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2010 April.pdf


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GARY McNEW'S TIP OF THE MONTH
“The Sound of Gold”
I have seen this question many times by club
members and other hunters I have met on the beach:
“Why does gold have such a wide range of sounds?”
Gold comes in many different Karat ratings. To make
these different Karats, gold is mixed or alloyed with
other metals such as silver, copper, tin, and nickel to
make it harder or to create different colors. A detector
identifies a metal object by its conductivity. Gold is a
poor conductor, but when mixed with other metals, that
conductivity increases. As the conductivity increases,
the tone reported by your detector increases. Other
things that will affect the sound a piece of gold creates
are the shape and size. A small pendent will not
produce the same tone as a large ring. So, get your
detector, head to the beach, have fun, and dig all of
those lower tones. It may be a pull-tab, a gum wrapper,
or it just might be the ring of your dreams.

BURIED COIN CACHE
FIRST CLUE:
Take Southern off Rte 95.
It will be about 2 miles+ when you arrive.
Search to the west
and hope for the best.
Rhyme Time:
The signal it gave me was very fickle
So I capped off with a nickel
After checking the new signal several times
I swapped the nickel for two dimes.
SECOND CLUE:
5 large live Oaks
Line the trail
If you have high expectations
You might not fail.
Item buried is a small vitamin container 2 3/4" long and
1 1/2 " in diameter. It is placed in a Ziploc® bag.

Burial of cache and the clues are provided by Irving
Smith. If found by a club member, that person will receive a
$25 prize AND earn the right to bury the next cache! Good
luck everyone! Start digging! Please fill all holes!
PLEASE REMEMBER OUR CODE OF ETHICS:
HAVE PERMISSION AND DO NO HARM

From Left: Judi & Willie Ray; Amy & Steve Hamedl;
Heather & Gary McNew; Irving Smith; and Bob Dobski

GARY’S REPORT ON THE
TCAS 23rd ANNUAL BENEFIT HUNT
Despite all the rain, a great time was had at the 23rd
Annual Treasure Coast Archeological Society Hunt in
Wabasso, Florida on March 13th. There were 59
hunters, including Gary & Heather McNew, Willie &
Judi Ray, Steve & Amy Hamedl, Irving Smith, and
Bob Dobski from the GCTC. The guys hunted while
the gals relaxed. Just over 1,200 silver dimes were
planted in the last hunt; the guys recovered over 100 of
them. Many prizes, provided by Garrett, were given
away, with Gary receiving a pair of headphones, Bob,
a screwdriver set and Irving, a travel bag.

****************************************
Newsletter corrections and/or suggestions
are welcomed by the editor

**********************************
HEADS UP FOR SHARKS!
On March 30th Jason Petenbrink emailed a
warning to Jan Smirnow that the beaches were closed
again due to sharks. Jason suggested, “Watch the
lifeguard stands before you jump in the water.”
Thanks, guys, for sharing that good advice that we all
should heed! (Remember: Safety first! Gold second!)

**********************************
CONTEST COMING IN AUGUST!
“WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR FINDS”
Don’t forget that our “What to Do with Your Finds
Contest” is coming. Members will be challenged to
submit entries made out of things they’ve found while
detecting. Silver prizes will be awarded in three
categories: Most Creative, Best Display and Most
Unusual. Members are not limited to the number of
entries that they can submit and everyone is
encouraged to participate.