PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact



Dynamic Performance Assessment of Primary Frequency Modulation for a Power Control System Based on MATLAB .pdf



Original filename: Dynamic Performance Assessment of Primary Frequency Modulation for a Power Control System Based on MATLAB.pdf

This PDF 1.7 document has been generated by / iText® 7.1.1 ©2000-2018 iText Group NV (AGPL-version), and has been sent on pdf-archive.com on 05/01/2019 at 13:01, from IP address 188.83.x.x. The current document download page has been viewed 66 times.
File size: 6.1 MB (35 pages).
Privacy: public file




Download original PDF file









Document preview


processes
Article

Dynamic Performance Assessment of Primary
Frequency Modulation for a Power Control System
Based on MATLAB
Shizhe Li *

and Yinsong Wang

School of Control and Computer Engineering, North China Electric Power University; Baoding 071003, China;
missliujinmei@163.com
* Correspondence: 52651488@ncepu.edu.cn; Tel.: +86-312-752-3460
Received: 4 December 2018; Accepted: 24 December 2018; Published: 30 December 2018




Abstract: The primary frequency modulation (PFM) performance of a power control system (PCS)
is an important factor affecting the security and stability of a power grid. The traditional control
method is proportional integral (PI) control. In order to improve its dynamic control performance,
a control method based on the combination of internal model control (IMC) and PI is proposed.
Using the method of theoretical assessment and system identification, a simple simulated model
of the typical PCS is established. According to the principle of system identification and the least
square estimation (LSE) algorithm, the mathematical models of a generator and a built-in model are
established. According to the four dynamic performance indexes, the main and auxiliary assessment
index of the PCS are defined, and the benchmark and the result of the performance assessment are
given. According to three different structures, the PFM dynamic performance of the PCS is analyzed
separately. According to the dynamic performance assessment index of PFM, the structure of the
control system and the influence of different parameters on the performance of the PCS are analyzed
under ideal conditions. The appropriate control structure and controller parameters are determined.
Secondly, under the non-ideal condition, the influence of the actual valve flow coefficient on the
performance of the control system is studied under two different valve control modes. The simulation
results show that the internal model combined with PI has better dynamic control performance and
stronger robustness than the traditional PI control, and it also has better application prospects for
thermal power plants.
Keywords: dynamic performance assessment index; power control system; primary frequency
modulation; least square estimation; internal model control; valve local flow coefficient

1. Introduction
Power grid frequency is an important index of power quality that reflects the balance relation
between active power and load. Controlling the frequency of a power grid makes it maintain a rating,
which is an important task for power grid operation. Frequency control of the power grid consists
of three stages according to execution order, namely primary frequency modulation (FM) (please
refer to Abbreviation list for all abbreviations appearing in this article), secondary FM, and triple FM.
The frequency control function at all levels is cross-sectional and completes the power frequency the
control task together. Among them, the primary frequency modulation (PFM) response time is fastest,
so it is very important to restrain frequency fluctuation frequently, changing within small range and
frequency stability when electric network accidents occur [1,2]. When power grid frequency deviates
from the rated frequency, the thermal power units utilizing boiler heat storage respond quickly to
the frequency change of a power grid, while the generator increases or decreases the output force

Processes 2019, 7, 11; doi:10.3390/pr7010011

www.mdpi.com/journal/processes

Processes 2019, 7, 11

2 of 35

correspondingly, which is the PFM of the thermal power units. The rated speed of turbine generator is
3000 r/min, so the frequency of power grids is 50 Hz in China. At present, frequency variation of a
power grid is permitted to be 0.1 Hz in developed countries, while it is 0.2 Hz in China. The influence
of a photovoltaic power generation system and conventional hydropower generation on the frequency
of a power grid is discussed in [3]. In the process of grid connection, the contribution of wind farms
to frequency control is discussed in [4]. Because the thermal power units occupy a very important
position in China’s energy structure proportion, this paper mainly studies the effect of thermal units on
the PFM performance of a power grid. Therefore, the performance of PFM is an important guarantee
to prevent large fluctuations in frequency and to maintain grid stability. A sudden accident occurs if
the network unit FM response ability is poor, and frequency fluctuation of a power grid is high when
system collapse occurs. Under the trend of interconnection of regional power grids, the performance of
PFM becomes more obvious. Many studies indicate that PFM plays an important role in maintaining
stability under abrupt disturbances [5,6].
A mathematical model should be established for studying the PFM of a power control system
(PCS). Previous studies mainly use mechanism assessment methods and system identification methods
to describe models of dynamic characteristics of PCSs as much as possible [7,8]. Results show that a
model is not only complex but also difficult to solve. Therefore, establishing a simplified PCS model
with certain accuracy has become the primary task in studying the dynamic performance of PFM of
generating units. Relevant studies have been carried out, and simplified models with certain accuracy
have been established for steam turbines and generators [9,10]. Before a frequency disturbance test, the
unit is in stable equilibrium state. When frequency disturbance is added, the turbine regulation speed
changes quickly and the main steam pressure changes rapidly, according to the steam flow entering the
steam turbine. Compared with the steam turbine, the boiler dynamic response is slower. During this
process, the main steam pressure cannot maintain stability. Theoretically, the main steam pressure can
change by establishing a boiler model, but this requires extra tests to identify boiler model parameters,
and the boiler structure is very complicated. Perfect characterization of main steam pressure variation
characteristics with a model is difficult, and the modeling cost is relatively high. When the turbine
valve flow characteristic deviates from the ideal value, it may cause continuous power oscillation in
the turbine generator, thereby triggering forced power oscillation of the power grid. Forced power
oscillation caused by valve flow characteristics indicates that steam turbine valve flow characteristics
not only affect the safety of a unit but also affect the stability of the power grid. The valve flow
characteristics of the actual unit are tested, correcting the valve flow function. Optimizing the valve
flow characteristics of the unit can reduce forced power oscillation accidents caused by imperfect valve
flow characteristics [11,12]. However, during actual operation, valve flow characteristics may change
over time, so valve flow function cannot guarantee reliable matching with the actual unit valve flow
characteristics. Therefore, we modified and adjusted existing control strategies to restrain forced power
oscillation caused by valve flow characteristics.
A thermal power plant is mainly composed of a thermal control system and a power generation
system. A thermal control system mainly refers to boiler equipment and control loops, and a power
generation system mainly refers to steam turbine and generator equipment control loops. In this paper,
the PCS on the generator side is studied. In recent years, China’s power system has developed rapidly,
the scale is expanding, and the structure is becoming increasingly complex. As PFM is an important
function of thermal power units related to the power grid, its performance has a direct impact on the
security and stability of the power system [13–16]. Although an increasing amount of attention has
been paid to the work of thermal power units related to the power grid, the design of the control
system has not adapted to new situations with the demand of PFM and PCS, and the performance of
some units is still not up to the expected value. In [17–19], the authors point out that the response
time, regulation speed, and regulation range of a PCS are closely related to the control mode of the
unit. Therefore, the design of a PCS is an important factor, affecting the performance of units and the
power grid. In [20,21], it is shown that the configuration of the valve flow function has a significant

Processes 2019, 7, 11

3 of 35

influence on the regulating effect of the thermal power unit control system. In [22,23], it is pointed out
that the variation in operating characteristics not only affects the performance of the existing control
system, but also endangers the safety and stability of the unit in the process of operation. In [24–27],
it is pointed out that the control strategy of each control loop in the power plant generally adopts the
proportional integral (PI) control structure. The main reason is that the PI control strategy has strong
robustness, and it is easy to adjust parameters. Therefore, new control algorithms, such as internal
model control (IMC) [28–30] and the intelligent control algorithm [31–33], even if the development is
very rapid, are of very little practical application for a control system of thermal power plants with
such high security requirements. A small number of applications are limited to local control loops.
IMC is a highly practical method proposed in the 1980s. An extension of the Smith predictor, it has a
simple structure, a simple design, fewer online adjustment parameters, a clear adjustment policy, and
easy adjustability. The improvement in robustness and disturbance as well as the effect especially on
the control of a large time-delay system are especially remarkable. Therefore, it is not only used in slow
response process control, but also has a better effect in the fast response of motor control compared
with the PI control algorithm since its advent. In order to optimize the performance of the PCS, a PCS
based on IMC is proposed in this paper. For simplicity and practicality, this paper does not establish a
boiler side main steam pressure model. With adopting a mathematical model of the turbine generator,
the simulated model of the PCS is built in a MATLAB environment. First, under ideal conditions, the
valve local flow coefficient is supposed as 1. The dynamic performance of PCSs under different control
strategies and controller parameters is studied. Second, according to two kinds of steam turbine valve
control modes, the actual valve local flow coefficient is calculated, and the dynamic characteristics
and robustness of a PCS under different control strategies are analyzed. In a simulated environment,
the performance of the IMC system and the PI control system are compared. The simulation results
show that the control strategy based on the combination of the internal model and PI control can better
ensure the control performance of the unit under the operating characteristics and operation mode
changes. Thus, the performance of the PFM of the unit is improved, and the security and stability of
the power system are improved.
The organizational structure of this paper is as follows. In Section 2, the methods are introduced.
In Section 3, the working principle of the PCS and the mathematical model of each component are
introduced in detail. In Section 4, four indexes are defined as the benchmark of the performance
assessment. On this basis, the factors that affect the PCS are simulated in detail, and the performance
of the system is compared and analyzed. In Section 5, the valve local flow coefficient is defined, and
the relationship between different valve control modes and the valve local flow coefficient is analyzed.
At the same time, under the simulation environment, when the valve local flow coefficient is different,
the performance of the PCS in PI and IMC mode is compared and analyzed, the root locus is plotted,
and the robustness of the system is analyzed. Section 6 summarizes the paper.
2. Methods
2.1. Control System Based on Proportion Integration Differentiation
Figure 1 is a schematic diagram of the traditional proportion integration differentiation (PID)
Processes
2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW
4 of 38
control
system.
D(s )
+

R (s )

E ( s)
+

GPID ( s )

U (s )

G p ( s)

+

Y (s )



Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the proportion integration differentiation (PID) control system.
Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the proportion integration differentiation (PID) control system.

In Figure 1, GP ( s ) and GPID ( s ) represent the controlled object and controller, respectively,
and R ( s ) , E ( s ) , U ( s ) , Y ( s ) , and D( s ) represent the reference, the error, the control action, the
output, and the external disturbance, respectively.
The mathematic relationship between input and output of the PID controller is as follows:



Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the proportion integration differentiation (PID) control system.

Processes 2019, 7, 11

4 of 35

In Figure 1, GP ( s ) and GPID ( s ) represent the controlled object and controller, respectively,
s ) , E ( s1,
) ,G
UP((ss)), and
Y (s) G
, PID
and
( s ) represent
the reference,
error,
the control
action,and
the
and InR (Figure
(sD
) represent
the controlled
objectthe
and
controller,
respectively,
Routput,
(s), E(sand
), U (the
s), external
Y(s), anddisturbance,
D(s) represent
the
reference,
the
error,
the
control
action,
the
output,
and
respectively.
the external
disturbance,
respectively.
The mathematic
relationship
between input and output of the PID controller is as follows:
The mathematic relationship between input and output of the PID controller is as follows:
t
de(t )
u (t ) = K P e(t ) + KZ
.
(1)
I 0 e(t ) dt + K D
t
dt (t)
de
u(t) = KP e(t) + KI
e(t)dt + KD
.
(1)
dt
0
The corresponding transfer function is as follows:
The corresponding transfer function
K
1
U ( s ) is as follows:
= K P + I + K D s = K(
+ TD s ) .
GPID ( s ) =
(2)
P 1 +
E ( s)
s
TI s
U (s)
K
1
= KP + I + KD s = KP (1 +
GPID (s) =
+ TD s ) .
(2)
s
TI s
E(s)
2.2. The Structure and Design of IMC
2.2. The Structure and Design of IMC
The structure of the IMC system is shown in Figure 2. GP ( s ) is the process, Gˆ P ( s ) is the
The
structure
of the IMC
in Figure
2. G
the process, RGˆ(Ps() s,)Uis( sthe
P (s) is controller.
controlled
object model,
andsystem
GIMC ( sis
) shown
is an IM
(internal
model)
) , Ycontrolled
( s ) , Ym ( s ) ,
object model, and GIMC (s) is an IM (internal model) controller. R(s), U (s), Y(s), Ym (s), and D(s)
and D( s ) represent the reference, the control action, the object output, the model output, and the
represent the reference, the control action, the object output, the model output, and the external
external disturbance, respectively.
disturbance, respectively.
D(s )
+

R(s)
+

GIMC ( s )

U (s )

G p ( s)

+

Y (s )



+

Gˆ p ( s )

Ym ( s)



Dˆ ( s)

Figure 2.
2. Schematic
Schematic diagram
diagram of
of the
the internal
internal model
model control
control (IMC)
(IMC) system.
system.
Figure

In
obtain
thethe
following
relation
between
the equivalent
feedback
controller
Gc ( s )
In Figure
Figure2,2,we
wecan
can
obtain
following
relation
between
the equivalent
feedback
controller
and
IM controller
GIMC (s) G
inIMC
the
Gc ( sthe
) and
the IM controller
( s )dashed
in theline:
dashed line:
GGIMC
()
IMC s
GcG(cs)( s=
.
)=
11−− G
(s)M(s)
GIMC
IMC ( s ) M ( s )

(3)
(3)

The
The internal
internal model
model controller
controller is
is transformed
transformed into
into aa PID-type
PID-type solution;
solution; that
that is,
is, Equation
Equation (2)
(2) is
is
equivalent
equivalent to
to Equation
Equation (1).
(1). Therefore, the PID controller is designed from the point of view of IMC.
In
In general,
general, the
the design
designprocess
processof
ofan
aninternal
internalmodel
modelcontroller
controllerisisas
asfollows:
follows:
(A) The model Gp (s) of the controlled object is decomposed into an all-pass part Gp+ (s) and a
minimum phase part Gp− (s):
Gp ( s ) = Gp + ( s ) × Gp − ( s ) .
(4)
In Equation (2), Gp+ (s) contains the pure lag element in Gp− (s) and the zero point of the right half
s plane and


Gp+ (s) ( jω) = 1
∀ω.
(5)

Processes 2019, 7, 11

5 of 35

In general, Gp+ (s) has the following form:
Gp+ (s) = e−τs

Y −s + ξ
i

s + ξH

Re(ξ), τ > 0.

(6)

In Equation (6), the superscript H denotes a complex conjugation.
(B) In order to suppress the influence of the model error on the system and increase the robustness
of the system, a low-pass filter GDT (s) is added to the controller, which is generally taken as the
simplest form as follows:
1
.
(7)
GDT (s) =
(λs + 1)r
In Equation (7), the order r depends on the order of Gp− (s) so that the control can be realized, and
λ is a time constant.
The IM controller obtained by this two-step design is as follows:
GIMC (s) = G−1
p_ (s)GDT (s).

(8)

Substitute Equation (7) into Equation (8) and the result to Equation (3), and take Equation (4) into
account. The following equation is then obtained:
Gc ( s ) =

G−1
p_ (s)

(λs + 1)r − Gp+ (s)

.

(9)

When the process model is known, the parameters of the PID controller based on IMC can be
obtained by Equations (2) and (9) according to the principle of identical equality.
If the controlled plant is an n-order model, the form of the state equation is given as follows:
X = AX + Bu
.
Y = CX

(10)

Under the optimal condition of the quadratic performance index,
1
J (u) =
2

tf

Z




XT GIMC X + uT Ru dt → min.

(11)

0

The following Hamiltonian function is obtained:
H=

1 T
1
X GIMC X + uT Ru + PT (AX + Bu).
2
2

(12)

where P is the adjoint of the state vector:


P(t) = X(t) X−1 (t).

(13)

According to ∂H/∂u = 0, the optimal control solution is
u∗ (t) = −R−1 BT P(t) = −K(t)X(t).

(14)

K(t) = R−1 BT M(t).

(15)

The M(t) is the solution of the following Riccati equation:
M(t) = −M(t)A − AT M(t) + M(t)BR−1 BT M(t) − GIMC .

(16)

Processes 2019, 7, 11

6 of 35

The Riccati equation has the following properties:
lim M = 0.

(17)

t→∞

For the above reasons, the matrix differential equation of Equation (16) can be replaced by the
following matrix differential equation:
MA = AT M − MBR−1 RT M + GIMC + M(t)BR−1 BT M(t) − GIMC .

(18)

It can be seen from the viewpoint of modern control theory that PID is the optimal control model
of process control for an n-order system, which shows that the PID controller designed based on the
internal model principle also conforms to the principle of quadratic optimal control selection.
2.3. Least Squares Method (LSM)
In the process of establishing the whole mathematical model of the PCS, a system identification
method is needed, and the most basic method is the LSM. Compared to other approaches, least square
estimation (LSE) is easy to understand and often effective.
Since the sampling is discrete, the discrete model is usually used in time domain identification.
Let the difference equation be
n
X

ai z(k − i) =

i=0

n
X

bi u(k − i) , a0 = 1

(19)

i=0

where u = input, z = output, and n = model order, respectively. In practical engineering, both input
and output have measurement errors, and a noise is added to the previous equation:
y(k ) = −

n
X
i=0

ai z(k − i)+

n
X

bi u ( k − i ) + e ( k ) .

(20)

i=0

If there are N + m points of measurement, there are N equations as follows:
y(n + 1)

= −a1 y(n) − a2 y(n − 1) − · · · − an y(1)
+b0 u(n + 1) + · · · + bn u(1) + e(n + 1)
y(n+2)
= −a1 y(n + 1) − a2 y(n) − · · · − an y(2)
+b0 u(n + 2) + · · · + bn u(2) + e(n + 2)
···
···
y(n + N ) = −a1 y(n + N − 1) − a2 y(n + N − 2) − · · · − an y(N )
+b0 u(n + N ) + · · · + bn u(2) + e(n + 2)

(21)

The above equations are written in vector form. The definition is as follows:



Y = [ y(n + 1), y(n + 2), · · ·, y(n + N )]T





ε = [e(n + 1), e(n + 2), · · ·, e(n + N )]T





θ = [a1 , a2 , · · ·, an , b0 , b1 , · · ·, bn ]T





−y(n)
· · · −y(1) u(n + 1) · · · u(1)







−y
(
n
+
1
)
· · · −y(2) u(n + 2) · · · u(2)






Φ = 

.
..
..
..
..
..

..



.
.
.
.
.






−y(N + n − 1) · · · −y(N ) u(n + N ) · · · u(N )
The equation can be written as


 .








(22)

Processes 2019, 7, 11

7 of 35

Y = Φθ + ε.

(23)

That is,
Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

7 of 38

ε = Y − Φθ.

The equation can be written as

Define another objective function to measure
Y = Φθ +the
ε . quality of the model:

(24)
(23)

That is,

J = εT ε.
(25)
ε =Y − Φθ .
(24)
Select a set of vectors θˆ to minimize the objective function, i.e., to optimize. Place Equation (24)
Define another objective function to measure the quality of the model:
into Equation (25), and the objective function J is expressed as
(25)
J = εTε .
T
T
T T
T
T T
J = (Y − Φθ) (Y − Φθ) = Y Y − θ Φ Y − Y Φθ + θ Φ Φθ.
(26)
Select a set of vectors θˆ to minimize the objective function, i.e., to optimize. Place Equation
(24) Take
into Equation
(25), and
is expressed
as
the derivative
of the
theobjective
objectivefunction
functionJ and
make it zero.
J = (Y − Φθ )T (Y − Φθ ) = Y T Y − θ T ΦT Y − Y T Φθ + θ T ΦT Φθ .

∂J

= −2ΦT Y + 2ΦT Φθˆ = 0.
Take the derivative of the objective
and make it zero.
∂θ θfunction
=θˆ
Thus, it is possible to obtain
Thus, it is possible to obtain

∂J
∂θ

θ =θˆ

=-2ΦT Y + 2ΦT Φθˆ = 0 .

(26)

(27)
(27)

ΦT Φθˆ = ΦT Y.

(28)

ˆ which
Thus, the parameter estimation θ,
minimizes the objective function, can be obtained.
(28)
ΦT Φθˆ = ΦT Y .

−1 T
theY.
objective function, can be obtained.
Thus, the parameter estimation θˆ , which
θˆ =minimizes
( ΦT Φ Φ
(29)
θˆ=(method
ΦT Φ )-1ΦTis
Y .used in the follow-up generator mathematical
(29)
This result is called the LSE of θ. This
modelThis
andresult
built-in
is model
called calculation.
the LSE of θ . This method is used in the follow-up generator
mathematical model and built-in model calculation.

3. The Structure and Mathematical Model of PCS
3. The
Structure
Mathematical
Model of process
PCS
The
thermaland
power
plant production
is shown in Figure 3. A boiler combined with a

steamThe
turbine
andpower
a generator
constitutesprocess
the main
of thermal
generating
units.
In aorder to
thermal
plant production
is equipment
shown in Figure
3. A boiler
combined
with
steam turbine
and
a generator
the main
equipment
of thermal
generating
establish
a PCS
model
of the constitutes
thermal power
unit,
a demand
assessment
shouldunits.
first In
beorder
carried out
to establish
a PCSthe
model
of the of
thermal
powerDuring
unit, a demand
assessment
should
first be
carried
out should
clearly
to clarify
purpose
modeling.
modeling,
it should
be noted
that
models
clearly
to
clarify
the
purpose
of
modeling.
During
modeling,
it
should
be
noted
that
models
should
include only information related to modeling purposes, while other irrelevant information or less
include only
information
related
to modeling
purposes, while
other
irrelevant
information orofless
relevant
information
should
be discarded
or simplified.
When
verifying
the performance
unit PFM,
relevant information should be discarded or simplified. When verifying the performance of unit
information about the boiler side can be greatly simplified. If the precision of the model requirement is
PFM, information about the boiler side can be greatly simplified. If the precision of the model
not very high, boiler side characteristics cannot be considered. Therefore, the PCS in the blue square is
requirement is not very high, boiler side characteristics cannot be considered. Therefore, the PCS in
studied, and its mathematical model will be established for simulation research.
the blue square is studied, and its mathematical model will be established for simulation research.

Figure 3. Production flow chart of the thermal power unit.

Figure 3. Production flow chart of the thermal power unit.

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

8 of 38

3.1. The Structure of the Power Control System
Processes 2019, 7, 11
Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

8 of 35
8 of 38

Figure 4 is a typical schematic diagram of a traditional PCS. The control system adopts feed
forward (FF) and feedback control, the controlled variable is electromagnetic power PE , and the
3.1. The Structure of the Power Control System
3.1.
The Structure
themanually
Power Control
reference
Psp canofbe
set orSystem
can be an AGC (automatic generation control) target value. It's
Figure 4 is a typical schematic diagram of a traditional PCS. The control system adopts feed
Figure
is a typical
schematic
diagram
of asum
traditional
PCS.
Theand
control
system
adoptsisfeed
just that
the4power
is set in
a different
way. The
of the set
value
the FM
increment
the
forward (FF) and feedback control, the controlled variable is electromagnetic power PE , and the
forward
(FF)
and
feedback
control,
the
controlled
variable
is
electromagnetic
power
P
,
and
the
final power value of FF and feedback control, and the deviation of the electric power are Ecompared
reference
can
be
manually
or can
be AGC
an AGC
(automatic
generation
control)
value.
It's
reference
PspPspvalue
can
beto
manually
setset
orvalve
can
be
an
(automatic
control)
targettarget
value.
It’s
just
with
the set
form
a total
position
command
sogeneration
as to
control
the
opening
of the
steam
just the
that
the
power
isinset
in
a different
way.
The steam
sum
the
set value
andFM
the
FM
increment
is
the
that
power
is setof
a different
way.
Themain
sum
of
theofpressure
set
value
and the
increment
is the
final
valve.
The
opening
the
actuator
and the
determine
the
steam
flow
into
the
final
power
value
of
FF
and
feedback
control,
and
the
deviation
of
the
electric
power
are
compared
power
value
of
FF
and
feedback
control,
and
the
deviation
of
the
electric
power
are
compared
with
turbine, which is expressed by Q = f ( μ , PT ) . The steam expands to be mechanical power, and the
with
set
value
to
form
avalve
total position
valve position
command
socontrol
as topower
control
the opening
of the valve.
steam
the
setthe
value
to form
total
command
so asinto
to
the opening
of the steam
generator
converts
it ainto
electromagnetic
power
pouring
the
grid.
valve.
The opening
of the actuator
mainpressure
steam pressure
determine
the
steam
into the
The
opening
of the actuator
and the and
mainthe
steam
determine
the steam
flow
intoflow
the turbine,
turbine,
which is expressed
(μ , P
steam to
expands
to be mechanical
power,
and the
which
is expressed
by Q = f (by
µ, PQT =
). fThe
steam
expands
be mechanical
power, and
the generator
T ) . The
K
F
converts
into electromagnetic
power pouring
into
the power
generatorit converts
it into electromagnetic
power
pouring
into grid.
the power grid.
Psp

Psp

+

E( s)

E( s)

U(s)

K

GPI (Fs )



+

PT

+

GPI ( s )



+

GZ (s)

Q

μ

f (μ, PT )

PT

+
U(s)

GZ (s)

μ

+

Q

f (μ, PT )

GT ( s )

PM

GT ( s )

GE ( s )

PM

PE

PE

GE ( s )

Figure 4. Schematic diagram of power control system (PCS) based on proportional integral (PI) plus
feed forward (FF) (Psp—power reference value; E(s)—error; U(s)—controller output; μ—valve
steam pressure;
flow; (PCS)
PM—mechanical
power; PE—electromagnetic
opening;
PT—main diagram
Figure
4. Schematic
of powerQ—steam
control system
based on proportional
integral (PI) plus
Figure 4.
diagram
of power control
system (PCS)f(μ,P
based
on proportional
integral (PI)
plus
FSchematic
—FF
gain;
G
PI(s)—controller;
G
Z(s)—actuator;
T)—function;
GT(s)—steam
turbine;
power;
K
feed forward (FF) (Psp —power reference value; E(s)—error; U(s)—controller output;
µ—valve opening;
sp
—power
reference
value;
E(s)—error;
U(s)—controller
output;
μ—valve
feed
forward
(FF)
(P
GE—main
(s)—generator).
P
steam pressure; Q—steam flow; PM —mechanical power; PE —electromagnetic power; KF —FF
T
pressure; Q—steam
flow; PM—mechanical
opening;
PT—main steam
gain; GPI (s)—controller;
GZ (s)—actuator;
f (µ,PT )—function;
GT (s)—steampower;
turbine;PEG—electromagnetic
E (s)—generator).
Compared
withgain;
the typical
PI plus FF G
inZ(s)—actuator;
Figure 4, the f(μ,P
structure
of PCS G
based
on IMC
plus PI is
GPI(s)—controller;
T)—function;
T(s)—steam
turbine;
power; KF—FF
G
E
(s)—generator).
illustrated
in
Figure
5.
The
FF
function
is
removed,
and
the
closed
loop
controller
still
uses
Compared with the typical PI plus FF in Figure 4, the structure of PCS based on IMC plusthe
PI PI
is

controller. in
GDT
( s ) is5.a mathematical
model
of the lowand
pass
filter,
andloop
GT (controller
s ) is the transfer
function
illustrated
Figure
The FF function
is removed,
the
closed
still uses
the PI
Compared
with
the
typical
PI
plus
FF
in
Figure
4,
the
structure
of
PCS
based
on
IMC
plus
PI is
controller.
G
(
s
)
is
a
mathematical
model
of
the
low
pass
filter,
and
G
(
s
)
is
the
transfer
function
between Q DT
and PM , which represents the dynamic relationship between
T the two variables. The full
illustrated
in
Figure
5.
The
FF
function
is
removed,
and
the
closed
loop
controller
still
uses
the
PI
between
Q and P
, which represents the dynamic relationship between the two variables. The full
built-in model
GM
M ( s ) = 1 − GIMC ( s ) . The role of GM ( s ) is to make the controller work in advance
controller.
G
(
s
)
is
a
mathematical
model
of
the
low
pass
filter,
and
G
(
s
)
is
the
transfer
function
DT
T
built-in
model
GM (s)flow
= 1into
− GIMC
s). The role
of GMchanges
(s) is to make
controller
work in advance based
based on
the steam
the(turbine
to reflect
to thethe
input
of the controller.
between
Q
and
P
,
which
represents
the
dynamic
relationship
between
the
two variables. The full
on the steam flow into
M the turbine to reflect changes to the input of the controller.
built-in model GM ( s ) = 1 − GIMC ( s ) . The role of GM ( s ) is to make the controller work in advance
based on the steam flow into the turbine to reflect changes P
to the input of the controller.

Psp
Psp

E( s)

GDT (s)



E( s)

GDT (s)



GPI ( s )

GPI ( s )

μ

U(s)
GZ (s)

μ

U(s)
GZ (s)

T

PM

Q

f (μ, PT )

PT

PM

Q

f (μ, PT )
GM ( s )

PE

GE ( s )

GT ( s)

GT ( s)

GIMC (s)

GE ( s )

+



PE

+

GM ( s )
GIMC (s)
Figure 5. Schematic diagram of the power control system (PCS) based on IMC-PI (GDT (s)—low pass
FigureG5.(s)—built-in
Schematic diagram
the
power control
system
(PCS)
on remaining
IMC-PI (Gcomponents
DT(s)—low pass
filter;
model; GofIMC
(s)—transfer
function
of Q
and based
PM . (the
are
M
filter;
G
M(s)—built-in model; GIMC(s)—transfer function of Q and PM. (the remaining components are
the same as in Figure 4)).
the same as in Figure 4)).
Figure
5. Schematic
diagram
system (PCS)
IMC-PI
(s)—low
For
comparison
with
Figuresof4the
andpower
5, thecontrol
PCS combines
IMCbased
with on
PI and
FF, (G
asDT
shown
in pass
Figure 6.
For
with
Figures
4 and 5, thefunction
PCS combines
with
PI and
FF, as shown
filter;comparison
GM(s)—built-in
model;
GIMC(s)—transfer
of Q and PIMC
M. (the
remaining
components
are in
the6.same as in Figure 4)).
Figure

For comparison with Figures 4 and 5, the PCS combines IMC with PI and FF, as shown in
Figure 6.

Processes 2019, 7, 11
Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

9 of 35
9 of 38

KF

Psp

+

E( s)

U(s)

GPI ( s )

GDT (s)

GZ (s)

PT

μ

f (μ, PT )

PM

Q

PE

GE ( s )

GT ( s )



GM ( s )

GIMC (s)



+

Figure 6. Schematic diagram of PCS based on IMC-PI plus FF. (Please refer to the corresponding
Figure 6. Schematic
components
in Figuresdiagram
4 and 5).of PCS based on IMC-PI plus FF. (Please refer to the corresponding
components in Figures 4 and 5).

3.2. Mathematical Model of PCS

3.2. Mathematical
of PCS
First in orderModel
to carry
out the simulation research on the PCS, the mathematical model of each
component
becarry
established.
this section,
model
and the parameters
First inshould
order to
out the Therefore,
simulation in
research
on thethe
PCS,
the mathematical
modelof
ofeach
each
component
Figures
respectively,
are determined.
componentinshould
be4–6,
established.
Therefore,
in this section, the model and the parameters of each
In manyincases,
the PID
control strategy
easily and flexibly, and the P, PI, PD (Proportion
component
Figures
4, 5, can
andchange
6, respectively,
are determined.
Differentiation),
or
PID
are
typical
structural
composition.
The easily
PI control
usedthe
in this
paper.
In many cases, the PID can change control strategy
andstructure
flexibly,isand
P, PI,
PD

(Proportion Differentiation), or PID are typical structural composition. The PI control structure is
U (s)
K
GPI (s) =
= KP + I .
(30)
used in this paper.
s
E(s)
K I shown in Table 1.
U ( s)
The controller parameters under the
GPItwo
K P + are
.
( s ) =control=modes
(30)
E (s)
s
Table 1. The controller parameters under two control modes (PI: Proportion Integration; FF: Feed
The controller parameters under the two control modes are shown in Table 1.
forward; IMC: Internal model control).

Table 1. The controllerPIparameters
under two control modes
Proportion Integration; FF: Feed
+ FF
IMC (PI:
+ PI
forward; IMC: Internal model control).
GPI2 (s) = 0.50 + 1s
GPI1 (s) = 0.20 + 0.05
1 #
s
GDT (s) =
PI + FF KF = 1
IMC
2s+1+ PI
+1 ##
GM (s) = 1 − GIMC (s) = 1 − 5.4064s
10.4s
1+1

( s ) = 0.50 +

G

2 LSE (Least square estimation) method
Note. # : According to the Equation (7) in Section 2.2; ## : According toPIthe
s

0.05
introducedGin Section
2.3, G+IMC
(s) =
( s ) = 0.20

P∗m
Q∗

=

Tm s + 1
Tn s + 1

is determined, where Tm and Tn are parameters to be identified.

1 #
2s + 1
= 1 establishment mathematical model of the controlled object, which is the
The following KisF the
5.4064s + 1 ##
GM ( s ) = 1 − steam
GIMC ( s )turbine
= 1 − governing
steam turbine and generator [34] of the PCS. The traditional
system model
10.4 s + 1
can be applied
to most large steam turbine units and the transfer function is as follows.
Note. #: According to the Equation (7) in Section 2.2; ##: According to the LSE (Least square
The electro-hydraulic servo actuator model is
P∗ T s + 1
is determined, where Tm
estimation) method introduced in Section 2.3, GIMC ( s ) = m∗ = m
K
Tn s +1
(KP1 + sI1 ) Q
PI 1

s

and Tn are parameters to be identified.
GZ ( s ) =

GDT ( s ) =

T·s
KI1
s )

(KP1 +
T·s

.

(31)

1+
The following is the establishment mathematical model of the controlled object, which is the
The turbine model is
steam turbine and generator [34] of the PCS. The traditional steam turbine governing system model
can be applied to most large steam turbine units and the transfer function is as follows.
FHP · (1 +servo
λ) · TRH
· s + 1 model
− FLP is
The electro-hydraulic
actuator
FLP
GT ( s ) =
+
.
(32)
(TCH · s + 1) · (TRH · s + 1)
(TCHK· s + 1) · (TRH · s + 1) · (TCO · s + 1)
I1
( K P1 +
)
s
The definitions and values of all parameters in Equations
(31) and (32) are shown in Appendix A.
T ⋅s
GZ (A)
s) =
. Equations (31) and (32), respectively,
The parameters in Table A1 (Appendix
are substituted
into
(31)
K I1
( K P1 +
)
and the following models are gained.
s
1+
T ⋅s

Processes 2019, 7, 11

10 of 35

The actuator model is
GZ ( s ) =

12s + 1
.
0.889s2 + 12s + 1

(33)

5.4064s + 1
.
0.52s2 + 10.45s + 1

(34)

The turbine model is
GT ( s ) =

The equivalent forward transfer function of the PCS is
G∗T (s) = GPI (s) · GZ (s) · GT (s).

(35)

Suppose the steam flow into the turbine is a per-unit value
Q∗ = f (µ, PT ) = µ × P∗T .

(36)

In Equation (36), µ is the opening of the electro-hydraulic servo system, and P∗T is the unitary
value of the main steam pressure. When the steam pressure is constant, the relationship between Q∗
and µ is linear. Therefore, the definition of the local valve flow coefficient is
k=

∆Q
.
∆µ

(37)

In Equation (37), ∆Q represents the steady-state increment of the actual flow and ∆µ represents
the steady-state increment of the total valve position.
The main difference between different synchronous generator mathematical models lies in the
rotor windings number of motor. If each rotor has two windings, and each rotor windings correspond
to the first order differential equations on the d and q axes, then it is called a fourth-order model. Along
with the second-order rotor motion equations, the whole generator equations are sixth-order models
described in Appendix B (Equations (A1)–(A6)). For the specific parameters and significance, refer
to [35,36].
In an actual generator system, if we consider the influence of the excitation system and the power
system stabilizer, the generator model will become more complicated because of a high degree of
nonlinearity. Therefore, the reduced order model can be used instead of the full order model to ensure
that the power simulation response curve is undistorted.
According to the ideas foundation of Prony assessment [37,38], the lower-order model can be
extracted from the full order model to obtain the related transfer function by means of the relationship
between the output and the input under disturbance. The two parameters measured are the input
mechanical power and the output electromagnetic power of the generator. The model can be represented
by a second order transfer function expressed by Equation (38) [39]. According to the least square
system identification method introduced in Section 2.3, two undetermined parameters of the generator
are identified.
GEN (s) =

a1

s2

1
.
+ a2 s + 1

(38)

According to the relationship between the input and output of the generator model, the linear low
order model is extracted from the high order model of the generator. The optimization algorithm for
system identification is the simplex method, and identified parameters are shown as Equation (39).
GEN (s) =

0.0177s2

1
.
+ 0.0333s + 1

(39)

Appendix B represents the actual complicated model, and Equation (39) represents a simplified
reduced model, and the simulation step response results are shown in Figure 7.

GEN ( s ) =

1
.
0.0177 s + 0.0333s + 1

(39)

2

Appendix B represents the actual complicated model, and Equation (39) represents a simplified
11 of 35
and the simulation step response results are shown in Figure 7.

Processes
2019,
7, 11
reduced
model,

1.8
1.6

The actual model
The simplified model

1.4

Power (p.u.)

1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
0

1

2

3

4

5
Time (s)

6

7

8

9

10

Figure
Figure 7.
7. Generator
Generator power
power responses
responses of
of the
the actual
actual model
model and
and aa simplified
simplified model.
model.

From Figure 7, it shows that the simplified model can reflect the power response characteristic of
From Figure 7, it shows that the simplified model can reflect the power response characteristic
the actual model with high accuracy. Since the response curves of the low order model and the high
of the actual model with high accuracy. Since the response curves of the low order model and the
order model coincide well, it is feasible to replace the complex nonlinear model with a low order model.
high order model coincide well, it is feasible to replace the complex nonlinear model with a low
order
model. Assessment and Simulation of the Power Control System
4.
Performance
In this section,
the performance
assessment
of Control
the PCSSystem
is established first, and further
4. Performance
Assessment
and Simulation
of theindex
Power
simulation research is then described on the basis of the establishment of each component of PCS in
In this section, the performance assessment index of the PCS is established first, and further
Section 3.
simulation research is then described on the basis of the establishment of each component of PCS in
Section
3. Performance Indexes and Performance Assessment Definition
4.1.
Dynamic

4.1. Dynamic
Performance
Indexes
and Performance
Assessment Definition
4.1.1.
Dynamic
Performance
Indexes
of PCS
A typical schematic diagram of PFM of thermal power unit is shown in Figure 8. The initial
4.1.1. Dynamic Performance Indexes of PCS
FM power constant value is obtained by calculating the speed difference in unit speed through an
A typical
schematic
diagram
of PFM of thermal
power between
unit is shown
in Figure
8. Thespeed
initialand
FM
unequal
ratio function
(Figure
9). Theoretically,
the relation
the actual
rotational
power
constant
value
is
obtained
by
calculating
the
speed
difference
in
unit
speed
through
an
the frequency of the power grid is n = 60f (r/min). On the side of the power loop, the speed difference
unequal
ratio function
(Figure
9). Theoretically,
between
rotational
which
reflects
the change
of network
frequencythe
is relation
compensated
bythe
FMactual
power
constantspeed
valueand
by
the frequency
of the power
grid is
n = 60f
(r/min).
On (digital
the side
of thehydraulic
power loop,
thesystem)
speed
designing
the function
of the speed
varying
rate.
The DEH
electric
control
difference
reflects
the change
of signal
network
frequency
is compensated
by FMturbine
powerregulator
constant
side
makes which
the rotation
speed
difference
directly
superimposed
on the steam
value
designing
thevarying
function
the speed
varying
rate.
The
DEH
via
the by
rotational
speed
rateofdesign
function.
On the
DEH
side,
FM (digital
directly electric
controls hydraulic
the valve
control
system)
side
makes
the
rotation
speed
difference
signal
directly
superimposed
on
the
steam
opening regulation of the steam turbine, thereby rapidly changing the unit power. After adjusting
the
turbine
via loop
the rotational
varying rate
designout
function.
On
the DEH
FM
FM
effectregulator
of the power
side, closedspeed
loop regulation
is carried
to ensure
steady
powerside,
and FM
directly
controls
the valve opening regulation of the steam turbine, thereby rapidly changing the
target
power
suppression.
unit The
power.
After
adjustingofthe
FM effect
of units
the power
side, closed
loopthe
regulation
carried
PFM performance
thermal
power
is veryloop
important
to ensure
frequencyisstability
outthe
to power
ensuregrid.
steady
power
andcharacteristics
FM target power
of
The
control
andsuppression.
operating characteristics of the units have a great
influence on the performance of the PFM, so the factors affecting the performance are analyzed below.
First, the specific indicators for evaluating the performance of primary frequency regulation are
confirmed, so three dynamic indicators are selected as part of the performance assessment index
according to [40]. The first dynamic index is described as the load time of the coal-fired units.
Seventy-five percent of the target load should be less than 15 s. The second dynamic index is described
as the load time. A 90% target load should be less than 30 seconds. The third dynamic index is that
the stability time of the unit participating in PFM and is less than 1 min. According to Figure 10, the
meaning of the three dynamic indexes is explained below.

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

12 of 38

Speed
difference

Speed
difference

Processes 2019, 7, 11

12 of 35

Processes
2017,
5, x FOR PEER REVIEW
Power
loop

DEH

Unequal rate
Speed 1
function
difference

+
Power Setpoint

Unequal rate
function
Speed 2
difference

Actual
power

Frequency
Power loopmodulation
power setpoint

Power
controller

_

Unequal
Σ rate
function 1

12 of 38



PI

Valve position
DEH
increment
Total valve position
instruction
Unequal
Σ rate
function 2

Actual
power

Frequency

Valve
position power unit
Figure 8. Typical schematic diagram of primary frequency modulation (PFM)
of thermal
Power
modulation
increment
(DEH: Digital
Electro-hydraulic
Control).
controller
power setpoint
_

Total valve position
instruction

+

TheSetpoint
PFM performance
is very important
Power
Σ of thermal∆ power units PI
Σ to ensure the frequency
stability of the power grid. The control characteristics and operating characteristics of the units have
a great influence on the performance of the PFM, so the factors affecting the performance are
Figure
8. Typical
schematic
diagram
primaryfrequency
frequency modulation
of of
thermal
power
unit unit
analyzed
below.
Figure
8. Typical
schematic
diagram
ofofprimary
modulation(PFM)
(PFM)
thermal
power
Digital
Electro-hydraulic
Control).
(DEH:(DEH:
Digital
Electro-hydraulic
Control).
The PFM performance of thermal power units is very important to ensure the frequency
stability of the power grid. The control characteristics and operating characteristics of the units have
a great influence on the performance of the PFM, so the factors affecting the performance are
analyzed below.

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

13 of 38

Figure 9. Rotational speed inequality curve.
1.4

Figure 9. Rotational speed inequality curve.

Power (p.u.)

First, the specific indicators for evaluating the performance of primary frequency regulation are
1.2
confirmed, so three dynamic
indicators are selected as part of the performance assessment index
according to [40]. The first dynamic index is described as the load time of the coal-fired units.
1
Seventy-five percent Pof
30 the target load should be less than 15 s. The second dynamic index is
P15
9. Rotational
speed inequality
curve.
described as the load time. A Figure
90% target
load should
be less than
30 seconds. The third dynamic
0.8
index is that the stability time of the unit participating in PFM and is less than 1 min. According to
First,
the meaning
specific indicators
fordynamic
evaluating
the performance
primary frequency regulation are
Figure
10, the
of the three
indexes
is explainedofbelow.
confirmed, so three dynamic
indicators are selected as part of the performance assessment index
0.6
according to [40]. The first dynamic index is described as the load time of the coal-fired units.
Seventy-five percent 0.4
of the target load should be less than 15 s. The Pe
second dynamic index is
n
described as the load time. A 90% target load should be less than 30 seconds.
The third dynamic
index is that the stability
0.2 time of the unit participating in PFM and is less than 1 min. According to
Figure 10, the meaning of the three dynamic indexes is explained below.
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

Figure
10.10.Typical
curve.
Figure
Typicalpower
power response
response curve.

Under
a simulation
environment,
turbine
speed
step
andthe
the the
Under
a simulation
environment,
turbine
speed
stepchange
changeisisartificially
artificially simulated,
simulated, and
the PFM
loopchanges
quicklythe
changes
turbine mechanical
output
power, response
so powercharacteristics
response
PFM loop
quickly
turbinethe
mechanical
output power,
so power
characteristics of the unit can be obtained under frequency disturbance. As shown in Figure 10,
when the unit speed signal has a step change n and the speed discrepancy exceeds the death zone
(eg., ±2 r/min) in Figure 10, then the unit’s frequency function begins to change the power of the
unit. The time of the step change of the speed signal is the starting time of the PFM action. The
symbol Pe means the power change, and the power of the unit reaches a steady value of Psp as the

Processes 2019, 7, 11

13 of 35

of the unit can be obtained under frequency disturbance. As shown in Figure 10, when the unit
speed signal has a step change n and the speed discrepancy exceeds the death zone (e.g., ±2 r/min)
in Figure 10, then the unit’s frequency function begins to change the power of the unit. The time of
the step change of the speed signal is the starting time of the PFM action. The symbol Pe means the
power change, and the power of the unit reaches a steady value of Psp as the action of PFM continues.
After PFM action lasts 15 s, according to the requirements of the first dynamic, the variation of power
P15 /Psp × 100% should be greater than 75%. When the PFM action continues for 30 s, according to the
second dynamic index, the variation of power P30 /Psp × 100% should be greater than 90%. According
to the third dynamic index, the stable time of PFM action should be less than 60 s.
The PFM performance assessment indicators are defined as follows.
β1 =

P15
.
Psp

(40)

β2 =

P30
.
Psp

(41)

tS (∆ = ±2%).

(42)

In Equation (17), tS is the adjustment time of the PFM and the error band is marked as ∆ = ±2%.
In order to evaluate the performance of the PFM, the power grid dispatching has the corresponding
means to assess. Taking the Hunan Province power grid in China as an example, the implementation
of the assessment of PFM of thermal power units is according to the related requirements of two
documents [41,42]. In these two detailed sets of rules, the main basis for the assessment of PFM is the
unit contribution rate, which is defined as
H













.

t0




Rt1



He = ∆P(∆ f , t)dt 


K = Hei × 100%
Rt1
Hi = (Pt − P0 )dt

(43)

t0

In Equation (43), K is a power PFM contribution rate that represents the percentage of the real
contribution Hi and the theoretical contribution He . The actual contribution Hi represents the integral
value of the actual power variation. The theoretical contribution He represents the integral value
of the theoretical FM power variation calculated according to the unequal speed rate in the FM
duration. If K < 50%, the PFM of the unit will be considered unqualified. On the contrary, it will be
considered qualified.
According to Equations (40)–(43), the chosen performance assessment indexes of PCS include a
total of four items as shown in Table 2.
Table 2. Dynamic performance indexes and qualified scope of the power control system (PCS).
Performance Dynamic Index

Qualified Scope

β1 ( % )
β2 ( % )
tS ( s )
K (%)

≥ 75%
≥ 90%
≤ 60s
≥ 50%

4.1.2. Dynamic Performance Assessment Index Definition of PCS
Definition: The dynamic performance assessment index of PFM for PCS DPAI (Dynamic
Performance Assessment Index) as

Processes 2019, 7, 11

14 of 35













β

β

2
1
K
+ λ2 0.90
+ λ3 60
DPAI = λ1 0.75
ts + λ4 0.50
.
λ1 + λ2 + λ3 + λ4 = 1
And β1 ≥ 75%, β2 ≥ 90%, ts ≤ 60s, K ≥ 50%

(44)

At the same time, another auxiliary performance assessment index Num is given, i.e., the number
of dynamic performance indicators satisfying the eligible range of parameters in Table 2. The same
weights for four dynamic performance metrics are given.
λ1 = λ2 = λ3 = λ4 = 0.25.

(45)

Finally, the performance assessment benchmarks and results for the PCS are shown in Table 3 below.
Table 3. Benchmark and result of dynamic performance assessment for the PCS (DPAI: Dynamic
Performance Assessment Index).
DPAI

Num

Performance Assessment Results

DPAI ≥ 1.4
1.4 > DPAI ≥ 1.3
1.3 > DPAI ≥ 1.0
1.0 > DPAI ≥ 0.5
0.5 > DPAI > 0
System Unstable

Num = 4
3 ≤ Num ≤ 4
2 ≤ Num ≤ 4
1
0
0

Excellent
Good
Medium
Poor
So Bad
Unacceptable

The structure of PCS shown in Figures 4–6 are, respectively, adopted below. According to
the established mathematical model in Section 3.2 and the performance assessment indexes as the
benchmark in Table 3, a deep assessment of the specific factors affecting PFM was carried out under the
MATLAB (Version: 8.0.0.783(R2012b), MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA, 2017) simulation environment.
The simulation software version is Matlab2012b and the simulation and performance assessment
flow is as follows: (1) build the simulation model; (2) calculate the four dynamic performance indexes;
(3) calculate the main and auxiliary performance assessment indexes. The result is given depending on
the circumstances.
4.2. Simulation of PCS
It is assumed that all equipment in the PCS works in the rated condition, and the disturbance signal
is applied to it at the stable state. In this way, the mathematical model of each part can be simplified in
the form of transfer function, which is convenient to establish the simulation model of the PCS in the
MATLAB environment. Corresponding to the control structures of Figures 4–6, the simulation model of
the controlled object is established, respectively, using Equations (33), (34), and (39). Using the proper
tuning method of controller parameters and selecting suitable parameters, the dynamic performance
of PCS was analyzed. In order to obtain an ideal control effect, the controller needs features that
match with the controlled object. Because the dynamic characteristics cannot be easily changed, only
reasonable controller parameters can be set. In engineering, commonly used parameter tuning methods
include the critical proportional band method, the attenuation curve method, the dynamic parameter
method, and the empirical method [43–45]. The critical proportional zone method has certain limitation
in practical applications. Some production processes do not allow for the generation of other side
oscillations such as boiler drum level control in thermal power plants, and some controlled objects
with larger inertia do not easily generate equal amplitude oscillations, so the proportional band and
oscillation period cannot be obtained under critical conditions. The attenuation curve method was
developed based on the critical proportional band method and has similar limitations. The dynamic
parameter method requires the system to be tested with a step disturbance test under an open loop
condition. Parameters are calculated according to the step response curve. The empirical method

Processes 2019, 7, 11

15 of 35

is essentially a method of trial and error. It is an effective method that is summed up in production
practice and widely applied in process control field. The steps of this method are described according
to operational experience. A set of controller parameters is determined, and closed loop operation
is performed. Step disturbance is then added to observe the adjustment process. If the adjustment
process is unsatisfactory, regulator parameters are modified, and the disturbance test is repeated
until the adjustment process is satisfactory. Finally, the combination of the empirical method and the
theoretical algorithm introduced in Section 2.2 is used in this paper, so the performance differences can
be compared directly under different parameters during parameter tuning.
Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW
16 of 38
The
influence of the different control parameter on the control effect is complex and profound.
Therefore,
how
to achieve
best PFM effect
requires
analysis
ofavailable,
the relationship
betweenofdifferent
PCS, the
conditions
forthe
comprehensive
analytical
research
are not
so the simulation
PCS
control
parameters
PFM
the stability
andlocal
security
of the actual
was
carried outand
under
theperformance.
following fourFor
cases.
Suppose the
flow requirements
characteristic coefficient
PCS, the
for(37).
comprehensive analytical research are not available, so the simulation of PCS
k =conditions
1 in Equation
was carried out under the following four cases. Suppose the local flow characteristic coefficient k = 1
4.2.1. The
Influence of FF Coefficient K F on PCS
in Equation
(37).
Firstly, the influence of FF coefficient on PFM was analyzed. In Figure 4, through the total valve
position instructions, the comprehensive valve position increment directly controls the steam
turbinethe
regulating
valve
andcoefficient
plays a fast
The PFM
a kind4,ofthrough
disturbance
for the
Firstly,
influence
of FF
onregulation
PFM wasrole.
analyzed.
In isFigure
the total
valve
stable
operation
of
the
unit
since
it
changes
power
of
the
assembling
unit
quickly.
In
order
to
better
position instructions, the comprehensive valve position increment directly controls the steam
turbine
balance
the PFM
and the
stableregulation
operation role.
of the The
unit,PFM
the comprehensive
increment offor
thethe
valve
regulating
valve
and plays
a fast
is a kind of disturbance
stable
position is not directly superimposed on the total valve position instruction, instead adjusted by FF
operation of the unit since it changes power of the assembling unit quickly. In order to better balance
gain coefficient and then apply to it. Changing K F can adjust the primary frequency disturbance

4.2.1. The Influence of FF Coefficient KF on PCS

the PFM and the stable operation of the unit, the comprehensive increment of the valve position is not
degree.
directly superimposed on the total valve position instruction, instead adjusted by FF gain coefficient
0.05
Let K Fto= it.
0 / 0.4
/ 0.8 /1.2 /1.6
2.0 ,adjust
and the
controller
GPI ( s ) = 0.2disturbance
+
. The power
simulation
and then apply
Changing
KF /can
the
primaryisfrequency
degree.
s
0.05
Let
KF of
= the
0/0.4/0.8/1.2/1.6/2.0,
and the
curve
PFM test is shown in Figure
11. controller is GPI (s) = 0.2 + s . The power simulation
curve of the PFM test is shown in Figure 11.
1.8
1.6
1.4

Power (p.u.)

1.2
1
0.8

y1
y2
y3
y4
y5
y6
ysp

0.6
0.4
0.2
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

Figure
11. 11.
TheThe
response
FFcoefficients.
coefficients.
Figure
responseofofPCS
PCSwith
with different
different FF

According
to thetopower
curvecurve
shown
in Figure
8, β1 ,8,β2 ,β1tS、
, and
calculated, respectively,
According
the power
shown
in Figure
β 2 、K tare
S , and K are calculated,
when respectively,
KF = 0/0.4/0.8/1.2/1.6/2.0.
The
results
are
shown
in
Table
4.
when K F = 0 / 0.4 / 0.8 /1.2 /1.6 / 2.0 . The results are shown in Table 4.
According to the requirements of β1 , β2 , tS , and K, Table 4 shows that β1 , β2 , and K increase to
4. Performance
primary of
frequency
obtain betterTable
performance
withresult
the of
increase
KF , butmodulation
the effect(PFM)
of KFwith
on different
tS is notcontrollers.
monotonic; that is,
a KF value thatKisF too
small
or
too
big
will
increase
t
.
Therefore,
to
make
t
qualified,
K should be
Num SPerformance F
Output β (%) β (%) t (s) S K (%)
1

0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2.0

y1
y2
y3
y4
y5
y6

49.52
69.66
89.79
109.93
130.06
150.20

2

75.88
88.05
100.22
112.39
124.56
136.73

S

72.10
56.50
24.20
72.80
81.50
86.80

70.08
78.02
85.95
93.88
101.80
109.80

DPAI
0.9232
1.1195
1.6126
1.3376
1.4544
1.5823

1
2
4
3
3
3

Poor
Medium
Excellent
Good
Good
Good

Processes 2019, 7, 11

16 of 35

selected in the appropriate range. For KF , we ensure that a larger value is selected to optimize the
performance of PFM on the premise that tS is qualified.
Because KF is not the only factor that affects the performance of PFM, the influence of different
power controller parameters on their performance is further studied below.
Table 4. Performance result of primary frequency modulation (PFM) with different controllers.
KF

Output

β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2.0

y1
y2
y3
y4
y5
y6

49.52
69.66
89.79
109.93
130.06
150.20

75.88
88.05
100.22
112.39
124.56
136.73

72.10
56.50
24.20
72.80
81.50
86.80

70.08
78.02
85.95
93.88
101.80
109.80

0.9232
1.1195
1.6126
1.3376
1.4544
1.5823

1
2
4
3
3
3

Poor
Medium
Excellent
Good
Good
Good

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW
4.2.2. Influence
of Controller Parameters on PCS

17 of 38

According
to the is
requirements
of β1 、 β 2in
、 tthe
K , Table
4 shows that
β1 、actual
β 2 , andunit.
K
S , and
The PI control
strategy
usually adopted
power
controller
of the
When
increase
to
obtain
better
performance
with
the
increase
of
K
,
but
the
effect
of
K
on
t
is
not
F
S
the parameter setting of the PI controller is not reasonable, Fthe PFM performance
of
the unit will
monotonic; that is, a K F value that is too small or too big will increase tS . Therefore, to make tS
be decreased. According to Section
4.2.1 and the results in Table 3 and Figure 11, the FF coefficient
qualified, K F should be selected in the appropriate range. For K F , we ensure that a larger value is
performs best when it is 0.8, so it may be assumed that it is 0.8. Therefore, let KF = 0.8, keep the PI
selected to optimize the performance of PFM on the premise that tS is qualified.
integral gain KI = 0.05, and change the PI proportional gain. Four different power controllers are
Because K F is not the only factor that affects the performance of PFM, the influence of
shown in Table
5.
different power controller parameters on their performance is further studied below.

Table
5. Performance
results
of PFM with different controllers.
4.2.2. Influence
of Controller
Parameters
on PCS
The PI controlOutput
strategy isβusually
adopted
power controller
of
the actualNum
unit. When
the
Controller
β2 (%) in the
tS (s)
K(%)
DPAI
Performance
1 (%)
parameter setting of the PI controller is not reasonable, the PFM performance of the unit will be
Gc1 (s) = 0.10 + 0.05/s
y1
89.40
100.88
50.80
85.96
1.2885
4
Medium
decreased. According to Section 4.2.1 and the results in Table 3 and Figure 11, the FF coefficient
Gc2 (s) = 0.20 + 0.05/s
y2
89.79
100.22
24.20
85.95
1.6126
4
Excellent
performs best when it is 0.8, so it may be assumed that it is 0.8. Therefore, let K F = 0.8 , keep the PI
Gc3 (s) = 0.40 + 0.05/s
y3
90.51
99.25
25.80
85.95
1.5740
4
Excellent
gain K I =0.05
proportional
Four different
are
Gc4 (s) =integral
0.60 + 0.05/s
y4, and change
90.97 the PI
98.61
27.40 gain.85.97
1.5400power controllers
4
Excellent
shown in Table 5.
The power simulation curve with different proportional gain is shown in Figure 12, and the
The power
curve with
different
gain is shown in Figure 12, and the results
resultssimulation
of four performance
indexes
are also proportional
shown in Table 5.

of four performance indexes are also shown in Table 5.

1.2

Power (p.u.)

1
0.8
y1
y2
y3
y4
ysp

0.6
0.4
0.2
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

Figure Figure
12. PCS
response
with
proportional
12. PCS
response
withdifferent
different proportional
gain.gain.
Table 5. Performance results of PFM with different controllers.

Controller
Gc1 ( s ) = 0.10 + 0.05 s
Gc 2 ( s ) = 0.20 + 0.05 s

Output

β1 (%)

β 2 (%)

tS (s)

K (%)

y1
y2

89.40
89.79

100.88
100.22

50.80
24.20

85.96
85.95

DPAI
1.2885
1.6126

Num

Performance

4
4

Medium
Excellent

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

18 of 38

When K P = 0.95 , the system becomes unstable and the output power oscillates as shown in
Figure
13.
It 5,
can be seen from Figure
Processes
2017,
Processes
2019,
7, 11x FOR PEER REVIEW

13, if the proportional gain becomes larger, the stability18ofofthe
17 of 38
35
system will decline.
When K P = 0.95 , the system becomes unstable and the output power oscillates as shown in
When
= 0.95,
thefrom
system
becomes
unstable
and thegain
output
power
oscillates
as shown
in
Figure
13.KItP can
be seen
Figure
13, if the
proportional
becomes
larger,
the stability
of the
1.4
Figure
13.
It
can
be
seen
from
Figure
13,
if
the
proportional
gain
becomes
larger,
the
stability
of
the
system will decline.
system will decline.
1.2
1.4

Power (p.u.)
Power (p.u.)

1
1.2
0.8
1
0.6
0.8
0.4
0.6

y1
ysp

0.2
0.4
0
0.20

20

40

Time (s)

60

y1
ysp

80

100

0
0

Figure 13. Oscillatory
output
20
40
60 of PCS. 80
100
Time (s)
As can be seen in Table 5, the performance of Gc 2 ( s ) = 0.20 + 0.05 s is superior, so the
Figure
Figure13.
13.Oscillatory
Oscillatoryoutput
outputof
ofPCS.
PCS.

proportional gain K P =0.20 is kept unchanged. The PI integral gain is then changed, and six
As canpower
be seen in Table 5, the
of
Gc2 (each
s) = 0.20
+ 0.05/spower
is superior, so the proportional
different
areperformance
compared
with
curve
As can be controllers
seen in Table
5,
the performance
ofother.
Gc 2 ( s )The
= 0.20 + 0.05 simulation
s is superior,
so with
the
gain
KP =integral
0.20 is gain
kept isunchanged.
The PI
is then
changed,
and six
different
different
shown in Figure
14,integral
and thegain
results
of four
performance
indexes
arepower
shown
proportional gain K P =0.20 is kept unchanged. The PI integral gain is then changed, and six
controllers
in Table 6. are compared with each other. The power simulation curve with different integral gain is
different
power
are compared
with eachindexes
other. are
Theshown
powerinsimulation
curve with
shown
in Figure
14,controllers
and the results
of four performance
Table 6.
different integral gain is shown in Figure 14, and the results of four performance indexes are shown
in Table 6.
1.4
1.2
1.4

Power (p.u.)
Power (p.u.)

1
1.2
0.81
y1
y2
y3
y1
y4
y2
y5
y3
y6
y4
ysp
y5

0.6
0.8
0.4
0.6
0.2
0.4
0.2
0
0
0
0

50

100

Time (s)

150

y6
ysp 200

50
100
150
200
Figure
Figure14.
14.PCS
PCSresponse
responsewith
withdifferent
differentintegral
integralgains.
gains.
Time (s)

Figure 14. PCS response with different integral gains.

250
250

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

19 of 38

Table 6. Performance result of PFM with different controllers.

tS (s)
K (%)
Controller
Output β1 (%) β 2 (%)
DPAI Num Performance
18 of 35
Gc1 ( s ) = 0.20 + 0.01 s
y1
79.11
87.37
223.80 77.37 0.9475
1
Poor
Gc 2 ( s ) = 0.20 + 0.02 s
y2
82.18
91.83
88.30
81.06 1.0908
3
Medium
Table 6. Performance result of PFM with different controllers.
Gc 3 ( s ) = 0.20 + 0.03 s
y3
84.96
95.35
42.30
83.41 1.3058
4
Good
Output
β87.49
β2 98.10
(%)
tS 29.70
(s)
K(%)
Gc 4 ( s ) =Controller
0.20 + 0.04 s
y4
84.94 DPAI
1.4795 Num4 Performance
Good
1 (%)
G
(
s
)
=
0.20
+
0.01/s
y1
79.11
87.37
223.80
77.37
0.9475
1
Poor
Gc 5 ( sc1) = 0.20 + 0.05 s
y5
89.79
100.22
24.20
85.95 1.6126
4
Excellent
G (s) = 0.20 + 0.02/s
y2
82.18
91.83
88.30
81.06
1.0908
3
Medium
Gc 6G( sc2)(=
0.20
+
0.06
s
y6
91.87 95.35
101.82 42.30
49.70 83.41
86.65 1.3058
1.3399 4 4
Good
s) = 0.20 + 0.03/s
y3
84.96
Good

Processes 2019, 7, 11

c3

Gc4 (s) = 0.20 + 0.04/s
y4
Gc5 (s) = 0.20 + 0.05/s
The simulation resultsy5in
Gc6 (s) = 0.20 + 0.06/s
y6

87.49

98.10

29.70

84.94

1.4795

4

Good

89.79
100.22
85.95
1.6126
4
Excellent
Figure
14 show
that a24.20
reasonable
setting
of control
parameters
is very
91.87
101.82
49.70
86.65
1.3399
4
Good
important for PFM. When K I = 0.01 , under the action of the integral element, power changes to the

target value at a slower speed, but when Gc 5 ( s ) = 0.2 + 0.05 s , the Gc ( s ) control parameter setting is
The simulation results in Figure 14 show that a reasonable setting of control parameters is very
more reasonable, and the power response characteristics are more ideal, so the power reaches the
important for PFM. When KI = 0.01, under the action of the integral element, power changes to the
target value in a relatively short period of time. The simulation results show that the control
target value at a slower speed, but when Gc5 (s) = 0.2 + 0.05/s, the Gc (s) control parameter setting is
parameters affect the steady state response characteristics of the PCS, so the reasonable control
more reasonable, and the power response characteristics are more ideal, so the power reaches the target
parameter setting is important to ensure tS , which is on behalf of the steady state performance of
value in a relatively short period of time. The
simulation results show that the control parameters
qualified
PFM.
affect the steady state response characteristics of the PCS, so the reasonable control parameter setting is
important to ensure tS , which is on behalf of the steady state performance of qualified PFM.
4.2.3. Simulation Study of IMC-PI PCS
4.2.3. The
Simulation
of IMC-PI
PCS5 was adopted, and two parameters of built-in model and two
IMC-PIStudy
structure
in Figure
different
parameters
of PI in
controller
The results
the comparison
The IMC-PI
structure
Figure 5were
was selected
adopted,individually.
and two parameters
of of
built-in
model andunder
two
four different
cases are
shown
in Figure
and the
results of four
are shown
different
parameters
of PI
controller
were15,
selected
individually.
Theperformance
results of theindexes
comparison
underin
Table
7.
four
different
cases are shown in Figure 15, and the results of four performance indexes are shown in
Table 7.

1.2
1

Power (p.u.)

0.8
0.6
y1
y2
y3
y4
ysp

0.4
0.2
0
0

50

Time (s)

100

150

Figure 15. PCS response with four different IMC-PI parameters.
Figure 15. PCS response with four different IMC-PI parameters.

From Figure 15 and Table 7, we can see that the performance of the system is getting worse under
the four different parameters. This means that the performance of the system under the first parameter
is the best. The best parameter is also used in Section 4.2.4 below.

1
5.4064 s + 1 #
GIMC ( s ) =
10.40 s + 1
s
1
11.90s + 1 #
Gc ( s ) = 0.50 +
GIMC ( s ) =
s
22.80 s + 1
0.05
5.4064 s + 1 #
Gc ( s ) = 0.20 +
GIMC ( s ) =
s
10.40 s + 1
Processes 2019, 7, 11
0.05
11.90 s + 1 #
Gc ( s ) = 0.20 +
GIMC ( s ) =
s
22.80 s + 1
Gc ( s ) = 0.50 +

#

:

According

to

the

LSE

y1

87.83

97.08

33.90

84.01

1.4108

4

Good

y2

78.28

87.40

87.80

78.69

1.0552

2

Poor

y3

42.56

68.81

92.00

65.49

0.8134

1

Poor

y4

41.27

64.84

138.00

61.75

0.7256

1

Poor

introduced

in

19 of 35

system

identification

method

Section

Table 7. Performance result of PFM with four different controllers.
P∗ T s + 1
GIMC ( s) = m∗ = m
is determined, where Tm and Tn are parameters to be identified.
Controller
Output
β1 (%)
β2 (%)
tS (s)
K(%)
DPAI
Num
Tn s +1
Q

Gc (s) = 0.50 + 1s
Gc (s) = 0.50 + 1s
Gc (s) = 0.20 + 0.05
s
Gc (s) = 0.20 + 0.05
s
#:

+1 #
GIMC (s) = 5.4064s
10.40s+1
+1 #
GIMC (s) = 11.90s
22.80s+1
+1 #
GIMC (s) = 5.4064s
10.40s+1
+1 #
GIMC (s) = 11.90s
22.80s+1

y1

87.83

97.08

33.90

84.01

1.4108

2.2.3,
Performance

4

Good

y2 can see
78.28that the
87.40performance
87.80
78.69
1.0552 is getting
2
Poor
From Figure 15 and Table 7, we
of the system
worse
y3
42.56
68.81
92.00
65.49
0.8134
1
Poor
under the four different parameters. This means that the performance of the system under the first
y4
41.27
64.84
138.00
61.75
0.7256
1
Poor
parameter is the best. The best parameter is also used in Section 4.2.4 below. P∗
T s+1

According to the LSE system identification method introduced in Section 2.3, GIMC (s) =
where Tm and Tn are parameters to be identified.

m

Q∗

=

m

Tn s+1

is determined,

4.2.4. PCS Response under IMC-PI plus FF

IMC-PIunder
plus the
FF structure
4.2.4. PCS The
Response
IMC-PI
plus FF in Figure 6 was adopted, and the performance of IMC-PI

under a different FF coefficient is shown in Figure 16. The performance index of PFM is shown in

The
IMC-PI
plus the FF structure in Figure 6 was adopted, and the performance of IMC-PI under
Table
8.
a different FF coefficient is shown in Figure 16. The performance index of PFM is shown in Table 8.

1
0.9
0.8

Power (p.u.)

0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4

y1
y2
y3
y4
ysp

0.3
0.2
0.1
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

Figure
16. The
power
response
differentFF
FFcoefficient.
coefficient.
Figure
16. The
power
responseofofIMC-PI
IMC-PI plus
plus different
Table 8. Performance result under IMC-PI with different FF coefficients.
KF

Output

β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

0.00
0.20
0.40
0.60

y1
y2
y3
y4

87.83
87.99
88.15
88.30

97.08
97.13
97.18
97.23

33.90
33.90
33.90
33.90

84.01
84.21
84.41
84.61

1.4108
1.4124
1.4141
1.4157

4
4
4
4

Good
Good
Good
Good

Figure 16 and Table 8 show that the four performance indexes of PFM change little with the
increase in FF coefficient. Even the oscillation of output power increases, and the stability becomes
worse, so FF control is not suitable for IMC.
When choosing the control strategy of the PCS, from the assessment of Sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2,
the performance of the traditional PI controller with FF is better than that without FF, while the
performance of IMC without FF is better than that with FF according to the assessment of Sections 4.2.3
and 4.2.4. The main result of Section 4 is that FF control improves the conventional PI control.
The above conclusions are based on the ideal situation that is the local flow coefficient k = 1,
so its effect on the performance of PCS will be further studied under the following circumstances in
Section 5 below.

Processes 2019, 7, 11

20 of 35

5. Robustness Assessment of the PI and IMC Control Structures
5.1. Valve Local Flow Coefficient k
When the thermal power unit is connected to the grid, the electro-hydraulic governor usually
consists of four or six turbine control valves. There is only one electrical agency in the model that
represents all turbine control valves. The valve management of the actual unit has two modes: sequence
valve mode and single valve mode. When the unit is in sequence valve mode, the openings of every
turbine control valve are not necessarily equal, but when the unit is in single valve mode, the openings
of every turbine control valve are equal. The valve characteristic test was carried out on a certain
300 MW unit in sequence valve mode and single valve mode, respectively. During the test, the main
steam pressure, the main steam temperature, and the condenser vacuum were kept relatively stable,
and the test data are shown in Tables 8 and 9. At the same time, all local flow coefficients were
calculated according to Equation (12) and are listed in the rightmost column of Tables 9 and 10.
Table 9. Test data and local valve flow coefficients in sequence valve mode.
Total Opening of Valve-µ(%)
68.00
68.60
70.10
72.10
75.10
79.10
81.10
83.10
87.10
88.50
92.50
97.00
99.00
100.00

Power-PE (MW)

Steam Flow-Q(%)

Local Flow Coefficient-k

184.40
199.60
255.30
237.00
241.90
247.30
246.40
247.30
257.70
280.40
284.60
287.20
290.00
294.20

61.47
66.53
75.10
79.00
80.63
82.43
82.13
82.43
85.90
93.47
94.87
95.73
96.67
98.07

8.433
5.713
1.950
0.543
0.450
−0.150
0.150
0.868
5.407
0.350
0.191
0.470
1.400

Table 10. Test data and local valve flow coefficients in single valve mode.
Total Opening of Valve-µ(%)
86.00
87.00
88.00
89.00
90.00
90.50
91.00
91.50
92.00
92.50
93.00
94.00
95.00
96.00
97.00
98.00
100.00

Power-PE (MW)

Steam Flow-Q(%)

Local Flow Coefficient-k

182.50
186.00
192.00
198.50
202.80
205.50
209.00
220.20
228.40
242.00
248.90
260.10
265.10
273.80
283.60
286.80
296.10

60.83
62.00
64.00
66.17
67.60
68.50
69.67
73.40
76.13
80.67
82.97
86.70
88.37
91.27
94.53
95.60
98.70

1.170
2.000
2.170
1.430
1.800
2.340
7.460
5.460
9.080
4.600
3.730
1.670
2.900
3.260
1.070
1.550

From Table 9, in sequence valve mode, the relationship between µ and Q is shown in Figure 17,
and the relationship between µ and PE is shown in Figure 18.

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW
Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

22 of 38
22 of 38

From Table 9, in sequence valve mode, the relationship between μ and Q is shown in Figure 17,
From Table 9, in sequence valve mode, the relationship between μ and Q is shown in Figure 17,
and the
relationship
between μ and PE is shown in Figure 18.
Processes
2019,
7, 11
21 of 35
and the relationship between μ and PE is shown in Figure 18.
Sequential valve mode
Sequential valve mode

100
100

Steam
flow
rate
(%)
Steam
flow
rate
(%)

95
95
90
90
85
85
80
80
75
75

Actual value
Actualvalue
value
Ideal
Ideal value

70
70
65
65
60
6065
65

70
70

75
80
85
90
95
75 valve80
95
Total
position85
opening 90
(%)
Total valve position opening (%)
Figure 17. The relationship between μ and Q .
Figure
Q.
Figure17.
17.The
Therelationship
relationshipbetween
betweenµμand
andQ.

100
100

Sequential valve mode
Sequential valve mode

300
300

Power
(MW)
Power
(MW)

280
280
260
260
240
240
220
220

Actual value
Actualvalue
value
Ideal
Ideal value

200
200
180
18065
65

70
70

75
80
85
90
75 valve80
Total
position85
opening 90
(%)
Total valve position opening (%)

95
95

Figure
E. .
Figure18.
18.The
Therelationship
relationshipbetween
betweenµμand
andPP
E
Figure 18. The relationship between μ and PE .

100
100

From Table 10, in single valve mode, the relationship between µ and Q is shown in Figure 19, and
the relationship between µ and PE is shown in Figure 20.

98.00
100.00

286.80
296.10

95.60
98.70

1.070
1.550

From Table 10, in single valve mode, the relationship between μ and Q is shown in Figure 19,
Processes 2019, 7, 11

22 of 35

and the relationship between μ and PE is shown in Figure 20.
Single valve mode

100
95

Steam flow rate (%)

90
85
80
75
70

Actual value
Ideal value

65
60
86

88

90
92
94
96
Total valve position opening (%)

98

100

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

24 of 38

Figure
Figure19.
19.The
Therelationship
relationshipbetween
betweenµμand
andQ.Q .

Single valve mode

300
280

Power (MW)

260
240
220
Actual value
Ideal value

200
180
86

88

90
92
94
96
Total valve position opening (%)

98

100

Figure
Figure20.
20.The
Therelationship
relationshipbetween
betweenµμand
andPEP.E .

From Figures 17 and 19, it can be seen that there is a great deviation between the actual flow curve
From Figures 17 and 19, it can be seen that there is a great deviation between the actual flow
and the ideal curve of the unit, showing a strong nonlinearity. Similarly from Figures 18 and 20, it can
curve and the ideal curve of the unit, showing a strong nonlinearity. Similarly from Figures 18 and
also be seen that there is a great deviation between the actual power curve and the ideal curve of the
20, it can also be seen that there is a great deviation between the actual power curve and the ideal
unit, and this deviation is due to the nonlinear nature of the valve flow characteristics.
curve of the unit, and this deviation is due to the nonlinear nature of the valve flow characteristics.
In order to quantify the deviation between the actual flow curve and the ideal curve of the unit,
In order to quantify the deviation between the actual flow curve and the ideal curve of the unit,
the local flow coefficient is used to express the effect of the change of the total valve opening on the
the local flow coefficient is used to express the effect of the change of the total valve opening on the
steam flow. In sequence valve mode, the relationship between µ and k is shown in Figure 21. In single
steam flow. In sequence valve mode, the relationship between μ and k is shown in Figure 21. In
valve mode, the relationship between µ and k is shown in Figure 22.
single valve mode, the relationship between μ and k is shown in Figure 22.

9
8
ient

7

Sequential valve mode
Actual value
Ideal value

curve of the unit, and this deviation is due to the nonlinear nature of the valve flow characteristics.
In order to quantify the deviation between the actual flow curve and the ideal curve of the unit,
the local flow coefficient is used to express the effect of the change of the total valve opening on the
steam flow. In sequence valve mode, the relationship between μ and k is shown in Figure 21. In
Processes 2019, 7, 11

23 of 35

single valve mode, the relationship between μ and k is shown in Figure 22.
Sequential valve mode

9
8

Actual value
Ideal value

Valve local flow coefficient

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
-1

70

75
80
85
90
Total valve position opening (%)

95

100

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

25 of 38

Figure
The relationship
relationship between
Figure 21.
21. The
between µ
μ and
and k.
k.

Single valve mode

10
9
Valve local flow coefficient

8

Actual value
Ideal value

7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

88

90
92
94
96
Total valve position opening (%)

98

100

Figure
Figure22.
22. The
The relationship
relationshipbetween
betweenµμand
andk.k .

5.2. The Influence of k on PCS Performance
5.2. The Influence of k on PCS Performance
In the case of different local flow coefficients, the output y1 of PCS under traditional PI plus FF
In the
caseisofcompared
different local
coefficients,
the output
of PCS
under
PIcontrol
plus FF
control,
which
with flow
the output
of y2 under
IMCy1
plus
PI. In
othertraditional
words, the
control, which
is compared
the output
of y2
plus local
PI. Inflow
othercoefficient
words, theoncontrol
structures
in Figures
4 and 5with
are used
to study
theunder
effectIMC
of valve
PCS.
structures
in
Figures
4
and
5
are
used
to
study
the
effect
of
valve
local
flow
coefficient
on
PCS.
According to the assessment results of Sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2, the PI controller Gc5 (s) = 0.20 + 0.05/s
According
to
the
assessment
results
of
Sections
4.2.1
and
4.2.2,
the
PI
controller
in Table 6 and the FF coefficient KF = 0.8 are adopted. Similarly according to the assessment results of
1 adopted. Similarly according
1
Gc 5 ( s ) = 4.2.3
0.20 +and
0.054.2.4,
s inthe
Table
6 andparameters
the FF coefficient
= 0.8 +
are
to
Sections
control
GIMC (s) K
=F 5.4064s
10.40s+1 and Gc (s) = 0.50 + s in Table 7
5.4064 s + 1
are
theadopted.
assessment results of Sections 4.2.3 and 4.2.4, the control parameters GIMC ( s ) =
and
10.40 s + 1
1
Gc ( s) = 0.50 +
in Table 7 are adopted.
s
When k ∈ (0,1.0] , the out power under PI plus FF and IMC-PI are shown in Figure 23, and the

corresponding performance results are shown in Tables 11 and 12.

Processes 2019, 7, 11

24 of 35

When
k ∈2017,
(0, 1.0
], the
out
power under PI plus FF and IMC-PI are shown in Figure2623,
and the
Processes
5, x FOR
PEER
REVIEW
of 38
corresponding performance results are shown in Tables 11 and 12.
1.4
ysp
PI - k = 0.1
PI - k = 0.2
PI - k = 0.3
PI - k = 0.4
PI - k = 0.5
PI - k = 0.6
PI - k = 0.7
PI - k = 0.8
PI - k = 0.9
PI - k = 1.0
IMC - k = 0.1
IMC - k = 0.2
IMC - k = 0.3
IMC - k = 0.4
IMC - k = 0.5
IMC - k = 0.6
IMC - k = 0.7
IMC - k = 0.8
IMC - k = 0.9
IMC - k = 1.0

1.2

Powe (p.u.)

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

Time (s)

Figure 23. The power response with k ∈ (0, 1.0].
Figure 23. The power response with k ∈ (0,1.0] .

Table 11. The performance result with k ∈ (0, 1.0].
Table 11. The performance result with k ∈ (0,1.0] .

k

PI plus FF Control

k

0.100.10
0.200.20
0.300.30
0.400.40
0.500.50
0.600.60
0.700.70
0.800.80
0.900.90
1.001.00

β1 β(%)
(%)
1

β2β(%)
(%)

13.63
13.63
25.93
25.93
37.01
37.01
47.02
47.02
56.06
56.06
64.23
64.23
71.61
71.61
78.29
78.29
84.33
84.33
89.79
89.79

20.33
20.33
37.19
37.19
51.18
51.18
62.77
62.77
72.37
72.37
80.30
80.30
86.84
86.84
92.22
92.22
96.62
96.62
100.22
100.22

2

PI plus FF Control
ttS (s)
DPAI
Num
Performance
(s)
KK(%)
(%)
Num
Performance
DPAI
S
761.70
22.82
0.2327 0
0
So Bad
761.70
22.82
0.2327
So Bad
369.10
39.47
0.4223
0
So Bad
369.10
39.47
0.4223
0
So Bad
236.90
51.79
0.5803 1
1
236.90
51.79
0.5803
Poor Poor
169.40
61.01
0.7155 1
1
169.40
61.01
0.7155
Poor Poor
127.40
68.03
0.8352 1
1
127.40
68.03
0.8352
Poor Poor
97.20
73.44
0.9469
1
97.20
73.44
0.9469
1
Poor Poor
72.60
77.67
1.0622
1
72.60
77.67
1.0622
1
Poor Poor
50.80
81.04
1.2041
2
Medium
50.80
81.04
1.2041
2
Medium
34.20
83.74
1.3927
4
34.20
83.74
1.3927
4
GoodGood
34.20
85.95
1.4314 4
4
Excellent
34.20
85.95
1.4314
Excellent

Table 12. The performance result with k ∈ (0, 1.0].
k
0.10
0.20
0.30
0.40
0.50
0.60
0.70
0.80
0.90
1.00

IMC-PI Control
β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

60.75
80.40
85.29
85.97
86.03
86.31
86.78
87.26
87.62
87.83

88.96
95.50
96.31
96.64
96.80
96.90
96.97
97.02
97.05
97.08

49.00
38.50
36.30
35.40
34.90
34.60
34.30
34.20
34.00
33.90

75.01
80.01
81.67
82.51
83.01
83.34
83.58
83.76
83.90
84.01

1.1178
1.3090
1.3593
1.3772
1.3864
1.3929
1.3997
1.4036
1.4081
1.4108

2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Medium
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent

0.60
0.70
0.80
0.90
1.00

Processes 2019, 7, 11

86.31
86.78
87.26
87.62
87.83

96.90
96.97
97.02
97.05
97.08

34.60
34.30
34.20
34.00
33.90

83.34
83.58
83.76
83.90
84.01

1.3929
1.3997
1.4036
1.4081
1.4108

4
4
4
4
4

Good
Good
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent

25 of 35

Figure 23, Table 11, and Table 12 show that three indexes are not qualified under k ∈ (0, 0.7] , so
k ∈ [0.8,1.0]
arekall
the
performance
of PCS
under
traditional
PI plus
is very
poor. Only
when
Figure
23, Table
11, and
Table
12 show
thatFF
three
indexes
are not
qualified
under
∈ four
(0, 0.7], so
qualified.
As a under
contrast,
all indexesPI
ofplus
PCS FF
based
on IMC
are Only
superior
to the
one.all four
the indexes
performance
of PCS
traditional
is very
poor.
when
k ∈traditional
[0.8, 1.0] are
∈ (1.0, 2.0]all
, the
out power
under
PIon
plus
FF are
andsuperior
IMC-PI to
are,the
respectively,
indexes Similarly,
qualified.when
As akcontrast,
indexes
of PCS
based
IMC
traditional one.
shown
in Figure
24,k and
the 2.0
corresponding
performance
results
in Tables
and 14.
Similarly,
when
∈ (1.0,
], the out power
under PI
plus are
FF shown
and IMC-PI
are,13respectively,
shown
in Figure 24, and the corresponding performance results are shown in Tables 13 and 14.
1.8
ysp
PI - k = 1.1
PI - k = 1.2
PI - k = 1.3
PI - k = 1.4
PI - k = 1.5
PI - k = 1.6
PI - k = 1.7
PI - k = 1.8
PI - k = 1.9
PI - k = 2.0
IMC - k = 1.1
IMC - k = 1.2
IMC - k = 1.3
IMC - k = 1.4
IMC - k = 1.5
IMC - k = 1.6
IMC - k = 1.7
IMC - k = 1.8
IMC - k = 1.9
IMC - k = 2.0

1.6
1.4

Power (p.u.)

1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

Time (s)

Figure 24. The power response with k ∈ (1.0, 2.0].

Figure 24. The power response with k ∈ (1.0, 2.0] .

Table 13. The performance result with k ∈ (1.0, 2.0].
k
1.10
1.20
1.30
1.40
1.50
1.60
1.70
1.80
1.90
2.00

PI plus FF Control
β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

94.74
99.21
103.27
106.93
110.25
113.26
115.97
118.43
120.65
122.66

103.14
105.49
107.36
108.84
109.99
110.86
111.50
111.95
112.25
112.41

55.60
58.50
58.90
58.30
57.40
56.20
55.00
53.80
52.60
51.40

87.78
89.31
90.60
91.71
92.67
93.51
94.25
94.90
95.49
96.01

1.2959
1.3113
1.3344
1.3587
1.3816
1.4037
1.4240
1.4427
1.4602
1.4766

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent

Figure 24, Table 13, and Table 14 show that the four performance indexes of PCS, respectively,
based on traditional PI and IMC are qualified under k ∈ (1.0, 2.0]. For the three indexes, β1 , β2 , and K,
the PI plus FF performance is better than IMC-PI, but for tS , the IMC is superior to PI plus FF. In a
word, the overall performance of IMC-PI is stable and superior to the traditional one.
Similarly, when k ∈ (2.0, 16.0), the out power under PI plus FF and IMC-PI are, respectively,
shown in Figure 25, and the corresponding performance indexes are shown in Tables 15 and 16.

Processes 2019, 7, 11

26 of 35

Table 14. The performance result with k ∈ (1.0, 2.0].
k
1.10
1.20
1.30
1.40
1.50
1.60
1.70
1.80
1.90
2.00

IMC-PI Control
β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

87.93
87.94
87.92
87.90
87.90
87.92
87.95
88.00
88.05
88.10

97.11
97.13
97.14
97.16
97.17
97.18
97.17
97.19
97.20
97.21

33.90
33.80
33.70
32.70
33.60
33.60
33.60
33.50
33.50
33.50

84.10
84.17
84.24
84.29
84.34
84.38
84.42
84.45
84.48
84.51

1.4116
1.4134
1.4150
1.4288
1.4168
1.4171
1.4174
1.4191
1.4195
1.4198

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent

Table 15. The performance result with k ∈ (2.0, 16.0).
k
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
12.00
15.00
16.00

PI plus FF Control
β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

133.84
152.28
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※

110.55
108.44
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※

42.60
38.60
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※

99.34
101.00
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※

1.5859
1.6866
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※
——※

4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Excellent
Excellent
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Unacceptable

Note.※ —— indicates that the system is unstable.

Table 16. The performance result with k ∈ (2.0, 16.0).
k
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
12.00
15.00
16.00

IMC-PI Control
β1 (%)

β2 (%)

tS (s)

K(%)

DPAI

Num

Performance

88.29
88.37
88.42
88.45
88.47
88.49
88.50
88.51
88.56
95.14
——※

97.25
97.27
97.28
97.28
97.29
97.29
97.30
97.30
97.30
98.65
——※

33.30
33.30
33.20
33.20
33.20
33.20
33.10
33.10
33.10
37.10
——※

84.67
84.76
84.81
84.84
84.86
84.88
84.90
84.91
84.92
84.94
——※

1.4240
1.4248
1.4266
1.4268
1.4270
1.4272
1.4287
1.4288
1.4290
1.4058
——※

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
0

Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Excellent
Unacceptable

Note: ※ —— indicates that the system is unstable.

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

29 of 38

Processes 2019, 7, 11

27 of 35

2.5

PI - k = 3.0
IMC - k = 3.0
ysp

Power (p.u.)

2

1.5

1

0.5

0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

(a) The power response with k =3.0 .

3
2.5

PI - k = 4.0
IMC - k = 4.0
ysp

Power (p.u.)

2
1.5
1
0.5
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

(b) The power response with k =4.0 .
Figure 25. Cont.

80

100

Processes
Processes
2019,2017,
7, 115, x FOR PEER REVIEW

30
28ofof3835

10
8

PI - k = 5.0
IMC - k = 5.0
ysp

6

Power (p.u.)

4
2
0
-2
-4
-6
-8
-10
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

(c) The power response with k =5.0 .
9

2.5

x 10

2

PI - k = 6.0
IMC - k = 6.0
ysp

1.5

Power (p.u.)

1
0.5
0
-0.5
-1
-1.5
-2
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

(d) The power response with k =6.0 .
Figure 25. Cont.

80

100

Processes
Processes
2019,2017,
7, 115, x FOR PEER REVIEW

3129ofof3835

1.4
1.2

Power (p.u.)

1
0.8

IMC - k = 6.0
IMC - k = 9.0
IMC - k = 12.0
IMC - k = 15.0
ysp

0.6
0.4
0.2
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

(e) The power response with k ∈ (6.0,15.0) .

1.4
1.2

Power (p.u.)

1
0.8
0.6

IMC - k = 16.0
ysp

0.4
0.2
0
0

20

40

Time (s)

60

80

100

(f) The power response with k =16.0 .
Figure 25. The power response with k ∈ (2.0, 16.0).
Figure 25. The power response with k ∈ (2.0,16.0) .

Figure 25, Table 15, and Table 16 show that, under k ∈ (2.0, 16.0), the traditional PI plus FF power
system control becomes unstable when k ≥ 5.0, and the IMC one becomes unstable when k ≥ 16.0,

Processes 2019, 7, 11

30 of 35

so the system based on IMC can maintain stability and perform better in a larger parameter range.
That is, the PCS based on IMC-PI is more robust than that based on PI-FF.
Through the simulation method, this section analyzes the robustness of PCS and the theoretical
derivation and the assessment to this question will be carried out in the next section. When the local
flow coefficient is the open-loop gain of the system, the root locus method is used to analyze the
relationship between the stability of the system and this variable.
5.3. Closed Loop Characteristic Root Locus Assessment
The assessment of Section 5.2 shows that, when the k increases to a certain extent, the traditional
PCS based on PI plus FF becomes unstable. Compared with the traditional system, the stability of PCS
based on IMC-PI is analyzed. The controller parameters are the same as in Section 5.2.
The closed loop characteristic equation of traditional system based on PI plus FF is as follows:
ChaPI−FF (s) = 1 + kG∗T (s)GEN (s) = 0.

(46)

Substitute the relevant parameters and Equations (30), (31), (34), (35), and (39) into Equation (46),
the open-loop transfer function is obtained:
GOpen−PI−FF (s) = G∗T (s)GEN (s)

=

12.98s3 +6.725s2 +1.07s+0.05
0.008182s7 +0.2903s6 +3.224s5 +20.15s4 +127.6s3 +22.48s2 +s

.

(47)

Compared with Equation (46), the closed loop characteristic equation of the PCS based on IMC-PI
is as follows:
ChaIMC−PI (s) == 1 + kGDT (s)Gc (s)Gz (s)[1 − GIMC (s) + GT (s)GEN (s)] = 0.

(48)

Similarly, the open loop transfer function corresponding to the IMC-PI control system is as follows:
GOpen−IMC−PI (s) = GDT (s)Gk (s)Gz (s)[1 − GIMC (s) + GT (s)GEN (s)]

=

0.276s7 +6.636s6 +39.21s5 +707.8s4 +1486s3 +374.6s2 +33.3s+1
0.1702s9 +6.139s8 +70.67s7 +459.4s6 +2907s5 +2070s4 +427.2s3 +34.88s+s

.

(49)

Let k = 0 → ∞ , the root locus of the traditional PI-FF and IMC-PI control system are, respectively,
shown in Figures 26 and 27.
As can be seen from Figures 26 and 27 that the traditional PID control system is in critical oscillation
when k ≈ 3.9734, while the IMC system is in critical oscillation when k ≈ 15.3793. This means that,
when the local flow coefficient is too large, the new system is not prone to oscillate and the stability
of the system is enhanced. The assessment of the closed-loop control system using the root locus
method verifies the correctness of the simulation results in Section 5.2. Compared with the theoretical
assessment, the simulation method is more intuitive and easy to understand for engineers.
The results of Sections 4 and 5 show that the performance assessment results based on IMC are
obviously superior to traditional PI control. The main reason is that the control strategy based on
IMC is more advanced in structure than traditional PI control, and its robustness is obviously stronger
when the IM is established properly. When the characteristics of the controlled object change during
operation, its adaptability is stronger too.

=

.
0.276s 7 + 6.636s 6 + 39.21s 5 + 707.8s 4 + 1486s 3 + 374.6s 2 + 33.3s +1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
0.1702s + 6.139s + 70.67s + 459.4s + 2907s + 2070s + 427.2s + 34.88s +s

(49)

Let k = 0 → ∞ , the root locus of the traditional PI-FF and IMC-PI control system are,
respectively,
shown in Figures 26 and 27.
Processes 2019, 7, 11
31 of 35

60

Root Locus
0.81

0.7

0.56

0.38 0.2

Imaginary Axis (seconds-1)

40 0.89
20

0.95
0.988
70 60 50 40 30 20 10

0

0.988
-20

0.95

-40 0.89
0.81 0.7
-60
-80
-60

0.56

0.38 0.2

-40

-20

0

20

40

60

Real Axis (seconds-1)

Processes 2017, 5, x FOR PEER REVIEW

34 of 38

Figure26.
26.Root
Rootlocus
locusof
ofsystem
systembased
basedon
onPI-FF.
PI-FF.
Figure

100

Root Locus
0.25

0.18

0.125

Imaginary Axis (seconds-1)

80

0.085 0.055 0.025
80
60

60 0.38

40

40
20

0.65

20

0.65

20

0
-20
-40

40

-60 0.38

60

-80
-100 0.25
-25

0.18
-20

0.125
-15

80
0.085 0.055 0.025

-10

-5

0

5

-1

Real Axis (seconds )
Figure
Rootlocus
locusofofsystem
systembased
based
IMC-PI.
Figure
27.27.Root
onon
IMC-PI.

6. Conclusions
As can be seen from Figures 26 and 27 that the traditional PID control system is in critical
oscillation
when k ≈ 3.9734
IMC system
critical oscillation
when
k ≈ 15.3793
This
Firstly, according
to the, while
typicalthe
composition
of is
theingenerating
side of the
power
plant,. the
means that, when
local
flow
coefficient by
is too
the new
is not
prone to and
oscillate
and
mathematical
modelthe
of the
PCS
is established
the large,
combination
ofsystem
theoretical
assessment
system
the
stability
of
the
system
is
enhanced.
The
assessment
of
the
closed-loop
control
system
using
the
identification. At the same time, three typical control structures are given. Secondly, four dynamic
root locus method
verifies
correctness
of the simulation
results
Section
5.2. Compared
with
performance
indexes are
giventhe
to evaluate
the control
performance
of thein
PCS.
A dynamic
performance
the
theoretical
assessment,
the
simulation
method
is
more
intuitive
and
easy
to
understand
for
assessment index is defined by four dynamic performance indexes. At the same time, an auxiliary
engineers.
performance assessment index is given, and the benchmark and result of performance assessment are
ofIn
Sections
4 andenvironment,
5 show that the
assessment
results
basedparameters
on IMC are
definedThe
forresults
the PCS.
a simulated
the performance
performance of
the PCS with
different
obviously
superior
to
traditional
PI
control.
The
main
reason
is
that
the
control
strategy
was compared. According to the assessment results, the traditional PI controller combined withbased
the FFon
IMC is more advanced in structure than traditional PI control, and its robustness is obviously
stronger when the IM is established properly. When the characteristics of the controlled object
change during operation, its adaptability is stronger too.

6. Conclusions

Processes 2019, 7, 11

32 of 35

coefficient can achieve better performance. The combination of IMC and PI can also achieve better
control performance, but the IMC is not suitable for adding FF coefficients. At the same time, the IMC
combined with PI control mode achieved better overall performance than the traditional PI control
mode. When tuning the parameters of the controller, despite the use of trial and error, which is slightly
less theoretical, it can intuitively provide results to the engineers. Thirdly, the definition of the local
flow coefficient of the valve is given. When the steam turbine is controlled in two different control
modes, namely, the sequence valve and the single valve, the local flow coefficient is not completely
consistent with the ideal linear characteristics. Therefore, in the same simulation environment, the
influence of valve local flow coefficient on the robustness of PCS is analyzed. At the same time, when
the PCS is in a critical stable state, the root locus assessment method is used. The numerical results also
show that the IMC combined with PI is more robust than the traditional PI plus FF control strategy.
It should be noted that the application of IMC in power plant is not as wide as that of traditional
PI. The reason is that the parameter tuning of IMC is more complex, while the parameter tuning of
traditional PI controller is more mature. All these limit the wide application of IMC in power plants
with emphasis on safety. In this paper, combined with a trial-and-error method and an optimization
algorithm, the parameters of the PI controller are adjusted, which provides technical support for the
wide application of IMC in practical power plants. Future research mainly includes three aspects: firstly,
to establish a more accurate model of PCS; secondly, to study how to establish a better performance
control strategy through simulation technology; finally, to find new problems of various new control
strategies through field application in power plants.
Author Contributions: S.L. and Y.W. conceived and designed the experiments; S.L. performed the experiments;
S.L. and Y.W. analyzed the data; Y.W. contributed analysis tools; S.L. wrote the paper.
Funding: This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities
(No.2017MS189) and the Hebei Province Higher Education Teaching Reform and Practice Project (No.2016GJJG318).
Conflicts of Interest: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Abbreviations
AGC
DPAI
FF
FFC
IM
IMC
PF
PFM
P
PI
PD
PID
PCS
LSE
LSM

Automatic Generation Control
Dynamic Performance Assessment Index
Feed Forward
Feed Forward Control
Internal Model
Internal Model Control
Primary Frequency
Primary Frequency Modulation
Proportion
Proportion Integration
Proportion Differentiation
Proportion Integration Differentiation
Power Control System
Least Square Estimation
Least Square Method

Processes 2019, 7, 11

33 of 35

Appendix A
Table A1. Parameters of the steam turbine governing system model.
Description

Identification

Parameter Value

Proportional coefficient of electro-hydraulic servo system
Integral coefficient of electro-hydraulic servo system
Time constant of oil motive
Power coefficient of high pressure cylinder
Power coefficient of medium pressure cylinder
Power coefficient of low pressure cylinder
Time constant of high pressure chamber volume
Time constant of reheated steam chamber volume
Time constant of connected pipe volume
Power overshoot coefficient of high pressure cylinder

KP1
KI1
T
FHP
FIP
FLP
TCH
TRH
TCO
λ

12.0
1.00
0.889
0.281
0.30
0.419
0.0498
10.40
0.10
0.85

Appendix B
Mathematical Model of Synchronous Generator in Thermal Power Unit: A Sixth-Order Differential Equation.
T0 d0
T00 d0

dE00 q
dt

dE0 q
dt

= −E00 q − (x0 d − x00 d )Id + E0 q + T00 d0

(A1)
dE0 q
dt

(A2)

dE0 d
= −E0 d + (xq − x0 q )Iq
dt

(A3)

dE0 d
dE00 d
= −E00 d + (x0 q − x00 q )Iq + E0 d + T00 q0
dt
dt

(A4)

T0 q0
T00 q0

= E f d − (xd − x0 d )Id − E0 q

TJ


= Mm − Me − D(ω − ω0 )
dt

= ω − ω0 .
dt

(A5)
(A6)

Equations (A1)–(A4) are output power and the electromagnetic torque equations presented, respectively,
on d and q axes. Equations (A5) and (A6) are the scalar form of the rotor motion equation for synchronous motors.
Equation (A6) is the rotor angular motion equation.

References
1.

2.
3.
4.

5.

6.
7.

Zhang, Y.; Gao, K.; Qu, Z. An evaluation method of primary frequency modulation performance based on
characteristics of unit output power curves. Dianli Xitong Zidonghua/Autom. Electr. Power Syst. 2012, 36,
99–103.
Delavari, A.; Kamwa, I. Improved optimal decentralized load modulation for power system primary
frequency regulation. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2018, 33, 1013–1025. [CrossRef]
Tavakkoli, M.; Adabi, J.; Zabihi, S.; Godina, R.; Pouresmaeil, E. Reserve Allocation of Photovoltaic Systems
to Improve Frequency Stability in Hybrid Power Systems. Energies 2018, 11, 2583. [CrossRef]
Tavakoli, M.; Pouresmaeil, E.; Adabi, J.; Godina, R.; Catalão, J.P. Load-frequency control in a multi-source
power system connected to wind farms through multi terminal HVDC systems. Comput. Oper. Res. 2018, 96,
305–315. [CrossRef]
Choi, Y.G.; Lee, S.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, S.C.; Kang, B. Increase in power conversion efficiency of bidirectional
DC-DC converter using 1:1 transformer and pulse frequency modulation control. IEEE Trans. Power Electron.
2018, 33, 10539–10549. [CrossRef]
Choi, H.J.; Jung, J.H. Enhanced power line communication strategy for DC microgrids using switching
frequency modulation of power converters. IEEE Trans. Power Electron. 2017, 32, 4140–4144. [CrossRef]
Ahmed, A.M.H.E. Boiler Control Design Using Fuzzy Logic. Ph.D. Thesis, Sudan University of Science and
Technology, Khartoum, Sudan, 2017.

Processes 2019, 7, 11

8.
9.

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

18.
19.
20.
21.
22.

23.
24.
25.
26.

27.

28.
29.
30.
31.

34 of 35

Ławrynczuk,
´
M. Nonlinear predictive control of a boiler-turbine unit: A state-space approach with successive
on-line model linearisation and quadratic optimisation. ISA Trans. 2017, 67, 476–495. [CrossRef]
Paul, A.; Joos, G.; Kamwa, I. Dynamic state estimation of full power plant model from terminal phasor
measurements. In Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE/PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and
Exposition (T&D), Denver, CO, USA, 16–19 April 2018; pp. 1–5.
Gomez-Exposito, A.; Conejo, A.J.; Canizares, C. Electric Energy Systems: Analysis and Operation; CRC Press:
Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2018.
Wang, P.; Liu, Y. Influence of a circular strainer on unsteady flow behavior in steam turbine control valves.
Appl. Therm. Eng. 2017, 115, 463–476. [CrossRef]
Wang, J.; Ma, Q.; Zhong, J.; Gou, X. Mechanism research on active power fluctuation caused by steam turbine
valve test. Electr. Eng. 2018, 100, 2147–2154. [CrossRef]
Nan, D.; Guosheng, L.; Yushan, W. Research on Primary Frequency Modulation Function Operating on
Large Fossil-fuel Power Plants. North China Electr. Power 2003, 10, 000.
Molina-Garcia, A.; Bouffard, F.; Kirschen, D.S. Decentralized demand-side contribution to primary frequency
control. IEEE Trans. Power Syst. 2011, 26, 411–419. [CrossRef]
Shang, X.; Li, L.; Zhuo, J.; Yang, X.; Luo, Y.; Liu, G. Improvement of Strategies of AGC in North China Power
Grid After UHVAC Pilot Project Operation. Power Syst. Technol. 2010, 9, 007.
Shabani, H.; Vahidi, B.; Ebrahimpour, M. A robust PID controller based on imperialist competitive algorithm
for load-frequency control of power systems. ISA Trans. 2013, 52, 88–95. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Liu, K.; Wang, S.; Wu, Q.; Wang, L.; Ma, Q.; Zhang, L.; Li, G.; Tian, H.; Duan, L.; Hao, J. A Highly Resolved
Mercury Emission Inventory of Chinese Coal-Fired Power Plants. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2018, 2400–2408.
[CrossRef] [PubMed]
Yang, J. Research and development of assessment system of primary frequency regulation in central China
power grid. Autom. Electr. Power Syst. 2008, 9, 024.
Gu, Y.; Xu, J.; Chen, D.; Wang, Z.; Li, Q. Overall review of peak shaving for coal-fired power units in China.
Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2016, 54, 723–731. [CrossRef]
Jin, N.; Liu, W.Y.; Cao, Y.L.; Xing, Z.; Cui, G. Influence on the grid frequency characteristic by the parameters
of primary frequency modulation of large capacity generator units. Power Syst. Prot. Control 2012, 40, 91–95.
Zimmer, G. Modelling and simulation of steam turbine processes: Individual models for individual tasks.
Math. Comput. Model. Dyn. Syst. 2008, 14, 469–493. [CrossRef]
Sheng, K.; Liu, F.; Liu, W.; Xun, X.; Wang, B.; Li, J. Influence of steam turbine valve discharge characteristics
on power systems and its control strategy. Dianli Xitong Zidonghua/Autom. Electr. Power Syst. 2012, 36,
104–109.
Wen, X.K.; Zhong, J.L.; Qian, J. Research on the control strategy for turbine on low-frequency oscillation.
Proc. CSEE 2009, 26, 020.
Ke, Y. Design of IMC Oriented PID Control Law for Typical Thermal Process in Thermal Power Plant. Energy
Fuel Technol. 2018. [CrossRef]
Dos Santos, L.R.; Durand, F.R.; Goedtel, A.; Abrão, T. Auto-tuning PID distributed power control for
next-generation passive optical networks. IEEE/OSA J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 2018, 10, D110–D125. [CrossRef]
Wu, X.; Shen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, M.; Lawal, A. Flexible operation of post-combustion solvent-based carbon
capture for coal-fired power plants using multi-model predictive control: A simulation study. Fuel 2018, 220,
931–941. [CrossRef]
Kaushaley, S.; Shaw, B. Transient Analysis of Quasi Oppositional Based Lightning Search Algorithm
Optimized PID Controller in Isolated Small Hydro Power Plant. Trends Renew. Energy 2018, 4, 34–43.
[CrossRef]
Garcia, C.E.; Morari, M. Internal model control. A unifying review and some new results. Ind. Eng. Chem.
Process Des. Dev. 1982, 21, 308–323. [CrossRef]
Saxena, S.; Hote, Y.V. Internal model control based PID tuning using first-order filter. Int. J. Control Autom.
Syst. 2017, 15, 149–159. [CrossRef]
Sonker, B.; Kumar, D.; Samuel, P. Design of two degree of freedom-internal model control configuration for
load frequency control using model approximation. Int. J. Model. Simul. 2018, 1–11. [CrossRef]
Zahedi, F.; Zahedi, Z. A review of neuro-fuzzy systems based on intelligent control. J. Electr. Electron. Eng.
2015, 3, 58–61. [CrossRef]

Processes 2019, 7, 11

32.
33.
34.
35.

36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.

45.

35 of 35

Mars, P. Learning Algorithms: Theory and Applications in Signal Processing, Control and Communications; CRC
Press: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2018.
Mi, Y.; Zhang, H.; Fu, Y.; Wang, C.; Loh, P.C.; Wang, P. Intelligent Power Sharing of DC Isolated Microgrid
Based on Fuzzy Sliding Mode Droop Control. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018. [CrossRef]
Babahajiani, P.; Shafiee, Q.; Bevrani, H. Intelligent demand response contribution in frequency control of
multi-area power systems. IEEE Trans. Smart Grid 2018, 9, 1282–1291. [CrossRef]
Liu, Y.; Yan, Y.; Xu, M.; Song, K.; Shi, Q. Exact generator and its high order expansions in the
time-convolutionless generalized master equation: Applications to the spin-boson model and exictation
energy transfer. Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 2018, 31. [CrossRef]
Kanimba, E.; Pearson, M.; Sharp, J.; Stokes, D.; Priya, S.; Tian, Z. A comprehensive model of a lead telluride
thermoelectric generator. Energy 2018, 142, 813–821. [CrossRef]
Wang, H.; Su, X.L. Several improvements of Prony algorithm and its application in monitoring low-frequency
oscillations in power system. Power Syst. Prot. Control 2011, 39, 140–145.
Anna, L.; Xi, W.; Ping, J. Research on identifying low frequency oscillation modes based on morphological
filtering theory and Prony algorithm. Power Syst. Prot. Control 2015, 43, 137–142.
Gu, Y.; Bottrell, N.; Green, T.C. Reduced-order models for representing converters in power system studies.
IEEE Trans. Power Electron. 2018, 33, 3644–3654. [CrossRef]
Zhou, K.; Yang, S. Demand side management in China: The context of China’s power industry reform.
Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2015, 47, 954–965. [CrossRef]
Yuan, J.; Shen, J.; Pan, L.; Zhao, C.; Kang, J. Smart grids in China. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 2014, 37,
896–906. [CrossRef]
Xie, X.; Xin, Y.; Xiao, J.; Wu, J.; Han, Y. WAMS applications in Chinese power systems. IEEE Power Energy
Mag. 2006, 4, 54–63.
Aström, K.J.; Hägglund, T. PID Controllers: Theory, Design, and Tuning; Instrument Society of America:
Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 1995; p. 67.
Kaya, I. Simple and optimal PI/PID tuning formulae for unstable time delay processes. In Proceedings of
the 2017 10th International Conference on Electrical and Electronics Engineering (ELECO), Bursa, Turkey,
30 November–2 December 2014; pp. 847–851.
Ozyetkin, M.M.; Onat, C.; Tan, N. PID Tuning Method for Integrating Processes Having Time Delay and
Inverse Response. IFAC-PapersOnLine 2018, 51, 274–279. [CrossRef]
© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).


Related documents


PDF Document untitled pdf document 1
PDF Document steam valve controller presents his command
PDF Document ijetr011915
PDF Document 3i18 ijaet0118692 v6 iss6 2342 2353
PDF Document open loop variable vector ac frequency driv
PDF Document 3i21 ijaet0721239 v7 iss3 666 674


Related keywords