated, and more detailed. These articles are written at the 10th to 12th grade reading level
and are best for patients who want in­depth information and are comfortable with some medical jargon.
Here are the patient education articles that are relevant to this topic. We encourage you to print or e­mail these topics to
your patients. (You can also locate patient education articles on a variety of subjects by searching on “patient info” and the
keyword(s) of interest.)
● Beyond the Basics topics (see "Patient education: Methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (Beyond the
Basics)")
SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS
● Basic infection prevention principles include attention to careful hand hygiene and adherence to contact precautions
for care of patients with known MRSA infection. (See 'Basic infection prevention principles' above.)
● Active surveillance cultures identify asymptomatic individuals with MRSA colonization to be placed on contact
precautions with the goal of minimizing MRSA spread to other patients. This practice is appropriate in the setting of
an outbreak; its role for routine screening is a question of ongoing debate. (See 'Role of active surveillance' above.)
● We suggest that decolonization not be performed in the routine management of MRSA infections (Grade 2B).
Decolonization does not appear to be consistently effective for eliminating MRSA carriage, and emergence of
resistance to agents used for decolonization will limit the utility of such protocols. (See 'Decolonization' above.)
● We suggest performing decolonization in the setting of a MRSA outbreak, particularly if there is epidemiologic
evidence pointing to transmission by one or more healthcare workers or among individuals in a specific population
(Grade 2C). Regimens are outlined above. (See 'Decolonization' above.)
● Additional important components for MRSA prevention and control include environmental cleaning and prudent
antibiotic use. (See 'Environmental cleaning' above and 'Antibiotic stewardship' above.)
● Tools for preventing MRSA spread in the community include hand hygiene and minimizing risk factors for
transmission (table 1). Decolonization may be appropriate if there is epidemiologic evidence pointing to transmission
within a household. (See 'In the community' above.)
Use of UpToDate is subject to the Subscription and License Agreement.
REFERENCES
1. Klevens RM, Morrison MA, Nadle J, et al. Invasive methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in the
United States. JAMA 2007; 298:1763.
2. Miller LG, Diep BA. Clinical practice: colonization, fomites, and virulence: rethinking the pathogenesis of community­
associated methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Clin Infect Dis 2008; 46:752.
3. Miller LG, Eells SJ, David MZ, et al. Staphylococcus aureus skin infection recurrences among household members:
an examination of host, behavioral, and pathogen­level predictors. Clin Infect Dis 2015; 60:753.
4. Calfee DP, Salgado CD, Milstone AM, et al. Strategies to prevent methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus
transmission and infection in acute care hospitals: 2014 update. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014; 35:772.
5. Coia JE, Duckworth GJ, Edwards DI, et al. Guidelines for the control and prevention of meticillin­resistant
Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in healthcare facilities. J Hosp Infect 2006; 63 Suppl 1:S1.
6. Vriens M, Blok H, Fluit A, et al. Costs associated with a strict policy to eradicate methicillin­resistant
Staphylococcus aureus in a Dutch University Medical Center: a 10­year survey. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis
2002; 21:782.
http://www.uptodate.com/contents/methicillin­resistant­staphylococcus­aureus­mrsa­in­adults­prevention­and­control?topicKey=ID%2F4048&elapsedTimeM…

5/12