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7/13/2017

AST 303 (Control Systems)
Lec. Mohammad Mehdi GOMROKI

Transient and Steady-State Response
Analyses

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INTRODUCTION
Typical Test Signals. The commonly used test input signals are step functions, ramp
functions, acceleration functions, impulse functions, sinusoidal functions, and
white noise. In this chapter we use test signals such as step, ramp, acceleration and
impulse signals. With these test signals, mathematical and experimental analyses of
control systems can be carried out easily, since the signals are very simple functions of
time.
If the inputs to a control system are gradually changing functions of time, then a ramp
function of time may be a good test signal. Similarly, if a system is subjected to sudden
disturbances, a step function of time may be a good test signal; and for a system
subjected to shock inputs, an impulse function may be best.
The use of such test signals enables one to compare the performance of many systems
on the same basis.

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INTRODUCTION
Transient Response and Steady-State Response. The time response of a control
system consists of two parts: the transient response and the steady-state response. By
transient response, we mean that which goes from the initial state to the final state. By
steady-state response, we mean the manner in which the system output behaves as t
approaches infinity. Thus the system response ๐‘(๐‘ก) may be written as

where the first term on the right-hand side of the equation is the transient response and
the second term is the steady-state response.

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INTRODUCTION
Absolute Stability, Relative Stability, and Steady-State Error. In designing a control
system, we must be able to predict the dynamic behavior of the system from a
knowledge of the components. The most important characteristic of the dynamic
behavior of a control system is absolute stabilityโ€”that is, whether the system is stable
or unstable. A control system is in equilibrium if, in the absence of any disturbance or
input, the output stays in the same state.
A linear time-invariant control system is stable if the output eventually comes back to
its equilibrium state when the system is subjected to an initial condition. A linear timeinvariant control system is critically stable if oscillations of the output continue forever.
It is unstable if the output diverges without bound from its equilibrium state when the
system is subjected to an initial condition.
If the output of a system at steady state does not exactly agree with the input, the
system is said to have steady-state error. This error is indicative of the accuracy of the
system.

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS

The input-output relationship is given by

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS
Unit-Step Response of First-Order Systems. Since the Laplace transform of the unitstep function is 1/s,

Expanding C(s) into partial fractions gives

Taking the inverse Laplace transform, we obtain

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS
Unit-Ramp Response of First-Order Systems. Since the Laplace transform of the
unit-ramp function is 1 ๐‘  2, we obtain

The error signal e(t) is then

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS

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FIRST-ORDER SYSTEMS
Unit-Impulse Response of First-Order Systems. For the unit-impulse input, R(s)=1
and the output of the system can be obtained as

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS
Here, we shall obtain the response of a typical second-order control system to a step
input, ramp input, and impulse input. We consider a servo system as an example of a
second-order system.
Servo System. The servo system consists of a proportional controller and load
elements (inertia and viscous-friction elements). Suppose that we wish to control the
output position c in accordance with the input position r.
The closed-loop transfer function is obtained as

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS
Step Response of Second-Order System. The closed-loop transfer function of the
system is

which can be rewritten as

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS
In the transient-response analysis, it is convenient to write

where ๐œŽ is called the attenuation; ๐œ”๐‘› , the undamped natural frequency; and ๐œ, the
damping ratio of the system. The damping ratio ๐œ is the ratio of the actual damping ๐ต to
the critical damping ๐ต๐‘ = 2 ๐ฝ๐พ or

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS

(1) Underdamped case (๐ŸŽ < ๐œป < ๐Ÿ):

where ๐œ”๐‘‘ = ๐œ”๐‘› 1 โˆ’ ๐œ 2. The frequency ๐œ”๐‘‘ is called the damped natural frequency.
For a unit-step input, C(s) can be written

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS
The error signal for this system is the difference between the input and output and is

This error signal exhibits a damped sinusoidal oscillation. At steady state, or at ๐‘ก = โˆž,
no error exists between the input and output.
If the damping ratio ๐œ is equal to zero, the response becomes undamped and
oscillations continue indefinitely.

we see that ๐œ”๐‘› represents the undamped natural frequency of the system.

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SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS
(2) Critically damped case (๐œป = ๐Ÿ): If the two poles of C(s)/R(s) are equal, the
system is said to be a critically damped one.
For a unit-step input, R(s)=1/s and C(s) can be written

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