PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



Five Myths About Syrian Refugees .pdf


Original filename: Five_Myths_About_Syrian_Refugees.pdf

This PDF 1.4 document has been generated by Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/56.0.2924.87 Safari/537.36 / Skia/PDF m56, and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 26/04/2018 at 00:54, from IP address 96.69.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 337 times.
File size: 907 KB (19 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

YANNIS BEHRAKIS / REUTERS

A
S
SNAPSHOT

March 22, 2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees
Separating Fact From Fiction
By Max Abrahms, Denis Sullivan, and Charles Simpson

The Syrian refugee crisis is the worst human security disaster o쨪 the twenty­first century. Beyond the
death toll, which stands at around 400,000, an estimated 11 million Syrians—about hal쨪 the national
population—have fled their homes since the beginning o쨪 the conflict in March 2011. Prior to the
evacuation o쨪 eastern Aleppo in late 2016, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(UNHCR) reported that over six million Syrians were displaced inside the country; about five
million refugees have fled to nearby Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey; and nearly a million
more have requested asylum in Europe, mostly in Germany. This crisis is not only a matter o淖� life and
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

1/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

death for millions o쨪 Syrians but is consequential to Syria’s immediate neighbors and to much o쨪 the
rest o쨪 the world.
Yet a lack o쨪 direct evidence from the field has spawned speculation, misinformation, and poorly
informed policymaking. In response to this informational deficit, a seven­person research team from
Northeastern University was deployed along the western Balkan migration route into Europe (see
map below) to speak with Syrian migrants, learn how and why they have left their country, and study
the consequences o쨪 their migration to themselves and to Europe. Members o쨪 the research team
spoke Arabic, were natives o쨪 or had spent substantial time in the countries in which they operated,
and had been trained to interact with vulnerable migrant communities.  

The western Balkan migrant route into Europe. 

Unlike previous studies, which have relied on questionnaires in a single country such as Lebanon or
Germany, our team conducted detailed, comprehensive interviews in numerous locations along the
Balkan route, albeit with a smaller number o쨪 refugees. The interviews, done mainly during the
summers o쨪 2015 and 2016, were conducted at refugee camps, border crossings, checkpoints, cities,
and smuggler boat launch sites in departure countries (Jordan, Turkey), transit countries (Albania,
Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Macedonia, Serbia), and destination countries (Belgium, Germany).
Our sample o쨪 130 Syrian refugees does not purport to be representative, but it was carefully selected
to include variation with respect to age, gender, socioeconomic background, formal education level,
religion, political affiliation, region o쨪 origin, and travelling variables such as group size, presence or
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

2/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

absence o㩂� family members, and location on the migrant route. For added confidence, information
from these interviews was triangulated with ethnographic notes from each site, third­party
government and NGO data sets, and supplemental meetings with aid workers, security personnel,
government representatives, and local community leaders. The results o쨪 this fieldwork challenge five
commonly held myths about the refugees. 
MYTH ONE: MOST SYRIAN REFUGEES ARE FLEEING ASSAD
Conventional wisdom holds that Syrian President Bashar al­Assad holds primary, i쨪 not sole,
responsibility for the refugee crisis. Although the Islamic State (ISIS) may grab the headlines, the
Western media presents the Alawite dictator as the real menace to the Syrian people and to the
armed opposition that is protecting them. “Assad Regime Fans Refugee Crisis,” warned The Wall
Street Journal in September 2015. The Washington Post similarly explained the “exodus” o쨪 Syrians from
their country by noting that “Islamic State has killed many Syrians, but Assad’s forces have killed
more.”
Yet does Assad really bear all the blame for the refugee crisis? Not according to Syrian refugees. Most
refugees we spoke to said they felt endangered by all parties fighting in the war, not just the
government. In our sample o쨪 Syrian refugees, only 16 percent lay the blame exclusively with the
Assad regime, compared to 77 percent who said they were fleeing from both the regime and the
armed opposition. This pattern was observed in every country along the Balkan route.

Only 16 percent of Syrian refugees lay the blame exclusively with the Assad regime,
compared to 77 percent who said they were fleeing from both the regime and the armed
opposition.

Take the example o쨪 Abdullah, a 40­year­old interviewed in the Serbian town o㩂� Horgos, along the
border with Hungary, who asked that his real name not be used. Abdullah was initially kidnapped in
Damascus by Jabhat al­Nusra (also known as Jabhat Fatah al­Sham), al Qaeda’s Syrian affiliate. After
Nusra released him, the Assad government imprisoned him for suspected collusion with the rebels.
Seeing threats from both sides, Abdullah fled the country with his wife and children. A 30­year­old
refugee in the Fatih neighborhood o㩂� Istanbul shared a similar experience and said, “There was no
one left to trust, which is why I left.” Fear o쨪 all sides was the norm. Another refugee, a 34­year­old
man with whom we spoke in Dortmund, Germany, had also been kidnapped by Nusra and then
arrested by the government. “Torture was more [severe]” under Nusra, he said. A 21­year­old student
from Aleppo said that she felt unsafe only after the Free Syrian Army “took control o쨪 [her] area,”
because she was then exposed to a dual hazard: harm from the rebels and the possibility o쨪 a bombing
by the Syrian air force. Another refugee, a 31­year­old interviewed in Athens, told us o淖� how grateful
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

3/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

he and his brother were when the Syrian army chased ISIS from their neighborhood in Deir ez­Zor,
but explained that the situation nonetheless remained too unstable for them to continue living there.
In sum, in­depth conversations with Syrian refugees along the Balkan route and within the EU
suggest they are fleeing not only, or primarily, from Assad, but from a complex civil war with
multiple belligerents who all pose a threat to the population. The “blame­Assad only” narrative may
resonate, but most refugees count him as one o쨪 several culprits, alongside the rebels and ISIS.

A refugee walks through a gate at a refugee camp near Idomeni, Greece, March 2016.

MYTH TWO: IT’S HARD FOR SYRIAN REFUGEES TO ENTER EUROPE
Policymakers in the EU and Turkey assure their citizens that new security measures, such as
additional border fences, checkpoints, and land and sea patrols, effectively block refugees from
reaching Europe illegally. Frontex, the EU border security agency, has called its “enhanced border
security measures” a “success,” and EU Council President Donald Tusk has gone so far as to say, “The
days o쨪 irregular migration to Europe are over.” But what do Syrian refugees have to say about the
new security?
Refugees stressed how easy it is to bypass the EU’s new security measures. There remain expansive
swaths o쨪 rural terrain where Syrians can easily walk across national boundaries; indeed, members of
our team were taken to several unmanned crossings along the Turkish, Greek, Bulgarian,
Macedonian, Serbian, and Hungarian borders. Some refugees use cornfields to cover their movement
and low­tech tools such as wire cutters to get through fences. Even at heavily fortified areas along the
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

4/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

border, refugees are often able to cross after a process o쨪 trial and error. But in our sample, 75 percent
o쨪 the refugees interviewed said that they had crossed into the EU on their first attempt. O쨪 course,
it’s possible that a large portion o쨪 Syrian refugees never make it out o쨪 the country even after
multiple attempts. But the refugees who did make it stressed the ease o淖� bypassing the new security
measures, especially for those who can afford a smuggler.

75 percent of the refugees interviewed said that they had crossed into the EU on their
first attempt.

In fact, 60 percent o쨪 the refugees we spoke to travelled without any form o쨪 documentation at all. A
a 22­year­old male refugee in Athens said, “No one looked at my documents.” A 21­year­old male
refugee, who passed from Macedonia into Serbia through the Presevo checkpoint, likewise noted the
lack o쨪 concern from the border guards. “They don’t need to see your passport,” he said. “They don’t
care about your visa or anything.” Interviews with Presevo security experts support the refugees’
depiction o쨪 the border closures as largely symbolic.
Even without travel documents, many refugees said that they were usually processed by untrained
police or Coast Guard officers in under ten minutes. Background questions put to refugees were
perfunctory. A 27­year­old Syrian refugee in Frankfurt described his security interview in Germany
as “silly.” He was asked whether he had killed anyone or participated in “political extremist stuff like
ISIS or whatever.” He said that he had replied with a laugh, “No, I didn’t kill anyone. I’m [an] angel.”
Bribery at border crossings is especially rampant. A 21­year­old refugee in Falkensee, Germany, told
us that in September 2015, for ten euros per person, he and his traveling companions from Syria,
Iraq, and Central Asia bribed Serbian policemen into getting them a ride across the border.

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

5/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

A Kurdish refugee from Iraq has her hair brushed in a French camp for migrants in Grande Synthe, December 2016.

MYTH THREE: REFUGEES MUST BE PROTECTED FROM SMUGGLERS 
Most Syrian refugees who reach the European Union use a smuggling network. Interpol, Europol,
and the European Commission promote the widespread view that border security personnel protect
refugees from these smugglers, who are generally characterized as predatory, i쨪 not downright evil. As
Europol Director Rob Wainwright puts it, “Europol has been at the forefront o쨪 supporting Member
States in fighting the criminal networks that exploit desperate migrants.” The international media
contribute to this narrative as well. The New York Times ran a story with the headline “The Refugee
Crisis Has Produced One Winner: Organized Crime,” and USA Today told readers that “good
fortune” for the smugglers comes “at the expense o쨪 the migrants.” Lost in this apparent consensus is
what the refugees say about the smugglers.
Instead o쨪 seeing their smugglers as exploiters, refugees tended to express gratitude toward them,
while describing European security personnel as cruel and often abusive. In our sample, 75 percent of
refugees said they were either “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their smuggler experience, compared
to only 16 percent who said they were either “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied.” (Nine percent were
neutral.) A middle­aged mother who crossed the Syrian­Turkish and Turkish­Greek borders
described the man who helped her as “very helpful.” She admitted being “taken advantage o쨪 in terms
o쨪 money,” but said, “I wasn’t mistreated.” A 20­year­old male refugee in Serbia likewise said his
smuggler wanted to “grab some money,” but at no point tried to cheat or harm him or his daughter.
“He insured her safety,” he said. Such stories were retold by many o쨪 the refugees who had travelled
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

6/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

along the Balkan route. O쨪 course, there are also some cases o쨪 exploitation. But most refugees from
our sample characterized smugglers fondly and thanked them for providing a life­saving service.

Instead of seeing their smugglers as exploiters, refugees tended to express gratitude toward
them.

Refugee views o쨪 security personnel, both in and outside o㩂� Europe, were far worse. An elderly
refugee in the Diavata camp near Thessaloniki, Greece, recalled how the Turkish police had
imprisoned her and shot at other migrants. Another refugee, also interviewed near Thessaloniki, said
that Turkish soldiers beat and threatened to kill Syrians.Similar stories were told in Elliniko about
the Greek authorities. In Sofia, Bulgaria, our team observed grotesque conditions, such as broken
washroom facilities and flooded hallways in government­administered camps, which were essentially
run­down prisons. Refugees reported being attacked by vigilantes in the southeast o쨪 the country,
perhaps with the blessing o쨪 the government. The vigilantes warned them, “Remember the name of
this place—Bulgaria! And tell your friends not to come here!” Further along the Balkan route in
Horgos, a Syrian refugee told us o淖� her group being robbed and beaten by the Bulgarian police.
Detailed testimonies o쨪 refugees along the Balkan route therefore challenge the conventional wisdom
that officials tend to protect them from raptorial smugglers. Based on our research, refugees seem to
view the smugglers as allies, while security officials are generally seen as callous, hostile, and even
dangerous. 

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

7/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

Refugees on a Greek Coast Guard vessel docking on the island of Lesbos, March 2016.

MYTH FOUR: CRACKING DOWN ON SMUGGLERS HELPS REFUGEES
Since the onset o쨪 the refugee crisis, the EU has introduced a suite o쨪 countermeasures against
smugglers, allegedly to help protect Syrian refugees and to block potential terrorists from entering
Europe. By patrolling sea routes and border crossings, EU agencies like Frontex have tried to deter
smugglers by arresting them, seizing their boats, and otherwise raising the costs o쨪 illegally
transporting Syrians into Europe.
Officially, this strategy has proved successful. In testimony to the British Parliament, Richard
Lindsay, then the head o쨪 the Security Policy Department o쨪 the United Kingdom’s Foreign and
Commonwealth Office, concluded that thanks to EU countermeasures, “smuggling networks … can
no longer operate with impunity.” A spokesperson from one o쨪 the anti­smuggling operations,
Operation Sophia, has echoed this rosy assessment. The main externality o쨪 punishing the smugglers,
however, has been a steep rise in the cost o쨪 their services—a rise that disproportionately harms the
poorest refugees rather than comparatively wealthy terrorists. Our research team found that between
May 2015 and May 2016, the average price for an individual Syrian refugee to flee to Europe
increased by about 488 euros, and the price for a family increased by 3,657 euros.
As a result o쨪 this price increase, countless destitute refugees now complain about being stuck at
border crossings along the migrant route. A lack o쨪 money is nearly always the sole impediment for
refugees looking to enter Western Europe. And despite tighter EU security, smugglers still abound
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

8/19

3/22/2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees | Foreign Affairs

for those who can afford them. Our team observed thriving smuggler businesses in major cities in
Austria, Greece, Hungary, Serbia, and Turkey. In Basmane, a smuggling hub in the Turkish city of
Izmir, a 20­year­old Syrian refugee laughed when asked i쨪 it had become challenging to find
smugglers. “There are hundreds,” she said. “I쨪 you go to eat at any restaurant, [smugglers] come to
you [and ask], ‘Do you want to go to Europe?’ ”
With support from militant groups funded by the Gul쨪 states, terrorists are less affected by the
soaring costs o쨪 smuggling. A former Nusra fighter based in Izmir bragged about crossing the Syrian
border with impunity, taking respite in Turkey before returning to the frontlines. Aid workers in
border cities corroborated these claims, describing fighters travelling unencumbered across the
Syrian­Turkish border. Smugglers have even admitted to loading up terrorists on ships bound for
Europe, a point o쨪 pride in Islamic State propaganda.         

A woman protests U.S. President Donald Trump's Muslim ban in London, February 2017.

                         
MYTH FIVE: CULTURAL DIFFERENCES PREVENT INTEGRATION
A final myth is that Syrian refugees cannot integrate into Europe because o쨪 their cultural
differences. The charge, by now familiar, is that the predominantly Muslim refugee population has
illiberal, even dangerous cultural values, which will lead to rising crime rates and the threat of
terrorism and sexual violence in Europe. Right­wing politicians have played on this fear, warning that
the influx o㩂� Muslims into Europe will inevitably lead to a clash o쨪 civilizations. Marc Vallendar, of
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/europe/2017­03­22/five­myths­about­syrian­refugees?cid=soc­tw­rdr

9/19


Related documents


five myths about syrian refugees
p3261 366 1
icc report greece
piece of shit paper
darth maul liveleak links migrants 05 2016
conference 1


Related keywords