PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 12 July at 00:28 - Around 220000 files indexed.

Show results per page

Results for «anglican»:


Total: 60 results - 0.135 seconds

pre1924ecumenism2eng 100%

THE PAN‐HERESY OF ECUMENISM EXISTED   AMONG THE ORTHODOX PRIOR TO 1924    In 1666‐1667 the Pan‐Orthodox  Synod of  Moscow  decided  to  receive  Papists  by simple confession of Faith, without rebaptism or rechrismation!    At the beginning of the 18th century at Arta, Greece, the Holy Mysteries would  be administered by Orthodox Priests to Westerners, despite this scandalizing  the Orthodox faithful.    In 1863 an Anglican clergyman was permitted to commune in Serbia, by the  official decision of the Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church.    In the 1800s, Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow wrote that the schisms within  Christianity  “do  not  reach  the  heavens.”  In  other  words,  he  believed  that  heresy doesn’t divide Christians from the Kingdom of God!    In 1869, at the funeral of Metropolitan Chrysanthus of Smyrna, an Archbishop  of  the  Armenian  Monophysites  and  a  Priest  of  the  Anglicans  actively  participated in the service!    In  1875,  the  Orthodox  Archbishop  of  Patras,  Greece,  concelebrated  with  an  Anglican priest in the Mystery of Baptism!    In  1878  the  first  Masonic  Ecumenical  Patriarch,  Joachim  III,  was  enthroned.  He  was  Patriarch  for  two  periods  (1878‐1884  and  1901‐1912).  This  Masonic  Patriarch Joachim III is the one who performed the Episcopal consecration of  Bp. Chrysostom Kavouridis, who in turn was the bishop who consecrated Bp.  Matthew of Bresthena. Thus the Matthewites trace their Apostolic Succession  in part from this Masonic “Patriarch.” In 1903 and 1912, Patriarch Joachim III  blessed  the  Holy  Chrism,  which  was  used  by  the  Matthewites  until  they  blessed their own chrism in 1958! Thus until 1958 they were using the Chrism  blessed by a Masonic Patriarch!    In 1879 the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Constantinople decided that in  times of great necessity, it is permitted to have sacramental communion with  the Armenians. In other words, an Orthodox priest can perform the mysteries  for Armenian laymen, and an Armenian priest for Orthodox laymen!    In  1895  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  Anthimus  VII  declared  his  desire  for  al  Christians to calculate days according to the new calendar!    In  1898,  Patriarch  Gerasimus  of  Jerusalem  permitted  the  Greeks  and  Syrians  living in Melbourne to receive communion in Anglican parishes!    In 1902 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical Patriarchate refers to the  heresies  of  the  west  as  “Churches”  and  “Branches  of  Christianity”!  Thus  it  was an official Orthodox declaration that espouses the branch theory heresy!    In 1904 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical Patriarchate refers to the  heretics  as  “those  who  believe  in  the  All‐Holy  Trinity,  and  who  honour  the  name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and hope in the salvation of God’s grace”!    In  1907  at  Portsmouth,  England,  there  was  a  joint  doxology  of  Russian  and  Anglican clergy!    Prior  to  1910  the  Russian  Bishop  Innokenty  of  Alaska,  made  a pact  with  the  Anglican  Bishop  Row  of  America,  that  the  priests  belonging  to  each  Church  would  be  permitted  to  offer  the  mysteries  to  the  laymen  of  one  another.  In  other  words,  for  Orthodox  priests  to  commune  Anglican  laymen,  and  for  Anglican priests to commune Orthodox laymen!    In  1910  the  Syrian/Antiochian  Orthodox  Bishop  Raphael  (Hawaweeny)  permitted  the  Orthodox  faithful,  in  his  Encyclical,  to  accept  the  mysteries  of  Baptism, Communion, Confession,  Marriage,  etc,  from Anglicna  priests!  The  same  bishop  took  part  in  an  Anglican  Vespers,  wearing  his  mandya  and  seated on the throne!    In 1917 the Greek Orthodox Exarch of America Alexander of Rodostolus took  part  in  an  Anglican  Vespers.  The  same  hierarch  also  took  part  in  the  ordination of an Anglican bishop in Pensylvania.    In  1918,  Archbishop  Anthimus  of  Cyprus  and  Metropolitan  Meletius  mataxakis of Athens, took part in Anglican services at St. Paul’s Cathedral in  London!    In  1919,  the  leaders  of  the  Orthdoxo  Churches  in  America  took  part  in  Anglican  services  at  the  “General  Assembly  of  Anglican  Churches  in  America”!    In 1920 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical patriarchate refers to the  heresies as “Churches of God” and advises the adoption of the new calendar!    In 1920, Metropolitan Philaret of Didymotichus, while in London, serving as  the  representative  of  the  Ecumenical  Patriarchate  at  the  Conference  of  Lambeth, took part in joint services in an Anglican church!    In  1920,  Patriarch  Damian  of  Jerusalem  (he  who  was  receiving  the  Holy  Light), took part in an Anglican liturgy at the Anglican Church of Jerusalem,  where he read the Gospel in Greek, wearing his full Hierarchical vestments!    In  1921,  the  Anglican  Archbishop  of  Canterbury  took  part  in  the  funeral  of  Metropolitan Dorotheus of Prussa in London, at which he read the Gospel!    In  1022,  Archbishop  Germanus  of  Theathyra,  the  representative  of  the  Ecumenical  Patriarchate  in  London,  took  part  in  a  Vespers  service  at  Westminster Abbey, wearing his Mandya and holding his pastoral staff!    In 1923, the Ecumenical Patriarchate recognized the mysteries of the “Living  Church” which had been anathematized by Patriarch Tikhon of Russia!    In 1923, the Ecumenical Patriarchate recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In 1923, the Patriarchate of Jerusalem recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In 1923, the Church of Cyprus recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In  1923,  the  “Pan‐Orthodox  Congress”  under  Ecumenical  Patriarch  Meletius  Metaxakis proposed the adoption of the new “Revised Julian Calendar.”    In  December  1923,  the  Holy  Synod  of  the  Church  of  Greece  officially  approved  the  adoption  of  the  New  Calendar  to  take  place  in  March  1924.  Among  the bishops who signed  the  decision  to  adopt the new calendar was  Metropolitan  Germanus  of  Demetrias,  one  of  the  bishops  who  later  consecrated Bishop Matthew of Bresthena in 1935. Thus the Matthewites trace  their Apostolic Succession from a bishop who was personally responsible (by  his signature) for the adoption of the New Calendar in Greece. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Anglican structures need updating, says Archbishop 98%

Anglican structures need updating, says Archbishop | Christian News on Christian Today EDITION:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/anglican-structures-need-updating-says-archbishop/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

pre1924ecumenism8eng 97%

Orthodox Bishop Raphael Hawaweeny Accepted the Mysteries  of the Anglicans In 1910 and Then Changed His Mind in 1912.  He Was Not Judged By Any Council For This Mistake. Did He  and His Flock Lose Grace During Those Two Years?    His  Grace,  the  Right  Reverend  [Saint]  Raphael  Hawaweeny,  late  Bishop of Brooklyn and head of the Syrian Greek Orthodox Catholic Mission  of  the  Russian  Church  in  North  America,  was  a  far‐sighted  leader.  Called  from  Russia  to  New  York  in  1895,  to  assume  charge  of  the  growing  Syrian  parishes  under  the  Russian  jurisdiction  over  American  Orthodoxy,  he  was  elevated  to  the  episcopate  by  order  of  the  Holy  Synod  of  Russia  and  was  consecrated  Bishop  of  Brooklyn  and  head  of  the  Syrian  Mission  by  Archbishop  Tikhon  and  Bishop  Innocent  of  Alaska  on  March  12,  1904.  This  was the first consecration of an Orthodox Catholic Bishop in the New World  and  Bishop  Raphael  was  the  first  Orthodox  prelate  to  spend  his  entire  episcopate, from consecration to burial, in America. [Ed. note—In August 1988  the  remains  of  Bishop  Raphael  along  with  those  of  Bishops  Emmanuel  and  Sophronios  and  Fathers  Moses  Abouhider,  Agapios  Golam  and  Makarios  Moore  were  transferred  to  the  Antiochian  Village  in  southwestern  Pennsylvania  for  re‐burial.  Bishop  Raphaelʹs  remains  were  found  to  be  essentially incorrupt. As a result a commission under the direction of Bishop  Basil (Essey) of the Antiochian Archdiocese was appointed to gather materials  concerning the possible glorification of Bishop Raphael.]    With  his  broad  culture  and  international  training  and  experience  Bishop  Raphael  naturally  had  a  keen  interest  in  the  universal  Orthodox  aspiration  for  Christian  unity.  His  work  in  America,  where  his  Syrian  communities  were  widely  scattered  and  sometimes  very  small  and  without  the  services  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  gave  him  a  special  interest  in  any  movement which promised to provide a way by which acceptable and valid  sacramental  ministrations  might  be  brought  within  the  reach  of  isolated  Orthodox  people.  It  was,  therefore,  with  real  pleasure  and  gratitude  that  Bishop  Raphael  received  the  habitual  approaches  of  ʺHigh  Churchʺ  prelates  and  clergy  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Assured  by  ʺcatholic‐mindedʺ  Protestants, seeking the recognition of real Catholic Bishops, that the Anglican  Communion and Episcopal Church were really Catholic and almost the same  as  Orthodox,  Bishop  Raphael  was  filled  with  great  happiness.  A  group  of  these  ʺHigh  Episcopalianʺ  Protestants  had  formed  the  American  branch  of  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Unionʺ  (since  revised  and  now  existing  as  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Churches  Association,ʺ  chiefly  active  in  England,  where  it  publishes  a  quarterly  organ  called  The  Christian  East).  This  organization,  being  well  pleased  with  the  impression  its  members  had  made  upon  Bishop  Raphael,  elected  him  Vice‐President  of  the  Union.  Bishop  Raphael  accepted,  believing  that  he  was  associating  himself with truly Catholic but unfortunately separated [from the Church]  fellow priests and  bishops in  a movement that  would promote  Orthodoxy  and true catholic unity at the same time.    As is their usual custom with all prelates and clergy of other bodies,  the  Episcopal  bishop  urged  Bishop  Raphael  to  recognize  their  Orders  and  accept  for  his  people  the  sacramental  ministrations  of  their  Protestant  clergy on  a basis of equality with the Sacraments of the Orthodox Church  administered  by  Orthodox  priests.  It  was  pointed  out  that  the  isolated  and  widely‐scattered  Orthodox  who  had  no  access  to  Orthodox  priests  or  Sacraments could be easily reached by clergy of the Episcopal Church, who,  they persuaded Bishop Raphael to believe, were priests and Orthodox in their  doctrine  and  belief  though  separated  in  organization.  In  this  pleasant  delusion, but under carefully specified restrictions, Bishop Raphael issued  in  1910  permission  for  his  faithful,  in  emergencies  and  under  necessity  when  an  Orthodox  priest  and  Sacraments  were  inaccessible,  to  ask  the  ministrations  of  Episcopal  clergy  and  make  comforting  use  of  what  these  clergy could provide in the absence of Orthodox priests and Sacraments.    Being Vice‐President of the Eastern Orthodox side of the Anglican and  Orthodox Churches Union and having issued on Episcopal solicitation such a  permission  to  his  people,  Bishop  Raphael  set  himself  to  observe  closely  the  reaction  following  his  permissory  letter  and  to  study  more  carefully  the  Episcopal Church and Anglican teaching in the hope that the Anglicans might  really  be  capable  of  becoming  actually  Orthodox.  But,  the  more  closely  he  observed  the  general  practice  and  the  more  deeply  he  studied  the  teaching  and faith of the Episcopal Church, the more painfully shocked, disappointed,  and  disillusioned  Bishop  Raphael  became.  Furthermore,  the  very  fact  of  his  own  position  in  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Union  made  the  confusion  and  deception of Orthodox people the more certain and serious. The existence and  cultivation  of  even  friendship  and  mutual  courtesy  was  pointed  out  as  supporting  the  Episcopal  claim  to  Orthodox  sacramental  recognition  and  intercommunion.  Bishop  Raphael  found  that  his  association  with  Episcopalians  became  the  basis  for  a  most  insidious,  injurious,  and  unwarranted  propaganda  in  favor  of  the  Episcopal  Church  among  his  parishes  and  faithful.  Finally,  after  more  than  a  year  of  constant  and  careful  study and observation, Bishop Raphael felt that it was his duty to resign from  the  association  of  which  he  was  Vice‐President.  In  doing  this  he  hoped  that  the  end  of  his  connection  with  the  Union  would  end  also  the  Episcopal  interferences and uncalled‐for intrusions in the affairs and religious harmony  of  his  people.  His  letter  of  resignation  from  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  published  in  the  Russian  Orthodox  Messenger,  February  18,  1912, stated his convictions in the following way:    I have a personal opinion about the usefulness of the Union. Study has  taught me that there is a vast difference between the doctrine, discipline, and  even  worship  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  and  those  of  the  Anglican  Communion;  while,  on  the  other  hand,  experience  has  forced  upon  me  the  conviction that to promote courtesy and friendship, which seems to be the only  aim of the Union at present, not only amounts to killing precious time, at best,  but also is somewhat hurtful to the religious  and  ecclesiastical welfare of  the  Holy Orthodox Church in these United States.    Very many of the bishops of the Holy Orthodox Church at the present  time—and  especially  myself  have  observed  that  the  Anglican  Communion  is  associated  with  numerous  Protestant  bodies,  many  of  whose  doctrines  and  teachings, as well as practices, are condemned by the Holy Orthodox Church. I  view  union  as  only  a  pleasing  dream.  Indeed,  it  is  impossible  for  the  Holy  Orthodox Church to receive—as She has a thousand times proclaimed, and as  even  the  Papal  See  of  Rome  has  declaimed  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Churchʹs  credit—anyone into Her Fold or into union with Her who does not accept Her  Faith in full without any qualifications—the Faith which She claims is most  surely  Apostolic.  I  cannot  see  how  She  can  unite,  or  the  latter  expect  in  the  near future to unite with Her while the Anglican Communion holds so many  Protestant tenets and doctrines, and also is so closely associated with the non‐ Catholic religions about her.    Finally, I am in perfect accord with the views expressed by His Grace,  Archbishop  Platon,  in  his  address  delivered  this  year  before  the  Philadelphia  Episcopalian  Brotherhood,  as  to  the  impossibility  of  union  under  present  circumstances.    One would suppose that the publication of such a letter in the official  organ  of  the  Russian  Archdiocese  would  have  ended  the  misleading  and  subversive propaganda of the Episcopalians among the Orthodox faithful. But  the Episcopal members simply addressed a reply to Bishop Raphael in which  they  attempted  to  make  him  believe  that  the  Episcopal  Church  was  not  Protestant and had adopted none of the errors held by Protestant bodies. For  nearly  another  year  Bishop  Raphael  watched  and  studied  while  the  subversive  Episcopal propaganda  went  on among his people  on the basis  of  the letter of permission he had issued under a misapprehension of the nature  and teaching of the Episcopal Church and its clergy. Seeing that there was no  other means of protecting Orthodox faithful from being misled and deceived,  Bishop Raphael finally issued, late in 1912, the following pastoral letter which  has  remained  in  force  among  the  Orthodox  of  this  jurisdiction  in  America  ever  since  and  has  been  confirmed  and  reinforced  by  the  pronouncement  of  his successor, the present Archbishop Aftimios.  Pastoral Letter of Bishop Raphael  To  My  Beloved  Clergy  and  Laity  of  the  Syrian  Greek‐Orthodox  Catholic Church in North America:  Greetings in Christ Jesus, Our Incarnate Lord and God.  My Beloved Brethren:  Two  years  ago,  while  I was  Vice‐President  and  member  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  being  moved  with  compassion  for  my  children  in  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith  once  delivered  to  the  saints  (Jude  1:3),  scattered  throughout  the  whole  of  North  America  and  deprived  of  the  ministrations  of  the  Church;  and  especially  in  places  far  removed  from  Orthodox  centers;  and  being  equally  moved  with  a  feeling  that  the  Episcopalian  (Anglican)  Church  possessed  largely  the  Orthodox  Faith,  as  many of the prominent clergy professed the same to me before I studied deeply  their doctrinal authorities and their liturgy—the Book of Common Prayer—I  wrote a letter as Bishop and Head of the Syrian‐Orthodox Mission in North  America,  giving  permission,  in  which  I  said  that  in  extreme  cases,  where  no  Orthodox priest could be called upon at short notice, the ministrations of the  Episcopal (Anglican) clergy might be kindly requested. However, I was most  explicit  in defining when  and how the  ministrations should be accepted,  and  also what exceptions should be made. In writing that letter I hoped, on the one  hand, to help my people spiritually, and, on the other hand, to open the way  toward  bringing  the  Anglicans  into  the  communion  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith.  On  hearing  and  in  reading  that  my  letter,  perhaps  unintentionally,  was  misconstrued by some of the Episcopalian (Anglican) clergy, I wrote a second  letter  in  which  I  pointed  out  that  my  instructions  and  exceptions  had  been  either overlooked or ignored by many, to wit:  a)  They  (the  Episcopalians)  informed  the  Orthodox  people  that  I  recognized  the Anglican Communion (Episcopal Church) as being united with the Holy  Orthodox Church and their ministry, that is holy orders, as valid.  b) The Episcopal (Anglican) clergy offered their ministrations even when my  Orthodox clergy were residing in the same towns and parishes, as pastors.  c) Episcopal clergy said that there was no need of the Orthodox people seeking  the  ministrations  of  their  own  Orthodox  priests,  for  their  (the  Anglican)  ministrations were all that were necessary.  I,  therefore, felt bound  by  all  the  circumstances  to  make  a  thorough  study  of  the Anglican Churchʹs faith and orders, as well as of her discipline and ritual.  After serious consideration I realized that it was my honest duty, as a member  of the College of the Holy Orthodox Greek Apostolic Church, and head of the  Syrian Mission in North America, to  resign from the  vice‐presidency of  and  membership in the Anglican and  Eastern  Orthodox Churches  Union.  At  the  same time, I set forth, in my letter of resignation, my reason for so doing.  I  am  convinced  that  the  doctrinal  teaching  and  practices,  as  well  as  the  discipline,  of  the  whole  Anglican  Church  are  unacceptable  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church.  I  make  this apology  for  the Anglicans  whom  as  Christian  gentlemen  I  greatly  revere,  that  the  loose  teaching  of  a  great  many  of  the  prominent Anglican theologians are so hazy in their definitions of truths, and  so  inclined  toward  pet  heresies  that  it  is  hard  to  tell  what  they  believe.  The  Anglican  Church  as  a  whole  has  not  spoken  authoritatively  on  her  doctrine.  Her  Catholic‐minded  members  can  call  out  her  doctrines  from  many  views,  but  so  nebulous  is her pathway in the doctrinal world that those  who would  extend a hand of both Christian and ecclesiastical fellowship dare not, without  distrust,  grasp  the  hand  of  her  theologians,  for  while  many  are  orthodox  on  some  points,  they  are  quite  heterodox  on  others.  I  speak,  of  course,  from  the  Holy  Orthodox  Eastern  Catholic  point  of  view.  The  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has never perceptibly changed from Apostolic times, and, therefore, no one can  go astray in finding out what She teaches. Like Her Lord and Master, though  at times surrounded with human malaria—which He in His mercy pardons— She is the same yesterday, and today, and forever (Heb. 13:8) the mother and  safe deposit of the truth as it is in Jesus (cf. Eph. 4:21).  The  Orthodox  Church  differs  absolutely  with  the  Anglican  Communion  in  reference  to  the  number  of  Sacraments  and  in  reference  to  the  doctrinal  explanation of the same. The Anglicans say in their Catechism concerning the  Sacraments that there are ʺtwo only as generally necessary to salvation, that  is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord.ʺ I am well aware that, in their  two books of homilies (which are not of a binding authority, for the books were  prepared only in the reign of Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth for priests who  were not permitted to preach their own sermons in England during times both  politically  and  ecclesiastically  perilous),  it  says  that  there  are  ʺfive  others  commonly  called  Sacramentsʺ  (see  homily  in  each  book  on  the  Sacraments),  but long since they have repudiated in different portions of their Communion  this very teaching and absolutely disavow such definitions in their ʺArticles of 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism8eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

cyprus 96%

Orthodox Statements on Anglican Orders CYPRUS, 1923 The Archbishop of Cyprus wrote to the Patriarch of Constantinople in the name of his Synod on March 20, 1923, as follows:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cyprus/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

CHURCH OF NIGERIA MISSIONARY SOCIETY 95%

Missionary Agents The Church of Nigeria Missionary Society is the Mission Agent of the Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion) taking the Mission of God's love and reconciliation to every home in Nigeria, Africa and beyond.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/church-of-nigeria-missionary-society/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

MetaxakisAnglicans1918 95%

Project Canterbury  The Episcopal and Greek Churches  Report of an Unofficial Conference on Unity  Between Members of the Episcopal Church in America and  His Grace, Meletios Metaxakis, Metropolitan of Athens,  And His Advisers.  October 26, 1918.  New York: Department of Missions, 1920    PREFACE  THE desire for closer communion between the Eastern Orthodox Church and  the various branches of the Anglican Church is by no means confined to the  Anglican  Communion.  Many  interesting  efforts  have  been  made  during  the  past two centuries, a resume of which may be found in the recent publication  of  the  Department  of  Missions  of  the  Episcopal  Church  entitled  Historical  Contact Between the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches.  The most significant approaches of recent times have been those between the  Anglican  and  the  Russian  and  the  Greek  Churches;  and  of  late  the  Syrian  Church of India which claims foundation by the Apostle Saint Thomas.  Evdokim, the last Archbishop sent to America by the Holy Governing Synod  of Russia in the year 1915, brought with him instructions that he should work  for a closer understanding with the Episcopal Church in America. As a result,  a series of conferences were held in the Spring of 1916. At these conferences  the  question  of  Anglican  Orders,  the  Apostolical  Canons  and  the  Seventh  Oecumenical Council were discussed. The Russians were willing to accept the  conclusions  of  Professor  Sokoloff,  as  set  forth  in  his  thesis  for  the  degree  of  Doctor of Divinity, approved by the Holy Governing Synod of Russia. In this  thesis  he  proved  the  historical  continuity  of  Anglican  Orders,  and  the  intention to conform to the practice of the ancient Church. He expressed some  suspicion concerning the belief of part of the Anglican Church in the nature of  the sacraments, but maintained that this could not be of sufficient magnitude  to prevent the free operation of the Holy Spirit. The Russian members of the  conference,  while  accepting  this  conclusion,  pointed  out  that  further  steps  toward inter‐communion could only be made by an oecumenical council. The  following is quoted from the above‐mentioned publication:  The  Apostolical  Canons  were  considered  one  by  one.  With  explanations  on  both sides, the two Churches were found to be in substantial agreement.  In  connection  with  canon  forty‐six,  the  Archbishop  stated  that  the  Russian  Church  would  accept  any  Anglican  Baptism  or  any  other  Catholic  Baptism.  Difficulties  concerning  the  frequent  so‐called  ʺperiods  of  fastingʺ  were  removed by rendering the word ʺfastingʺ as ʺabstinence.ʺ Both Anglicans and  Russians  agreed  that  only  two  fast‐days  were  enjoined  on  their  members‐‐ Ash‐Wednesday and Good Friday.  The  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council  was  fully  discussed.  Satisfactory  explanations  were  given  by  both  sides,  but  no  final  decision  was  reached.  Before  the  conference  could  be  reconvened,  the  Archbishop  was  summoned  to a General Conference of the Orthodox Church at Moscow.  During  the  past  year  the  Syrian  Church  and  the  Anglican  Church  in  India  have  been  giving  very  full  and  careful  consideration  to  the  question  of  Reunion and it is hoped that some working basis may be speedily established.  As  a  preliminary  to  this  present  conference,  the  writer  addressed,  with  the  approval  of  the  members  of  the  conference  representing  the  Episcopal  Church,  a  letter  to  the  Metropolitan  which  became  the  basis  of  discussion.  This letter has been published as one of the pamphlets of this series under the  title, An Anglican Programme for Reunion. These conferences were followed by  a series of other conferences in England which took up the thoughts contained  in the American programme, as is shown in the following quotation from the  preface to the above‐mentioned letter:  At  the  first  conference  the  American  position  was  reviewed  and  it  was  mutually agreed that the present aim of such conference was not for union in  the  sense  of  ʺcorporate  solidarityʺ  based  on  the  restoration  of  intercommunion,  but  through  clear  understanding  of  each  otherʹs  position.  The  general  understanding  was  that  there  was  no  real  bar  to  communion  between  the  two  Churches  and  it  was  desirable  that  it  should  be  permitted,  but that such permission could only be given through the action of a General  Council.  The  third  of  these  series  of  conferences  was  held  at  Oxford.  About  forty  representatives  of  the  Anglican  Church  attended.  The  questions  of  Baptism  and  Confirmation  were  considered  by  this  conference.  It  was  shown  that,  until  the  eighteenth  century,  re‐baptism  of  non‐Orthodox  was  never  practiced. It was then introduced as a protest against the custom in the Latin  Church  of  baptizing,  not  only  living  Orthodox,  but  in  many  cases,  even  the  dead.  Under  order  of  Patriarch  Joachim  III,  it  has  become  the  Greek  custom  not to re‐baptize Anglicans who have been baptized by English priests. In the  matter  of  Confirmation  it  was  shown  that  in  the  cases  of  the  Orthodox,  the  custom of anointing with oil, called Holy Chrism, differs to some extent from  our  Confirmation.  It  is  regarded  as  a  seal  of  orthodoxy  and  should  not  be  viewed  as  repetition  of  Confirmation.  Even  in  the  Orthodox  Church  lapsed  communicants must receive Chrism again before restoration.  The  fourth  conference  was  held  in  the  Jerusalem  Chapel  of  Westminster  Abbey, under the presidency of the Bishop of Winchester. This discussion was  confined  to  the  consideration  of  the  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council.  It  is  not  felt by the Greeks that the number of differences on this point touch doctrinal  or  even  disciplinary  principles.  The  Metropolitan  stated  that  there  was  no  difficulty  tin  the  subject.  From  what  he  had  seen  of  Anglican  Churches,  he  was  assured  as  to  our  practice.  He  further  stated  that  he  was  strongly  opposed  to  the  practice  of  ascribing  certain  virtues  and  power  to  particular  icons, and that he himself had written strongly against this practice, and that  the Holy Synod of Greece had issued directions against it.ʺ  Those  brought  in  contact  with  the  Metropolitan  of  Athens,  and  those  who  followed  the  work  of  the  Commission  on  Faith  and  Order  can  testify  to  the  evident desire of the authorities of the East for closer union with the Anglican  Church as soon as conditions permit.  This  report  is  submitted  because  there  is  much  loose  thinking  and  careless  utterance on every side concerning the position of the Orthodox Church and  the  relation  of  the  Episcopal  Church  to  her  sister  Churches  of  the  East.  It  seems  not  merely  wise,  but  necessary,  to  place  before  Church  people  a  document showing how the minds of leading thinkers of both Episcopal and  Orthodox  Churches  are  approaching  this  most  momentous  problem  of  Intercommunion and Church Unity.    THE CONFERENCE  BY  common  agreement,  representatives  of  the  Greek  Orthodox  Church  and  delegates from the American Branch of the Anglican and Eastern Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation  of  the  Episcopal  Church,  met  in  the  Bible  Room  of  the  Library  of  the  General  Theological  Seminary,  Saturday,  October 26, 1918, at ten oʹclock. There were present as representing the Greek  Orthodox  Church:  His  Grace,  the  Most  Reverend  Meletios  Metaxakis,  Metropolitan  of  Greece;  the  Very  Reverend  Chrysostomos  Papadopoulos,  D.D.,  Professor  of  the  University  of  Athens  and  Director  of  the  Theological  Seminary  ʺRizariosʺ;  Hamilcar  Alivisatos,  D.D.,  Director  of  the  Ecclesiastical  Department  of  the  Ministry  of  Religion  and  Education,  Athens,  and  Mr.  Tsolainos,  who  acted  as  interpreter.  The  Episcopal  Church  was  represented  by  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney;  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  J.  Kinsman, Bishop of Delaware; the Right Reverend James H. Darlington, D.D.,  Bishop  of  Harrisburg;  the  Very  Reverend  Hughell  Fosbroke,  Dean  of  the  General Theological Seminary; the Reverend Francis J. Hall, D.D., Professor of  Dogmatic  Theology  in  the  General  Theological  Seminary;  the  Reverend  Rockland T. Homans, the Reverend William Chauncey Emhardt, Secretary of  the  American  Branch  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation;  Robert  H.  Gardiner,  Esquire,  Secretary  of  the  Commission  for  a  World  Conference  on  Faith  and  Order;  and  Seraphim  G.  Canoutas, Esquire. The Right Reverend Edward M. Parker, D.D.,  Bishop of New Hampshire, telegraphed his inability to be present. His Grace  the Metropolitan presided over the Greek delegation and Dr. Alivisatos acted  as  secretary.  The  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney  presided  over  the  American delegation and the Reverend W. C. Emhardt acted as secretary.  Bishop Courtney opened the conference with prayer and made the following  remarks:  ʺOur  brethren  of  the  Greek  Church,  as  well  as  the  Anglican,  have  received copies of the letter to His Grace which our secretary has drawn up;  and which lies before us this morning. It is clear to all those who have taken  active  part  in  efforts  to  draw  together,  that  it  is  of  no  use  any  longer  to  congratulate each  other  upon points on  which  we agree, so  long as we hold  back those things on which we differ. The points on which we agree are not  those which have caused the separation, but the things concerning which we  differ.  So  long  as  we  assume  that  the  conditions  which  separate  us  now  are  the same as those which have held us apart, we are in line for removing those  things  which  separate  us.  We  are  making  the  valleys  to  be  filled  and  the  mountains  to  be  brought  low  and  making  possible  a  revival  of  the  spirit  of  unity.  It  is  in  the  hope  of  effecting  this  that  we  are  gathered  together.  Doctrinal differences underlie the things that differentiate us from each other.  The  proper  way  to  begin  this  conference  would  be  to  ask  the  Greeks  what  they think of some of the propositions laid down in the letter, beginning first  with the question of the Validity of Anglican Orders, and then proceeding to  the ʺFilioque Clauseʺ in the Creed and other topics suggested.  ʺWill  His  Grace  kindly  state  what  is  his  view  concerning  the  Validity  of  Anglican Orders?ʺ  The Metropolitan: ʺI am greatly moved indeed, and it is with feelings of great  emotion  that  I  come  to  this  conference  around  the  table  with  such  learned  theologians  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Because  it  is  the  first  time  I  have  been  given the opportunity to express, not only my personal desire, but the desire  of  my  Church,  that  we  may  all  be  one.  I  understand  that  this  conference  is  unofficial.  Neither  our  Episcopal  brethren,  nor  the  Orthodox,  officially  represent  their  Churches.  The  fact,  however,  that  we  have  come  together  in  the spirit of prayer and love to discuss these questions, is a clear and eloquent  proof  that  we  are  on  the  desired  road  to  unity.  I  would  wish,  that  in  discussing these questions of ecclesiastical importance in the presence of such  theological experts,  that I were  as  well equipped  for  the  undertaking  as you  are.  Unfortunately,  however,  from  the  day  that  I  graduated  from  the  Theological Seminary at Jerusalem, I have been absorbed in the great question  of the day, which has been the salvation of Christians from the sword of the  invader of the Orient.  ʺUnfortunately, because  we  have  been confronted  in  the  Near East with this  problem of paramount importance, we leaders have not had the opportunity  to  think  of  these  equally  important  questions.  The  occupants  of  three  of  the  ancient thrones of Christendom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, the Patriarch  of  Antioch  and  the  Patriarch  of  Jerusalem,  have  been  constantly  confronted  with  the  question  of  how  to  save  their  own  fold  from  extermination.  These  patriarchates represent a great number of Orthodox and their influence would  be  of  prime  importance  in  any  deliberation.  But  they  have  not  had  time  to  send their bishops to a round‐table conference to deliberate on the questions  of  doctrine.  A  general  synod,  such  as  is  so  profitably  held  in  your  Church  when you come together every three years, would have the same result, if we  could  hold  the  same  sort  of  synod  in  the  Near  East.  A  conference  similar  to  the one held by your Church was planned by the Patriarch of Constantinople  in  September,  1911,  but  he  did  not  take  place,  owing  to  command  of  the  Sultan that the bishops who attended would be subject to penalty of death.  ʺIn 1906, when the Olympic games took place in Athens, the Metropolitan of  Drama, now of Smyrna, passed through Athens. That was sufficient to cause  an  imperative  demand  of  the  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  that  the  Metropolitan  be  punished,  and  in  consequence  he  was  transferred  from  Drama  to  Smyrna.  From  these  facts  you  can  see  under  what  conditions  the  evolution of the Greek Church has been taking place.  ʺAs I have stated in former conversations with my brethren of the Episcopal  Church, we hope that, by the Grace of God, freedom and liberty will come to  our race, and our bishops will be free to attend such conferences as we desire.  I assure you that a great spirit of revival will be inaugurated and give proof of  the revival of Grecian life of former times.  ʺThe question of the freedom of the territory to be occupied in the Near East is  not merely a question of the liberty of the people and the individual, but also 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/metaxakisanglicans1918/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

EPAnglicanOrders1922 89%

Encyclical on Anglican Orders  from the Oecumenical Patriarch to the Presidents of the  Particular Eastern Orthodox Churches, 1922  [The Holy Synod has studied the report of the Committee and notes:]  1.  That  the  ordination  of  Matthew  Parker  as  Archbishop  of  Canterbury  by  four bishops is a fact established by history.  2.  That  in  this  and  subsequent  ordinations  there  are  found  in  their  fullness  those  orthodox  and  indispensable,  visible  and  sensible  elements  of  valid  episcopal ordination ‐ viz. the laying on of hands, the Epiclesis of the All‐Holy  Spirit and also the purpose to transmit the charisma of the Episcopal ministry.  3.  That  the  orthodox  theologians  who  have  scientifically  examined  the  question  have  almost  unanimously  come  to  the  same  conclusions  and  have  declared themselves as accepting the validity of Anglican Orders.  4.  That  the  practice  in  the  Church  affords  no  indication  that  the  Orthodox  Church has ever officially treated the validity of Anglican Orders as in doubt,  in  such  a  way  as  would  point  to  the  re‐ordination  of  the  Anglican  clergy  as  required in the case of the union of the two Churches.  +  Meletios  [Metaxakis],  Archbishop  of  Constantinople  New  Rome  and  Oecumenical Patriarch        http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucgbmxd/patriarc.htm 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/epanglicanorders1922/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

jerusalem 88%

Orthodox Statements on Anglican Orders JERUSALEM, 1923 The Patriarch of Jerusalem wrote to the Archbishop of Canterbury in the name of his Synod on March 12, 1923, as follows:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/jerusalem/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Beginning of Methodism 85%

John Wesley was an ordained Anglican Clergyman.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/beginning-of-methodism/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

dialoguecommunionvladmoss 85%

2 3 Orthodox.  Well,  while  you’re  thinking  let  me  remind  you  that  the  Eastern  Patriarchs in their Encyclical of 1848 also condemned this teaching, which  is  essentially  that of the  Lutherans. It is also very close to the Anglican idea of  the  “Real  Presence”  of  Christ  in  the  Eucharist  –  although  it  is  notoriously  difficult to say precisely what the Anglicans believe. And you will remember  that  the  Anglicans  and  Catholics  killed  each  other  during  the  Anglican  Reformation precisely because the Catholics had a realistic understanding of  the  sacrament,  whereas  the  Anglicans,  being  Protestants,  did  not.  A  recent  Anglican  biography  of  the  first  Anglican  archbishop,  Cranmer,  has  demonstrated that he was a Zwinglian in his eucharistic theology.  Rationalist.  You  know,  I  think  that  you  are  misrepresenting  the  Anglican  position.  Fr.  X  of  the  Moscow  Theological  Academy  has  told  me  that  the  Orthodox teaching coincides with that of the Anglicans, but not with that of  the Catholics.  Orthodox. Really, you do surprise me! I knew that your Moscow theologians  were close to the Anglicans, the spiritual fathers of the ecumenical movement  and  masters  of  doctrinal  double‐think,  but  I  did  not  know  that  they  had  actually  embraced  their  doctrines!  As  for  the  Catholics  –  what  do  you  find  wrong with their eucharistic theology?  Rationalist.  Don’t  you  know?  The  Orthodox  reject  the  Catholic  doctrine  of  transubstantiation!  Orthodox.  I  do  not  believe  that  the  Orthodox  reject  transubstantiation.  We  dislike  the  word  “transubstantiation”  because  of  its  connotations  of  Aristotlean  philosophy  and  medieval  scholasticism,  but  very  few  people  today  –  even  Catholics  –  use  the  word  in  the  technically  Aristotlean  sense.  Most  people  mean  by  “transubstantiation”  simply  the  doctrine  that  the  substances  of  bread  and  wine  are  changed  into  the  substances  of  Body  and  Blood  in  the  Eucharist,  which  is  Orthodox.  The  Eastern  Patriarchs  in  their  Encyclical  write  that  “the  bread  is  changed,  transubstantiated,  converted,  transformed,  into  the  actual  Body  of  the  Lord.”  They  use  four  words  here,  including  “transubstantiated”,  to  show  that  they  are  equivalent  in  meaning.  In  any  case,  is  not  the  Russian  word  “presuschestvlenie”  a  translation  of  “transubstantiation”? It is important not to quarrel over words if the doctrine  the words express is the same.  Rationalist.  Nevertheless,  the  doctrine  of  transubstantiation  is  Catholic  and  heretical.  Orthodox. If that is so, why has the Orthodox Church never condemned it as  heretical?  The  Orthodox  Church  has  on  many  occasions  condemned  the  Catholic  heresies  of  the  Filioque,  papal  infallibility,  created  grace,  etc.,  but  never the Catholic doctrine of the Eucharist.  Rationalist. It’s still heretical. And I have to say that I find your thinking very  western, scholastic, primitive and materialist!  Orthodox.  Perhaps  you’ll  find  these  words  of  the  Lord  also  “primitive  and  materialist”: “Unless you eat of My Flesh and drink of My Blood, you have no  life in you” (John 6.53). And these words of St. John Chrysostom written in his  commentary  on  the  Lord’s  words:  “He  hath  given  to  those  who  desire  Him  not only to see Him, but even to touch, and eat Him, and fix their teeth in His  Flesh,  and  to  embrace  Him,  and  satisfy  their  love…” 5   Was  St.  John  Chrysostom, the composer of our Liturgy, a western Catholic in his thinking?  Rationalist. Don’t be absurd!  Orthodox. Well then… Let’s leave the Catholics and Protestants and get back  to the Orthodox position. And let me put my understanding of the Orthodox  doctrine as concisely as possible: at the moment of consecration the bread and  wine are changed into the Body and Blood of Christ in such a way that there  is no longer the substances of bread and wine, but only of Body and Blood.  Rationalist. I accept that so long as you do not mean that there is a physico‐ chemical change in the constitution of the bread and wine?  Orthodox.  But  can  there  not  be  a  physico‐chemical  change?!  Are  not  bread  and wine physical substances?  Rationalist. Yes.  Orthodox. And are not human flesh and blood physico‐chemical substances?  Rationalist. Yes…  Orthodox.  And  is  not  a  change  from  one  physico‐chemical  substance  into  another physico‐chemical substance a physico‐chemical change?  Rationalist.  Here  you  are  demonstrating  your  western,  legalistic,  primitive  mentality! All Aristotlean syllogisms and empty logic! The Orthodox mind is  quite different: it is mystical. You forget that we are talking about a Mystery!  Orthodox.  Forgive  me  for  offending  you.  I  quite  accept  that  we  are  talking  about a Mystery. But there is a difference between mystery and mystification.  If  we  are  going  to  speak  at  all,  we  must  speak  clearly,  with  as  precise  a  definition of terms as human speech will allow. The Fathers were not opposed  to logic or clarity. Illogicality is no virtue!  Rationalist.  Alright…  But  the  fact  remains  that  the  change  is  not  a  physico‐ chemical one, but a supernatural one. It says so in the Liturgy itself!  Orthodox.  I  agree  that  the  change  is  supernatural  in  two  senses.  First,  the  instantaneous change of one physical substance into another is obviously not  something that we find in the ordinary course of nature. Of course, bread and  wine are naturally changed into flesh and blood through the process of eating  and digestion. But in this case the change is effected, not by eating, but by the  word  of  prayer  –  and  it’s  instantaneous.  For,  as  St.  Gregory  of  Nyssa  points  out, “it is not a matter of the bread becoming the Body of the Word through  the natural process of eating: rather it is transmuted immediately into the Body  5 St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/dialoguecommunionvladmoss/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

40 Days of lent prayer Kigali Calendar 2016 part 1 84%

Anglican Church of Rwanda, Kigali Diocese Department of Evangelism and Training THE 4O DAYS OF LENT CALENDAR:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/04/40-days-of-lent-prayer-kigali-calendar-2016-part-1/

04/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

anglicanserbia1865 81%

The Church of Serbia Permitted Anglicans to Commune in 1865    (The below article is taken from an Anglican source)    ORTHODOX PRECEDENT  Orthodox  precedent  for  the  admission  of  non‐Orthodox  in  destitution  exists  as far back as the twelfth century, and was justified by the Orthodox canonist  Balsamon,  but  no  precedent  exists,  so  far  as  is  known,  for  the  public  admission for non‐Orthodox not in destitution. Neither the Patriarch nor the  Serbian  Church  is  committed  to  any  repetition  of  the  action,  nor  is  the  Orthodox  Church  as  a  whole,  nor  is  the  Anglican  Church  committed  in  any  way.  But  it  has  nevertheless  no  small  importance.  Evidently  some  of  the  Orthodox  in  Belgrade  were  not  very  happy  about  it,  fearing  it  might  be  premature.  The  Politika  said:  ʺAlthough  the  manifestation  of  the  relationship  made  so  beautifully  among  us  at  the  cathedral  was  both  touching  and  praiseworthy,  some  people  did  not  approve  the  action  of  the  Patriarch  because the Anglicans are not in formal communion with us.ʺ  Frank  Steel,  an  attaché  of  the  British  legation,  who  was  one  of  the  eight  communicants,  writes  a  letter  to  the  Church  Times  of  which  I  give  some  extracts:  ʺAs there is no English church or chaplain in Belgrade, a letter was sent to the  Patriarch,  asking  if  he  would  permit  us  to  make  our  communion  at  the  cathedral  on  Christmas  Day.  The  Patriarch  replied  expressing  his  approval,  and  personally  administered  the  Sacrament  to  four  Americans  and  four  English people, of whom I was one.ʺ  ʺI understand that no patriarch has ever officiated in this capacity before, but  His  Holiness  insisted  on  administering  the  Sacrament  himself.  I  hear  that  a  large  number  of  Orthodox  priests  have  expressed  their  disapproval  of  His  Holinessʹ  action,  and  the  newspapers  have  given  diverse  views  on  the  matter.ʺ  It would be indeed interesting if Mr. Steel would give us some more details of  what must evidently have been a very wonderful experience.  A WAR PRECEDENT  Another  letter  has  also  been  printed  in  the  same  journal  from  an  English  country parson who was communicated by a Serb priest during the war:  ʺIt  may  be  of  interest  to  know  that  during  the  war,  while  I  was  stationed  at  Salonika, I was admitted to the Sacrament of Holy Communion by the express  consent and with the utmost goodwill of the Serbian ecclesiastical authorities.  There  could  be  no  question  of  destitution  in  this  case,  for  English  chaplains  and services were well to the fore. I took it to be a grateful acknowledgement  of the kindly feelings between me and the Serbians under my command, and  who asked that I might communicate with them. I was not a chaplain.ʺ  This  is  indeed  a  remarkable  letter.  The  sum  total  of  the  matter  seems  to  be,  whatever  the  theological  issues  involved  may  be,  that  the  Serbs  like  the  Americans  and  English  and  wish  to  share  their  religious  experiences  and  privileges with them.  INTERCOMMUNION SIXTY YEARS AGO  I  am  supposed  to  chronicle  news  in  these  letters,  but  perhaps  I  may  be  pardoned for once if I delve down into the files of the Church Times as far back  as  August,  1865,  to  find  an  occasion  when  a  similar  thing  seems  to  have  happened in Belgrade. The following is quoted from a correspondent signed  W[illiam]. D[enton].  ʺWhen  I  mentioned  in  my  former  letter  that  I  received  communion  in  the  Serbian  Church  at  the  hands  of  the  Archimandrite  of  Studenitza,  I  forgot  at  the same time to point out the full significance of the act. The Archimandrite  was one of the ecclesiastics consulted by the Archbishop of Belgrade as to my  request  for  communion  on  Whitsunday,  so  that  the  administration  was  not  the  act  of  an  individual,  however  prominent  his  position,  but  was  the  synodical  act  of  the  prelates  and  inferior  clergy  of  Servia.  I  arrived  at  the  monastery of Studenitza on Monday. I left it on Wednesday, and on Thursday  I had another pleasant meeting with the Bishop of Tschatchat. I found that he  knew  all  about  the  proposed  administration  to  me  by  the  Archimandrite.  Leaving him, I had a few daysʹ travel in the interior of the country and met all  the  leading  ecclesiastics.  Among  others  I  had  pleasure  in  meeting  the  Archpriest  of  Jagodina,  whose  acquaintance  I  had  made  while  he  was  a  resident  of  the  monastery  of  Ruscavitza.  I  found  on  all  sides  the  greatest  satisfaction at my communion, and I heard the strongest desire expressed for  closer  intercourse  with  the  English  Church  on  the  ground  of  its  orthodoxy  and the prominent position given to scriptural teaching in its formularies.  ʺI  had  the  pleasure  of  staying  with  the  Bishop  of  Schabatz  and  the  opportunity  of  discussing  with  that  able  and  large‐minded  prelate  the  question of intercommunion of the Churches of England and Servia. Referring  to  my  communion  at Studenitza he hailed me as  a member  of  the  Orthodox  Church. But he did more than this. I was accompanied by an English layman  who intends to make a stay in Servia of at least two monthsʹ duration after my  leaving.  I  mentioned  that  as  he  was  accustomed  to  communicate  in  the  English Church he was unwilling to be deprived of the same blessing whilst  in a strange land. The bishop at once declared that there was no hindrance to  his communicating in Servia, and at my request gave him a letter addressed  to  all  the  clergy  of  his  diocese,  directing  them  to  administer  communion  to  him, a member of the Church of England, if he desired to receive the sacred  mysteries.  ʺThere now remained the general question of the right of all members of the  English  Church  to  communicate  simply  as  members  of  the  English  Church,  and  without  any  test  beond  that  of  their  loyal  membership  in  their  own  branch of the Church Catholic: and your readers will be glad to know that on  the  production  of  a  simple  certificate  of  real  and  living  membership,  settled  by the bishop and indicated to me, all such persons will from this time forth  be  received  as  communicants  of  the  Orthodox  Church  of  Servia.  And  intercommunion of one portion of the Orthodox Church cannot long precede  formal  intercommunion  with  the  whole  Eastern  Church.  Here  is  real  intercommunion  on  the  true  Catholic  basis,  the  beginning  I  trust  of  wider  communion.  There  is  no  doubt  much  to  labor  for,  much  to  pray  for,  much  need of ʹpatience and confidenceʹ, but here surely is the darn and promise; in  part  also  to  past  prayers  for  unity,  but  especially  may  we,  I  trust,  without  presumption, see an answer to His effectual prayer, who, in the night of His  betrayal,  prayed  ʹthat  they  all  may  [541/542]  be  one.ʹ  Who  shall  despair  and  say any longer that the unity of all Christian people is a mere dream, when in  the person of the English and Servian Churches, the distant East resumes her  intercourse  with  the  separated  West;  and  when  what  to  most  persons  since  the  Council  of  Florence  has  seemed  unattainable,  has  been  done  without  human instruments by Him who in essence and attributes is One.ʺ  Church Times OPTIMISTIC  This  is  an  extraordinarily  optimistic  letter  almost  implying  that  reunion  between  the  two  churches  was  a  fait  accompli.  But,  whatever  the  rights  and  wrongs of the facts, very little seems to have arisen from them. The following  is a portion of a leading article that appeared in the Church Times on August  26, 1865.  ʺThe  Servian  Church  has  entered  into  full  communion  with  the  Church  of  England.  This  is  the  step  to  which  we  allude.  The  efforts  of  the  ʹEastern  Church  Associationʹ  and  especially  the  energy,  perseverance,  and  personal  popularity  in  Servia  of  one  of  the  first  originators  of  that  association  have  induced  the  ancient  Orthodox  Church  in  Servia  to  admit  privately  to  Holy  Communion, and to promise to admit to participation in the sacred mysteries  any traveler, whether priest or layman of the Anglican communion, who shall  bring  with  him  certain  letters  commendatory,  the  form  of  which  will  be  arranged  and  agreed  upon  by  the  Servian  episcopate.  Thus  we  really  at  the  present moment are in communion with the whole Orthodox Church. For the  Servian Church is an Orthodox branch of the great Slavonic communion, and  is  in  full  connection  and  communion  with  Constantinople.  But  the  Servian  Church  has  recognized  our  baptism,  our  orders,  and  our  position,  and  has  admitted our members into communion with herself: therefore now at last the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Church  are  as  one.  What  shall  we  say?  The  heart of every believer must burst into an irrepressible Te Deum at such a truly  Christian triumph.  ʺThe  Servian  Church  which,  perhaps,  is  little  known  to  our  readers  as  yet  except  through  certain  charity‐breathing  letters  of  its  prelates,  especially  of  Archbishop  Michael,  will  soon  be  a  household  word  in  our  mouths.  We  are  bound to give the Servians the credit which is their due for their freedom of  spirit  and  their  intelligent  and  far‐seeing  charity.  English  Churchmen  must  reciprocate this mighty act of Christian brotherhood by all the means that lie  within  their  power.  The  Eastern  Church  for  a  century  past  is  a  suffering  Church. The Church of autonomous Servia has emerged from the fiery trial of  persecution  into  a  clear  sky  and  a  more  peaceful  dwelling  place.  English  Churchmen  in  future  will  find  it  impossible  to  side  with  the  infidel  and  the  Mahometan against those with whom they have broken the Bread of Life and  shared  the  Cup  of  Immortality.  They  are  and  they  must  vividly  realize  that  they are one Church with them.ʺ  C. H. PALMER.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/anglicanserbia1865/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Beginning Of Methodism, Methodist Chuch 78%

Like the mother Church, the Methodist Church in Ghana was established from a core of persons with Anglican background.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/beginning-of-methodism-methodist-chuch/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

OrthodoxAnglicanUnity1914to1921 74%

Project Canterbury The Anglican and Eastern Churches:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/orthodoxanglicanunity1914to1921/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Ascension Day May 24 2020 68%

In the Anglican cycle of prayer, please pray for all members of the Anglican Communion around the world:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/23/ascension-day-may-24-2020/

23/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

SDHF 2016 - Calendar of Events - Social Media 42x60 65%

Sue 0427 962 281 or sue.nalder@gmail.com St Marks Anglican Church Cnr of Grafton and Albion Streets, Warwick 1:00pm -2:00pm and 2:00pm -3:00pm “Sandstone &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/09/sdhf-2016-calendar-of-events-social-media-42x60/

09/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Facts & Figures 62%

Plans were the Wesley brothers to travel to Georgia as missionaries to the Indians for the Anglican church.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/facts-figures/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

40 Day Shepherd Challenge 60%

Francisco, Ph.D., D.D., PH Archbishop for the United States Armed Forces Bishop Emissary for the Diocese of Katakwa – Anglican Church of Kenya (Anglican Communion) Spiritual Formation Workbook Based on the Aims and Methods of Scouting The Scripture quotations contained herein are from the Contemporary English Version © 1995, American Bible Society, used by permission.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/04/40-day-shepherd-challenge/

04/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

pre1924ecumenism3eng 60%

Historical Contact of the Eastern  Orthodox and Anglican Churches    A review of the relations between the Orthodox Church of the East  and the Anglican Church since the time of Theodore of Tarsus    By William Chauncey Emhardt  Department of Missions and Church Extension of the Episcopal Church  New York   1920      EARLY RELATIONS    The  creation  of  a  department  for  Church  Work  among  Foreign‐born  Americans and their Children under the Presiding Bishop and Council, calls  for  a  careful  consideration  of  the  Orthodox  Church.  It  seems  most  desirable  first  of  all  to  review  briefly  the  historical  contact  which  has  existed  between  the  Church  of  England  and  the  Orthodox  Eastern  Church  from  almost  the  very beginning. There are, of course, many traditions, unsupported however  by  historical  documents,  which  indicate  that  the  English  Church  was  of  Grecian origin, and that contact between Greece and the British Isles prior to  the  time  of  Saint  Augustine  (A.  D.  597)  was  continuous.  The  attendance  of  bishops  of  the  British  Church  at  the  Council  of  Nicea  (A.D.  325),  the  first  historical  reference  toʹ  the  Church  in  England,  proves  that  there  was  some  contact.    In 680 A.D., a Greek, Theodore of Tarsus, was consecrated Archbishop  of Canterbury, thus bringing the Greek Church to the Metropolitan See itself.  Theodore  left  deep  imprint  upon  both  the  civil  and  the  ecclesiastical  life  of  England, unifying the several kingdoms and organizing into a compact body  the  disjointed  churches  of  the  land.  To  him,  more  [1/2]  than  to  any  other  source,  we  should  trace  the  spirit  of  national  unity  and  independence  in  national  and  religious  ambitions  that  has  since  characterized  the  English  nation.  It  is  worthy  of  note  that  under  Theodore  the  famous  Council  of  Hatfield was held, at which the doctrine of the double procession of the Holy  Ghost  was  accepted  by  the  English  Church,  long  before  this  doctrine  was  officially  recognized  in  either  Spain  or  Rome.  It  seems  strange  that  theologians,  of  either  side  of  the  controversy  which  has  grown  around  this  doctrine, have never turned to Theodore as the justifier of the doctrine and as  an  historical  evidence  that  the  British  Church,  by  its  acceptance,  never  intended to depart from the teachings of the East.    RELATIONS IN SEVENTEENTH CENTURY    Many  centuries  must  be  passed  over  before  we  again  find  Grecian  contact  in  English  ecclesiastical  life.  In  1617,  Metrophanes  Critopoulos  of  Veria was sent by the martyr‐patriarch Cyril Lucar to continue his studies at  Oxford. Three years later  Nicodemus Metaxas of Cephalonia established the  first  Greek  printing  press  in  England.  This  he  later  took  to  Constantinople,  where it was immediately destroyed by the Turks.    In  the  year  1653  we  find  Isaac  Basire,  a  religious  exile,  trying  to  establish  good  feeling  among  the  Greeks  toward  the  suffering  Church  of  England,  delighting  in  spreading  among  the  Greeks  at  Zante  information  concerning the Catholic doctrine of our Church. In the same year we find him  writing:  ʺAt  Jerusalem  I  received  much  honor,  both  from  the  Greeks  and  Latins.  The  Greek  Patriarch  (the  better  to  express  his  desire  of  communion  with our old Church of England by mee declared unto him) gave mee his bull  or patriarchal seal in a blanke (which is their way of credence) besides many  [2/3] other respects. As for the Latins they received mee most courteously into  their own convent, though I did openly profess myself a priest of the Church  of  England. After  some velitations about the  validity of our  ordination,  they  procured  mee  entrance  into  the  Temple  of  the  Sepulchre,  at  the  rate  of  a  priest,  that  is,  that  is  half  in  half  less  than  the  lay‐menʹs  rate;  and  at  my  departure  from  Jerusalem  the  popeʹs  own  vicar  (called  Commissarius  Apostolicus  Generalis)  gave  me  his  diploma  in  parchment  under  his  own  hand and publick seal, in it stiling mee Sacerdotum Ecclasiae Anglicanae and  S.S.  Theologiae  Doctorem;  at  which  title  many  marvelled,  especilly  the  Freench Ambassador here (Pera). . . Meanwhile, as I have not been unmindful  of  our  Church,  with  the  true  patriarch  here,  whose  usurper  noe  for  a  while  doth  interpose,  so  will  I  not  be  wanting  to  to  embrace  all  opportunities  of  propagating the doctrine and repute thereof, stylo veteri; Especilly if I should  about it receive commands or instructions from the King (Charles II) (whom  God  save)  only  in  ordine  as  Ecclesiastica  do  I  speak  this;  as  for  instance,  proposall of communion with the Greek Church (salva conscientia et honore)  a  church  very  considerable  in  all  those  parts.  And  to  such  a  communion,  together with a convenient reformation of some grosser errours, it hath been  my constant design to dispose and incline them.ʺ    In  1670,  the  chaplain  of  the  English  Embassy  at  Constantinople  at  the  request  of  Drs.  Pearson,  Sancroft  and  Gunning,  made  special  inquiry  concerning  the  alleged  teaching  of  the  doctrine  of  transubstantiation  by  the  Greeks  and  recorded  his  impressions  in  a  publication  called  Some  Account  of  the Present Greek Churches, published in 1722. His successor, Edward Browne,  made a number of official reports concerning the affairs of the Greek Church.  In 1669 occurred the noted semi‐official visit of Papas Jeremias Germanus to  Oxford. A more important visit was undertaken [3/4] by Joseph Georgirenes,  Metropolitan  of  Samos,  who  solicited  funds  for  the  building  of  a  Greek  church,  which  was  erected  in  the  Soho  quarter  of  London  in  1677.  Over  the  door  there  was  an  inscription  recording  its  setting  up  in  the  reign  of  King  Charles  the  Second,  while  Dr.  Henry  Compton  was  Bishop  of  London.  The  cost  was  borne  by  the  king,  the  Duke  of  York,  the  Bishop  of  London,  and  other bishops  and nobles.  The  Greeks do not  seem to  have kept  it long;  and  after some changes of ownership it was consecrated for Anglican worship in  the  middle  of  the  nineteenth  century  under  the  title  and  in  honor  of  Saint  Mary the Virgin. It was taken down as unsafe at the end of that century and a  new building was set up on the site. The Bishop of London, who seemed to be  a  special patron of  the  Greeks at  this time, undertook  the establishment of  a  Greek  College  for  Greek  students,  who  probably  came  from  Smyrna.  An  unsigned letter to Archbishop Sancroft seems to indicate that in 1680 twelve  Greek students were sent to Oxford. In addition to the Bishop of London, the  chief promoter of this movement was Dr. Woodroof, Canon of Christ Church,  who  succeeded  in  getting  Gloucester  Hall,  now  Worcester  College,  assigned  to  the  Greeks.  There  exists  in  the  Archbishopʹs  library  at  Lambeth  a  printed  paper describing the ʺModel of a College to be settled in the university for the  education  of  some  youths  of  the  Greek  Church.ʺ  These  twelve  students  seemed  to  have  been  but  temporary  residents,  however,  because  no  official  account is given of the permanent residence of Greek students until the year  1698.    It  is  significant  to  find  that  in  the  year  1698,  in  the  copy  of  the  Alterations  in  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer,  prepared  by  the  World  Commissioners  for  the  revision  of  the  liturgy,  who  were  by  no  means  sympathetic with the Greeks, an expression of desire that some explanation of  the addition of [4/5] the Filioque, a clause in the Creed, should be given, with  the  view  to  ʺmaintaining  Catholic  Communionʺ  as  suggested  by  Dr:  Henry  Compton.        RELATIONS IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY    About  1700,  Archbishop  Philippopolis  was  granted  honorary  degrees  in  both  Oxford  and  Cambridge  and  was  accorded  general  courtesies.  These  free relationships had an abrupt termination when, in a letter dated March 2,  1705,  the  registrar  of  the  Church  of  Constantinople  wrote  as  follows  to  Mr.  Stephens:  ʺThe  irregular  life  of  certain  priests  and  laymen  of  the  Eastern  Church,  living  in  London,  is  a  matter  of  great  concern  to  the  Church.  Wherefore the Church forbids any to go and study at Oxford be they ever so  willing.ʺ    In  1706,  we  find  the  Archbishop  of  Gotchan  in  Armenia,  receiving  liberal  contributions  from  Queen  Anne  and  the  Archbishops  of  Canterbury  and  York  toward  the  establishment  of  a  printing  press  for  his  people.  Soon  afterward  considerable  correspondence  was  established  between  the  dissenting  Nonjurors  and  the  Patriarchs  of  the  East.  The  Archbishop  of  Canterbury, Dr. Wake wrote to the Patriarch of Jerusalem explaining that the  Nonjurors  were  separatists  from  the  Church  of  England.  The  Archbiship  significantly ends his letter: ʺita ut in orationibus atque sacrificiis tuis ad sacra Dei  altaria mei reminiscaris impensissime rogo.ʺ    In 1735, we find the Society for the Promoting of Christian Knowledge  recording  a  gift  of  books  as  a  present  to  the  Patriarch  Alexander  of  Constantinople.  In  1772,  the  Reverend  Dr.  King,  chaplain  to  the  British  Factory  at  St.  Petersburg,  after  explaining  the  necessity  of  the  elaborate  worship  of  the  Greek  Church,  in  a  report,  dedicated  by  permission  to  King  George  III  says:  ʺThe  Greek  Church  as  it  is  at  present  established  in  Russia,  may  be  considered  in  respect  of  [5/6]  its  service  as  a  model  of  the  highest  antiquity now extant.ʺ About the same time we find the Latitudinarian Bishop  of  Llandaff,  Dr.  Watson,  advising  a  young  woman  that  she  should  have  no  scruples in marrying a Russian, ʺon the subject of religion.ʺ We find early in  the  nineteenth  century,  Dr.  Waddingham,  afterward  Dean  of  Durham,  publishing a sympathetic account of The Present Condition and Prospects of the  Greek Oriental Church.    RELATIONS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY    Intimate  relations  were  again  resumed  at  the  time  of  the  Greek  insurrection  in  1821,  when  many  Greeks  fled  to  England  to  escape  the  vengeance  of  the  Turks.  The  flourishing  churches  in  London,  Lancaster  and  Liverpool date from this period.    The actual resumption of intercourse between the two Churches dates  from 1829 when the American Church was first brought into contact with the  Church in the East through the mission of Drs. Robertson and Hill. This was  purely  an  expression  of  a  disinterested  desire  on  the  part  of  the  American  Church to assist the people of Greece in their effort to recover the educational  advantages which had been suppressed by the Turk. The educational work of  Dr. Hill at Athens became famous throughout the East. Dr. Hill continued as  the head of the school for over fifty years. The next approach by the American  Church  was  made  by  the  Reverend  Horatio  Southgate,  who  was  sent  from  this country to investigate the missionary opportunities in Turkey and Persia.  In  order  to  avoid  any  suspicions  concerning  the  motive  of  the  American  Church, he again returned in 1840 to assure their ecclesiastical authorities that  ʺthe  American  bishops  wished  most  scrupulously  to  avoid  all  effusive  intrusion within the jurisdiction of their Episcopal brethren their great desire  being  to  commend  and  promote  a  friendly  intercourse  between  the  two  branches  of  the  Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church  in  the  [6/7]  hope  of  mutual  advantage.ʺ He returned again in 1844 and although he met with considerable  success  in  his  efforts  to  establish  a  work  for  the  Church  he  found  that  the  Church  at  home  was  not  prepared  for  such  an  undertaking  and  after  a  few  years returned to America.    ʺIn the General Convention of 1862, a joint committee was appointed to  consider  the  expediency  of  opening  communication  with  the  Russo‐Greek  Church, and to collect authentic information bearing upon the subject. And, in  July,  1863,  a  corresponding  committee  was  appointed  in  the  lower  house  of  the  Convocation  of  Canterbury.  Between  1862  and  1867,  a  number  of  important  pamphlets  were  issued  by  the  Russo‐Greek  committee,  under  the  able editorship of the Reverend Dr. Young, its secretary. After Dr. Young was  made Bishop of Florida, the Reverend Charles R. Hale, afterwards Bishop of  Cairo,  was  appointed  to  succeed  him  as  secretary  of  the  Russo‐Greek  committee,  and  wrote  the  reports  presented  to  the  General  Convention  of  1871  and  1874.  When  the  Joint  Commission  on  Ecclesiastical  Relations  replaced  with  larger  powers  the  Russo‐Greek  Committee,  he  was  in  1877  made  secretary  of  the  commissions,  and  wrote  the  reports  up  to  the  year  1895.ʺ  The  reports  of  this  committee  and  the  pamphlets  issued  between  the  years 1862 and 1867 are extremely valuable, showing the care exercised by the  Church in those days, in trying to meet a problem that was just beginning to  present itself.    While negotiations of the American Committee were in process in 1867  an  interesting  interview  was  held  by  Archbishop  Alexander  Lycurgus  of  Cyclades, and a number of bishops and clergy of the Church of England. The  Archbishop  went  to  England  in  order  to  dedicate  the  orthodox  church  at 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism3eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Comparison of Major Denominations 59%

Conversion of John and Charles Wesley, already devout Anglican ministers, sparks Great Awakening.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/05/28/comparison-of-major-denominations/

28/05/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

PM4 MfE MUC EN 160624 58%

Established in 1999, it brings together Evangelical, Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox Christians, as well as members of the Free Churches and new congregations.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/26/pm4-mfe-muc-en-160624/

26/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

PM4 MfE MUC FR 160624 58%

24 juin 2016 Après le Brexit :

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/26/pm4-mfe-muc-fr-160624/

26/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

good quality roman catholic chasuble1078 57%

good quality roman catholic chasuble The usage of complete vestments is noted mostly with the anglican, lutheran as well as the roman catholic.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/01/12/good-quality-roman-catholic-chasuble1078/

12/01/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Paul Chehade - Summaries of World Religions. 56%

The Church of England has 6,000 Anglican Orthodox Church members in the U.S.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/01/21/paul-chehade-summaries-of-world-religions/

21/01/2016 www.pdf-archive.com