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Greenhouse Growing Month by Month – A Complete Greenhouse Growing Schedule .pdf


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Greenhouse Growing Month by Month – A Complete
Greenhouse Growing Schedule
readylifestyle.com/greenhouse-growing-month-by-month
Ready Lifestyle Contributing Author

April 9, 2018

Greenhouse Growing Month by Month
Month

Plants

Actions

January

In January we can begin planting frost tolerant plants.
Potatoes, beets, leafy salad greens, Swiss chard, spinach,
bulb onions, turnips, radishes, and carrots.
Beets and carrots can be transplanted repeatedly from
March to September.
Bulb onions can be transplanted as early as January.

The greenhouse should stay
above 45 degrees.
Water plants as needed.
Keep an eye out for pests.
Don’t over water plants to
prevent diseases.

February

Transplant the frost tolerant plants into your garden. Make
sure you climatize the plants to the outside environment over
a few days prior transplanting them.
Start planting cool weather plants like broccoli, cabbage,
cauliflower, and lettuce.
Sow tomatoes if planting from seed.

Keep the greenhouse
between 55 and 65 degrees.
Keep an eye out for pests.
Keep the soil damp but not
wet.
Make sure you ventilate your
greenhouse during the day
as needed.

March

Transplant the frost tolerant plants into your garden. Make
sure you climatize the plants to the outside environment over
a few days prior transplanting them.
Start planting cool weather plants like broccoli, cabbage,
cauliflower, and lettuce.

Keep the greenhouse
between 55 and 65 degrees.
Keep an eye out for pests.
Keep the soil damp but not
wet.
Make sure you ventilate your
greenhouse during the day
as needed.
1/5

April

Transplant your cool weather plants into your garden
climatizing them in the same manner as you did with your
frost tolerant plants.
Now is the time to plant your warm weather vegetables.
These include tomatoes, vining beans, cucumbers, legumes,
squash, peppers, eggplant, potatoes, peas, corn, and
melons.
These plants cannot withstand a frost. Do not move them to
your garden until average temps reach 70 degrees.

Warm weather plants prefer a
growing temp of 70-85
degrees.
Keep an eye out for pests.
Ventilate as needed.
The weather can still sneak
up on you. Be ready to cover
your plants as needed.

May

Continue to plant your plants from April.
Keep a close eye on any plants that you’ve moved into your
garden.

Dampen floors if needed to
keep temperatures cool and
add humidity to your
greenhouse.
Mold and other fungi can
become a serious problem.
Use fungicide as needed.

June

This time of year is mostly based around maintaining the
plants that you have.

Dampen floors if needed to
keep temperatures cool and
add humidity to your
greenhouse.
Mold and other fungi can
become a serious problem.
Use fungicide as needed.

July

Begin the second crop of cool-season vegetables if it’s
appropriate for your region.

Dampen floors if needed to
keep temperatures cool and
add humidity to your
greenhouse.
Mold and other fungi can
become a serious problem.
Use fungicide as needed.

August

Begin the second crop of cool-season vegetables if it’s
appropriate for your region.
Climatize your plants at the end of the month for
transplanting in your garden.

Dampen floors if needed to
keep temperatures cool and
add humidity to your
greenhouse.
Mold and other fungi can
become a serious problem.
Use fungicide as needed.

September

Climatize your cool-season vegetables for transplanting in
your garden.

Expect fluctuating
temperatures.
Cool or heat your greenhouse
as needed.

October

Harvest your mature cool-season vegetables.
You can continue to plant cool temperature vegetables as
long as the weather holds.

Bring plants that aren’t a
hardy inside.
Protect your plants as needed
as the temperatures begin to
drop. Especially at night.

2/5

November

Pot chives, parsley, and mint.
Sow certain beans, lettuce, and carrots if you’re growing
them from seed.
Harvest your mature cool-season vegetables.

November is our month to
focus on repairs.
Insulate your greenhouse.
Ensure any holes, cracks or
other exterior damage is
repaired.
If you have heaters, make
sure they’re working.
Keep the greenhouse dry and
cool.
On warmer days you may
need to ventilate.

December

Pot chives, parsley, and mint.
Sow certain beans, lettuce, and carrots if you’re growing
them from seed.
If you still have a winter garden going, then maintain it as
needed.

December is the month to
clean your greenhouse and
prepare for the spring.
Clean and organize any
unused pots or trays.
Wash the windows and
disinfect the
glass/plastic/frame with a
garden disinfectant.
Keep the greenhouse dry and
cool.
On warmer days you may
need to ventilate.

Additional Considerations and Tips for Greenhouse Growing Month by Month
While these planting times should be pretty accurate for most states in the center of the U.S.
We suggest that you get specific planting times based on your plant heartiness zone. Some
regions can vary greatly.

3/5

When planting your vegetables, it’s best to follow the spacing directions on the seed packet.
You should consider using commercial soil for planting in your greenhouse. If you need to use
native soil, it’s recommended that you steam the soil to kill any fungus and parasites.
Don’t let the name “frost resistant” fool you. These plants still can’t resist long-term freezes.
When ordering seeds, the term like new or improved normally refers to plants that are resistant
to new diseases or are improved in some other way.

4/5

Backyard greenhouse kits are a great
way to get started without having to
figure out exactly what you need to buy to
build your greenhouse. Bootstrap
Farmer is our favorite place to shop for
pre-made greenhouse kits.
Do you have any suggestions to help
people come up with a complete
greenhouse growing schedule? Add them
to the comments below!
Be sure to check out our other preparedness articles. You can also read about how to build
your own bug out bag.

5/5


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