Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 16 April at 08:47 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «baptism»:


Total: 130 results - 0.121 seconds

HolyFathersReBaptismEng 100%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos Regarding Re‐Baptism  Differs From the Canons of the Ecumenical Councils      In  the  last  few  years,  Bp.  Kirykos  has  begun  receiving  New  Calendarists and even Florinites and ROCOR faithful under his omophorion  by  re‐baptism,  even  if  these  faithful  received  the  correct  form  of  baptism  by  triple  immersion  completely  under  water  with  the  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  He  also  has  begun  re‐ordaining  such  clergy  from  scratch  instead  of  reading  a  cheirothesia.  But  this  strict  approach,  where  he  applies  akriveia  exclusively for these people, is different from the historical approach taken by  the Holy Fathers of the Ecumenical Councils.       Canon  7  of  the  Second  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  Arians,  Macedonians,  Sabbatians,  Novatians,  Cathars,  Aristeri,  Quartodecimens  and  Apollinarians are to be received only by a written libellus and re‐chrismation,  because  their  baptism  was  already  valid  in  form  and  did  not  require  repetition. The Canon reads as follows:      “As for those heretics who betake themselves to Orthodoxy, and to the  lot of the saved, we accept them in accordance with the subjoined sequence and  custom; viz.: Arians, and Macedonians, and Sabbatians, and Novatians, those  calling themselves  Cathari,  and  Aristeri,  and the  Quartodecimans,  otherwise  known as Tetradites, and Apollinarians, we accept when they offer libelli (i.e.,  recantations in writing) and anathematize every heresy that does not hold the  same beliefs  as the catholic and  apostolic  Church of  God,  and are  sealed first  with holy chrism on their forehead and their eyes, and nose, and mouth, and  ears; and in sealing them we say: “A seal of a free gift of Holy Spirit”…”      The same Canon only requires a re‐baptism of individuals who did not  receive the correct form of baptism originally (i.e. those who were sprinkled  or who were baptized by single immersion instead of triple immersion, etc).  The Canon reads as follows:      “As  for  Eunomians,  however,  who  are  baptized  with  a  single  immersion,  and  Montanists,  who  are  here  called  Phrygians,  and  the  Sabellians,  who  teach  that  Father  and  Son  are  the  same  person,  and  who  do  some  other bad  things, and  (those belonging  to)  any  other heresies (for  there  are  many  heretics  here,  especially  such  as  come  from  the  country  of  the  Galatians:    all  of  them  that  want  to  adhere  to  Orthodoxy  we  are  willing  to  accept as Greeks. Accordingly, on the first day we make them Christians; on  the second day, catechumens; then, on the third day, we exorcize them with the  act  of  blowing  thrice  into  their  face  and  into  their  ears;  and  thus  do  we  catechize them, and we make them tarry a while in the church and listen to the  Scriptures; and then we baptize them.”      Thus  it  is  wrong  to  re‐baptize  those  who  have  already  received  the  correct form by triple immersion. The Holy Fathers advise in this Holy Canon  that  only  those  who  did  not  receive  the  correct  form  are  to  be  re‐baptized.  Now then, if the Holy Second Ecumenical Council declares that such heretics  as  Arians,  Macedonians,  Quartodecimens,  Apollinarians,  etc,  are  to  be  received  only  by  libellus  and  chrismation,  how  on  earth  does  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  refusal  to  receive  Florinites  and  ROCOR  faithful  by  chrismation,  but instead insists upon their rebaptism as if they are worse than Arians?      The  95th  Canon  of  the  Quinisext  (Fifth‐and‐Sixth)  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  those  baptized  by  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  are  to  be  received  into  the  Orthodox  Church  by  a  simple  libellus  and  anathematization of the heresies, without needing to be re‐baptized, and even  without needing to be re‐chrismated! The Canon reads:      As  for  Nestorians,  and  Eutychians  (Monophysites),  and  Severians  (Monothelites),  and  those  from  similar  heresies,  they  have  to  give  us  certificates (called  libelli)  and  anathematize  their  heresy,  the  Nestorians,  and  Nestorius, and Eutyches and Dioscorus, and Severus, and the other exarchs of  such heresies, and those who entertain their beliefs, and all the aforementioned  heresies, and thus they are allowed to partake of holy Communion.      Now  then,  if  the  Quinisext  Ecumenical  Council  allows  even  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  to  be  received  by  mere  libellus,  without requiring to be baptized or even chrismated, and following this mere  libellus  they  are  immediately  free  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  how  is  Bp.  Kirykos’s  approach  patristic,  if  he  requires  the  re‐baptism  of  even  Florinites  and ROCOR faithful?!!! Is Bp. Kirykos not trying to outdo the Holy Fathers in  his  attempt  to  be  “super‐Orthodox”?  Can  such  an  approach  taken  by  Bp.  Kirykos be  considered Orthodox  if the  Holy Fathers in their  Canons request  otherwise? Are the Canons of Ecumenical Councils invalid for Bp. Kirykos?      Certainly  the  Latins  (Franks,  Papists)  are  unbaptised,  because  their  baptisms  consist  of  mere  sprinklings  instead  of  triple  immersion.  Likewise,  various  New  Calendarists  are  also  unbaptised  if  they  were  not  dunked  completely  under  the  water  three  times.  But  can  such  be  said  for  those  Orthodox  Christians,  and  even  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians  (be  they  Florinite, ROCOR or otherwise), who do have the correct form of baptism?      In the Patriarchal Oros of 1755 regarding the re‐baptism of Latins, the  Orthodox Patriarchs make it quite clear that their reason for requiring the re‐ baptism  of  Latins  is  because  the  Latins  do  not  have  the  correct  form  of  baptism, but rather sprinkle instead of immersing. The text of the Patriarchal  Oros  actually  refers  to  the  Canons  of  the  Second  and  Quinisext  Councils  as  their  reasons  for  re‐baptizing  the  Latins.  The  relevant  text  of  the  Patriarchal  Oros of 1755 is as follows:    “...And we follow the Second and Quinisext holy Ecumenical Councils,  which  order  us  to  receive  as  unbaptized  those  aspirants  to  Orthodoxy  who  were  not  baptized  with  three  immersions  and  emersions,  and  in  each  immersion  did  not  loudly  invoke  one  of  the  divine  hypostases,  but  were  baptized in some other fashion...”    Thus we see in the above Patriarchal Oros of 1755, that even as late as  this  year,  the  Orthodox  Church  was  carrying  out  the  very  principles  of  the  Second and Quinisext Ecumenical Councils, namely that it is only those who  were  baptized  by  some  obscure  form  other  than  triple  immersion  and  invocation of the Holy Trinity, that were required to be re‐baptized.    How  then  can  the  positions  of  the  Holy  Ecumenical Councils  and  the  Holy  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  be  compared  to  the  extremist  methods  of  Bp.  Kirykos and his fellow hierarchs of late? Is Bp. Kirykos’ current practice really  Orthodox? Is it possible to preach contrary to the teachings of the Ecumenical  and Pan‐Orthodox Councils and yet remain Orthodox? And as for those who  believe that there is nothing wrong with being strict, let them remember that  the Pharisees were also strict, but it was they who crucified the Lord of Glory!  The Orthodox Faith is a Royal Path. Just as it is possible to fall to the left (as  the New Calendarists and Ecumenists have done), it is also quite possible to  fall  to  the  right  and spin off on  a wrong  turn far  away from  the tradition of  the  Holy  Fathers.  It  is  this  latter  type  of  fall  that  has  occurred  with  Bp.  Kirykos.  In  fact,  even  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  quite  moderate  compared  to  Bp.  Kirykos.  For  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  knew  the  Canons  quite well, and required New Calendarists to be received only by chrismation,  or in some cases by only a libellus or Confession of Faith.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/holyfathersrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii04 99%

THE TEACHING OF BLESSED MATTHEW OF BRESTHENA  REGARDING FREQUENT RECEPTION OF COMMUNION  Written in 1933 by Archimandrite Matthew [Carpathaces] of Great Laura,  the future Bishop of Bresthena (1937‐1949), and Metropolitan of Athens  (1949‐1950), of the Genuine Orthodox Church of Greece (+14 May, 1950).  Is it possible, you ask me, to receive Communion? Why, don’t we have  to become saints in order to be worthy, as Blessed Chrysostom calls out in his  liturgy,  “The  Holies  for  the  holy?”  And  who  can  become  a  saint?  You’re  not  able?  Then,  are  the  Holy  Scriptures  false?  “And  ye  shall  be  holy  men  unto  me  (Exodus 22:31);” “I said ye are gods (Psalms 81:6).” This is what God says about  us.  So,  who  is  able?  As  many  as  desire  this,  cleanse  yourselves  from  every  bodily and spiritual sin, and you will immediately become saints. I do not tell  you this myself, God says it through the Apostle. “So clean yourselves, brethren,  from  all  filthiness  of  the  flesh  and  spirit,  perfecting  holiness  in  the  fear  of  God  (2  Corinthians 7:1).” But is it difficult? I do not deny it. But it is probably not as  difficult as you think. Consider this…    An  infant  or  even  a  very  sinful  old  man,  upon  leaving  the  baptismal  font, is he not worthy to commune of the Holy Mysteries? Yes, and who can  doubt this? Baptism is a divine bath, it is a purification of sins, it is a spiritual  rebirth. In the baptismal font we bury the old person of sin, and we put on the  new man, Jesus Christ. “For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have  put on Christ (Galatians 3:27),” says he who ascended to the third heaven. So,  what if it was possible to multiply the Mystery of Holy Baptism? What I am  trying to say is, if it was possible for us to be baptized every time we wished,  then you would no longer have any doubt that we worthily commune of the  Mystery  of  the  Frightful  Eucharist.  So  if  I  prove  to  you  that  every  time  you  wish, it is  possible to  enter  the  baptismal font and  to  get baptized, then  you  would no longer be able to leave [i.e., shun the Mystery of Holy Communion].  You must conclude then, that it is possible to become worthy of the Mystery  of Holy Communion.     And  is  not  Repentance,  my  brethren,  a  second  baptismal  font,  into  which  it  is  possible  to  enter  every  time  we  wish  and  as  many  times  as  we  wish, and nobody can prevent us? Is not Repentance a font equivalent to the  font  of  Holy  Baptism?  “Tears  dropped  are  equivalent  to  the  font.”  Yes,  the  tear,  whenever it drops from our eyes for our sins, has the power of Holy Baptism.  “And  toilsome lamentation brings back the  grace  which departed for some time.” A  lamentation  from  the  heart  ascends  to  heaven,  and  brings  down  that  grace,  which we have lost because of the multitude of our sins. It is not my opinion,  but that of Gregory of Nyssa and the moral teachers of the Church. See now,  upon what that which seemed impossible and most difficult to you depends?  Upon  one  tear,  one  lamentation!  “Tears  dropped  are  equivalent  to  the  font,  and  toilsome lamentation brings back the grace which departed for some time.” (Gregory  of Nyssa, Words Concerning Repentance).    What is this? I knew it! In the midst you bring to me the canons of St.  Basil, the revealer of heavenly things, to St. Amphilochius, in order to oppose  me.  And  you  tell  me,  “Does  not  St.  Basil,  the  revealer  of  heavenly  things,  define  in  his  canons  that  for  those  who  steal  to  not  receive  Communion  for  two  years;  for  those  who  murder,  twenty;  for  those  who  commit  adultery,  fifteen years; and so forth? For nearly all sins he appoints many years for us to  abstain from Communion.”     And what is concluded from this? Is it concluded that it is not possible  for  us  to  become  worthy  to  receive  Communion?  Or  rather  that  Repentance  does  not  have  the  same  power  that  Baptism  has?  Both  conclusions  are  erroneous. They are erroneous because from these same canons of St. Basil, it  is  concluded  that  it  is  possible  for  us  to  become  worthy  to  receive  Communion,  since  he  himself  appoints  that  after  so  many  years,  depending  upon the sin, we may receive Communion. So the revealer of heavenly things  himself says that it is possible for us to become worthy.     Basil  also  believed  that  Repentance  is  equivalent  to  Baptism  and  that  there  is  no  other  difference  between  Baptism  and  Repentance,  except  that  Repentance only blots out the voluntary sins, while Baptism also blots out the  ancestral  sin.  But  because  he  was  most  exact  and  perfect  in  everything,  he  desired a sure and true Repentance. And because he knew how easy it is for  man  to  fall  into  evil,  especially  after  he  has  fallen  once,  for  this  reason  he  appointed the years so that everybody be informed, and for us ourselves to be  informed, that our Repentance is sure and true.     So whenever Repentance is perfect and true, what then remains? Then  everything remains to the judgment of the corrector of our souls and spiritual  father, as St. Basil himself, the revealer of heavenly things, clearly appoints in  his  second  canon,  and  informs  us,  how  he  agrees  with  all  the  other  fathers:  “To  also  define  the  therapy  of  Repentance  not  based  on  time  but  on  manner.”  And  behold how Repentance is equivalent to Baptism even according to St. Basil, if  you interpret his opinion correctly. And behold how you no longer have any  reply to a truth so evident.      Tell me, my Christians, after Pascha, which will be in a few days, what  will you do? Do you celebrate Pascha? What a ridiculous question! Yet, this is  what I ask you. Do you celebrate Pascha as all Christians have the obligation  to  do?  Do  we  celebrate  Pascha?  Indeed,  all  of  us  with  such  eagerness  await  Pascha.  The  Lord  grant!  [i.e.,  God  willing!]  But  I  am  afraid  that  few  of  us  celebrate Pascha. Pascha, O Christians, is not that which is commonly called  pascha, to wit, the partaking of meat and the rest of the foods. That is called  eating; that is called nourishment. Pascha, however, is the Communion of the  Mysteries! This is Pascha, as God told Moses, “and ye shall eat it in haste: it is  the Lord’s Pascha (Exodus 12:11).” Know therefore, all of you who do not wish  to  commune  of  this  mystical  Pascha,  that  you  will  not  have  any  reply;  you  will not be able to find any excuse when you appear before the judgment of  the fearful God.   —“And  why  did  you  not  condescend,”  the  God‐man  will  tell  you  then,  “when  I  was  crying  out  to  you  to  come  eat  my  bread,  and  drink  my  wine,  which I have treated to you? Why such contempt for me, when I have showed  you so much love? You see this Cross? You see these wounds? Out of love for  you I endured them.”   —“Lord we were not worthy.” Is this what you have to respond to Him?   —“And  you  do  not  know  how  to  cleanse  yourselves  with  Repentance,  to  wash yourselves with tears, to bathe yourselves with Confession?”   —“But it was difficult for us to stop sinning.”   —“So you preferred your passions and your sins above me? Therefore, since  you  desired  to  be  separated  from  me  while  you  were  living  on  earth,  separated  from  my  word  you  must  also  be  in  heaven.  Is  this  really  so,  O  wretched  and  unfortunate  ones,  as  many  of  you  as  are  wounded  by  your  passions, and full of your uncleanness and sins?”     O my Lord, I am the first [among sinners], and what will become of me  then during so many frightful censures? And what will become of all of you  who are similar to me? It would have been better if we were never born.   —“Such contempt for my blood? Such contempt for my body?” the Judge will  cry, “Are your hands filthy and have you sacrificed me and cut me to pieces,  and touched me, as did the Jews? Are your lips foul and have you kissed me,  as did Judas? Is your heart dirty and have you partaken of me? Is your soul  sinful, and have you been insolent?”    And what will I say, what will I reply, when, after the censures, Hades  immediately swallows me up?     My Christian brethren, please listen to me carefully. We cannot remain  without  Holy  Communion:  “If  we  do  not  eat  of  the  body  of  the  Son  of  Man  and  drink  His  blood,  we  have  no  life  in  us.”  And  we  cannot  receive  Communion  unworthily:  “For  he  that  eateth  and  drinketh  unworthily,  eateth  and  drinketh  damnation to himself.” If we do not receive Communion: despair. If we receive  Communion  unworthily:  hell.  Therefore,  we  must  receive  Communion  worthily (which, as I have shown you, is possible) in order to inherit eternal  life  in  Jesus  Christ  our  Lord,  to  whom  be  glory  and  power  unto  the  ages  of  ages. Amen.    Thus  in  the  above  homily  by  Blessed  Matthew  Carpathaces,  we  see  that  the  worthiness  of  a  communicant  is  obtained  by  the  Mystery  of  Repentance,  which  is  equal  to  Baptism,  and  is  sealed  by  receiving  Holy  Communion itself.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii04/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

RomaniansReBaptismEng 98%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos’ Romanian Counterparts  Regarding Re‐Baptism is Extremely Hypocritical    The  Romanians  who  are  in  communion  with  Bp.  Kirykos  require  all  New  Calendarists,  Florinites,  Glicherians,  ROCOR  faithful,  etc,  to  be  re‐ baptized,  even  if  their  baptism  was  performed  in  the  canonical  manner,  by  triple  immersion  and  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  They  have  even  begun  re‐baptizing  people  who  had  already  been  received  into  the  Matthewite  Church  by  chrismation.  Thus,  in  Cyprus,  several  laymen  who  had  been  received  even  decades  ago  by  chrismation,  are  now  being  rebaptized  by  the  Romanian bishop Parthenios! So then, one might ask, all of these years were  they communing or not? If they were communing as members of the Church,  then how is it that they are now being regarded as foreign to the Church and  in need of baptism? This isn’t Orthodox ecclesiology, it is blasphemy against  the Holy Spirit, a crime that the Lord has declared to be unforgivable.    But  this  very  act  of  rebaptizing  by  the  Romanians  is  extremely  hypocritical considering their own origins. The truth is that according to their  own  principles,  they  themselves  are  very  much  in  need  of  being rebaptized.  This is because the Romanian bishops derive their Apostolic Succession from  Bishop  Victor  Leu,  who  was  consecrated  in  1949  by  three  bishops  of  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church  Abroad.  The  main  consecrating  hierarch  who  actually  passed  the  Apostolic  Succession  (for  the  other  two  were  mere  witnesses, as is the case), was Metropolitan Seraphim (Lyade) of Berlin.     Metropolitan Seraphim was actually born into a Protestant family and  was “baptized” by sprinkling in the Lutheran Church. When he was received  into  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church,  he  was  received  by  mere  chrismation,  despite not  having the  correct form  of  baptism. He was  then  elevated to  the  deaconate and priesthood within the Russian Orthodox Church. However, on  1st  of  September, 1923, he was  “consecrated”  as  a “bishop”  by  Renovationist  hierarchs who had been anathematized a year earlier by Patriarch St. Tikhon.  In  1929,  the  Renovationist  “bishop”  Seraphim  Lade  was  received  into  communion  by  the  Russian  Orthodox  Church  Abroad,  but  he  was  not  reordained nor was a cheirothesia read on him, but he was received by mere  repentance.  Thus,  according  to  the  strict  point  of  view,  Metropolitan  Seraphim  Lyade  was  both  un‐baptized  and  un‐consecrated!  Yet  this  Metropolitan  Seraphim  is  the  very  source  of  priesthood  of  the  Romanian  hierarchs. Thus, if they have their origins from a bishop who was un‐baptized  and  un‐consecrated,  how  is  their  baptism  and  priesthood  valid?  If  the  Romanian hierarchs are so strict that they reject economia, should they not be  the first to re‐enter the baptismal font before they dare to re‐baptize others? 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/romaniansrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18930615 96%

BAPTISM AND ITS IMPORT That our Lord and his apostles practiced and enjoined upon all followers— “ even to the end of the world,” or present dispensation, an outward rite called baptism, in which water was used in some manner, cannot reasonably be questioned.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18930615/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

1881 August Thürmer 96%

Day of baptism, where it happened and who she performed.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/19/1881-august-th-rmer/

18/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

JOURNEY TO SPIRITUAL PROMISED LAND 96%

Jesus’ journey began with baptism in water, followed by receiving the Holy Spirit;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/01/journey-to-spiritual-promised-land/

01/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

THE PATH TO RESURRECTION 95%

Jesus’ journey began with baptism in water, followed by receiving the Holy Spirit;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/03/the-path-to-resurrection/

03/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 93%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Paul Chehade - Summaries of World Religions. 92%

Baptism-cleansing a soul of the legacy of Adam and Eve's Original Sin;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/06/paul-chehade-summaries-of-world-religions/

06/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

EARTHLY MAN SPIRITUAL MAN 92%

In the early Church, being born of water was clearly understood to imply water baptism.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/07/earthly-man-spiritual-man/

07/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

MatthewBresthenaReBaptismEng 88%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos Regarding Re‐Baptism  Differs From the Position of Bp. Matthew of Bresthena    When  Bp.  Kirykos  receives  New  Calendarists,  Florinites,  ROCOR  faithful,  etc,  under  his  omophorion,  he  insists  on  rebaptising  them  even  if  they  had  already  been  baptized  in  the  correct  form  of  triple  immersion  and  invocation of the Holy Trinity. He insists on doing this due to his belief that  he  is  the  only  valid  bishop  left  on  earth  and  that  anyone  baptized  out  of  communion  with  him,  even  if  baptized  in  the  correct  form,  is  in  need  of  re‐ baptism by his hands. But was this the position of Bp. Matthew of Bresthena?    In  1937,  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  issued  an  Encyclical  in  which  he  declared the following:    “…We  knock  against  the  slander  that  supposedly  we  re‐baptize  or  request the repetition of the service of marriage. We request only, according to  our  sacred  obligation,  as  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians,  to  follow  the  Sacred  Ecclesiastical  Tradition,  and  according  to  which,  we  must  guide  the  faithful  towards  salvific  pastures,  and  thus  to  those  approaching  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church,  those  who  are  of  age  we  receive  by  libellus,  as  for  the  children which were baptized by Schismatics, we re‐chrismate them according  to the 1st Canon of St. Basil the Great.”    So  there  you  have  it.  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena  adhered  to  the  correct practice of the Second and Quinisext Ecumenical Councils, and of St.  Basil the Great, whereby he received New Calendarist converts to his Synod  only  by  chrismation,  and  sometimes  only  by  mere  libellus,  because  the  converts had already received the correct form of baptism. This clearly correct  method  is  that  practiced  today  by  the  Kiousis  Synod,  Makarios  Synod,  Nicholas  Synod,  Gregorians,  Maximites,  HOCNA,  Tikhonites,  Valentinites,  ROCIE, etc. Almost every Old Calendarist Synod adheres to the Patristic use  of  receiving  Orthodox  converts  by  chrismation.  Thus  all  of  these  Synods  prove by their methods to be truly “Matthewite,” since they adhere to Bishop  Matthew’s  practice.  Only  Bp.  Kirykos  has  fallen  from  this  principle  and  has  ignored the Patristic Matthewite approach, by beginning to “re‐baptize” those  who are already baptized in the canonical form of triple immersion! 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/matthewbresthenarebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Newsletter- Ethiopia 2013 86%

Our team also saw new people could be felt throughout the believers receive baptism as a mark of their relationship with Jesus Christ.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/07/25/newsletter-ethiopia-2013-1/

25/07/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18800900 83%

3 IMPORTANCE OF BAPTISM [Ree revision of this article in issue of December, 1881.] Before considering what constitutes Scriptural baptism, let of his body, obeying no will but that of "the head,"

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18800900/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

SONS OF GOD 82%

By the time he was around thirty years old, the Holy Spirit (the tree of life) came upon Him and into him a holy spirit, during his baptism in water that was administered by John the Baptist.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/31/sons-of-god/

31/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

011115 80%

January 11, 2015-The Baptism of the Lord Host:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/01/011115/

01/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

REPENT AND RECEIVE THE KNIGDOM OF GOD 80%

Shortly after the baptism, God breathed His Holy Spirit into Jesus and declared him to be His Son.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/06/25/repent-and-receive-the-knigdom-of-god/

25/06/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18810300 79%

baptism, after tchich h e should ponr out h i s '<on !

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18810300/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Jan28 79%

BAPTISM CERTIFICATES BENEDICTION Galatians 6:9 Hymn:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/24/jan28/

24/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii01 77%

CAN FASTING MAKE ONE “WORTHY” TO COMMUNE?    In the first paragraph of his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes:  “...  according  to  the  tradition  of  our  Fathers  (and  that  of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  must  be  suitably prepared, in order to worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord. This  preparation indispensably includes fasting according to one’s strength.” To further  prove that he interprets this worthiness as being based on fasting, Metropolitan  Kirykos  continues  further  down  in  reference  to  his  unhistorical  understanding  about the  early  Christians:  “They fasted  in the fine and  broader  sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    Here Bp. Kirykos tries to fool the reader by stating the absolutely false  notion  that  the  Holy  Fathers  (among  them  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena)  supposedly agree with his unorthodox views. The truth is that not one single  Holy Father of the Orthodox Church agrees with Bp. Kirykosʹs views, but in  fact, many of them condemn these views as heretical. And as for referring to  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  this  is  extremely  misleading,  which  is  why  Bp.  Kirykos  was  unable  to  provide  a  quote.  In  reality,  St.  Matthew’s  five‐page‐ long treatise on Holy Communion, published in 1933, repeatedly stresses the  importance  of  receiving  Holy  Communion  frequently  and  does  not  mention  any  such  pre‐communion  fast  at  all.  He  only  mentions  that  one  must  go  to  confession,  and  that  confession  is  like  a  second  baptism  which  washes  the  soul and prepares it for communion. If St. Matthew really thought a standard  week‐long  pre‐communion  fast  for  all  laymen  was  paramount,  he  certainly  would have mentioned it somewhere in his writings. But in the hundreds of  pages  of  writings  by  St.  Matthew  that  have  been  collected,  no  mention  is  made of such a fast. The reason for this is because St. Matthew was a Kollyvas  Father  just  as  was  his  mentor,  St.  Nectarius  of  Aegina.  Also,  the  fact  St.  Matthew left Athos and preached throughout Greece and Asia Minor during  his earlier life, is another example of his imitation of the Kollyvades Fathers.    As  much  as  Bp.  Kirykos  would  like  us  to  think  that  the  Holy  Fathers  preach that a Christian, simply by fasting, can somehow “worthily receive the  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,”  the  Holy  Fathers  of  the  Orthodox  Church  actually  teach  quite  clearly  that  NO  ONE  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion,  except by the grace of God Himself. Whether someone eats oil on a Saturday  or  doesnʹt  eat  oil,  cannot  be  the  deciding  point  of  a  person’s  supposed  “worthiness.”  In  fact,  even  fasting,  confession,  prayer,  and  all  other  things  donʹt  come  to  their  fulfillment  in  the  human  soul  until  one  actually  receives  Holy  Communion.  All  of  these  things  such  as  fasting,  prayers,  prostrations,  repentance,  etc,  do  indeed  help  one  quench  his  passions,  but  they  by  no  means make him “worthy.” Yes, we confess our sins to the priest. But the sins  aren’t loosened from our soul until the priest reads the prayer of pardon, and  the  sins  are  still  not  utterly  crushed  until  He  who  conquered  death  enters  inside the human soul through the Mystery of Holy Communion. That is why  Christ  said  that  His  Body  and  Blood  are  shed  “for  the  remission  of  sins.”  (Matthew 26:28).     Fasting  is  there  to  quench  our  passions  and  prevent  us  from  sinning,  confession is there so that we can recall our sins and repent of them, but it is  the  Mysteries  of  the  Church  that  operate  on  the  soul  and  grant  to  it  the  “worthiness” that the human soul can by no means attain by itself. Thus, the  Mystery  of  Pardon  loosens  the  sins,  and  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion  remits  the  sins.  For  of  the  many  Mysteries  of  the  Church,  the  seven  highest  mysteries have this very purpose, namely, to remit the sins of mankind by the  Divine  Economy.  Thus,  Baptism  washes  away  the  sins  from  the  soul,  while  Chrism  heals  anything  ailing  and  fills  all  voids.  Thus,  Absolution  washes  away the sins, while Communion heals the soul and body and fills it with the  grace of God. Thus, Unction cures the maladies of soul and body, causing the  body  and  soul  to  no  longer  be  divided  but  united  towards  a  life  in  Christ;  while Marriage (or Monasticism) confirms the plurality of persons or sense of  community that God desired when he said of old “Be fruitful and multiply”  (or in the case of Monasticism, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for  brethren  to  dwell  together  in  unity!”).  Finally,  the  Mystery  of  Priesthood  is  the  authority  given  by  Christ  for  all  of  these  Mysteries  to  be  administered.  Certainly, it is an Apostolic Tradition for mankind to be prepared by fasting  before  receiving  any  of  the  above  Mysteries,  be  it  Baptism,  Chrism,  Absolution,  Communion,  Unction,  Marriage  or  Priesthood.  But  this  act  of  fasting itself does not make anyone “worthy!”    If  someone  thinks  they  are  “worthy”  before  approaching  Holy  Communion,  then  the  Holy  Communion  would  be  of  no  positive  affect  to  them.  In  actuality,  they  will  consume  fire  and  punishment.  For  if  anyone  thinks  that  their  own  works  make  themselves  “worthy”  before  the  eyes  of  God, then surely Christ would have died in vain. Christ’s suffering, passion,  death  and  Resurrection would have  been  completely unnecessary.  As Christ  said,  “They  that  be  whole  need  not  a  physician,  but  they  that  are  sick  (Matthew 9:12).” If a person truly thinks that by not partaking of oil/wine on  Saturday,  in  order  to  commune  on  Sunday,  that  this  has  made  them  “worthy,”  then  by  merely  thinking  such  a  thing  they  have  already  proved  themselves unworthy of Holy Communion. In fact, they are deniers of Christ,  deniers  of  the  Cross  of  Christ,  and  deniers  of  their  own  salvation  in  Christ.  They  rather  believe  in  themselves  as  their  own  saviors.  They  are  thus  no  longer Christians but humanists.     But  is  humanism  a  modern  notion,  or  has  it  existed  before  in  the  history  of  the  Church?  In  reality,  the  devil  has  hurled  so  many  heresies  against  the  Church  that  he  has  run  out  of  creativity.  Thus,  the  traps  and  snares he sets are but fancy recreations of ancient heresies already condemned  by the Church. The humanist notions entertained by Bp. Kirykos are actually  an offshoot of an ancient heresy known as Pelagianism. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii01/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

ENTER THE KINGDOM OF GOD NOW 77%

the proper way to do it is by baptism in water.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/31/enter-the-kingdom-of-god-now/

31/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

THE KINGDOM OF GOD IS NEAR 75%

Being born of water is baptism in water.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/10/the-kingdom-of-god-is-near/

10/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

MANIFESTATION 75%

In Gen 2:7, the breath of life that God breathed into Adam was the same Holy Spirit that Jesus received immediately after baptism in water.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/12/22/manifestation/

22/12/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Christmas Day 2016 75%

Signing of Baptism Certificates Announcements Benediction:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/20/christmas-day-2016/

20/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 72%

It included the celebration of Christ’s birth, the adoration of the Wisemen, and all of the childhood events of Christ such as his circumcision and presentation to the temple as well as his baptism by John in the Jordan.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com