PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



WorldBankPartnershipFramework2015 .pdf


Original filename: WorldBankPartnershipFramework2015.pdf
Title: World Bank Document
Author: World Bank Group

This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by PScript5.dll Version 5.2.2 / PDF PT 3.40p (pdf-tools.com), and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 13/03/2018 at 18:14, from IP address 108.72.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 206 times.
File size: 2.8 MB (140 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


Public Disclosure Authorized

Document of
The World Bank Group

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

Public Disclosure Authorized

Public Disclosure Authorized

Public Disclosure Authorized

Report No. 98132-HT

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION
AND MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT GUARANTEE AGENCY
COUNTRY PARTNERSHIP FRAMEWORK
FOR
THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI
FOR THE PERIOD FY16-FY19
August 27, 2015

Haiti Country Management Unit
Latin America and the Caribbean Region
The International Finance Corporation
Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency

This document has a restricted distribution and may be used by recipients only in the
performance of their official duties. Its contents may not otherwise be disclosed without World
Bank authorization.

The Date of the last Interim Strategy Note FY13-14 was September 27, 2012
CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS
(Exchange Rate Effective as of August 20, 2014)
Currency Unit = Gourde (G)
51.54 G = US$1.00
FISCAL YEAR
October 1 to September 30
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
ASA
CAF
CCSA
CE
CLR
CPF
CPPR
DINEPA
DPO
DR
DRM
EDH
ESMAP
EU
FCS
FDI
GASFP
GDP
GFDRR
GNI
GOH
GPE
HRITF
ICT
IDA
IDB
IFC
IHRC
IPCC
IMF
ISN
LAC
LNG
MARNDR
MDGs
MEF

Advisory Support and Assistance
Development Bank of Latin America
Cross-Cutting Solutions Areas
Citizen Engagement
Completion and Learning Review
Country Partnership Framework
Country Portfolio Performance Review
Water and Sanitation Utility (Direction Nationale de l’Eau Potable et de
l’Assainissement)
Development Policy Operation
Dominican Republic
Disaster Risk Management
Public Electricity Company (Electricité d’Haïti)
Energy Sector Management Assistance Program
European Union
Fragile and Conflict Affected States
Foreign Direct Investment
Global Agriculture and Food Security Program
Gross Domestic Product
Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery
Gross National Income
Government of Haiti
Global Partnership for Education
Health Results Innovation Trust Fund
Information and Communication Technology
International Development Association
Inter-American Development Bank
International Finance Corporation
Interim Haiti Reconstruction Commission
Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change
International Monetary Fund
Interim Strategy Note
Latin America and the Caribbean
Liquid Natural Gas
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (Ministère de l’Agriculture, des
Ressources Naturelles et du Développement Rural)
Millennium Development Goals
Ministry of Economy and Finance

-i-

MIGA
MINUSTAH
MPCE
MSME
MSPP
MTEU
OCHA
ONPES
PARDH
PEMFAR
PFM
PPCR
PLR
PPA
PPP
PSDH
RE
SCD
SME
SREP
TA
UN
US
UNDP
UNICEF
USAID
WBG
WSS

Vice President:
Director:
Task Team Leader:

Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency
United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti
Ministry of Planning and External Cooperation (Ministère de la Planification et
de la Coopération Externe)
Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
Ministry of Public Health and Population (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de
la Population)
Millions of Twenty Foot Equivalent Units’
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
National Observatory for Poverty and Social Exclusion (Observatoire National
de la Pauvreté et de l’Exclusion Sociale)
Strategic Action Plan for the Recovery and Development of Haiti (Plan
d’Action Stratégique pour le Redressement et le Développement d’Haïti)
Public Expenditure Management and Financial Accountability Review
Public Financial Management
Pilot Program for Climate Resilience
Performance and Learning Review
Power Purchase Agreement
Public Private Partnership
Strategic Development Plan for Haiti (Plan Stratégique de Développement
d’Haïti)
Renewable Energy
Systematic Country Diagnostic
Small and Medium Enterprises
Scaling up Renewable Energy Program
Technical Assistance
United Nations
United States
United Nations Development Program
United Nations Children’s Fund
United States Agency for International Development
World Bank Group
Water and Sanitation Services

IBRD
Jorge Familiar
Mary Barton-Dock
Michelle Keane/Kanae
Watanabe

IFC
Nena Stoiljkovic
Lizabeth Bronder
Frank Sader/Sylvain
Kakou/Luc Grillet

-ii-

MIGA
Keiko Honda
Ravi Vish
Petal Jean Hackett

FY2016-2019 COUNTRY PARTNERSHIP FRAMEWORK FOR
THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI

INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................1
COUNTRY CONTEXT AND DEVELOPMENT AGENDA ........................................................................................... 2
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT ...........................................................................................................4
TRENDS IN GROWTH AND RECENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS ........................................................... 6
DRIVERS OF POVERTY AND DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES ................................................................... 10
WORLD BANK GROUP PARTNERSHIP STRATEGY ............................................................................. 15
LESSONS FROM THE 2009-2014 COUNTRY PARTNERSHIP STRATEGIES ............................................... 15
OVERVIEW OF WORLD BANK GROUP STRATEGY ................................................................................. 16
AREA OF FOCUS 1: INCLUSIVE GROWTH ............................................................................................. 22
Objective 1:
Objective 2:
Objective 3:
Objective 4:

Contribute to Enhancing Income Opportunities ........................................................ 24
Increase Access to Finance ........................................................................................ 25
Increase Energy Access and Support Renewable Energy .......................................... 26
Increase Capacity and Competition in the Port Sector .............................................. 28

AREA OF FOCUS 2: HUMAN CAPITAL .................................................................................................. 29
Objective 5: Improve Access to Quality Primary Education ......................................................... 30
Objective 6: Increase Access to Health Services for Mothers and Children .................................. 32
Objective 7: Cholera Control in Priority Communes ..................................................................... 33
AREA OF FOCUS 3: RESILIENCE ........................................................................................................... 34
Objective 8: Strengthen Natural Disaster Preparedness ................................................................. 35
Objective 9: Improve Disaster Prevention and Strengthen Climate Resilience ............................. 35
CROSS CUTTING THEME: GOVERNANCE – TRANSPARENCY, ACCOUNTABILITY, SUSTAINABILITY . 37
Objective 10: Improve Transparency and Accountability in Public Financial Management ......... 37
Objective 11: Improve Capacity for Sustainable Basic Service Delivery ...................................... 39
IMPLEMENTING THE FY14-FY19 COUNTRY PARTNERSHIP FRAMEWORK .......................................... 40
MANAGING RISKS TO THE CPF PROGRAM....................................................................................................... 44

List of Annexes
Annex 1A: Results Monitoring Matrix ........................................................................................................................ 49
Annex 1B: Monitoring and Evaluation of the CPF Results Framework……………………………………………..59
Annex 2 : Haiti Completion and Learning Review FY09-14 ..................................................................................... 65
Annex 3 : Selected Indicators of Bank Portfolio Performance and Management IDA Portfolio ............................. 117
Annex 4 : Operations Portfolio (IBRD/IDA/Grants) (As of 07/30/2015) ................................................................ 118
Annex 5 : IFC Committed and Disbursed Outstanding Investment Portfolio – ....................................................... 120
Annex 6 : Proposed IDA Lending Program .............................................................................................................. 121
Annex 7 : Major Development Partners ................................................................................................................... 122
Annex 8 : Haiti Gender – Status and CPF Actions ................................................................................................... 125

List of Boxes
Box 1 : SCD Priorities for Haiti ................................................................................................................................. 11
Box 2 : Haiti's Electricity Sector Challenges .......................................................................................................... 27

iii

List of Figures
Figure 1: Poverty and Extreme Poverty are largely a rural phenomenon in Haiti ......................................................... 9
Figure 2: CPF Selectivity Filters ................................................................................................................................. 17
Figure 3: Haiti CPF Strategic Framework ................................................................................................................... 20

List of Tables
Table 1 : Haiti Selected Indicators, 2012-2019 ............................................................................................................8
Table 2 : Access to Basic Services Coverage Rates (2001-2012) (In Percent)........................................................... 10
Table 3 : Haiti – Millennium Development Goals Indicator ...................................................................................... 31

iv

WBG COUNTRY PARTNERSHIP FRAMEWORK
FOR THE REPUBLIC OF HAITI
FY2016-2019

INTRODUCTION
1.
Five years into Haiti’s reconstruction following the devastating earthquake of 2010,
the country is experiencing an economic and a political transition. Although many challenges
brought by the earthquake remain to be fully addressed, Haiti’s focus has shifted from
reconstruction to longer term development and to securing a more prosperous future for its people.
This World Bank Group (WBG) Country Partnership Framework (CPF) for FY2016-2019
proposes to support Haiti’s efforts to reduce poverty and boost shared prosperity, in line with the
priorities of the Government of Haiti.
2.
Although significant challenges remain, Haiti has seen a number of positive
developments since the earthquake. These developments, some of which are significant,
illustrate Haiti’s potential and point to avenues for further progress. Extreme poverty has fallen
over the last decade, especially in urban areas, and foremost in Port au Prince. Key investments
in infrastructure have been realized: the main road network and connectivity between the country’s
key cities have been substantially improved with all major cities connected. Nearly 500km out of
the 930km primary network has been built or rehabilitated. Airline traffic to Port au Prince has
increased; a new airport in Cap Haitian is receiving domestic and international flights; and the
rehabilitation of the Peligre Dam has begun.
3.
Private sector development has also taken place. The tourism sector is growing with
several new hotels in Port au Prince and an increase in international travelers by nearly 20% in the
last couple of years. Access to finance, particularly of micro credit on offer, has increased. New
investments in the manufacturing sector have increased formal employment opportunities, and
private investment in port and electricity generation infrastructure hold the promise to enhance
Haiti’s competitiveness. Service provision in education has been expanded with 90% of children
going to school, and significant reforms are being undertaken to improve accountability and
quality in the sector. There have also been improvement in health. Between 2005 and 2012, the
infant mortality rate decreased by 9%, under-five mortality rate dropped by 11%, institutional
deliveries increased by 29%. Since 2013, hospital deaths from cholera have been maintained at
under 1%. With regard to children, the Paternity and Maternity Law has been passed giving
children born to unmarried parents the same rights to their father’s name and their inheritance as
children born to married parents. The impact from hurricanes Sandy and Isaac showed that the
Government has improved its disaster response when compared with previous disasters. Plant
coverage on the ground has increased from nearly 20% to approximately 30%. In terms of
Governance, in 2014/2015 fuel subsidy reform began with the removal of subsidies and the
objective of moving toward an automatic fuel price mechanism; and public accountants have been
deployed to Ministries to increase controls over public spending. Finally, the security situation has
remained relatively stable; nearly 12,000 trained police are increasingly taking on the task of
ensuring security in the country as the UN Stabilization Force is drawn down. While recognizing
Haiti’s challenges and working together to address its biggest constraints, the World Bank Group
and the Government of Haiti intend, in the context of this CPF, to build on these developments.
1

4.
Haiti stands now at a critical point in its political life. The current transition government
is tasked with organizing presidential, parliamentary and municipal elections, all in 2015.
Municipal and legislative elections are overdue: mayors have not been elected since December
2006 and the mandates of two thirds of the Senate and the entire House of Representatives had
lapsed by January 2015. The first round of legislative elections has taken place and presidential
elections are on schedule: President Michel Martelly’s term ends in early February 2016.
5.
This CPF follows two Interim Strategy Notes (ISNs), which framed the WBG’s
significant post-earthquake response over the FY2012-2015 period, financed by an
exceptional allocation from the IDA 16 Crisis Response Window (US$500M equivalent).
Over this period a substantially expanded WBG program supported reconstruction. However, the
program was also designed to continue to help the country address its long term development
challenges and capitalize on new opportunities as Haiti gradually transitioned out of the
reconstruction phase. Today, a CPF aimed at long-term objectives is appropriate.
6.
The CPF is designed to flexibly adapt to uncertainty. It includes a number of elements
that would allow the Bank to adjust the program to new realities as circumstances evolve. First,
new activities under this CPF take place against the backdrop of a large ongoing program focused
on key challenges and objectives, certain to remain highly relevant for any incoming
administration. Second, adjustments to the program can be made during the Program and Learning
Review (PLR), which the team proposes to schedule in FY17 once Haiti’s newly elected
Government is in place. Third, this CPF programs IDA 17 resources, leaving IDA 18 resources to
be allocated to new investments during the PLR.
7.
In establishing focus areas and setting objectives, the proposed WBG CPF uses
selectivity filters, including: (i) the Government’s demand for WBG support along the lines of its
Plan Stratégique de Développement d’Haïti (PSDH; Strategic Development Plan for Haiti); (ii)
the priorities identified in the 2015 SCD to eliminate poverty and boost shared prosperity; and (iii)
the WBG’s comparative advantages in light of its expertise, the work of other donors, and the
lessons learned from the implementation of earlier programs. The CPF is strongly aligned with
the IDA 17 special themes of Inclusive Growth, Fragility, Gender and Climate Change and the
Haiti program contributes substantially to meeting IDA 17 requirements in these areas, including
the requirements for fragile states. The CPF proposes public and private financing coupled with
knowledge and data development, based on global experience and local relevance.
COUNTRY CONTEXT AND DEVELOPMENT AGENDA
8.
Haiti’s geography, people, and history provide it with many opportunities. The third
largest Caribbean nation by area and population (10.4 million), Haiti shares the island of Kiskeya
with the Dominican Republic. In addition to an illustrious early history, as the first independent
nation in the region and the first nation in the world to be led to independence by former slaves,
Haiti benefits from proximity and access to major markets, a young labor force, a dynamic
diaspora, and substantial geographic, historical, and cultural assets. The country possesses
untapped markets and a pent-up demand for the private sector to explore, including agribusiness,
light manufacturing, and tourism.

2

9.
The Haitian and Dominican economies are closely linked by trade, investments, and
migration1. Trade chiefly consists of formal exports from the DR to Haiti (dominated by
construction materials and consumer goods) and informal exports of agricultural products from
Haiti to the DR. Trade numbers do not reflect that smuggled consumer products from the DR are
widely available in Haiti. Dominican firms are very active in Haiti and have strengthened their
position during the reconstruction period. Haiti is the source of important migration flows to the
DR, providing a young lower-wage labor force to the Dominican economy, particularly in the
tourism sector. It is estimated that 90% of the DR’s foreign workforce is of Haitian origin and that
half a million to a million people of Haitian origin live in the DR2. Haitian migrants in the DR
send home substantial remittances. Remittances have been demonstrated to be important to poverty
reduction in Haiti.3
10.
Almost 60% of Haiti’s population, 6.3 million people, remain poor, 4 and 24% or 2.5
million, extremely poor, with poverty highest in rural areas. The poorest regions, which are
also the furthest from the capital, show extreme poverty rates exceeding 40% and very limited
access to basic services. Like poverty, inequality is high with a Gini of 0.6 (highest in the
Americas).
11.
On January 12, 2010, a catastrophic earthquake of magnitude 7.0 struck 25
kilometers west of Port-au-Prince, Haiti's capital. The earthquake killed an estimated 230,000
people and displaced 1.5 million. It resulted in damages and losses of US$7.9B (120% of GDP)
and in US$11.3B in estimated reconstruction needs. The disaster compounded Haiti’s many
preexisting development challenges, increasing poverty and vulnerability, threatening livelihoods,
and hampering already weak service delivery and human development outcomes. The disaster also
exacerbated Haiti’s underlying socio-economic drivers of poverty, such as social divisions and
inequity, the fragility of political mechanisms, the government’s weak capacity, risks of political
instability and persistent volatility. Compounding these challenges, cholera broke out in October
2010, sickening almost 760,000 people and killing almost 9000 to date.
12.
Though criticized for delays and inefficiency, post-earthquake reconstruction efforts
have delivered visible results. In the aftermath of the disaster, Government, development partners
and private actors together made considerable headway in reconstruction, investing approximately
US$3B in Official Development Assistance (ODA) and much more from private flows5 mostly in
Port-au-Prince and surrounding affected areas. Over 1.4 out of the 1.5 million people displaced
have left the camps. Collapsed infrastructure and many affected neighborhoods have been rebuilt,
education services have been re-established and extended, and despite resurgences of the disease,
the cholera epidemic is being controlled (deaths have been driven down to below 1% of cases),

1
2

3

4
5

The Dominican Republic is an upper-middle income country of 10.3 million and a GNI per capita of US$5,850.
The World Bank migration database shows 479,000 registered migrants from Haiti in the DR in 2013. However,
various entities which include unregistered migrants cite numbers closer to 800,000 to 1 million.
Remittances from the DR represent 11% of remittances received in Haiti (second only to remittances from the US)
and mostly benefit poorer rural households with over 40% going to the bottom two quintiles of income distribution.
MPCE/ ONPES/World Bank; Investing in People to Fight Poverty in Haiti; May 2015.
Under Haiti’s National Poverty Line of US$1.98 per day, based on consumption.
Office of the UN Special Envoy; Official figures/ODA to Haiti. Flows from donations to private organizations are
unknown but substantial amounts are reported by NGOs as having been spent in Haiti over the period.

3


Related documents


worldbankpartnershipframework2015
ar special report
debt relief under the heavily indebted
vacancy announcement snv ghana energy focal point
26949
women in science and technology


Related keywords