PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



Gypsy Jazz Student Lesson Fast Improvisation Tools 7 .pdf



Original filename: Gypsy-Jazz-Student-Lesson-Fast-Improvisation-Tools-7.pdf
Author: --

This PDF 1.3 document has been generated by http://www.convertapi.com, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 28/12/2016 at 11:36, from IP address 124.253.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 644 times.
File size: 419 KB (15 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


Fast Improvisation Tools

Written By Daniel Barak

1|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Preface................................................................................................................... 4
BASIC TOOLS......................................................................................................... 5
Tool 1: Minor 7 over diatonic major ................................................................ 5
Tool 2: Start to play arpeggios with the 3rddegree ........................................... 6
Tool 3: Play parts of the major scale ................................................................ 6
Tool 4: Use the "Jazzy" sounds6, 9, 3 ............................................................... 6
Tool 5: 3 note chromatic approach to the 3rd and then 1 and 6 ........................ 6
Tool 6: Use the "Jazzy" sounds 3, 4, 6 .............................................................. 7
Tool 7: Use the "Jazzy" sounds of a minor 3, 7, 9, & higher octave 3,4 ............. 7
Tool 8: Start to play arpeggios with the 5th degree .......................................... 7
Tool 9: Use 2 notes intervals of the diatonic chord .......................................... 7
Tool 10: 4th degree Dominant 7 arpeggio over a minor chord .......................... 8
Tool 11: Diminished arpeggio over a minor chord ........................................... 8
Tool 12: 6 to flat 3 and then 3,5, and major 7 .................................................. 9
Tool 13: Major scale over a minor chord ......................................................... 9
DOMINANT 7 TOOLS .......................................................................................... 10
Tool 1: Minor 6 or 7 over dominant 7 chord .................................................. 10
Tool 2: Minor over dominant 7 chord ............................................................ 11
Tool 3: Diminished over dominant 7 chord .................................................... 11
Tool 4: Mixolydian 9b/13b over dominant 7 chord........................................ 11
Tool 5: Play the 7, b5, 9, 6 degrees ................................................................ 12
Tool 6: Play part/pattern from the whole tone scale ..................................... 12
Tool 7: Play the Tritone Substitution ............................................................. 12
TENSION, TRANSITION, AND RESOLVE TOOLS ................................................... 13
Tool 1: X#7/9 diminished and the 6th degree,with a resolve to X ................... 13
Tool 2: Sharp 5th degree and the flat 3rdor flat 9th degrees ............................. 13
2|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Tool 3: Create anticipation for the next chord in the progression .................. 13
Tool 4: Play a diminished 7 arpeggio over the same flat diminished chord .... 14
SPECIAL SOUND TOOLS ..................................................................................... 15
Tool 1: b5 over a dominant chord ................................................................. 15
Tool 2: Play the#5, i.e. Augmented,over a diatonic or dominant 7 chord ...... 15
Tool 3: Play a diminished arpeggio in Django's one note per string pattern ... 15

3|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Preface
This series of tools will give you the "building blocks" (i.e. Tools), that you can use
to build your improvisations. Simply use the mind map system described at our
forum, blog, and newsletters, to build your improvisations in a creative way.
Building your improvisation using the mind map system is like creating a blueprint
for a house, you start on the foundations and then go on to build the walls, the
roof, etc.... Note that this tools, lesson will be updated all the time as new
lessons will be published, so stay tuned and we will notify you on every update.
After you will create one mind map for one of your improvisations, the process
will become easier as you do it again and again. The final goal you should strive to
achieve, is to be able to create the mind map IN YOUR MIND and in real time and
not on paper when you have time to plan it before you actually use it. This is what
the master players do, they plan very quickly in their minds and they change the
tools they are using very quickly while choosing the correct timing to use them in
relation to the underlying harmonic structure of the song / musical piece, that
they are playing. Use the tools in this lesson to create a mind map as follows:
1.) Grab a piece of A4 paper and write the chords of the progression, each chord
inside its own circle. Make sure to leave enough space between the circles so
that you will be able to add more circles around and between them.
2.) Start to build the "story" of your improvisation. Start with the beginning of the
story by using the BASIC TOOLS. You don't have to apply some tool all the
Time, sometimes just play the same chord's arpeggio as you see in the
progression of the song / musical piece, just make sure to play the arpeggio in
an interesting way ,for example, by using some of the "jazzy sounds" tools.
3.) Use a SPECIALSOUND TOOL from time to time ,to make the story of your
improvisation more interesting.
4.) Use a TENSION AND RESOLVE TOOL right before a chord change or when the
progression change from A part to the B (or any other shift from some part to
the other). Or use this tools over a long progression of the same chord like for
example in the "Huneysuckle Rose" song, this will create and interesting
movement inside your improvisation.
5.) Use someDOMINANT 7 TOOL over a dominant chord.
4|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

BASIC TOOLS
Tool 1: Minor 7 over diatonic major
Over a major diatonic chord, for example A, E6, D6/9, G, etc..., you can play the
arpeggio, or parts of it, of a minor 7 chord that is located 2 degrees BEFORE and
AFTER the diatonic chord. The related minor chord BEFORE has the same notes of
the major diatonic chord with the addition of the 6 degree. The related minor
chord AFTER has the same notes of the major diatonic chord with the addition of
the major 7 and 9 degrees. For example, over G chord , you can play the arpeggio,
or parts of it, of the E minor 7 chord Or B minor 7 chord. This tool can be depicted
graphically as follows (for example, in the G diatonic chord):

=Em7
E

=Bm7

2

F

1

G

1

A

2

B

You can apply this tool in various ways , for example in the "Honeysuckle Rose"
lesson at 05:32 you can see how Paulus starts to play over F major chord with F
major 7 arpeggio and then play over the D minor 7 arpeggio with a typical gypsy
style octave jump ending, the finish is on C.
Another example is in the "Django's Tiger" lesson at 02:31 and 24:04 when
Paulus play the F# minor 7 arpeggio after playing A major 7 arpeggio.
You can also apply this tool in a very interesting way when you start to play an
arpeggio (or part of it) of one of the related minor chords and then end with the
arpeggio (or part of it) of the diatonic chord. For example in the "Honeysuckle
Rose" lesson at 04:36 you can see how Paulus starts to play over the A minor 7
chord's arpeggio and descends until the F and then end the phrase with the F
major 7 arpeggio, and the same at 10:38 with Gminor 7 over Bb chord.
Note that when you apply this tool you should always end the phrase you play on
one of the degrees of the diatonic chord because if you stay too long on one of
the related chord's minor arpeggios, the sound will tend to be more minor due to
the "minoric" relation between the notes of these arpeggios, so you must make
sure to keep the "majoric" sound in the ear of the listener by ending on one of the
degrees of the diatonic chord (like you see in the example above from
"Honeysuckle Rose" lesson at 05:32, when the phrase ends on C which is the 5th
degree of F chord).
5|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Tool 2: Start to play arpeggios with the 3rddegree
Start to play many of your arpeggios over the 3rddegree of the underlying chord.
For example, if the underlying chord is G diatonic chord, you can start over the
note B.You can start on the first degree in various ways, for example:
*Play an enclosure around the 3rd degree of the chord , for example in
"Honeysuckle Rose" lesson at 03:42 when Paulus plays an enclosure
Around the 3rd degree of the G minor chord (B).
*Start to play a half tone below the 3rddegree and then slide to (or play) the 3
Degree.
*Start to play a trill with the 3rddegree and the 4thdegree and then slide a half
tone back and play an enclosure.
*Play achromatic ascend or descend to the 3rd degree. For example "Honeysuckle
Rose" minute 9:53 when Paulus play a 3 note chromatic descend to the 3rd
degree of the C minor chord.

Tool 3: Play parts of the major scale
Play parts of the major scale of the diatonic major chord. For example in"Django's
Tiger" lesson at 4:17 and 24:07 when Paulus play on the A major scale, starting
from E. Or in "Shiek of Araby" lesson at 00:22 and 02:57 when Paulus is playing
part of the Bb major scale over the Bb6/9 chord and ends it with the 5, 3, 1 and 5
of the lower octave.

Tool 4: Use the "Jazzy" sounds M7, 6, 5 or M7, 5, 6
Play the major 7 sound in combinations with the 6, 9, 3 degrees of the diatonic
major chord. For example in "Djangology" lesson at 00:45 when Paulus play over
a G major 7 arpeggio that ends with a major 7 (F#), 5th degree (D), and the 6th
degree (E).

Tool 5: 3 note chromatic approach to the 3rd and then 1 and 6
Play a 3 note chromatic approach to 3rd degree and then the 1st degree and the
6th degree on a higher octave. For example, in "Honeysuckle Rose" lesson at04:19
and 7:06 when Paulus play over C7/9 chord. You can also apply this tool over
dominant 7 chords and diatonic chords.
6|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Tool 6: Use the "Jazzy" sounds 3, 4, 6
Use a combination of the 3, 4, 6 degrees of a chord you play improvisation over.
For example in "Django's Tiger" lesson at 05:00 and 24:08 when Paulus plays over
A chord, a half tone approach to the 3rd degree (C#) and an enclosure around the
4th degree (D). Then a half tone approach to the 6th degree (F#) one octave lower
and approach from half tone above the 3rd degree (C#).
Tool 7: Use the "Jazzy" sounds of a minor 3, 7, 9, & higher octave 3,4
This tool sounds very good over a minor chord due to the fact that the 9 of a
minor chord is only a half step below the 3rd degree. For example, in "Nuages"
lesson at 28:18 when Paulus starts to play over A sharp minor 7 chord with a half
tone approach to the 3rd degree and then the 5th, 7th, and sliding from the 9th
degree to the 4th degree and then the 3rd degree on a higher octave.

Tool 8: Start to play arpeggios with the 5th degree
This is the same idea as tool number 2 above, but with the 5th degree. For
example, in "Honeysuckle Rose" lesson minute 5:56 when Paulus starting to play
with a half tone approach to the 5th degree of the G minor chord, i.e. D.

Tool 9: Use 2 notes intervals of the diatonic chord
It is beautiful to use, from time to time, 2 note intervals of the diatonic chord, you
can use the 1st degree and the 6th degree, or the 1st degree and the 3rd degree, or
the 1st degree and the 5th degree, or similar combinations. You should also
consider playing these 2 notes with a 3 frets ascend from BELOW the target
interval degrees, or a with a 3 frets descend from ABOVE the target interval
degrees. For example, in "Honeysuckle Rose" lesson at05:48 when Paulus play
the 2 interval notes of the G minor chords (1st degree G and 3rd degree BB) with a
3 frets descend from ABOVE.

7|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Tool 10: 4th degree Dominant 7 arpeggio over a minor chord
You can play a dominant 7 (or 7 and 9) arpeggio (or part of it) over a minor or a
minor 6 chord. The dominant 7 chord is located on the 4th degree of the minor
chord. For example, in "Honeysuckle Rose" lesson at09:54 when Paulus play part
of the F7 dominant arpeggio over C minor. OR another example in "Hungaria"
when Paulus play part of the E7 dominant arpeggio over B minor 6 chord.
1
4

C

2

3

D

E

F

=F7 (or F7/9)

You can see the F7 or F7/9 contains the notes of the C minor chord including the
minor 3rd degree, 4th degree(F) and the 6th degree (A). F7/9 = F, A, C, Eb, G. This is
how your improvisation will sound more creative and interesting when you play
F7 or F7/9 instead of just the regular C minor arpeggio.

Tool 11: Diminished arpeggio over a minor chord
Due to tool number 10 above, you can also play the diminished 7 arpeggio that
starts from the 3rd degree of the dominant chord located on the 4th degree of the
minor chord. But to make it easy to remember you can use the following rule:
over a minor chord you can play a diminished arpeggio that starts on its 6th
degree. For example, on C minor chord you can play A diminished arpeggio, on A
minor chord you can play F# diminished arpeggio, over G minor you can play E
diminished arpeggio, over D minor you can play B diminished arpeggio, over E
minor you can play C# diminished arpeggio, etc…
The diminished arpeggio has the 6, 1(the root), minor 3rd, and flat 5 degrees of
the minor chord.
A nice example of this rule is found in "Shiek of Araby" lesson at 09:32 when
Paulus is playing F# diminished arpeggio over A minor chord.

8|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.

Tool 12: 6 to flat 3 and then 3,5, and major 7
This is a beautiful phrase, you can use it on any major chord.
For example in "Django's Tiger" lesson at 22:13 when Paulus play over A major
chord, he descends from the 6th degree (F#) all the way to the flat step 3 (C) and
then play the 3rd, and then the 5th, and end on the major 7 (G#). Learn to play it
in all of the positions of some chord on your guitar and you'll have a powerful tool
for your improvisations.

Tool 13: Major scale over a minor chord
This is a beautiful tool to add to your tools bank. Over a minor chord, you can play
a major scale that is located one tone below. This is a classic example of using the
Dorian mode. This mode simply means, to play a major scale over a minor chord.
For example, in "Shiek of Araby" lesson at 00:19 and 02:24 when Paulus is playing
a phrase from the Bb major scale over Cm chord. Or for example, over D minor
chord you can play C major scale. The major scale has the minor 3rd and the 7th
degree inside. For example, the Bb major scale, when played over the C minor
chord, has the 7th degree Bb, the root C, the 9thdegree D, the minor 3rd degree Eb,
the 4th degree F, the 5th degree G, and the 6th degree A. So you get the following
beautiful sounds over the minor chord:7th, 9th, minor 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th

9|Page
Copyright © 2016 GypsyJazzStudent.com All rights reserved.


Related documents


gypsy jazz student lesson fast improvisation tools 7
barry harris bebop line concepts
abrsm piano 2015 16 grade 4 alternate pieces book
there are a few points1501
a review of piano chords1615
skill share eh


Related keywords