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2006 May.pdf


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RAFFLE ITEM
Our current raffle is a Fisher Coinstrike metal detector
that was donated to the club in memory of Ed Berry. A
new foam handle has been purchased from Fisher. See
Gail Hoskins to purchase your chances. There are only
a few of the 80 chances left to be sold for $5/chance.

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TREASURER'S REPORT
$ 2,100.47
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HURRICANE TIPS FROM
MITZI BERGRUD
From an email in October 2005

In

an

emergency,

it's

ready,

set,

go

If there's one lesson each of us needs to learn in the
aftermath of Hurricane Frances, Jeanne, and Katrina, it's
this: Make sure you're always prepared to grab and go
with very little notice. And don't assume you'll get days
or even hours to prepare. Get ready now so you will be
ready at the start of Hurricane season.
Every household needs a Go-Bag. This is a
collection of items that will enable you and your family
to be self-sufficient in the event of a disaster. Because
you may need to evacuate, your Go-Bag needs to be
packed in an easy-to-carry container, like a suitcase on
wheels. Then each family member needs to have a
backpack that contains enough basic supplies to last for
72 hours -- all packed and ready to go.
Each backpack should contain a change of clothing
including underwear and socks that are sealed in ziptype plastic bags, such as photo I.D., emergency phone
numbers, Social Security number, insurance cards and so
on. When it's time to evacuate, each person grabs his or
her backpack and a gallon of water and gets out. The
larger family Go Bag or box should be compact enough
to carry easily and should fit in the trunk of the car -- a
vehicle whose gas tank is never less than half-full.
This is a precise list of basics for the family box: axe,
shovel, bucket, utility knife, can opener, at least $50 in
cash, extra pairs of eyeglasses, coins for phone calls and
medications. You will also need basic non-perishable
food items in the family box: dried fruit or trail mix,

soda crackers, graham crackers, tomato or orange juice,
granola bars, beef jerky, cans of tuna, cans of pork and
beans, dried milk and hot chocolate mix.
You'll need a battery-powered AM radio, a batterypowered light and fresh batteries. Make sure you have
packed a basic first-aid kit, paper and pencil, and, if
possible, a camp stove with fuel. You'll want bug
repellant, soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste, disinfectant,
plastic garbage bags, matches sealed in plastic (to be
waterproof) and candles.
Now, before you get discouraged because the task
seems overwhelming, let me assure you that there is no
perfect Go-Bag. Anything you can put together now is
better than having nothing. Take it one step at a time,
thinking of it as a process to get prepared for an
emergency.
What you have in your head is the most important
survival/first-aid equipment of all. Use your common
sense. Rotate medications that have a shelf-life, making
sure the freshest are always in your Go-Bag. Rotate food
items and water at least once quarterly. Give your GoBags and individual gallons of water respectable homes
on hooks or shelves that are easily accessible and placed
close to an outside door. Make this a family project.
Teach even the youngest children which backpack is
theirs, why it is special, and what to do when the time
comes to grab it and go.
The more you can do now the more confident you'll
be when the time comes to put your emergency
preparedness into action

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Quiet Waters Park
Stacey deLucia hosted a club hunt on Saturday, April
8th in Deerfield Beach at Quiet Waters Park after the
SPCA Wildlife Care Center's Walk for Wildlife event.
Stacey was joined by Ben Smith and a friend for a 1.25
mile mini-walk-a-thon to benefit the Wildlife Care
Center. Jeff Corwin from the Animal Planet was there!
Gary Del Rosal, Gail and Steve Hoskins and Irving
Smith joined Stacey for metal detecting in the park.
There was considerable damage to the park from last
year’s hurricane and the park still looks ravished. Irving
Smith found a small copper ring and Stacey found some
junk earrings and a cross. Stacey said, “There was a
goofy guy on the volleyball court that had to check out
everything we found!
He kind of made us
uncomfortable, but we still had fun.”
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Errors in grammar and spelling are added for those who like to find them.
Linda Bennett newsletter co-editor