The Thirteenth Chair (1917).pdf


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MISS EASTWOOD (to MRS. CROSBY). Marriage is such an awful
gamble. I know a girl who tried it four times. Billy, I do hope you——
(Turning to C., where WILLIAM was standing.) Why, they are gone!
(Laughter and buzz of conversation ad lib.)
(Miss EASTWOOD runs up to door R.C., opens it—looks in dining-room—
gives a scream—closes door quickly, comes to right end of chesterfield.
TRENT goes to console table L. of chesterfield, gets cigarette, lights it, and
crosses
to C. back
of
chesterfield
in
front
of
fireplace.
STANDISH and MRS.
TRENT move
to
table L. of
chesterfield.
WALES and MISS ERSKINE sit on chesterfield facing audience up C.
MRS. CROSBY is still at upper end of table R. CROSBY talks with MISS
EASTWOOD. MASON is the L. end of the chesterfield facing the
audience.)
(EnterBUTLERfrom downL.)
BUTLER. Mrs. Crosby, the person you sent the car for has arrived.
(All turn eagerly toward him.)
WALES (rises and moves down L.C.). Can we see her now, Mrs. Crosby?
MRS. CROSBY. Certainly—Pollock, ask Madame la Grange if she will
come in, please.
BUTLER. Yes, madame.
(He exits and closes the door after him.)
MISS EASTWOOD (coming down between the large table and the
chesterfield). I'm perfectly thrilled. Do you suppose she expects to be taken
seriously?
MISS ERSKINE. Of course.
MISS EASTWOOD (at table R.). How funny! If you don't laugh at her, we
can have no end of fun. I'll guy her terribly and she'll never know it.
MRS. CROSBY (at table R.). Oh, I wouldn't do that, Mary. She may be
quite in earnest.
MISS EASTWOOD. Oh, I can't believe that. Madame la Grange! I can see
her now. Tall, black-haired creature, regular adventuress, see if she isn't. Isn't
she, Mr. Wales?

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