PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media Motherboard .pdf


Original filename: The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard.pdf

This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/59.0.3071.86 Safari/537.36 / Skia/PDF m59, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 20/08/2017 at 20:39, from IP address 178.202.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 195 times.
File size: 9.9 MB (13 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

OP-ED

The Ethics of
Doxing Nazis on
Social Media
WP

 WHITNEY PHILLIPS
Aug 16 2017, 9:35pm

The important question is: does any of this help?
Image: Getty

SHARE

TWEET

Because 2017 is a clown car of human misery, the question of the day is whether or not it is
ok to name and shame fascists on social media.
The best argument against outing Charlottesville marchers is the possibility—and, already,
the actuality—of misidenti cation. Being misidenti ed online, for any reason, is always a
problem; it strips a person of their ability to consent to what happens to their name and
likeness, and can follow an individual through their personal and professional lives long
after a controversy has passed. Being misidenti ed as a Nazi, truly one of the worst things a
person can be, is particularly serious.

https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

1/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

Also serious is how easily online vigilantism can be hijacked by bad-faith actors looking to
sow discord for discord's sake, or even to deliberately frame an opposing party. Say, white
nationalists looking to discredit antiracists by deliberately misidentifying march
participants. This is the lesson I've taken from nearly ten years of studying these kinds of
cases: the more chum is oating in the water, the warier the public should be of strangers
taking stands on the internet. And when in doubt, just stop moving.
On the other hand, the best argument for outing marchers is that participants chose, of
their own volition, to march in a highly publicized white supremacist rally, faces uncovered,
as countless iPhones gleamed in the tiki torch light. They were the ones who outed
themselves publicly. Having their personal information publicized further is a natural
extension of that choice.
Plus, this argument goes, being a damn Nazi ("Nazi" here used imprecisely and de antly, as
marchers were a far motlier crew than just self-described Nazis; however, by my
estimation, giving Nazi salutes and chanting Nazi slogans, or simply choosing to publicly
associate oneself with those who do, forfeits one's right not to be called a Nazi) is a
qualitatively di erent thing than saying an o ensive joke on Twitter, which has been the
source of many a vigilante intervention. It is a qualitatively di erent thing than having a
political outlook that others might disagree with. Being a Nazi, associating with Nazis, or
simply hanging around while other Nazis do their thing, is a public health issue. It is an
ideology literally predicated on exclusion and violence. It is fundamentally undemocratic,
and fundamentally dangerous. Fuck them and the grand dragon they rode in on.
Both arguments are, I think, quite compelling. They are also surface phenomena. Because
while the immediate question might be "to dox or not to dox," or at least, "to RT those who
have doxed or not to RT," there is a bigger question to consider. Particularly for white
people of good will, that question is, am I being a good ally, does any of this help.

This is the moment, for white men in particular, to
lower your microphones, let someone speak with
theirs, and when it's needed, to give them yours.
In the speci c case of naming and shaming Nazis, the rst issue to consider is how the
media narrative has been framed. In the immediate aftermath of the march, the focus of
many of these stories has been the misidenti cation of participants. Understandably so, as
that is the strongest argument against vigilantism more broadly. Other stories have focused
on the impact these actions have had on participants, for example rings and other
immediate social consequences. Still others have questioned the practice of doxxing under
any circumstance, on the grounds that it contributes to mob mentality. Each of these points
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

2/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

is absolutely worth discussion, in this case and more generally. That said, they all do the
same basic thing in response to Charlottesville: They frame the fascists as the protagonists
of the story. They make it about them.
To be clear, we cannot and must not ignore the photos of screaming, dead-eyed white
supremacists currently ricocheting across social media. But we also cannot and must not
approach these images with a fetishized gaze, in which our sight is restricted to those
within the frame. The optics and iconography the protestors employed, from the Nazi
salute to the Confederate ag to the various echoes of Klan rallies, have a long, violent,
traumatizing history in this country.
Because of this history, literally building on this history, marchers were perpetuating
symbolic violence before they raised a single st, before they swung a single tiki torch. The
targets of this violence, the context for this violence, the ways in which this violence has
destroyed so many lives for so many generations—that is the true core of the narrative,
and is something that is too easily lost when the lede is preoccupied with what happened
to one of the screaming, dead-eyed, pasty faces featured in those images. There are other
faces—nonwhite faces, women's faces—far more deserving of having their stories told, and
futures fretted over.
Railing against speci c white supremacists—whether or not you choose to identify them or
amplify existing information—certainly isn't mutually exclusive with other forms of protest.
We can all do many things at once, our brains are pretty big. That said, to stand up to forces
of bigotry, to look these forces straight in the eye and say not a fucking inch, it's not enough
just to bellow condemnation, and certainly not enough to keep talking mostly about white
people. This is the moment, for white men in particular, to lower your microphones, let
someone speak with theirs, and when it's needed, to give them yours.
The other question to consider when deciding whether to name and shame Nazis is whose
interests you'll be serving if you do, particularly if you cannot verify with 100 percent
certainty that the person you're naming and shaming is, in fact, guilty as charged. If you
identify the wrong person, you are doing the white supremacists' work for them. If you
identify the right person, you may still be doing the white supremacists' work for them.
Let's be humans for a moment. It is undeniably satisfying to think that the Charlottesville
marchers will have to face the consequences of their choices. That they will face judgment
and condemnation. It is infuriating to think that they wouldn't, and irresponsible to even
propose letting them o the hook.
At the same time, ampli cation of these kinds of images and videos is good for the fascist
cause. It raises their cultural visibility, provides a warped con rmation of their cry-bully
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

3/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

martyrdom (this is the entire basis of the "on many sides" argument), and helps cohere an
even deeper sense of the collective fascist us.
This certainly doesn't mean we sit back, say nothing, and assure ourselves that this too will
pass. It won't if we do. We are in danger if we do. But there are bigger questions to ask,
here, and deeper ethical depths to plumb, above and beyond the immediate,
understandable impulse to click the RT button. If it wasn't apparent before this weekend, it
is now clearly time to start taking that dive.
Whitney Phillips of Mercer University is the co-author of The Ambivalent Internet.

SHARE

TWEET

TWITTER

SOCIAL MEDIA

NAZIS

DOXING

CHARLOTTESVILLE

Watch This Next

2:47

The Math That Predicted the Arab Spring

Find us in the
future.
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

4/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

LIKE MOTHERBOARD

MIND JACK

New Cyberpunk Game Asks Players to
Invade People’s Nightmares
 MATTHEW GAULT
Aug 18 2017, 4:00pm

Image: Aspyr

‘Observer’ pits players against the trauma of strangers.
SHARE

TWEET

Amir is dying in front of me. There's blood all over his apartment and he's barely aware of
his surroundings. I ask him who did this and he tries to answer, but only bloody wheezes
get past his lips. It's alright though, I've got other ways to get the information I need.
I pull a cable from the dream eater on my right hand, cradle Amir's head, nd the port on
the back of his neck, and jack into his mind. Our consciousnesses merge and I'm wandering
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

5/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

the fragmented, broken nightmares of a dying man. I need to see the moment he was
attacked, but to get there, I'll have to navigate his nightmares. The longer I stay, the more
my own memories bleed into his. If I'm in his head too long, I'll lose all sense of where Amir
ends and I begin.
This scene takes place in the early hours of Observer, a new cyberpunk horror game from
Polish developer Bloober Team SA—the indie developers behind Layers of Fear. Observer
puts you in the shoes of Dan Lazarski, a corporate detective who specializes in neural
interrogation.
He's a leech—a person with the tech and the temerity to jack directly into unwilling people's
minds and steal information. People in the world of Observer fear leeches because they
tend to go crazy after rummaging around in the brains of society's criminals. As players
move through the game, they watch Lazarski 's sanity unfurl as he slams corporationapproved mood stabilizers to manage his fragile mental state and keep reality in
perspective.
It's not a "walking simulator" and it's not an adventure game. There are jump scares,
psychological horror, puzzles, detective work, and dialogue trees—but no combat to speak
of, and few consequences beyond Lazarski's slow descent into madness. Players explore
their surroundings to move the story forward. The rst case puts the detective in a
tenement building rooting through the apartment of a dead hacker with a missing head.
You scan the body for trauma, look for hidden panels, and open drawers searching for
clues.
It's a good game elevated by its amazing sense of place and Rutger Hauer. Cypberpunk icon
Hauer is the man who played Roy Batty in Blade Runner and delivered everyone's favorite
monologue about tears and rain. In Observer, his likeness and voice lend weight to Lazarski.
His noir-style monologues, gritty voice, and subdued performance made me imagine what
Blade Runner would have been like with Hauer as Deckard instead of Harrison Ford.

https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

6/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

Hauer is great but the main draw to Observer is its story and setting. The game takes place
in Krakow, Poland in 2084. After a terrible digital plague called the nanophage wiped out
most of the population, East fought West in a massive war that killed most people on Earth.
One of the few places left relatively untouched was Poland, where a new "republic"
organized around a megacorp and quickly took power.
Lazarski exists in this world as a leech—feeding o the dreams of the destitute—but the
sudden reappearance of his missing son humanizes him.
Observer's Krakow is as hellish as you'd imagine a city run by corporation to be. Trash litters
the streets, dayglow advertisements assault you at every turn, and tech-junkies addicted to
strange drugs quiver in dark alleys. Boomer Team SA nailed the high-tech, low-life
atmosphere.
The way Observer tells that story is excellent. As Lazarski works cases, he's also chasing
after that missing son. But it's also possible that the detective's son is dead and the leech is
just beginning to lose himself. Every stroll through the memories of a suspect teases out
bits of his past until his o cial cases and his personal story blend together and Lazarski
and the player are both so disoriented they have trouble telling what's real and what's not.
A stranger's dream is a great place to set a horror game. Dreams are personal and strange
and often only make sense to the dreamer. Entering, and even watching, the dreams of
another person is an old ction trope, one science is getting closer to making a reality.

SHARE

GAMING

TWEET

STEAM

CYBERPUNK

PC

PS4

FIRST PERSON

OBSERVER

Related Articles
MIND JACK

New Cyberpunk Game Asks Players to Invade
People’s Nightmares
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

7/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

FUTURE EARTH

How Far into the Future Can Total Solar Eclipses Be
Predicted?

ONLINE TOXICITY

Google's Anti-Bullying AI Mistakes Civility for
Decency

Find us in the
future.

LIKE MOTHERBOARD

FUTURE EARTH

How Far into the Future Can Total Solar
Eclipses Be Predicted?
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

8/13

20.8.2017

The Ethics of Doxing Nazis on Social Media - Motherboard

 BECKY FERREIRA
Aug 18 2017, 3:00pm

Concept art of an eclipse. Image: Pixabay/Vancarlosfr

The Moon is slowly distancing itself from Earth, which means total
solar eclipses have an expiration date.
SHARE

TWEET

The space rock we call home has a lot of great things going for it. Not only is Earth the only
world in the universe known to support life, it's also generous about producing gorgeous
spectacles for these lifeforms to enjoy, with total solar eclipses being a particularly topical
example. (The United States will be treated to such an eclipse on August 21.)
No other planet has lucked out with such a sensational glimpse into our solar system's
orbital mechanics. Neighboring terrestrial worlds are either bereft of moons, or in the case
of Mars, which has two, they are not large enough to block the Sun. Jupiter has dozens of
moons, but you couldn't watch an eclipse from there, either: There's no terra rma from
which to experience the shadows these satellites cast on the gas giants. Way out in the
solar boonies, there's Pluto and Charon, its largest moon, which eclipse each other. But the
Sun is so distant from this system's vantagepoint that the results are far less dramatic than
the well-matched apparent sizes of the Moon and Sun from Earth.
In other words, Earth has found yet another way to be the MVP (most valuable planet). But
Earthlings won't have it this good forever. Right now, total solar eclipses occur once every
18 months on average, a frequency that makes it easy to take them somewhat for granted,
even though they're often only visible from places on our planet that are hard to reach.
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/wjjnpz/the-ethics-of-doxing-nazis-on-social-media

9/13


Related documents


the ethics of doxing nazis on social media motherboard
htrwss impo
egyptofficers rev 840
why nazism was socialism and why socialism is totalitarian
social media optimisation company in bhubaneswar
resolution denouncing white nationalism


Related keywords