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FRI - A

UG 11T

GETTING
NEWSLETTERS
DONE FOR
NEXT WEEK
WHILE MIKE
IS ON VACATION

Created by

H

Michael Matson

JANET’S
BIRTHDAY BASH
MIKE IS OUT
AT NOON
TODAY FOR
VACATION

ONLY 137 DAYS UNTIL

CHRISTMAS

REMEMBER - IF YOU NEED ANY IN ROOM ACTIVITIES, OTHER THAN YOUR TV, PLEASE LET
MICHAEL KNOW AND HE WILL BE MORE THAN HAPPY TO GET YOU SOMETHING TO KEEP YOU
OCCUPIED. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO UTILIZE OUR LIBRARY IN THE ACTIVITIES ROOM. ALL BOOKS
ARE YOURS TO KEEP.

ON THIS DAY - AUGUST 11TH
status after Japan’s surrender.
1860 - The first successful silver mill in
America began operations. The mill was in
Virginia City, NV.
1874 - A patent for the sprinkler head was
given to Harry S. Parmelee.

1951 - The first major league baseball game
to be televised in color was broadcast. The
Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the Boston Braves
8-1.

1954 - Seven years of fighting came to an end
1877 - The two moons of Mars were discovered in Indochina. A formal peace was in place for
by Asaph Hall, an American astronomer. He
the French and the Communist Vietminh.
named them Phobos and Deimos.
1962 - Andrian Nikolayev, of the Soviet Union,
1896 - Harvey Hubbell received a patent for
was launched on a 94-hour flight. He was the
the electric light bulb socket with a pull-chain. third Russian to go into space.
1909 - The American ship Arapahoe became
the first to ever use the SOS distress signal off
the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC.

1965 - The U.S. conducted a second launch of
“Surveyor-SD 2” for a landing on the Moon
surface test.

1924 - Newsreel pictures were taken of U.S.
presidential candidates for the first time.

1971 - Harmon Killebrew of the Minnesota
Twins got his 500th and 501st home runs of his
major league baseball career.

1934 - Alcatraz, in San Francisco Bay, received
federal prisoners for the first time.

1975 - The U.S. vetoed the proposed admission
of North and South Vietnam to the United
1941 - The Atlantic Charter was signed by U.S. Nations. The Security Counsel had already
President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime refused to consider South Korea’s application.
Minister Winston Churchill.
1984 - Carl Lewis won his fourth gold medal in
1942 - During World War II, Pierre Laval
the 1984 Summer Olympics.
publicly announced “the hour of liberation for
France is the hour when Germany wins the
1984 - U.S. President Ronald Reagan was
war.”
preparing for his weekly radio broadcast
when, during testing of the microphone, the
1945 - The Allies informed Japan that they
President said of the Soviet Union, “My fellow
would determine Emperor Hirohito’s future
Americans, I am pleased to tell you that I just

signed legislation that would outlaw Russia
forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.”
1984 - The Cincinnati Reds honored major
league All-Star and Hall of Fame catcher
Johnny Bench by retiring his uniform (#5).
1988 - Dick Thornburgh was unanimously
confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be the next
attorney general. He succeeded Edwin Meese
III.
1990 - Egyptian and Moroccan troops joined
U.S. forces in Saudia Arabia to help protect
from a possible Iraqi attack.
1991 - The space shuttle Atlantis ended its
nine-day journey by landing safely.
1992 - In Bloomington, MN, the Mall of
America opened. It was the largest shopping
mall in the United States.
1994 - The Tenth International Conference on
AIDS ended in Japan.
1994 - A U.S. federal jury awarded $286.8
million to about 10,000 commercial fishermen
for losses as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez
oil spill.
1995 - All U.S. nuclear tests were banned by
President Clinton.
1997 - U.S. President Clinton made the first use
of the line-item veto approved by Congress,
rejecting three items in spending and tax bills.
1998 - British Petroleum became No. 3 among

oil companies with the $49 billion purchase of
Amoco. It was the largest foreign takeover of a
U.S. company.
2002 - US Airways announced that it had filed
for bankruptcy.
2002 - Jason Priestly crashed his car during
practice for a race in the Infiniti Pro Series.
He suffered a spinal fracture, a moderate
concussion, a broken nose, facial lacerations
and broken bones in both feet.
2003 - Charles Taylor, President of Liberia,
flew into exile after ceding power to his vice
president, Moses Blah.
2003 - In Kabul, NATO took command
of the 5,000-strong peacekeeping force in
Afghanistan.

Across
1. Comedian ____ Carvey
5. Diminish
10. Singe
14. Woodsmen's tools
15. Smooth
16. Carson's successor
17. Maui garlands
18. Shine
19. Snacks
20. Unlawful
22. Scanty
24. Rains ice
27. Griffith and Warhol
28. Hobby wood
31. October gems
33. Freudian term
34. Gun jerk
37. Greek Cupid
41. Actor ____ Crowe
43. Capital of Kenya
45. Pant
46. Most feeble
48. Succeeded
49. Rental agreement
51. Curvy letters
53. Fertile desert spot
56. Blood component
59. Nastier
61. Blunder
65. Doesn't exist
66. Clip
69. Mall event
70. Haul
71. Stanza
72. She, in Nice
73. Ship's pole
74. Printing machine
75. School table

Down
1. Painter Salvador ____
2. Figure skater's jump
3. Singer ____ Diamond
4. Evaluate
5. Pond growth
6. Southern beauty
7. Wide street (abbr.)
8. Iced ____
9. Shade sources
10. Detergent
11. Listened to
12. Restless
13. Thorny blooms
21. Blinding light

23. Chum
25. As well as
26. Backbone
28. Ice mass
29. Water (Sp.)
30. Defeat
32. What a pity!
35. She, in Valencia
36. Necklace part
38. Aisles
39. Bassoon's relative
40. Transgressions
42. Sliver
44. List entries

47. Director ____ Brooks
50. Opposite of WNW
52. Talked back
53. Leaves out
54. Fable collector
55. Mr. Claus
57. Pile up
58. Fathers
60. Invitation letters
62. "A ____ of Two
Cities"
63. Building extensions
64. Quick look
67. That gal
68. Browning's "before"

Across
1. Comedian ____ Carvey
5. Diminish
10. Singe
14. Woodsmen's tools
15. Smooth
16. Carson's successor
17. Maui garlands
18. Shine
19. Snacks
20. Unlawful
22. Scanty
24. Rains ice
27. Griffith and Warhol
28. Hobby wood
31. October gems
33. Freudian term
34. Gun jerk
37. Greek Cupid
41. Actor ____ Crowe
43. Capital of Kenya
45. Pant
46. Most feeble
48. Succeeded
49. Rental agreement
51. Curvy letters
53. Fertile desert spot
56. Blood component
59. Nastier
61. Blunder
65. Doesn't exist
66. Clip
69. Mall event
70. Haul
71. Stanza
72. She, in Nice
73. Ship's pole
74. Printing machine
75. School table

Down
1. Painter Salvador ____
2. Figure skater's jump
3. Singer ____ Diamond
4. Evaluate
5. Pond growth
6. Southern beauty
7. Wide street (abbr.)
8. Iced ____
9. Shade sources
10. Detergent
11. Listened to
12. Restless
13. Thorny blooms
21. Blinding light

23. Chum
25. As well as
26. Backbone
28. Ice mass
29. Water (Sp.)
30. Defeat
32. What a pity!
35. She, in Valencia
36. Necklace part
38. Aisles
39. Bassoon's relative
40. Transgressions
42. Sliver
44. List entries

47. Director ____ Brooks
50. Opposite of WNW
52. Talked back
53. Leaves out
54. Fable collector
55. Mr. Claus
57. Pile up
58. Fathers
60. Invitation letters
62. "A ____ of Two
Cities"
63. Building extensions
64. Quick look
67. That gal
68. Browning's "before"

THE 1962 SEATTLE...

WORLDS FAIR

Century 21 World’s Fair

The Century 21 Exposition - also known as the
Seattle World’s Fair - was held between April 21
and October 21, 1962 drew almost 10 million
visitors. A defining moment in the history of
Seattle, this fair began life
as the brainchild of City
Councilman Al Rochester.
By 1955, the councilman
had generated considerable
interest in his idea from
decision makers at the
state and city level, and
in January Washington’s
legislature allocated $5,000
for a small commission to
study the feasibility of such
a fair. Public excitement,
spurred on by effective
advertisement, soon
gave the project further
momentum; in 1957
Seattle voters passed a $7.5
million Civic Center bond
for possible fairground
development, an amount
which was then matched
by the legislature.
The newly-expanded
Commission of 1957
decided on a theme for the Fair centered on
modern science, space exploration, and the
progressive future, wrapped in the broad concept
of a ‘Century 21 Exposition.’ A 28-acre parcel
of city-owned land near Queen Anne Hill was

eventually chosen for the site of the Fair over
larger and more nominally attractive sites such
as Fort Lawton (800 acres) and Sand Point Naval
Air Station (350 acres). The site’s proximity to
the downtown area, as well as the interest in
converting the Exposition’s permanent facilities
into a Civic Center after
the fair made this location
attractive to the planners.
Early planning continued
into 1960, when the
Century 21 Commission,
after considerable
lobbying, secured from the
International Bureau of
Expositions a certification
as an official World’s Fair.
International confirmation
provided a powerful
legitimacy among the
various entities the Fair’s
representatives sought
to attract as funders and
exhibit-builders. Enticed by
the publicity possibilities
inherent in the millions
of fair-goers projected to
appear, several giants of
American business decided
to sponsor exhibits in the
‘World of Commerce and
Industry’ section of the Exposition, including Ford
Motor Company, Boeing, and Bell Telephone.
The US Government, for its part, was exceedingly
interested in demonstrating the nation’s scientific

prowess to the world, and so committed over $9
million to the fair, chiefly to build the NASAthemed United States Science Exhibit (now the
Pacific Science Center). A number of foreign
governments provided the international flavor
crucial to a World’s Fair, and eventually 35 states
signed on as exhibitors. The tense geopolitical
mood of the early 1960s, however, limited
involvement of the Communist states; the Soviet
Union declined to participate, and the People’s
Republic of China, North Vietnam, and North
Korea were not invited.
To coordinate the overarching blueprint of all
these exhibits, respected designer Paul Thiry was
hired as chief architect of the Exposition. Thiry
was also tapped to design the Washington State
Pavilion (now the KeyArena), the conceptual

centerpiece of the ‘World of Tomorrow’ section.
Under the supervision of Thiry, the World’s Fair
Commission, and the city’s Civic Center Advisory
Committee, the ideas and plans of many differing
minds began to take shape in the fairgrounds at
the base of Queen Anne Hill, gradually creating
an aesthetically adventurous cityscape intended to
excite the visitor with futuristic visions of scientific
progress.
Reinforcing this sense of futurism was the ultramodern Monorail line developed to ferry tourists
from downtown Seattle to the fairgrounds. Those
searching for more conventional entertainments
would be catered to as well, with the construction
of the ‘Gayway’ (a small amusement park that
would become the Fun Forest) and ‘Show Street’
(the “adult entertainment” section, featuring a


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