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210p catalog .pdf



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Title: 2002-2004 Michigan Tech Undergraduate Catalog

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College of Engineering
College of Sciences and Arts
School of Business and Economics
School of Forestry and Wood Products
School of Technology

Michigan Technological University
Announces Programs for the 2002–04 Academic Years
1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, Michigan 49931-1295
Toll free (for prospective students only) 1-888-MTU-1885 or 906-487-1885
www.mtu.edu

2002-2003 Academic Calendar
FALL SEMESTER 2002
August 16, Friday
August 19-25, Monday–Sunday
August 26, Monday
September 2, Monday
September 6, Friday noon
September 9, Monday
September 27, Friday
October 4, Friday 3:00 p.m.
October 7, Monday
October 7-10, Monday-Thursday
November 22, Friday 10:00 p.m.
December 2, Monday
December 5, Thursday
December 14, Saturday
December 16-20, Monday–Friday
December 20, Friday 10:00 pm

Fall bills due
Orientation
Instruction begins
Labor Day Recess
K-Day Recess
2nd bills/refunds mailed
2nd bills due
Homecoming Recess
Classes Resume
Mid-Term Reporting Period
Thanksgiving Recess
Classes Resume
Spring bills mailed
Mid Year Commencement
Final Exam Period
Fall Semester Ends

SPRING SEMESTER 2003
January 7, Tuesday
January 13, Monday
January 20, Monday noon
January 21, Tuesday
January 27, Monday
February 12, Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.
February 14, Friday
February 17, Monday
February 24-27, Monday-Thursday
February 28, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
March 3, Monday
March 10, Monday
April 21, Monday
May 5-9, Monday–Friday
May 9, Friday
May 10, Saturday
May 14, Wednesday

Spring bills due
Instruction Begins
Martin Luther King Recess
Classes Resume
2nd bills/refunds mailed
Winter Carnival Recess
2nd bills due
Classes Resume
Mid-Term Reporting Period
Spring Break Begins
Mid-Term Grades Available
Classes Resume
Summer bills mailed
Final Exam Period
Spring Semester Ends
Commencement
Summer bills due

SUMMER SESSION 2003
May 19, Monday
May 26, Monday
May 27, Tuesday
June 2, Monday
June 20, Friday
June 26, Thursday
June 30, Monday
July 4, Friday
August 7, Thursday

Full Session begins/Session A begins
Memorial Day Recess, 1 day only
Classes Resume
2nd bills/refunds mailed
2nd bills due
Session A ends, followed by exam day(s)
Session B begins
Independence Day Recess, 1 day only
Full Session ends/Session B ends,
followed by exam day(s)

2003-2004 Academic Calendar
(Click here to view the 2003-04 Academic Calendar.)

For academic year 2003-04, see the Office of Student Records and Registration website <http://www.admin.mtu.edu/em/>.

Welcome to Michigan Tech!
I am pleased that you have chosen to join us as
you continue your journey of education.
This is the first undergraduate catalog under the
semester system here at Michigan Technological
University. The faculty and administration viewed
the change to semesters as an opportunity to
examine what we teach, and the result is the most
comprehensive collection of educational offerings
in our history.
Our main job at Michigan Tech is to prepare
students to create the future. As you pursue your
studies and extracurricular activities here, I
encourage you to develop not only your problem-solving skills but also your
creative skills.
And you can see creativity in many forms at the performances and lectures
in the new Rozsa Center for the Performing Arts. I guarantee that there is
something for everyone in the Great Events series and the Department of Fine
Arts schedule.
You should also walk up the hill to view the new Horner and Hesterberg
Halls in the U. J. Noblet Forestry Building. They are quite stunning and
possess some interesting architectural details.
I hope your experience at Michigan Tech is rewarding, inspiring, and the
best four (or more) years of your life!

Michigan Technological
University
Mission
We prepare students to create the future.

Vision
Michigan Tech will be a nationally
prominent and internationally recognized
technological university that bridges
technology and business and that will meet
the needs of a global and technologically rich
society through excellence in undergraduate
and graduate education, scholarship, and
research.

Best wishes!

Curtis J. Tompkins
President

Catalog Acknowledgments
University Relations
William J. Curnow, Executive Director
William A. Tembreull, Director of Design and Publication Services
Dennis Walikainen, Director of Marketing Communications
Undergraduate Catalog editor, Paula McCambridge
Design, Arlene Collins; cover design, Bill Tembreull; photography, Brian Parmeter
Student assistant, Nkemdilim Onwudinjo
The material presented in this catalog is subject to change by the University at any time.
List of faculty members compiled as of May 1, 2002
In keeping with its responsibilities as an educational institution, Michigan Technological University is committed to a policy of affording equal opportunity to all of its
employees, students, applicants for employment and applicants for admission without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, height,
weight, or marital status. The University is also committed to a policy of educating and employing handicapped individuals and veterans without discrimination.
These policies are to be implemented with due regard for the relative qualifications of all involved. The Affirmative Action Officer is Sherry L. Kauppi, 207
Administration Building, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295. Telephone 906-487-3310.
MTU complies with all federal and state laws and regulations regarding discrimination,
including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).

Table of Contents
Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .inside front cover
President’s Welcome Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ii
MTU at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv
QuickStart: What are you interested inQ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v

Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Associate Degrees (AAS, AH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Baccalaureate Degrees (BA, BS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Minors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

The University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Programs for Everyone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Admissions—Getting in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Finance 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Academic Policies & Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130

General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139

Colleges and Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187

College of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
College of Sciences and Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
School of Business and Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
School of Forestry and Wood Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
School of Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81

A: Refund/Repayment Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
B: Standards of Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
C: Scholarships and Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
D: Emeriti Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
E: University Information—Assessment, Leadership,
Accreditation, Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196

Departments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Aerospace Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Army ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Biological Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Biomedical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Civil and Environmental Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Electrical and Computer Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Engineering Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences . . . . . . .101
Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Materials Science and Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Mathematical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics . . . . . . . . .109
Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Campus Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .inside back cover

III

Michigan Tech. . .
About Michigan Technological University
Michigan Tech was founded in 1885 in the aftermath of the
first mining boom in the US—the clamor for Michigan’s copper
preceding the California Gold Rush by several years.
At its outset, the college trained mining and metallurgical
engineers Today, the University offers associate, bachelor’s,
master’s, or doctoral degrees in the sciences, engineering,
forestry, business, communication, and technology.
Michigan Tech undergraduates have the advantage of an
education that emphasizes study across disciplines, team
learning, and research; our graduate students receive intensive,
advanced instruction and the opportunity to pursue research in a
wide range of academic programs. Overall, our institution has
gained world-wide attention for innovative education; our faculty
strive to be mentors; our academic programs stress learning
hand in hand with application; and our students learn to inquire
and discover knowledge.

About Houghton, Michigan
The rigors of an education at Michigan Tech are
complemented by its unique and tranquil setting.
Houghton lies in the heart of upper Michigan’s
scenic Keweenaw Peninsula. The campus overlooks
Portage Lake, a long, winding ribbon of water that
divides the Keweenaw in half. Just a few miles from
campus, on either end of the Portage, lies Lake
Superior, a majestic body of water.
Upper Michigan’s expansive waters and forests
offer students unparalleled opportunity for outdoor
recreation—hunting, fishing, backpacking, hiking,
camping, boating, swimming, snowshoeing, and
skiing. The University owns an eighteen-hole golf
course and downhill and cross-country ski areas. It
also has a full array of men’s and women’s sports
programs, including Division I ice hockey.
Houghton, rated the eighth safest college town in
the nation and the safest in Michigan, is part of the
Houghton-Hancock twin-city center of approximately
12,000 residents. The University’s more than 6,000
students from many states and foreign countries
make the area a vibrant multicultural community.
All in all, the campus and the surrounding
communities provide a rich and inviting setting in
Michigan’s storied northlands.

IV

QuickStart . . .
What are you interested in?
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
A Accounting
F Finance
Actuarial Science (mathematics) . . . . . .46
Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 P Physics, Applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Aerospace Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
American Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Astrophysics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

B

C

Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 17, 62
Bioinformatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Biological Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Biomedical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Business Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Chemical Engineering Technology . . . . . .1
Chemical Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Chemistry, ACS Certified . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Civil Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Civil Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . .1
Clinical Laboratory Science . . . . . . . . . .20
Coaching Endorsement . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Computational Mathematics . . . . . . . . . .46
Computer Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24, 62
Computer Science Applications . . . . . . .25
Communication, Scientific & Technical . .56
Communication Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Cooperative Education . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Cytotechnology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20, 21

Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Discrete Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
D Design
Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38, 63
E Earth
Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6, 63
Ecology, Applied and
Environmental Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 63
Education, Secondary . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Electrical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Electrical Engineering Tech . . . . . . . . . . .2
Electromechanical Engineering Tech . . . . .2
Electronic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Engineering, (interdisciplinary) BS . .31–32
Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . .29, 30
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
English as a Second Language . . . . . . .118
Enterprise Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Environmental (chemistry) . . . . . . . . . . .18
Environmental Engineering . . . . . . . . . .34
Environmental Sciences,
Applied Ecology and . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Environmental Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Ethics and Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60, 67
Forest Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Forestry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51, 68
Plant Biotechnology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Plant Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8, 68
Polymers (chemistry) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Prelaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54, 74
Premedicine (see Preprofessional)
Preprofessional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

G

Geological Engineering . . . . . . . . . .36, 65
Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Geophysics, Applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60, 67

H

History (social sciences) . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Historical Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Histotechnology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21, 22
Humanities (assoc. degree) . . . . . . . . . . .3

Sensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
R Remote
ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
& Technical Communication . .56
S Scientific
Social and Behavioral Studies . . . . . . . .69

Industrial Forestry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Industrial Marketing & Management . . .12
Information Systems (computer sci) . . .25
International Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
International Programs . . . . . . . . . . . .119
International Student Admissions . . . . .121
International Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60, 67
Speech Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Structural Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Surveying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

I

Secondary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
J Journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 T Teaching,
Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .60, 65, 66, 67
Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
L Languages
Liberal Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41-42
Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Management Information Systems . . . . .13
Earth Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
M Manufacturing Engineering . . . . . . . . . .33
Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Materials Science & Engineering . . . . . .43
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45, 46, 66
Mathematics, Applied/Computational . . .46
Mathematics, General . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Mechanical Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Mechanical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Mechanical Engineering Technology . . . .30
Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Medical Technology (see Clinical Lab Sci)
Metallurgical Engineering (see Materials
Science & Engineering)
Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6, 67
Military Arts and Science . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Mine Environmental Engineering . . . . . .60
Mineral Process Engineering . . . . . . . . .45
Mining Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . .49, 67
Molecular Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
General Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Technical Communication . . . . . . . . . . .57
Technical Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Theatre Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Products, Engineered . . . . . . . . . .70
Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
W Wood

Undecided?
First-Year Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
First-Year Undeclared . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
General Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
Nondegree Seeking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

V

Degree Programs at MTU
Undergraduate Degrees

Graduate Degrees

Associate in Applied Science (2 year)

Master of Engineering

• Chemical Engineering Technology
• Civil Engineering Technology
• Electrical Engineering Technology
• Electromechanical Engineering Technology
• Engineering Technology
• Forest Technology

Associate in Humanities (2 year)
Bachelor of Science (4 year)
• Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences
• Applied Geophysics
• Applied Physics
• Bioinformatics
• Biological Sciences
• Biomedical Engineering
• Business Administration
• Chemical Engineering
• Chemistry
• Civil Engineering
• Clinical Laboratory Science
• Computer Engineering
• Computer Science
• Economics
• Electrical Engineering
• Engineering (interdisciplinary or special focus)
• Engineering Technology
• Environmental Engineering
• Forestry
• Geological Engineering
• Geology
• Mathematics
• Mechanical Engineering
• Materials Science and Engineering
• Mining Engineering
• Physics
• Scientific and Technical Communication
• Social Sciences
• Surveying
• Wood Science

Bachelor of Arts (4 year)
• Liberal Arts
• Scientific and Technical Communication

VI

• Professional Master of Science

Master of Science

• Applied Science Education
• Biological Sciences
• Chemical Engineering
• Chemistry
• Civil Engineering
• Computer Science
• Electrical Engineering
• Engineering Mechanics
• Environmental Engineering
• Environmental Engineering Science
• Environmental Policy
• Forestry
• Geological Engineering
• Geology
• Geophysics
• Industrial Archaeology
• Materials Science and Engineering
• Mathematics
• Mechanical Engineering
• Mineral Economics
• Mining Engineering
• Physics
• Rhetoric and Technical Communication

Doctor of Philosophy
• Biological Sciences
• Chemical Engineering
• Chemistry
• Civil Engineering
• Computer Science
• Electrical Engineering
• Engineering (nondepartmental)
• Engineering Physics
• Forest Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
• Forest Science
• Geological Engineering
• Geology
• Materials Science and Engineering
• Mathematical Sciences
• Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
• Mining Engineering
• Physics
• Rhetoric and Technical Communication

Academic Programs





ASSOCIATE DEGREES
BACCALAUREATE DEGREES
CERTIFICATES
MINORS

The following pages list the requirements for all degree programs,
associate and baccalaureate, as well as the requirements for certificates
and minors. In addition to the degree requirements, model schedules
are also shown. Remember that the model schedule is only an example.
Your schedule may vary. For the most accurate and up-to-date
requirements, see your advisor or department.
The University reserves the right to change the requirements for
graduation as a means of keeping pace with educational, scientific, and
technological developments. Changes may be applied to students
already enrolled, but, in such cases, every effort will be made to give the
student the benefit of the new educational program without imposing
undue hardships.
Program requirements are listed in alphabetical order within groups.

Associate Degrees
Michigan Tech has a variety of two-year associate in applied science programs
in the School of Technology (AAS) and one two-year program in the College of
Sciences and Arts (ASC). Those students who wish to combine an associate
degree with a baccalaureate degree should see their academic advisors.

Chemical Engineering Technology, AAS
School of Technology
The Chemical Engineering Technology degree prepares students for
employment in a variety of industries including chemical processing, pulp/paper,
oil refining, steel, power generation, and the pharmaceutical production. There is
an accelerating trend in these industries for continuous and simultaneous
improvement of financial, quality, safety, and environmental performance. This
has resulted in a continuous movement toward the increased use of
instrumentation and computer-based process management systems. In addition
to providing a strong basis for roles in process operations, this program also
builds a sound foundation for opportunities in technical sales and service with
primary manufacturers and companies that serve them. This program is unique
with very few existing nationwide. Students will work intensively with the pilot
plant facilities of the Process Simulation and Control Center (PSCC), a fully
automated unit that currently consists of two advanced chemical manufacturing
plants. Students have the opportunity to work together with chemical engineering
students to learn and practice the principles of effective teamwork. Following
completion of this degree, students can pursue business or engineering degrees.

Total Credits Required: 67
Major Requirements—54 credits
CET 1100 Intro to Computing and Technical Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CH 1100 General Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CMT 1100 Intro to Chemical Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CMT 1200 Team Skills Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
CMT 1300 Statistics in Process Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
CMT 2100 Instrumentation and Process Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2200 Process Operations I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
CMT 2300 Process Operations II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
CMT 2400 Process Safety, Quality, and Environmental Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2500 Spec Topics in Chemical Engg Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2600 Spec Proj in Chemical Engg Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
CMT 2700 Materials Science and Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
MAT 1115 Mathematics Technology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
MAT 1125 Mathematics Technology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

PH 1100 Introductory Physics Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1110 College Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Technical Elective (basic science or math) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Technical elective to be approved by CMT faculty and will include all 2000-level
or above courses that are focused on science, engineering, or technology and
may or may not include CMT 2600.
Concentration Requirements—0 credits
Free Electives—0 credits
General Education Requirements—13 credits
UN 1001 Perspectives on Inquiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 1002 World Cultures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
UN 2001 Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
DISTRIBUTION COURSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Choose 3 cr. from any non-communications distribution list entitled Language,
Thought, and Values; Aesthetics and Creativity; History and Cultures; Science,
Technology, and Society; and Economic, Political, or Social Institutions.
Chem Engg Tech Model Schedule—example only; actual schedule may vary.
1st Year Fall
CET 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CMT 1200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
MAT 1115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
PH 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
UN 1001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
1st Year Spring
CH 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CMT 1300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
MAT 1125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
PH 1110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 1002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

2nd Year Fall
CMT 2100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
CMT 2400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Tech Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
2nd Year Spring
General Ed Distribution . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
CMT 2500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CMT 2600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
CMT 2700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

*Technical Elective to be approved by CMT faculty and will include all 2000-level or above
courses that are focused on basic science or math.

Civil Engineering Technology, AAS
School of Technology
A civil engineering technician is a professional who can carry out either proven
procedures or those procedures especially prescribed by civil engineers. The
technician works under the guidance of a civil engineer to serve as the link between
the engineer and the skilled craftspersons. Civil engineering technicians work as
inspectors and estimators, conduct field and laboratory testing of construction
materials, perform surveying duties, assist design engineers, and can prepare
specifications and drawings for engineering projects. Technicians are proficient at
using current surveying equipment, density testing devices, and other qualitycontrol equipment. Computers are commonly used to prepare reports, process test
data, and to prepare design drawings (AutoCAD software, Eagle Point, etc.).
Careers are available in the public sector with departments of transportation or at
the city/county level, along with private engineering consulting firms, contractors,
and construction management firms. Civil engineering technology students have
the opportunity to obtain professional certifications in a variety of specific
materials-testing applications. The School also conducts testing for the national
NICET certification program. Cooperative education is encouraged through the
program’s links with state agencies, engineering firms, and contractors.

Total Credits Required: 65
Major Requirements—55 credits
CET 1000 Public Speaking and Group Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
CET 1100 Intro to Computing and Technical Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 1141 Fundamentals of Cemented Aggregate Mixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CET 2100 Civil/Surveying Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 2251 Soils in Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CET 2265 Construction Planning, Scheduling, and Estimating . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
MAT 1115 Technical Mathematics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 1

MAT 1125 Technical Mathematics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
MET 2120 Statics and Strength of Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
PE 3980 CPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PE 3990 Community First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1100 Introductory Physics Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1110 College Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1200 Introductory Physics Lab II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1210 College Physics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
SU 1100 Introduction to Surveying and Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
SU 2100 Surveying Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
SU 2110 Surveying Fundamentals Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Choose 6 credits from the following:
CET 3141 Cemented Aggregate Mix Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 3250 Structural Analysis and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 3252 Water and Wastewater Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 3270 Special Projects in Civil Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
SU 2220 Route and Construction Surveying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 3002 Cooperative Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

EET 2112 Circuits II Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 2141 Digital Electronics & Microprocessor Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
EET 2221 Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 2222 Electronic Devices and Circuits Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 2233 Electrical Machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
EET 3225 Special Electronic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
EET 3267 Communications Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 3268 Communications Systems Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 3281 Electrical Project Development and Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 3373 Introduction to Programmable Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
MAT 1115 Technical Mathematics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
MAT 1125 Technical Mathematics II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Math/Science Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1100 Introductory Physics Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1110 College Physics I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Concentration Requirements—0 credits

General Education Requirements—10 credits
UN 1001 Perspectives on Inquiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 1002 World Cultures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
UN 2001 Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Free Electives—0 credits
General Education Requirements—10 credits
UN 1001 Perspectives on Inquiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
UN 1002 World Cultures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
UN 2001 Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Civil Engg Tech Model Schedule—example only; actual schedule may vary.
1st Year Fall
2nd Year Fall
MET 2120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CET 1000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
CET 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
MAT 1115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
PE 3980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
SU 2100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PE 3990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
SU 2110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
UN 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
SU 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
UN 1001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
2nd Year Spring
1st Year Spring
CET 2251 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CET 2265 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 1141 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
CET Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
CET 2100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
MAT 1125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
CET Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
PH 1210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
UN 1002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Concentration Requirements—0 credits
Free Electives—0 credits

Co-Curricular Activities—1 unit
Units are required for graduation, but are not included in the calculation of the
GPA, or in the overall credits required for the degree.
Electrical Engg Tech Model Schedule—example only; actual schedule may vary.
Include 1 unit of co-curricular activities.
1st Year Fall
CET 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 1111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 1112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
MAT 1115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
UN 1001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
1st Year Spring
EET 2111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 2112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 2141 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
MAT 1125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
UN 1002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

2nd Year Fall
EET 2221 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 2222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 2233 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
EET 3373 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
UN 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
2nd Year Spring
EET 3225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
EET 3267 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 3268 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 3281 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Math/Sci Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
PH 1110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Electrical Engineering Technology, AAS
School of Technology
The Electrical Engineering Technology associate degree curriculum combines
broad electrical fundamental coursework with a rigorous laboratory focus. All of
the nine required EET courses have an associated laboratory component. While
mastering the analysis and design techniques of electric and electronic circuits
and systems in the classroom, students learn to interpret schematics, construct
circuits, correctly select, apply and operate electronic measuring instruments in
the laboratory. Students interested in the electrical, electronic, or computer fields,
and who prefer applying established technology to solve current technical
problems, should consider this program. Electrical engineering technicians are
employed in product evaluation and testing, power generation and transmission,
instrumentation installation and calibration, and computer data acquisition and
control. Work activities are generally instrument oriented and range from
research and development, production design, operation and maintenance, to
applications and sales.

Total Credits Required: 64
Major Requirements—54 credits
CET 1100 Intro to Computing and Technical Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 1111 Circuits I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
EET 1112 Circuits I Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
EET 2111 Circuits II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

2

ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Electromechanical Engineering
Technology, AAS
School of Technology
Graduates of the Electromechanical Engineering Technology associate degree
program are referred to as Electromechanical Engineering Technicians. The
curriculum has a strong laboratory focus with the goal of understanding the use of
electronics and computers to control mechanical systems. All ten of the required
major courses have an associated laboratory component where students learn the
operation and use of electronic measuring instruments and the control of mechanical
systems in the laboratory. Particular attention is given to the operation of sensors in
electromechanical transducers, their calibration and connection to data collection and
control systems. Electromechanical engineering technicians are employed in product
evaluation and testing, the electromechanical aspects of power generation,
installation and calibration of transducers, and computer data acquisition and control
of electromechanical systems. Work activities generally involve electrically controlled
mechanical systems in areas from research and development, to production design,
operation and maintenance. Opportunities also exist in technical communications and
sales.


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