Fred Engels The Housing Question.pdf


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Part One: How Proudhon Solves the Housing Question.) This series of
articles was soon followed by a second series examining the philanthropic bourgeois view of the question, on the basis of a work by Dr. Emil Sax.
(See Part Two: How the Bourgeoisie Solves the Housing Question.) After
a long pause, Dr. Mulberger did me the honor of replying to my articles,
and this compelled me to make a rejoinder. (Part Three: Supplement
on Proudhon and the Housing Question.) With this, however, both the
polemic and also my special occupation with this question came to an
end. This is the history of the origin of these three series of articles, which
have also appeared as a reprint in pamphlet form. The fact that a new
reprint has now become necessary I owe undoubtedly to the benevolent
solicitude of the German imperial government which, by prohibiting the
work, as usual tremendously increased the sale, and I hereby take this
opportunity of expressing my respectful thanks to it.
I have revised the text for this new edition, inserted a few additions and
notes, and I have corrected a small economic error in the first edition, as
my opponent Dr. Mulberger unfortunatlely failed to disccover it.
During this revision, it was borne in one me what gigantic progress the
international working class movement has made during the past 14 years.
At that time, it was still a fact that “for 20 years the workers of the Latin
countries had no other mental nourishment than the works of Proudhon”, and, at best, the still more one-sided version of Proudhonism presented by the father of “anarachism”, Bakunin, who regarded Proudhon
as “notre maitre a nous tous”, the master of us all. Although the Proudhonists in France were only a small sect among the workers, they were
still the only ones who had a definitely formulated programme and who
were able in the Commune to take over the leadership on the economic
field. In Belgium, Proudhonism reigned unchallenged among the Walloon workers, and in Spain and Italy, with isolated exceptions, everything
in the working class movement which was not anarchist was definitely
Proudhonist. And today? In France, Proudhon has been completely
disposed of among the workers and retains supporters only among the
radical bourgeois and petty bourgeois, who, as Proudhonists, also call
themselves “socialists”, but against whom the most energetic fight is carried on by the socialist workers. In Belgium, the Flemish have ousted the
Walloons from the leadership, deposed Proudhonism, and greatly raised
the level of the movement. In Spain, as in Italy, the anarchist igh tide of
the ‘70s has receded and swept away with it the remnnts of Proudhonism. While in Italy, the new party is still in process of clarification and
formation, in Spain the small nucleus, which as the Neuva Federacion
Madrilena remained loyal to the General Council of the International, has
developed into a strong party which -- as can be seen from the republican press itself -- is detroying the influence of the bourgeois republcans