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Hardin Simmons .pdf


Original filename: Hardin Simmons.pdf
Title: IMMEDIATE EFFECTS IN SHOULDER INTERNAL ROTATION RANGE OF MOTION WITH THREE DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES Rutland, MD, Hinman, MK, Bruton C, Loney R, Rawlings J, Shults B Hardin-Simmons University, Department of Physical Therapy Abilene, TX 79698
Author: Wheeler, Jennifer

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UPRIGHT POSE© VS THORACIC ROLL STRETCH AND
THE EFFECTS ON POSTURE ON SEDENTARY
OFFICE WORKERS
Rutland, MD, Carter B, Flores S, Nfodjo A, Spruiell J
Hardin-Simmons University, Department of Physical Therapy
Abilene, TX 79698
PURPOSE:

Data Analysis: An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used

The primary purpose of the proposed
study is to: Compare the effects of the Upright Pose©
vs. the thoracic roll stretch on sedentary office workers
versus instruction in a home exercises program through
postural assessment and endurance.

METHODS:
Subjects: Sedentary office workers were evaluated by
four physical therapy students in Abilene, TX at three
different locations (McMurry University, West Texas
Rehab Center, and Hardin-Simmons University)
Procedures: Prior to testing, participants signed a
medical
release
and
completed
demographic
information. Blood pressure, height assessment, and a
photograph of posture was taken prior to testing.
Posture was measured with the Flexicurve® device by
two physical therapy students. The instrument was
removed and traced onto a piece of plain white paper.
An Index of Kyphosis (IK) and Index of Lordosis (IL)
was calculated from the measures of the thoracic and
lumbar curves. The same tester measured and traced
each curve to maintain consistency. Participants then
randomly choose one of the three interventions (Group
1=Upright Pose©, Group 2=Foam roll stretch, Group
3=Posture education). Group 1 was educated in proper
use of the Upright Pose© and was instructed to use it
for 30 minutes during the workday. Group 2 was
instructed to lie longitudinally on the foam roller with
head support for 10 minutes, twice a day. Group 3
received instructions in proper posture to be done once
each hour during the workday.(Fig 1) Participants had
to demonstrate correct performance of Upright Pose©
use, foam roller stretching, and postural correction.
Following intervention, a post-test photograph was
taken.
AAS

a

c

b

Figure 1: Intervention Groups a. Upright Pose©
b. Thoracic Roll Stretch c. Postural Correction
14

Pre-test Index of Kyphosis

Post-test Index of Kyphosis

Pre-test Index of Lordosis

Post-test Index of Lordosis
12.085

12

10.962

11.5005

10.35

11.134

10.881
10.502

10.294
9.9865

10

8

6

M
E
A
N

8.47
8.285
7.3

P
O
W
E
R

4

2

0

Upright Pose©

Thoracic Roll Stretch Posture Correction

to determine if a significant change occurred in thoracic and/or
lumbar posture (dependent variable). Age, gender, and activity
level were entered as covariates. A post-hoc Tukey test was
used to determine the differences between groups. All data
was analyzed with SPSS 22 statistical software (p< 0.05).
RESULTS: A total of 60 participants (M=11, F=49) with a
mean age of 48.63 were evaluated. A significant change
between pre and post-test values overall (p=0.001) was found.
There was a significant difference between pre and post-test
measurements of subjects’ lordotic curve (p<0.05).(Fig 2) No
significant difference found in pre and post-test measurements
of subjects’ kyphotic curve (p =0.366). No significant
difference was found between the three interventions
(p=0.699). Wilks’ Lambda for between subjects’ pre and post
value was p<0.001 and between interventions 0.699 (p<0.05).
Based upon two separate age groups (31-49 years; 50-67
years), the younger group exhibited a significance between
group 1 and 3 (p =0.05). No significance was found between
age or sex with interventions.
CONCLUSIONS: A significant difference was found in
pre and post-measure for lordosis. No one intervention was
more significant than the other for posture curve changes. The
younger age of 31 to 49 years exhibited a greater effect for
improving both kyphotic and lordotic curves.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: It behooves us as clinicians
to assist in training patients with proper posture to decrease
pain, healthcare costs, absence days, and increased
occupational productivity and overall quality of life. In
sedentary office workers of younger age, this training can be
used to improve postural alignment over time. Further
research evaluating this population is needed to establish
normative data.

Table 1: Pre and Post values of index of kyphosis
and lordosis
A special thank you to those who participated in this study


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