Beasts and Beauties (Finished Chapters) Google Docs (PDF)




File information


This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/56.0.2924.87 Safari/537.36 / Skia/PDF m56, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 19/03/2017 at 19:40, from IP address 72.66.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 446 times.
File size: 1.52 MB (279 pages).
Privacy: public file
















File preview


 

 

 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           1 

 
Table
of Contents 
 

Chapter   1:   Ferals



Chapter   2:   Scratch   My   Back



Chapter   3:   The   Mirror

21 

Chapter   4:   Legacy

27 

Chapter   5:   Divergence

37 

Chapter   6:   Hunter

52 

Chapter   7:   Eschatology

73 

Chapter   8:   Tributary

81 

Chapter   9:   Checkmate,   Part   1:   The   Smothered   King

97 

Chapter   10:   Checkmate,   Part   2:   The   Queen's   Pawn

118 

Chapter   11:   Sellout

127 

Chapter   12:   My   Best   Self

146 

Chapter   13:   C'est   La   Vie

165 

Chapter   14:   The   Devil   and   the   Deep   Blue   Sea

187 

Chapter   15:   Ronin

210 

Chapter   16:   Faces   in   the   Earth   and   Sky

224 

Chapter   17:   Everything   Will   Work   Out   and   Be   Okay

251 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           2 

 
 
 

Chapter 1: Ferals 
 
It   was   a  bright   and   windy   day,   that   early   morning   after   Po   Town   fell.  
Once   news   had   gotten   out,   accompanied   by   the   plethora   of   pictures,   video,   and 
frantic   phone   calls   from   citizens,   all   of   which   splashed   across   the   news,   it   became   clear   to 
the   Alolans   that   something   must   be   done.   T he   police   force,   which   had   been   supported   for 
years   and   seemed   to   have   been   able   to   handle   the   r egular   outbursts   of   Team   Skull 
mischief,   crumpled   entirely   within   hours―one   small   cabal   of   thugs   r olled   into   the   Po   Town 
station,   and   the   chief   and   all   his   officers   scattered   like   r oaches,   eventually   r etreating   to 
more   amenable   grounds   on   the   east   coast   of   Ula'Ula   island. 
"Pathetic,"   Hala   grumbled. 
Olivia   nodded   in   agreement,   skimming   over   the   headline.   "They've   gotten   soft. 
But   it's   not   just   their   fault,   is   it?" 
Hala   scratched   his   beard   and   examined   her   expression   carefully,   and   though   he 
didn't   outwardly   express   his   opinion,   one   could   tell   he   knew   what   she   meant.   A  thoughtful 
grumble   came   from   his   throat.   "Well,   here   we   are."   He   looked   out   over   the   r oom,   catching 
the   attention   of   the   other   captains.   "Is   everyone   here?   Who   are   we   missing?" 
The   kahunas   and   assorted   captains   sat   in   a  scattered   arrangement   of   chairs,   a 
sofa   dragged   in   from   another   r oom,   and   one   footstool   ( which   Olivia   planted   herself   on,   in 
order   to   be   closest   to   Hala).   T hey   had   all   gathered   on   short   notice   at   Hala's   home   on 
Mele'Mele―Ilima,   Lana,   Mallow,   Kiawe,   Sophocles,   Acerola.   T hey   knew   Mina,   the   waifish 
artist,   wouldn't   be   making   the   meeting―her   head   was   still   in   the   clouds   somewhere   in   Poni 
Island   valley.   T he   figures   nervously   looked   around,   measuring   one   another,   and   finally 
Mallow   spoke   up.   "Is   Hapu   coming?   I  thought   she   was   standing   in   for   Lopaku―" 
"No,"   Acerola   said.   "I   just   talked   to   Hapu―her   grandmommy's   sick." 
Hala   frowned   and   made   another   deep,   r umbling   noise   that   implied   deep   thought. 
"That   is   unfortunate…   And   hardly   a  good   omen."   As   he   said   this,   another   thought   occurred 
to   him;   he   searched   about.   "Where's   Nanu?" 
"Uncle   Nanu's   on   his   way,"   Acerola   mewled.   "I   woke   him   up   myself;   he'll   be   here, 
promise!" 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           3 
Knowing   he'd   be   late   caused   a  wave   of   unhappiness   among   them;   Kiawe   was 
brave   enough   to   verbalize   his   impatience.   "He'd   better   hurry   up!   He's   the   one   with   the   most 
to   answer   for!" 
Mallow,   sitting   close   by,   swatted   at   his   shoulder.   "It's   not   his   fault!" 
"Well,   he's   supposed   to   protect   Ula'Ula,   isn't   he?" 
"It's   my   job   too,"   Acerola   pointed   out. 
"...And   mine,"   Sophocles   mumbled,   barely   audibly. 
"He   had   a  sacred   duty,   is   all   that   I  mean.   He   should   accept   r esponsibility." 
...And   as   if   summoned   by   their   argument,   the   door   r attled   loudly   and   opened   to 
reveal   Kahuna   Nanu. 
They   stared.   He   looked   like   had   just   r olled   out   of   bed,   with   his   breakfast   in   hand: 
a   mug   of   coffee   and   the   nub   of   his   morning   cigarette.   He   r eturned   their   looks   with   a  bleary 
gaze   and   a  muffled,   "'Morning,   kids." 
Acerola   squealed,   "Morning,   Uncle   Nanu!" 
He   winced   at   the   high­pitched   voice,   planting   a  hand   over   one   of   his   ears.   "Girl, 
have   some   mercy,   will   ya?   It's   early,   and   it's   the   weekend…   Criminy―" 
"We're   glad   you   could   make   it,"   Hala   announced.   He   just   barely   disguised   his 
irritation.   "But   please   put   that   outside." 
"Put   what―"   He   looked   into   his   hand,   and   r emembered   the   burning   cigarette. 
"Oh,   gotcha.   One   sec,   kids." 
While   Kahuna   Nanu   staggered   out   onto   the   doorstep   to   stamp   it   out,   the   r est   of 
them   sat   silently,   holding   their   breaths   for   the   start   of   the   troubling   meeting.   It   was   his 
island,   after   all,   where   this   had   all   happened:   they   knew   emotions   would   be   r unning   high. 
Nanu   didn't   show   any   sign   of   tension,   however―he   came   back   inside,   slowly   dragged   a 
chair   from   the   wall   and   into   the   circle,   and   collapsed   into   it   with   a  heave.   He   spilled   a  bit   of 
coffee   on   himself   in   the   process,   so   he   casually   wiped   his   jacket   down   with   his   free   hand, 
then   r ealized   everyone   was   gaping   at   him.   He   crossed   his   legs   and   grunted   irritably. 
"Well,   Hala,"   Nanu   droned,   "seeing   as   you're   in   the   big   chair,   how   about   you   start 
us   off?" 
"How   about   you   start   by   explaining   how   this   all   happened?"   Kiawe   demanded. 
Everyone   held   their   breath;   Nanu   slowly   turned   to   him,   his   eyes   burning   with   a 
powerful   disdain,   and   growled,   "Simmer   down,   kiddo.   Wasn't   talking   to   you   anyway." 
Kiawe   frothed   and   sprang   onto   his   feet.   "' Kiddo '?" 
"Hala!"   Nanu   snarled,   "Get   your   house   in   order,   or   I  will!" 
"We   could   say   the   same   to   you!"   Kiawe   taunted,   though   by   then   Hala   motioned 
for   him   to   quiet   himself,   and   Mallow   had   yanked   him   back   into   his   seat,   scolding   him. 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           4 
As   the   outbursts   settled   into   silence   again,   Nanu   gazed   around   himself,   seeing 
their   tense   faces.   He   made   a  deduction   and   snickered   dryly.   "Well,   isn't   this   fun.   Guess   I  got 
picked   as   the   scapegoat   before   I  even   got   here." 
"It   was   your   officers   who   folded,"   Hala   r eminded   him. 
But   Nanu   gave   him   a  withering   glare.   "I'm   r etired,   Hala,   and   you   know   it.   T hose 
fresh­faced   babies   they   put   in   that   station   were   doomed   with   or   without   me.   'Sides,   if   you're 
gonna   point   fingers,   start   with   yourself." 
"I   beg   your   pardon?" 
"That   boy…   Who's   taken   over   Team   Skull.   One   of   yours,   wasn't   he?"   With   that 
comment,   he   grinned   cruelly.   "What   a  shining   example   of   your   tutelage,   eh?" 
Just   when   Hala   was   about   to   leap   to   his   own   defense,   their   squabble   was 
interrupted. 
"Stop!"   Olivia   jumped   to   her   feet,   barking   her   admonishment   at   the   two   of   them. 
"Is   this   what   you   came   to   do?   Take   potshots   at   each   other   like   a  couple   of   children?" 
"Hrrngh."   Nanu   scratched   the   back   of   his   neck   and   turned   away.   Hala,   too, 
quieted. 
"There's   probably   plenty   of   blame   to   go   around,"   she   continued.   "But   this 
meeting   is   for   discussing   a  plan   of   action."   Seeing   she   had   everyone's   silent   attention,   she 
decided   to   make   the   first   proposal.   "The   most   obvious   thing   to   do,   of   course,   is   fight   back." 
Out   of   the   corner   of   her   eye,   she   saw   Nanu   lean   back   and   r oll   his   eyes.   She 
chose   to   ignore   it. 
"Suffice   to   say,   if   we   kahunas   and   captains   combine   our   pokemon,   we   should   be 
able   to   drive   them   out   of   the   town   and   r eturn   things   to   normal.   I  know   the   Alolas   haven't 
seen   an   operation   like   this   in   a  long   time―but   these   are   mostly   kids,   and   their   advantage   is 
in   numbers,   not   strength." 
Kiawe   crowed.   "I   agree!   If   they   think   they're   so   tough―let's   show   them   what 
we're   made   of!" 
"But   that   sounds…   A  lot   like   a  war,"   Mallow   said. 
Her   discomfort   was   evidently   shared   with   Lana,   who   asked,   "Can't   Tapu   Bulu   do 
something?   Isn't   he   the   island's   guardian?" 
Suddenly,   Nanu   guffawed   with   a  loud,   hoarse   laugh.   "The   two   ladies   are   on   the 
money."   He   turned   to   sneer   in   Mallow   and   Lana's   direction.   "It   sounds   like   a  war,   huh? 
Sweetie,   that   would   be   'cause   they're   starting   one.   As   for   the   Tapus―trade   secret,   so   listen 
close―they   don't   give   a  r at's   tail   about   human   affairs." 
Ilima,   not   one   to   allow   unchecked   cynicism,   cut   in.   "Have   you   actually   tried 
contacting   Tapu   Bulu?" 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           5 
"No,   matter   of   fact,   I  haven't,"   Nanu   said.   "Bulu   likes   to   be   left   to   himself.   I  can 
sympathize." 
Olivia   decided   to   speak   again.   "Nanu,   I'm   sensing   you   don't   like   this   plan." 
He   cocked   an   eyebrow   at   her.   "You   think   so?   Heh." 
"Please,   Nanu,"   Ilima   said,   "give   us   your   thoughts." 
"All   r ight,   all   r ight.   You   wanna   know   what   I  think?   It   think   it's   a  crappy   idea.   Let's 
imagine   this,   now.   You   all   get   together,   gather   your   forces   an'   all,   and   invade.   You   go   an 
start   a  war   with   these   kids.   You'd   probably   win,   but   then   what?   Where   are   these   kids 
gonna   go?   Run   'em   out   of   one   town,   and   they'll   move   onto   the   next―they   trash   the   new 
place,   we   chase   'em   down,   r un   'em   out   again―and   they   keep   goin'.   Soon   we've   got   a 
mess   of   r uined   towns   all   over   the   islands.   Unless   we   arrest   the   whole   lot―or   hey,   it'll   be 
war,   so   what's   a  couple   casualties?" 
If   the   discomfort   was   mild   before,   it   was   excruciating   now.   T he   young   captains 
fidgeted   in   their   seats,   and   the   other   kahunas   cast   their   eyes   on   the   floor   and   the   walls. 
"You're   r ight   about   one   thing.   T hey're   just   kids.   Rambunctious   and   obnoxious, 
yeah,   and   they've   done   their   share   of   property   damage,   but   you   overblow   this,   and   it'll   be 
blood   on   your   hands." 
Olivia   didn't   like   the   direction   this   had   gone―she   crossed   her   arms.   "Then   what 
should   we   do?" 
"How   about   stay   out   of   it ?  It's   my   island.   My   r esponsibility.   I  don't   want   any   of   you 
goodnicks   sticking   your   nose   where   it   doesn't   belong." 
"You   mind   telling   us   what   you   plan   to   do,   then?"   Hala   asked. 
They   expected   Nanu   to   blow   off   this   r equest,   but   to   their   surprise,   he   sighed   with 
cool   introspection,   sucked   a  deep   sip   from   his   by­now   cold   coffee,   and   started   to   explain. 
"We've   got   lots   of   feral   Meowth   on   our   island.   I've   got   lots   of   free   time,   you   know,   being   a 
retired   cop―so   I've   learned   a  lot,   about   how   to   deal   with   'em.   Here's   the   thing.   T hey   could 
be   the   nastiest,   spitting   creatures   you   ever   seen.   Won't   let   you   touch   'em,   or   hardly   look   at 
'em.   But   if   you   take   'em,   and   bring   'em   inside,   and   make   'em   live   with   you―sure,   they   scrap 
with   each   other,   they   tear   up   your   furniture,   make   messes   on   the   floor―but   after   a  while, 
they   get   used   to   you.   A  couple   months   of   that,   and   even   the   most   vicious   ones   curl   up   in 
your   lap." 
"...And   what   does   that   mean?" 
"Contain   them.   Let   them   have   Po   Town.   I'll   move   in,   somehow.   Chaperone,   do 
what   I  can.   Shoot,   maybe   I  can   work   with   'em." 
Olivia   scoffed.   "You   want   to   babysit   a  bunch   of   thugs?" 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           6 
"That's   more   or   less   my   plan,   yeah.   Ain't   like   I  got   much   else   to   do   with   my   time." 
He   slurped   at   his   coffee   again,   giving   the   others   time   to   process   his   idea.   "Welp,   that's   all   I 
have   to   say,   r eally."   He   promptly   got   up,   pushed   his   chair   back,   and   started   for   the   door. 
"Where   are   you   going?"   Hala   demanded.   "We   haven't   voted   on   our   final 
decision!" 
"Go   ahead   and   vote.   I'm   not   changing   my   mind.   Just   know,   if   you   invade   my 
island   without   my   permission?   You'll   come   to   r egret   it." 
"Is   that   a  threat?" 
Nanu   just   shrugged   and   scratched   the   inside   of   his   ear.   "A   good   faith   warning. 
See   ya   'round,   kids.   F or   better   or   for   worse." 
 
In   the   end,   Nanu   didn't   wait   to   hear   their   decision.   It   was   that   afternoon   that   he 
trudged   his   way   up   the   long   path   toward   Po   Town,   cutting   past   the   meadow   and   lifting   his 
coat   collar   against   the   cold   wind.   T he   way   the   mountain   leaned   against   this   valley   pushed 
stormclouds   there   almost   perpetually,   causing   torrents   of   r ain   to   dump   over   the   grassy 
plain.   T he   ground   had   an   uncomfortable,   swampy   feel   that   squished   with   mud   as   he 
trekked   it,   but   thankfully,   soon   enough,   he   saw   the   police   station   brightly   lit   in   the   dark. 
Though   he   could   hear   music   thumping   away   from   inside,   he   paused   a  while   to 
take   the   picture   in.   A  police   cruiser,   its   windshield   and   windows   all   bashed   in,   sat   dejected 
nearby.   Neon   paint   smeared   the   exterior   of   the   building   in   gaudy   symbols   and   slang,   and 
some   of   the   interior   furniture,   probably   pushed   through   a  broken   window,   soaked   up   the 
rain.   What   a  mess .  After   a  minute   or   so   passed,   one   grunt   opened   the   front   door,   and   the 
sound   of   loud   laughter,   r ap   music,   and   broken   glass   all   r olled   out   into   the   night.   T he   grunt 
said   something   to   the   others―but   Nanu   couldn't   understand   it,   not   from   this   far   away. 
In   the   brief   moments   before   he   walked   up   to   the   grunt   and   talked   to   them,   he 
thought   on   those   children―and   pictured   them,   as   he   r emembered   them,   r unning   stupidly 
about   with   their   shiny   baubles   and   dreams.   T hese   children   all   wanted   to   be   someone, 
once,   hadn't   they?   T he   cream   of   the   crop   had   since   floated   to   the   top   of   the   hierarchy, 
becoming   captains   and   champions,   but   what   of   these?   T hese   lumps   in   the   flour,   this   chaff 
from   the   wheat―dreamers   with   no   dreams   left,   who   had   every   ambition   swallowed   by 
mediocrity   and   the   chokehold   of   tradition… 
I   get   it,   he   mused.   T he   world's   spit   on   them,   and   they're   spitting   back. 
Those   thoughts   made   him   hate   being   a  kahuna   all   over   again. 
"Hey!"   T he   grunt   called   out   at   him.   "Hey,   you!   Who's   there?" 
So   then,   it   was   too   late   to   surprise   them.   Nanu   pushed   his   way   forward,   doing   his 
best   to   stay   in   the   light. 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           7 
"A   cop?"   T he   grunt   took   notice   of   his   outfit   immediately   and   yelled   into   the   station. 
"Yo,   a c  op's   here,   fam!" 
"What?" 
"Where!" 
"Get   'im!" 
Hilariously,   they   practically   fell   over   each   other   to   crowd   through   the   doorway   and 
give   him   nasty,   unwelcoming   looks.   A  girl   in   blue   pig­tails   approached   him   first,   puffing   out 
her   chest   to   look   tougher   than   her   small   stature   implied.   He   didn't   r ealize   it   until   she   got 
close,   but   she   waved   a  small   knife   around   to   back   her   posturing.   "Back   off,   copper!   Didn't 
we   chase   yo'   butts   outta   here?" 
He   didn't   flinch   or   move   back.   "Not   me,   blue.   Doesn't   matter,   though.   Not   here   to 
fight   you.   Need   to   have   a  chat   with   your   boss." 
"Big   G?   Yeah,   r ight,   old   man.   You   ain't   gonna   talkin'   to   nobody,   not   after   I'm   done 
with   you."   T he   knife   in   her   hand   swayed,   swayed   back   and   forth,   like   a  serpent   waiting   to 
strike. 
He   heaved   an   exaggerated   sigh.   "Blue.   I've   had   a  long   day.   Don't   wanna   have   to 
man­handle   a  little   thing   like   you.   Now   put   the   knife   down,   and―" 
The   blade   interrupted   him   with   a  silvery,   whispering   sound   as   it   swiped   toward 
his   chest.   He   easily   dodged―she   was   bold,   but   unskilled―and   when   she   clumsily   toppled 
over   herself,   he   swooped   in,   grabbed   her   wrist,   and   let   her   fall   the   r est   of   the   way   to 
ground. 
He   had   her   arm   straight   up   in   the   air,   and   twisted   it   painfully   against   his   knee. 
She   started   screaming   in   pain. 
"Hey!" 
"Let   her   go!" 
He   felt   an   empty   soda   can   launch   against   his   head;   he   ignored   it   and   prayed   they 
wouldn't   throw   anything   more   damaging.   "I   can   break   your   arm   like   this,   blue.   A  little   pull 
this   way―"   He   demonstrated;   she   shrieked   again.   "Drop   the   knife." 
"Stop!" 
"Leave   her   alone,   copper!" 
They   closed   in   around   him   like   hyenas,   but   didn't   dare   physically   intervene.   T he 
girl   was   moaning,   writhing,   and   begging   in   the   mud.   T he   r ain   drenched   them   both   for   some 
long   seconds   until   finally,   her   grip   loosened,   and   the   knife   dropped. 
He   stepped   on   it   and   let   go   of   her.   A  swirl   of   curses,   threats,   and   taunts   started 
around   him,   but   even   as   she   got   up   and   limped   back   to   the   group,   none   of   them   followed 
through.   Mobbing   Murkrow.   All   noise . 

 
( Back   to   Table   of   Contents )           8 
"I   said   it   before,   and   seeing   as   you   all   have   only   a  couple   brain   cells   between   you, 
I'll   say   it   again:   I  don't   want   to   fight.   I  want   to   see   your   boss.   Now." 
 
It's   hard,   Nanu   decided,   to   sum   up   a  r elationship   with   a  town.   T hey   at   first 
distrusted   him,   granting   him   cheap   r ent   for   use   of   the   police   station   only   because   they 
needed   the   easy   cash   flow.   T hey   called   him   "cop"   and   "old   man"   and   "geezer."   But   from 
then   on,   the   picture   gets   fuzzy:   within   months,   his   name   became   a  polite   "Mr.   Nanu,"   or 
"Officer   Nanu,"   and   within   even   more   time,   the   grunts   favored   the   warmth   of   "Uncle,"   as   in, 
"'Morning,   Uncle   Nanu!"   and   "Hey   Uncle,   how   are   the   Meowth   today?"   ( because   old   habits 
die   hard,   and   the   empty   space   in   the   station   could   do   nothing   else   but   fill   up   with   ferals). 
He   couldn't   decide   if   all   meant   something.   He   didn't   know   what   difference   he   had 
made   in   that   year.   Sometimes   it   felt   like   he   could   save   them,   bond   with   them―bring   over 
some   malasadas,   swap   stories,   sit   patiently   through   their   ungodly   freestyle   sessions. 
Plumeria   proved   more   amenable   than   the   boy,   but   even   Guzma,   especially   after   a  drink   or 
two,   came   to   crave   his   paternal   doting.   ( And   after   too   many   drinks,   Guzma   would   let   it   slip, 
slurring   and   whiny,   "Da­a­ad,   I  know―"). 
But   other   days,   it   all   fell   r ight   back   to   the   spitting,   hitting,   and   biting―thrown   beer 
bottles   and   threats   to   cut   him   open   like   a  fish.   He   comes   home,   it's   covered   in   graffiti,   and 
he   just   doesn't   know. 
Still,   it   wasn't   the   worst   life   he   had   chosen   for   himself.   T he   r ent   was   cheap.   No 
day   was   boring.   And   he   didn't   need   to   have   a  r oommate,   which   meant   every   night,   he   was 
greeted   the   same   way―the   mewls   and   purrs   of   his   loyal   clan.   Meowth,   at   least―he   mused 
as   he   scratched   their   ears   and   murmured   sweet­talk―don't   care   who   you   are,   or   whether 
you've   failed,   or   whether   you're   very   interesting. 
He   could   live   like   this   forever. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 






Download Beasts and Beauties (Finished Chapters) - Google Docs



Beasts and Beauties (Finished Chapters) - Google Docs.pdf (PDF, 1.52 MB)


Download PDF







Share this file on social networks



     





Link to this page



Permanent link

Use the permanent link to the download page to share your document on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or directly with a contact by e-Mail, Messenger, Whatsapp, Line..




Short link

Use the short link to share your document on Twitter or by text message (SMS)




HTML Code

Copy the following HTML code to share your document on a Website or Blog




QR Code to this page


QR Code link to PDF file Beasts and Beauties (Finished Chapters) - Google Docs.pdf






This file has been shared publicly by a user of PDF Archive.
Document ID: 0000571194.
Report illicit content