alicebatesdisertation.pdf


Preview of PDF document alicebatesdisertation.pdf

Page 1...4 5 67836

Text preview


! |Page
6

how to assess positive and relaxed behaviour (Boissy, et al. 2007). Good animal
welfare is about more than just ensuring the animal is not suffering and is receiving
the basic requirements for survival (e.g. food and water). The notion “quality of life”
suggests that welfare encompasses the animal’s relationship with the environment
and how it lives its life. It gives a more positive approach than simply looking for an
absence in suffering and looks at what the animal prefers and what opportunities
they have (Wemelsfelder, 2007). Although still controversial it is now becoming
accepted amongst researchers that animals do in fact experience emotions and as in
humans, use these emotions to assess the world around them.

An emotion can be defined as an intense, but short-lived, response to an event. The
exact purpose of emotions are unknown but it is likely that they have evolved from
basic mechanisms enabling the animal to avoid harm and seek resources (Boissy, et
al. 2011). The ability to express and recognize emotions is a vital part of socialization
between animals of the same species and allows for empathetic reactions (Stetina,
et al. 2011). There are different definitions of what the “basic emotions” are but these
mainly include disgust, interest/excitement, happiness/joy, anger, fear, grief, surprise,
shame/shyness, guilt, and contempt (Izard, 1994). Not being able to recognise these
basic emotions in the same species can lead to conflict, but identification of
emotional expressions in non-human animals is something humans are rarely able to
do (Stetina, et al. 2011).

Although still controversial it is now becoming accepted amongst most researchers
that animals do in fact experience emotions and as in humans, use these emotions
to assess the dangers and opportunities of the world around them (Mendl, et al.