Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 04 March at 02:09 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «canons»:


Total: 200 results - 0.157 seconds

livingsynodofbishops 100%

HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons.      The  Canons  themselves  offer  three  forms  of  punishment,  namely,  deposition, excommunication and anathematization. Deposition is applied to  clergy. Excommunication is applied to laity. Anathematization can be applied  to either clergy or laity. Deposition does not remove the priestly rank, but is  simply a prohibition from the clergyman to perform priestly functions. If the  deposition  is  later  revoked,  the  clergyman  does  not  require  reordination.  In  the same way, excommunication does not remove a layman’s baptism. It only  prohibits the layman to commune. If the excommunication is later lifted, the  layman  does  not  require  rebaptism.  Anathematization  causes  the  clergyman  or layman to be cut off from the Church and assigned to the devil. But even  anathematizations can be revoked if the clergyman or layman repents.     There Is a Hierarchy of Authority in Canon Law      The authority of one Canon over another  is determined by the  power  of the Council the Canons were ratified by. For example, a canon ratified by  an  Ecumenical  Council  overruled  any  canon  ratified  by  a  local  Council.  The  hierarchy of authority, from most binding Canons to least, is as follows:      Apostolic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  compiled  by  the  Holy  Apostles  and  their  immediate  successors.  These  Canons  were  approved  and  confirmed by the First Ecumenical Council and again by the Quinisext Council.  Not  even  an  Ecumenical  Council  can  overrule  or  overthrow  an  Apostolic  Canon.  There  are  only  very  few  cases  where  Ecumenical  Councils  have  amended  the  command  of  an  Apostolic  Canon  by  either  strengthening  or  weakening  it.  But  by  no  means  were  any  Apostolic  Canons  overruled  or  abolished.  For  instance,  the  1st  Apostolic  Canon  which  states  that  a  bishop  must  be  ordained  by  two  or  three  other  bishops.  Several  Canons  of  the  Ecumenical Councils declare that even two bishops do not suffice, but that a  bishop must be ordained by the consent of all the bishops in the province, and  the ordination itself must take place by no less than three bishops. This does  not abolish nor does it overrule the 1st Apostolic Canon, but rather it confirms  and  reinforces  the  “spirit  of  the  law”  behind  that  original  Canon.  Another  example is the 5th Apostolic Canon which states that Bishops, Presbyters and  Deacons are not permitted to put away their wives by force, on the pretext of  reverence.  Meanwhile,  the  12th  Canon  of  Quinisext  advises  a  bishop  (or  presbyters who has been elected as a bishop) to first receive his wife’s consent  to separate and for both of them to become celibate. This does not oppose the  Apostolic  Canon  because  it  is  not  a  separation  by  force  but  by  consent.  The  13th  Canon  of  Quinisext  confirms  the  5th  Apostolic  Canon  by  prohibiting  a  presbyters or deacons to separate from his wife. Thus the 5th Apostolic Canon  is not abolished, but amended by an Ecumenical Council for the good of the  Church.  After  all,  the  laws  exist  to  serve  the  Church  and  not  to  enslave  the  Church. In the same way, Christ declared: “The sabbath was made for man, and  not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).”    Ecumenical  Canons  (Universal)  are  those  pronounced  by  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils.  These  Councils  received  this  name  because  they  were  convened  by  Roman  Emperors  who  were  regarded  to  rule  the  Ecumene  (i.e.,  “the  known  world”).  Ecumenical  Councils  all  took  place  in  or  around  Constantinople,  also  known  as  New  Rome,  the  Reigning  City,  or  the  Universal  City. The president was always the hierarch in attendance that happened to be  the first‐among‐equals. Ecumenical Councils cannot abolish Apostolic Canons,  nor  can  they  abolish  the  Canons  of  previous  Ecumenical  Councils.  But  they  can overrule Regional and Patristic Canons.      Regional  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Regional  Councils that were later confirmed by an Ecumenical Council. This approval  gave these Regional Canons a universal authority, almost equal to Ecumenical  Canons.  These  Canons  are  not  only  valid  within  the  Regional  Church  in  which  the  Council  took  place,  but  are  valid  for  all  Orthodox  Christians.  For  this  reason  the  Canons  of  these  approved  Regional  Councils  cannot  be  abolished, but must be treated as those of Ecumenical Councils.       Patristic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  the  Canons  of  individual  Holy  Fathers  that  were  confirmed  by  an  Ecumenical  Council.  Their  authority  is  only  lesser  than  the  Apostolic  Canons,  Ecumenical  Canons  and  Universal  Regional Canons. But because they were approved by an Ecumenical Council,  these Patristic Canons binding on all Orthodox Christians.      Pan‐Orthodox  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Pan‐ Orthodox Councils. Since Constantinople had fallen to the Ottomans in 1453,  there  could  no  longer  be  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils,  since  there  was  no  longer a ruling Emperor of the Ecumene (the Roman or Byzantine Empire). But  the Ottoman Sultan appointed the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople as  both  the  political  and  religious  leader  of  the  enslaved  Roman  Nation  (all  Orthodox  Christians  within  the  Roman  Empire,  regardless  of  language  or  ethnic origin). In this capacity, having replaced the Roman Emperor as leader  of  the  Roman  Orthodox  Christians,  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  took  the  responsibility  of  convening  General  Councils  which  were  not  called  Ecumenical Councils (since there was no longer an Ecumene), but instead were  called  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils.  Since  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  was  also  the  first‐among‐equals  of  Orthodox  hierarchs,  he  would  also  preside  over  these  Councils. Thus he became both the convener and the president. The Primates  of  the  other  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  were  also  invited,  along with their Synods of Bishops. If the Ecumenical Patriarch was absent or  the one accused, the Patriarch of Alexandria would preside over the Synod. If  he too could not attend in person, then the Patriarchs of Antioch or Jerusalem  would  preside.  If  no  Patriarchs  could  attend,  but  only  send  their  representatives,  these  representatives  would  not  preside  over  the  Council.  Instead, whichever bishop present who held the highest see would preside. In  several  chronologies,  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  are  referred  to  as  Ecumenical. In any case, the Canons pertaining to these Councils are regarded  to be universally binding for all Orthodox Christians.       National  Canons  (Local)  are  those  valid  only  within  a  particular  National Church. The Canons of these National Councils are only accepted if  they  are  in  agreement  with  the  Canons  ratified  by  the  above  Apostolic,  Ecumenical, Regional, Patristic and Pan‐Orthodox Councils.      Provincial  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  Metropolitan  and  his  suffragan  bishops.  They  are  only  binding  within  that  Metropolis.      Prefectural  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  single  bishop and his subordinate clergy. They are only valid within that Diocese.       Parochial  Canons  are  the  by‐laws  of  a  local  Parish  or  Mission,  which  are  chartered  and  endorsed  by  the  Rector  or  Founder  of  a  Parish  and  the  Parish Council. These by‐laws are only applicable within that Parish.      Monastic Canons are the rules of a local Monastery or Monastic Order,  which  are  chartered  by  the  Abbot  or  Founder  of  the  Skete  or  Monastery.  These by‐laws are only applicable within that Monastery.      Sometimes  Canons  are  only  recommendations  explaining  how  clergy  and laity are to conduct themselves. Other times they are actually penalties to  be  executed  upon  laity  and  clergy  for  their  misdeeds.  But  the  penalties  contained  within  Canons  are  simply  recommendations  and  not  the  actual  executions of the penalties themselves. The recommendation of the law is one  thing and the execution of the law is another.     Canon Law Can Only Be Executed By Those With Authority       For  the  execution  of  the  law  to  take  place  it  requires  a  competent  authority  to  execute  the  law.  A  competent  authority  is  reckoned  by  the  principle  of  “the  greater  judges  the  lesser.”  Thus,  there  are  Canons  that  explain who has the authority to judge individuals according to the Canons.      A  layman  can  only  be  judged,  excommunicated  or  anathematized  by  his own bishop, or by his own priest, provided the priest has the permission  of  his own  bishop (i.e., a priest who  is  a pneumatikos).  This law  is ratified  by  the 6th Canon of Carthage, which has been made universal by the authority of  the Sixth Ecumenical Council. The Canon states: “The application of chrism and  the  consecration  of  virgin  girls  shall  not  be  done  by  Presbyters;  nor  shall  it  be  permissible for a Presbyter to reconcile anyone at a public liturgy. This is the  decision  of  all  of  us.”  St.  Nicodemus’  interprets  the  Canon  as  follows:  “The  present  Canon  prohibits  a  priest  from  doing  three  things…  and  remission  of  the  penalty for a sin to a penitent, and thereafter through communion of the Mysteries the  reconciliation  of  him  with  God,  to  whom  he  had  become  an  enemy  through  sin,  making  him  stand  with  the  faithful,  and  celebrating  the  Liturgy  openly…  For  these  three functions have to be exercised by a bishop…. By permission of the bishop even a  presbyter can reconcile penitents, though. And read Ap. c. XXXIX, and c. XIX of the  First EC. C.” Thus the only authority competent to judge a layman is a bishop  or a presbyter who has the permission of his bishop to do so. However, those  who are among the low rank of clergy (readers, subdeacons, etc) require their  own local bishop to try them, because a presbyter cannot depose them.      A  deacon  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  three  other  bishops,  and  a  presbyter  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  six  other  bishops.  The  28th  Canon  of  Carthage  thus  states:  “If  Presbyters  or  Deacons  be  accused,  the  legal  number  of  Bishops  selected  from the nearby locality, whom the accused demand, shall be empaneled — that is, in  the case of a Presbyter six, of a Deacon three, together with the Bishop of the accused  — to investigate their causes; the same form being observed in respect of days, and of  postponements,  and  of  examinations,  and  of  persons,  as  between  accusers  and  accused. As for the rest of the Clerics, the local Bishop alone shall hear and conclude  their  causes.”  Thus,  one  bishop  is  insufficient  to  submit  a  priest  or  deacon  to  trial or deposition. This can only be done by a Synod of Bishops with enough  bishops present to validly apply the canons. The amount of bishops necessary  to  judge  and  depose  a  priest  are  seven  (one  local  plus  six  others),  and  for  a  deacon the minimum amount of bishops is four (one local plus three others).      A  bishop  must  be  judged  by  his  own  metropolitan  together  with  at  least twelve other bishops. If the province does not have twelve bishops, they  must  invite  bishops  from  other  provinces  to  take  part  in  the  trial  and  deposition. Thus the 12th Canon of Carthage states: “If any Bishop fall liable to  any charges, which is to be deprecated, and an emergency arises due to the fact that  not many can convene, lest he be left exposed to such charges, these may be heard by  twelve Bishops, or in the case of a Presbyter, by six Bishops besides his own; or in the  case  of  a  Deacon,  by  three.”  Notice  that  the  amount  of  twelve  bishops  is  the  minimum  requirement  and  not  the  maximum.  The  maximum  is  for  all  the  bishops, even if they are over one hundred in number, to convene for the sake  of  deposing  a  bishop.  But  if  this  cannot  take  place,  twelve  bishops  assisting 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii12 99%

ARE THE HOLY CANONS ONLY VALID FOR THE  APOSTOLIC PERIOD AND NOT FOR OUR TIMES?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “After this, I request of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend to those who confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion,  they must prepare by fasting, and to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday.  Regarding  the  Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be interpreted correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy  and  communed.  They  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune. The  rest did not remain until  the end and  withdrew  together with  the catechumens. As for those who were in repentance, they remained outside  the gates of the church. If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only knew  how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”      From  the  above  explanation  by  Bp.  Kirykos,  one  is  given  the  impression that he believes and commands:     a) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  forbid  laymen  to  commune  on  Sundays  during  Great  Lent  in  order  to  ensure  “the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  canons  declare  that  it  is  those who do not commune on Sundays that are causers of disorder, as  the 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares: “All the faithful who come to  Church and hear the Scriptures, but do not stay for the prayers and the Holy  Communion, are to be excommunicated as causing disorder in the Church;”  b) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  advise  his  flock  “to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday,” thereby commanding his flock to become Sabbatians;  c) that  the  Canon  which  advises  people  to  receive  Holy  Communion  every  day  even  outside  of  fasting  periods  is  “correct”  but  must  be  “interpreted correctly and applied to everybody,” which, in the solution that  Bp. Kirykos offers, amounts to a complete annulment of the Canon in  regards to laymen, while enforcing the Canon liberally upon the clergy;  d) that  “we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,”  as  if  the  Orthodox  Church  today  is  not  still  the  unchanged  and  unadulterated  Apostolic  Church as confessed in the Symbol of the Faith, “In One, Holy, Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church,”  with  the  same  Head,  the  same  Body,  and  the  e) f) g) h) same requirement to abide by the Canons, but that we are supposedly  some kind of fallen Church in need of “return” to a former status;  that supposedly in apostolic times “all of the Christians were ascetics and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy and communed,” meaning that Communion is annulled for later  generations supposedly due to a lack of celibacy and vegetarianism;  that  supposedly  only  the  celibate  and  vegetarians  communed  in  the  early Church, and that “the rest did not remain until the end and withdrew  together with the catechumens,” as if marriage and eating meat amounted  to  a  renunciation  of  one’s  baptism  and  a  reversion  to  the  status  of  catechumen,  which  is  actually  the  teaching  and  practice  of  the  Manicheans, Paulicians and Bogomils and not of the Apostolic Church,  and  the  9th  Apostolic  Canon  declares  that  if  any  layman  departs  with  the catechumens and does not remain until the end of Liturgy and does  not commune, such a layman is to be excommunicated, yet Bp. Kirykos  promotes this practice as something pious, patristic and acceptable;  that Christians who have confessed their sins and prepared themselves  and  their  spiritual  father  has  deemed  them  able  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  are  supposedly  still  in  the  rank  of  the  penitents  either  due to being married or due to being meat‐eaters, as can be seen from  Bp. Kirykos’ words: “If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only  knew how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”  that  we  are  not  to  interpret  and  implement  the  Holy  Canons  the  way  they  are  written  and  the  way  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has  always  historically interpreted and implemented them, but that these Canons  supposedly need to be reinterpreted in Bp. Kirykos’s own way, or as he  says,  “interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody,”  and  that  “if  we  implemented this Canon today, everyone would have to go out of the church.”      All of the above notions held by Bp. Kirykos can be summed up by the  statement that he believes the Canons only apply for the apostolic era or the  time of the early Christians, but that these Canons are now to be reinterpreted  or nullified because today’s Christians are not worthy to be treated according  to  the  Holy  Canons.  He  also  believes  that  to  follow  the  advice  of  the  Holy  Canons  is  a  cause  of  “disorder  and  scandal,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  very  purpose of the Holy Canons is to prevent disorder and scandal. These notions  held by Bp. Kirykos are entirely erroneous, and they are another variant of the  same blasphemies preached by the Modernists and Ecumenists who desire to  set the Holy Canons aside by claiming that they are not suitable for our times.      Bp.  Kirykos’  incorrect  notions  regarding  the  supposed  inapplicability  of the Holy Canons in our times are notions that the Rudder itself condemns.  For  in  the  Holy  Rudder  (published  in  the  17th  century),  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos  included  an  excellent  introductory  note  regarding  the  importance  of  the  Holy  Canons,  and  that  they  are  applicable  for  all  times,  and  must  be  adhered to faithfully by all Orthodox Christians. This introductory note by St.  Nicodemus, as contained in the Holy Rudder, is provided below.    PROLEGOMENA IN GENERAL TO THE SACRED CANONS    What Is a Canon?      A canon, according to Zonaras (in his interpretation of the 39th letter of  Athansius the Great), properly speaking and in the main sense of the word, is  a piece of wood, commonly called a rule, which artisans use to get the wood  and  stone  they  are  working  on  straight.  For,  when  they  place  this  rule  (or  straightedge) against their work, if this be crooked, inwards or outwards, they  make  it  straight  and  right.  From  this,  by  metaphorical  extension,  votes  and  decisions  are  also  called  canons,  whether  they  be  of  the  Apostles  or  of  the  ecumenical  and  regional  Councils  or  those  of  the  individual  Fathers,  which  are contained in the present Handbook: for they too, like so many straight and  right rules, rid men in holy orders, clergymen and laymen, of every disorder  and  obliquity  of  manners,  and  cause  them  to  have  every  normality  and  equality of ecclesiastical and Christian condition and virtue.    That the divine Canons must be kept rigidly by all;   for those who fail to keep them are made liable to horrible penances      “These instructions regarding Canons have been enjoined upon you by us, O  Bishops. If you adhere to them, you shall be saved, and shall have peace; but if  you  disobey  them,  you  shall  be  sorely  punished,  and  shall  have  perpetual  war  with one another, thus paying the penalty deserved for heedlessness.” (The Apostles  in their epilogue to the Canons)      “We have decided that it is right and just that the canons promulgated by  the holy Fathers at each council hitherto should remain in force.” (1st Canon  of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It  has  seemed  best  to  this  holy  Council  that  the  85  Canons  accepted  and  validated by the holy and blissful Fathers before us, and handed down to us, moreover,  in the name of the holy and glorious Apostles, should remain henceforth certified  and  secured  for  the  correction  of  souls  and  cure  of  diseases…  [of  the  four  ecumenical councils according to name, of the regional councils by name, and of the  individual Fathers by name]… And that no one should be allowed to counterfeit  or tamper with the aforementioned Canons or to set them aside.” (2nd Canon  of the Sixth Ecumenical Council)      “If anyone be caught innovating or undertaking to subvert any of the  said Canons, he shall be responsible with respect to such Canon and undergo  the penance therein specified in order to be corrected thereby of that very thing in  which he is at fault.” (2nd Canon of the Second Ecumenical Council)      “Rejoicing  in  them  like  one  who  has  found  a  lot  of  spoils,  we  gladly  embosom the divine Canons, and we uphold their entire tenor and strengthen  them  all  the  more,  so  far  as  concerns  those  promulgated  by  the  trumpets  of  the  Spirit  of  the  renowned  Apostles,  of  the  holy  ecumenical  councils,  and  of  those  convened  regionally…  And  of  our  holy  Fathers…  And  as  for  those  whom  they  consign to anathema, we anathematize them, too; as for those whom they consign to  deposition  or  degradation,  we  too  depose  or  degrade  them;  as  for  those  whom  they  consign  to  excommunication,  we  too  excommunicate  them;  and  as  for  those  whom  they condemn to a penance, we too subject them thereto likewise.” (1st Canon of the  Seventh Ecumenical Council)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the four holy councils, namely, that held in Nicaea, and  that  held  in  Constantinople,  and  the  first  one  held  in  Ephesus,  and  that  held  in  Chalcedon, shall take the rank of laws.” (Novel 131 of Emperor Justinian)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the seven holy councils shall take the rank of laws.”  (Ed.  note—The  word  “confirmed”  alludes  to  the  canons  of  the  regional  councils  and  of  the  individual  Fathers  which  had  been  confirmed  by  the  ecumenical councils, according to Balsamon.)      “For we accept the dogmas of the aforesaid holy councils precisely as we do the  divine Scriptures, and we keep their Canons as laws.” (Basilica, Book 5, Title 3,  Chapter 2)      “The  third  provision  of  Title  2  of  the  Novels  commands  the  Canons  of  the  seven  councils  and  their  dogmas  to  remain  in  force,  in  the  same  way  as  the  divine Scriptures.” (In Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “I accept the seven councils and their dogmas to remain in force, in the  same way as the divine Scriptures.” (Emperor Leo the Wise in Basilica, Book  5, Title 3, Chapter 1)    “It has been prescribed by the holy Fathers that even after death those men  must  be  anathematized  who  have  sinned  against  the  faith  or  against  the  Canons.”  (Fifth  Ecumenical  Council  in  the  epistle  of  Justinian,  page  392  of  Volume 2 of the Conciliars)      “Anathema on those who hold in scorn the sacred and divine Canons of  our sacred Fathers, who prop up the holy Church and adorn all the Christian polity,  and  guide  men  to  divine  reverence.”  (Council  held  in  Constantinople  after  Constantine Porphyrogenitus, page 977 of Volume 2 of the Conciliars)    That the divine Canons override the imperial laws      “It  pleased  the  most  divine  Despot  of  the  inhabited  earth  (i.e.  Emperor  Marcian)  not  to  proceed  in  accordance  with  the  divine  letters  or  pragmatic  forms  of  the  most  devout  bishops,  but  in  accordance  with  the  Canons  laid  down as laws by the holy Fathers. The council said: As against the Canons, no  pragmatic sanction is effective.  Let the Canons of the Fathers remain in force.  And  again:  We  pray  that  the  pragmatic  sanctions  enacted  for  some  in  every  province  to  the  detriment  of  the  Canons  may  be  held  in  abeyance  incontrovertibly; and that the Canons may come into force through all… all of us  say  the  same  things.  All  the  pragmatic  sanctions  shall  be  held  in  abeyance.  Let  the  Canons  come  into  force…  In  accordance  with  the  vote  of  the  holy  council,  let  the  injunctions of Canons come into force also in all the other provinces.” (In Act  5 of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It has  seemed  best to all the holy  ecumenical council  that if  anyone  offers  any  form  conflicting  with  those  now  prescribed,  let  that  form  be  void.”  (8th  Canon of the Third Ecumenical Council)      “Pragmatic  forms  opposed  to  the  Canons  are  void.”  (Book  1,  Title  2,  Ordinances 12, Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “For those Canons which have been promulgated, and supported, that  is  to  say,  by  emperors  and  holy  Fathers,  are  accepted  like  the  divine  Scriptures. But the laws have been accepted or composed only by the emperors; and  for  this  reason  they  do  not  prevail  over  and  against  the  divine  Scriptures  nor  the  Canons.” (Balsamon, comment on the above chapter 2 of Photius)      “Do  not  talk  to  me  of  external  laws.  For  even  the  publican  fulfills  the  outer  law,  yet  nevertheless  he  is  sorely  punished.”  (Chrysostom,  Sermon  57  on  the  Gospel of Matthew)   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii12/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii10 92%

DEMANDING A STRICT FAST ON SATURDAYS   IS THE FIRST HERESY OF THE PAPISTS    In his two letters to Fr. Pedro, in several other writings on the internet,  as well as through his verbal discussions, Bp. Kirykos presents the idea that a  Christian is forbidden to ever commune on a Sunday, except by “economia,”  and  that  if  per  chance  a  Christian  is  granted  this  “economia,”  he  would  nevertheless be compelled to fast strictly without oil on the Saturday, that is,  the day prior to receiving Holy Communion.       For  instance,  outside  of  fasting  periods,  Bp.  Kirykos,  his  sister,  Vincentia, and the “theologian” Mr. Eleutherios Gkoutzidis insist that laymen  must  fast  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without oil, and one day without even olives or sesame pulp, for fear of these  things  containing  oil.  If  someone  prepares  to  commune  on  a  Sunday,  this  means that from the previous Sunday he cannot eat meat. From the Tuesday  onwards he cannot eat dairy either. On the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday  he  cannot  partake  of  oil  or  wine.  While  on  the  Saturday  he  must  perform  a  xerophagy in which he cannot have any processed foods, and not even olives  or  sesame  pulp.  This  means  that  the  strictest  fast  will  be  performed  on  the  Saturday, in violation of the Canons. This also means that for a layman to ever  be  able  to  commune  every  Sunday,  he  would  need  to  fast  for  his  entire  life  long. Yet, Bp. Kirykos and his priests exempt themselves from this rule, and  are allowed to partake of any foods all week long except for Wednesday and  Friday.  They  can  even  partake  of  all  foods  as  late  as  midnight  on  Saturday  night,  and  commune  on  Sunday  morning  without  feeling  the  least  bit  “unworthy.”  But  should  a  layman  dare  to  partake  of  oil  even  once  on  a  Saturday, he is brushed off as “unworthy” for Communion on Sunday.      Meanwhile during fasting periods such as Great Lent, since Monday to  Friday  is  without  oil  anyway,  Bp.  Kirykos,  Sister  Vincentia  and  Mr.  Gkoutzidis believe that laymen should also fast on Saturday without oil, and  even without olives and sesame pulp, in order for such laymen to be able to  commune on Sunday. Thus again they require a layman to violate Apostolic,  Ecumenical,  Local  and  Patristic  Canons,  and  even  fall  under  the  penalty  of  excommunication (according to these same canons) in order to be “worthy” of  communion. What an absurdity! What a monstrosity! A layman must become  worthy of excommunication in order to become “worthy” of Communion!      The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles advises: “If any clergyman be found  fasting  on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday  (except  for  one  only),  let  him  be  deposed  from  office. If, however, he is a layman, let him be excommunicated.” The term “fasting”  refers to the strict form of fasting, not permitting oil or wine. The term “except  for  one”  refers  to  Holy  and  Great  Saturday,  the  only  day  of  the  year  upon  which fasting without oil and wine is expected.      But  it  was  not  only  the  Holy  Apostles  who  commanded  against  this  Pharisaic  Sabbatian  practice  of  fasting  on  Saturdays.  But  this  issue  was  also  addressed  by  the  Quintisext  Council  (Πενδέκτη  Σύνοδος  =  Fifth‐and‐Sixth  Council),  which  was  convened  for  the  purpose  of  setting  Ecclesiastical  Canons, since the Fifth and Sixth Ecumenical Councils had not provided any.  The reason why this Holy Ecumenical Council addressed this issue is because  the Church of Old Rome had slowly been influenced by the Arian Visigoths  and  Ostrogoths  who  invaded  from  the  north,  by  the  Manicheans  who  migrated from Africa and from the East through the Balkans, as well as by the  Jews and Judaizers, who had also migrated to the West from various parts of  the East, seeking asylum in Western lands that were no longer under Roman  (Byzantine)  rule.  Thus  there  arose  in  the  West  a  most  Judaizing  practice  of  clergy forcing the laymen to fast from oil and wine on every Saturday during  Great Lent, instead of permitting this only on Holy and Great Saturday.      Thus, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council, we  read: “Since we have learned that those in the city of the Romans during the holy  fast  of  Lent  are  fasting  on  the  Saturdays  thereof,  contrary  to  the  ecclesiastical  practice handed down, it has seemed best to the Holy Council for the Church of the  Romans to hold rigorously the Canon saying: If any clergyman be found fasting on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday,  with  the  exception  of  one  only,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office.  If,  however,  a  layman,  let  him  be  excommunicated.”  Thus  the  Westerners  were admonished by the Holy Ecumenical Council, and requested to refrain  from this unorthodox practice of demanding a strict fast on Saturdays.      Now,  just  in  case  anyone  thinks  that  a  different  kind  of  fast  was  observed on the Saturdays by the Romans, by Divine Economy, the very next  canon  admonishes  the  Armenians  for  not  fasting  properly  on  Saturdays  during Great Lent. Thus the 56th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council reads:  “Likewise we have learned that in the country of the Armenians and in other regions  on the Saturdays and on the Sundays of Holy Lent some persons eat eggs and  cheese.  It  has  therefore  seemed  best  to  decree  also  this,  that  the  Church  of  God  throughout the inhabited earth, carefully following a single procedure, shall  carry  out  fasting,  and  abstain,  precisely  as  from  every  kind  of  thing  sacrificed,  so  and  especially  from  eggs  and  cheese,  which  are  fruit  and  produce from which we have to abstain. As for those who fail to observe this rule,  if they are clergymen, let them be deposed from office; but if they are laymen, let them  be  excommunicated.”  Thus,  just  as  the  Roman  Church  was  admonished  for  fasting  strictly  on  the  Saturdays  within  Great  Lent,  the  Armenian  Church  is  equally admonished for overly relaxing the fast of Saturdays in Great Lent.      Here the Holy Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council clearly gives us the  exact  definition  of  what  the  Holy  Fathers  deem  fit  for  consumption  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent.  For  if  this  canon  forbids  the  Armenians  to  consume  eggs  and  cheese  on  the  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent,  whereas  the  previous canon forbids the Westerners to fast on the Saturdays of Great Lent,  it  means  that  the  midway  between  these  two  extremes  is  the  Orthodox  definition  of  fasting  on  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent.  The  Orthodox  definition  is  clearly marked in the Typicon as well as most calendar almanacs produced by  the various Local Orthodox Churches, including the very almanac as well as  the  wall  calendar  published  yearly  by  Bp.  Kirykos  himself.  These  all  mark  that oil, wine and various forms of seafood are to be consumed on Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  except  of  course  for  Holy  and  Great  Saturday  which  is  marked as a strict fast without oil, in keeping with the Apostolic Canon.      Now,  if  one  is  to  assume  that  partaking  of  oil,  wine  and  various  seafood on the Saturdays of Great Lent is only for those who are not planning  to  commune  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent,  may  he  consider  the  following.  The  very  meaning  of  the  term  “excommunicate”  is  to  forbid  a  layman  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  So  then,  if  people  who  partake  of  oil,  wine  and  various permissible seafood  on  Saturdays  during  Great Lent are  supposedly  forbidden to commune on the Sundays of Great Lent, then this means that the  55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council would be entirely without purpose.  For  if  those  who  do  partake  of  such  foods  on  Saturdays  are  supposedly  disqualified  from  communion  on  Sundays,  then  what  is  the  purpose  of  also  disqualifying those who do not partake of oil on Saturdays from being able to  commune  on  Sundays,  since  this  canon  requires  their  excommunication?  In  other  words,  such  a  faulty  interpretation  of  the  canons  by  anyone  bearing  such  a  notion  would  need  to  call  the  Holy  Fathers  hypocrites.  They  would  need  to  consider  that  the  Holy  Fathers  in  their  Canon  Law  operated  with  a  system whereby “you’re damned if you do, and you’re damned if you don’t!”       Thus,  according  to  this  faulty  interpretation,  if  you  do  partake  of  oil  and  wine  on  Saturdays  of  Great  lent,  you  are  disqualified  from  communion  due  to  your  consumption  of  those  foods.  But  if  you  do  not  partake  of  these  foods on Saturday you are also disqualified from communion on Sunday, for  this canon demands your excommunication. In other words, whatever you do  you cannot win! Fast without oil or fast with oil, you are still disqualified the  next day. So how does Bp. Kirykos interpret this Canon in order to keep his  Pharisaical  custom?  He  declares  that  “all  Christians”  are  excommunicated  from  ever  being  able  to  commune  on  a  Sunday!  He  demands  that  only  by  extreme  economy  can  Christians  commune  on  Sunday,  and  that  they  are  to  only commune on Saturdays, declaring this the day “all Christians” ought to  “know”  to  be  their  day  of  receiving  Holy  Communion!  Thus  the  very  trap  that  Bp.  Kirykos  has  dug  for  himself  is  based  entirely  on  his  inability  to  interpret  the  canons  correctly.  Yet  hypocritically,  in  his  second  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro  he  condemns  others  of  supposedly  “not  interpreting  the  canons  correctly,” simply because they disagree with his Pharisaical Sabbatianism!      But the hypocrisies continue. Bp. Kirykos continuously parades himself  in his printed periodicals, on his websites, and on his various online blogs, as  some  kind  of “confessor” of Orthodoxy against Papism and Ecumenism. He  even dares to openly call himself a “confessor” on Facebook, where he spends  several  hours  per  day  in  gossip  and  idletalk  as  can  be  seen  by  his  frequent  status  updates  and  constant  chatting.  This  kind  of  pastime  is  clearly  unbecoming for an Orthodox Christian, let alone a hierarch who claims to be  “Genuine  Orthodox”  and  a  “confessor.”  So  great  is  his  “confession,”  that  when the entire Kiousis Synod, representatives from the Makarian Synod, the  Abbot  of  Esphigmenou,  members  from  all  other  Old  Calendarist  Synods  in  Greece,  as  well  as  members  of  the  State  Hierarchy,  had  gathered  in  Athens  forming crowds of clergy and thousands of laity, to protest against the Greek  Government’s antagonism towards Greek culture and religion, our wonderful  “confessor” Bp. Kirykos was spending that whole day chatting on Facebook.  The people present at the protest made a joke about Bp. Kirykos’s absence by  writing the following remark on an empty seat: “Bp. Kirykos, too busy being  an  online  confessor  to  bother  taking  part  in  a  real  life  confession.”  When  various monastics and laymen of Bp. Kirykos’s own metropolis informed him  that  he should have been  there, he  yelled  at  them and told  them “This is all  rubbish, I don’t care about these issues, the only real issue is the cheirothesia  of  1971.”  How  lovely.  Greece  is  on  the  verge  of  geopolitical  and  economical  self‐destruction, and Bp. Kirykos’s only care is for his own personal issue that  he has repeated time and time again for three decades, boring us to death.      But what does Bp. Kirykos claim to “confess” against, really? He claims  he confesses against “Papo‐Ecumenism.” In other words, he views himself as  a fighter against the idea of the Orthodox Church entering into a syncretistic  and ecumenistic union with Papism. Yet Bp. Kirykos does not realize that he  has already fallen into what St. Photius the Great has called “the first heresy  of the Westerners!” For as indicated above, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐ Sixth  Ecumenical  Council,  it  was  the  “Church  of  the  Romans”  (that  is  what  became  the  Papists)  that  fell  into  the  unorthodox  practice  of  demanding  laymen  to  fast  strictly  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  as  a  prerequisite  to  receiving  Holy  Communion  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent.  This  indeed  was  the  first  error  of  the  Papists.  It  arrived  at  the  same  time  the  filioque  also  arrived,  to  wit,  during  the  6th  and  7th  centuries.  This  is  why  St.  Photius  the  Great,  who  was  a  real  confessor  against  Papism,  calls  the  error  of  enforced  fasting without oil on Saturdays “the first heresy of the Westerners.” Thus, let  us depart from the hypocrisies of Bp. Kirykos and listen to the voice of a real  confessor against Papism. Let us read the opinion of St. Photius the Great, that  glorious champion and Pillar of Orthodoxy!      In  his  Encyclical  to  the  Eastern  Patriarchs  (written  in  866),  our  Holy  Father,  St.  Photius  the  Great  (+6  February,  893),  Archbishop  of  the  Imperial  City of Constantinople New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch, writes:    St. Photius the Great: Encyclical to the Eastern Patriarchs (866)    Countless have been the evils devised by the cunning devil against the race of  men,  from the beginning  up  to the coming of  the Lord. But even afterwards, he  has  not ceased through errors and heresies to beguile and deceive those who listen to him.  Before  our  times,  the  Church,  witnessed  variously  the  godless  errors  of  Arius,  Macedonius, Nestorius, Eutyches, Discorus, and a foul host of others, against which  the  holy  Ecumenical  Synods  were  convened,  and  against  which  our  Holy  and  God‐ bearing  Fathers  battled  with  the  sword  of  the  Holy  Spirit.  Yet,  even  after  these  heresies  had  been  overcome  and  peace  reigned,  and  from  the  Imperial  Capital  the  streams of Orthodoxy  flowed throughout  the world;  after  some people who had  been  afflicted by the Monophysite heresy returned to the True Faith because of your holy  prayers;  and  after  other  barbarian  peoples,  such  as  the  Bulgarians,  had  turned  from  idolatry to the knowledge of God and the Christian Faith: then was the cunning devil  stirred up because of his envy.    For the Bulgarians had not been baptised even two years when dishonourable  men  emerged  out  of  the  darkness  (that  is,  the  West),  and  poured  down  like  hail  or,  better,  charged  like  wild  boars  upon  the  newly‐planted  vineyard  of  the  Lord,  destroying  it  with  hoof  and  tusk,  which  is  to  say,  by  their  shameful  lives  and  corrupted  dogmas.  For  the  papal  missionaries  and  clergy  wanted  these  Orthodox  Christians to depart from the correct and pure dogmas of our irreproachable Faith.    The first error of the Westerners was to compel the faithful to fast on  Saturdays. I mention this seemingly small point because the least departure  from Tradition can lead to a scorning of every dogma of our Faith. Next, they  convinced the faithful to despise the marriage of priests, thereby sowing in their souls  the  seeds  of  the  Manichean  heresy.  Likewise,  they  persuaded  them  that  all  who  had  been  chrismated  by  priests  had  to  be  anointed  again  by  bishops.  In  this  way,  they  hoped to show that Chrismation by priests had no value, thereby ridiculing this divine  and supernatural Christian Mystery. From whence comes this law forbidding priests 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii10/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

HolyFathersReBaptismEng 91%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos Regarding Re‐Baptism  Differs From the Canons of the Ecumenical Councils      In  the  last  few  years,  Bp.  Kirykos  has  begun  receiving  New  Calendarists and even Florinites and ROCOR faithful under his omophorion  by  re‐baptism,  even  if  these  faithful  received  the  correct  form  of  baptism  by  triple  immersion  completely  under  water  with  the  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  He  also  has  begun  re‐ordaining  such  clergy  from  scratch  instead  of  reading  a  cheirothesia.  But  this  strict  approach,  where  he  applies  akriveia  exclusively for these people, is different from the historical approach taken by  the Holy Fathers of the Ecumenical Councils.       Canon  7  of  the  Second  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  Arians,  Macedonians,  Sabbatians,  Novatians,  Cathars,  Aristeri,  Quartodecimens  and  Apollinarians are to be received only by a written libellus and re‐chrismation,  because  their  baptism  was  already  valid  in  form  and  did  not  require  repetition. The Canon reads as follows:      “As for those heretics who betake themselves to Orthodoxy, and to the  lot of the saved, we accept them in accordance with the subjoined sequence and  custom; viz.: Arians, and Macedonians, and Sabbatians, and Novatians, those  calling themselves  Cathari,  and  Aristeri,  and the  Quartodecimans,  otherwise  known as Tetradites, and Apollinarians, we accept when they offer libelli (i.e.,  recantations in writing) and anathematize every heresy that does not hold the  same beliefs  as the catholic and  apostolic  Church of  God,  and are  sealed first  with holy chrism on their forehead and their eyes, and nose, and mouth, and  ears; and in sealing them we say: “A seal of a free gift of Holy Spirit”…”      The same Canon only requires a re‐baptism of individuals who did not  receive the correct form of baptism originally (i.e. those who were sprinkled  or who were baptized by single immersion instead of triple immersion, etc).  The Canon reads as follows:      “As  for  Eunomians,  however,  who  are  baptized  with  a  single  immersion,  and  Montanists,  who  are  here  called  Phrygians,  and  the  Sabellians,  who  teach  that  Father  and  Son  are  the  same  person,  and  who  do  some  other bad  things, and  (those belonging  to)  any  other heresies (for  there  are  many  heretics  here,  especially  such  as  come  from  the  country  of  the  Galatians:    all  of  them  that  want  to  adhere  to  Orthodoxy  we  are  willing  to  accept as Greeks. Accordingly, on the first day we make them Christians; on  the second day, catechumens; then, on the third day, we exorcize them with the  act  of  blowing  thrice  into  their  face  and  into  their  ears;  and  thus  do  we  catechize them, and we make them tarry a while in the church and listen to the  Scriptures; and then we baptize them.”      Thus  it  is  wrong  to  re‐baptize  those  who  have  already  received  the  correct form by triple immersion. The Holy Fathers advise in this Holy Canon  that  only  those  who  did  not  receive  the  correct  form  are  to  be  re‐baptized.  Now then, if the Holy Second Ecumenical Council declares that such heretics  as  Arians,  Macedonians,  Quartodecimens,  Apollinarians,  etc,  are  to  be  received  only  by  libellus  and  chrismation,  how  on  earth  does  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  refusal  to  receive  Florinites  and  ROCOR  faithful  by  chrismation,  but instead insists upon their rebaptism as if they are worse than Arians?      The  95th  Canon  of  the  Quinisext  (Fifth‐and‐Sixth)  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  those  baptized  by  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  are  to  be  received  into  the  Orthodox  Church  by  a  simple  libellus  and  anathematization of the heresies, without needing to be re‐baptized, and even  without needing to be re‐chrismated! The Canon reads:      As  for  Nestorians,  and  Eutychians  (Monophysites),  and  Severians  (Monothelites),  and  those  from  similar  heresies,  they  have  to  give  us  certificates (called  libelli)  and  anathematize  their  heresy,  the  Nestorians,  and  Nestorius, and Eutyches and Dioscorus, and Severus, and the other exarchs of  such heresies, and those who entertain their beliefs, and all the aforementioned  heresies, and thus they are allowed to partake of holy Communion.      Now  then,  if  the  Quinisext  Ecumenical  Council  allows  even  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  to  be  received  by  mere  libellus,  without requiring to be baptized or even chrismated, and following this mere  libellus  they  are  immediately  free  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  how  is  Bp.  Kirykos’s  approach  patristic,  if  he  requires  the  re‐baptism  of  even  Florinites  and ROCOR faithful?!!! Is Bp. Kirykos not trying to outdo the Holy Fathers in  his  attempt  to  be  “super‐Orthodox”?  Can  such  an  approach  taken  by  Bp.  Kirykos be  considered Orthodox  if the  Holy Fathers in their  Canons request  otherwise? Are the Canons of Ecumenical Councils invalid for Bp. Kirykos?      Certainly  the  Latins  (Franks,  Papists)  are  unbaptised,  because  their  baptisms  consist  of  mere  sprinklings  instead  of  triple  immersion.  Likewise,  various  New  Calendarists  are  also  unbaptised  if  they  were  not  dunked  completely  under  the  water  three  times.  But  can  such  be  said  for  those  Orthodox  Christians,  and  even  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians  (be  they  Florinite, ROCOR or otherwise), who do have the correct form of baptism?      In the Patriarchal Oros of 1755 regarding the re‐baptism of Latins, the  Orthodox Patriarchs make it quite clear that their reason for requiring the re‐ baptism  of  Latins  is  because  the  Latins  do  not  have  the  correct  form  of  baptism, but rather sprinkle instead of immersing. The text of the Patriarchal  Oros  actually  refers  to  the  Canons  of  the  Second  and  Quinisext  Councils  as  their  reasons  for  re‐baptizing  the  Latins.  The  relevant  text  of  the  Patriarchal  Oros of 1755 is as follows:    “...And we follow the Second and Quinisext holy Ecumenical Councils,  which  order  us  to  receive  as  unbaptized  those  aspirants  to  Orthodoxy  who  were  not  baptized  with  three  immersions  and  emersions,  and  in  each  immersion  did  not  loudly  invoke  one  of  the  divine  hypostases,  but  were  baptized in some other fashion...”    Thus we see in the above Patriarchal Oros of 1755, that even as late as  this  year,  the  Orthodox  Church  was  carrying  out  the  very  principles  of  the  Second and Quinisext Ecumenical Councils, namely that it is only those who  were  baptized  by  some  obscure  form  other  than  triple  immersion  and  invocation of the Holy Trinity, that were required to be re‐baptized.    How  then  can  the  positions  of  the  Holy  Ecumenical Councils  and  the  Holy  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  be  compared  to  the  extremist  methods  of  Bp.  Kirykos and his fellow hierarchs of late? Is Bp. Kirykos’ current practice really  Orthodox? Is it possible to preach contrary to the teachings of the Ecumenical  and Pan‐Orthodox Councils and yet remain Orthodox? And as for those who  believe that there is nothing wrong with being strict, let them remember that  the Pharisees were also strict, but it was they who crucified the Lord of Glory!  The Orthodox Faith is a Royal Path. Just as it is possible to fall to the left (as  the New Calendarists and Ecumenists have done), it is also quite possible to  fall  to  the  right  and spin off on  a wrong  turn far  away from  the tradition of  the  Holy  Fathers.  It  is  this  latter  type  of  fall  that  has  occurred  with  Bp.  Kirykos.  In  fact,  even  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  quite  moderate  compared  to  Bp.  Kirykos.  For  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  knew  the  Canons  quite well, and required New Calendarists to be received only by chrismation,  or in some cases by only a libellus or Confession of Faith.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/holyfathersrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Pionniers 89%

Table des matières Canons - petits chants Bataille de Reischoffen .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/05/pionniers/

05/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Scouts et Guides 89%

Table des matières Canons - petits chants Bataille de Reischoffen .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/05/scouts-et-guides/

05/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

pamphlet2eng 89%

SPIRITUAL PATH  REMEMBERING SACRED TRADITION AND  REFERRING TO THE HOLY FATHERS OF THE  ORTHODOX CHURCH    Canons of the Holy Apostles  8.  If  any  Bishop,  or  Presbyter,  or  Deacon,  or  anyone  else  in  the  sacerdotal  list, fail to partake of communion when the oblation has been offered, he must  tell  the  reason,  and  if  it  is  good  excuse,  he  shall  receive  a  pardon.  But  if  he  refuses  to  tell  it,  he  shall  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  he  has  become a cause of harm to the laity and has instilled a suspicion as against the  offerer of it that the latter has failed to present it in a sound manner.    Interpretation.  It  is  the  intention  of  the  present  Canon  that  all,  and  especially  those  in  holy  orders,  should  be  prepared  beforehand  and  worthy  to  partake  of  the  divine  mysteries when the oblation is offered, or what amounts to the sacred service  of the body of Christ. In case any one of them fail to partake when present at  the  divine  liturgy,  or  communion,  he  is  required  to  tell  the  reason  or  cause  why he did not partake:  then if it is a just and righteous and reasonable one,  he is to receive a pardon, or be excused; but if he refuses to tell it, he is to be  excommunicated,  since  he  also  becomes  a  cause  of  harm  to  the  laity  by  leading the multitude to suspect that that priest who officiated at liturgy was  not worthy and that it was on this account that the person in question refused  to communicate from him.      9.  All those faithful who enter and listen to the Scriptures, but do not stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that they are causing the Church a breach of order.    (Canon LXVI of the 6th; c. II of Antioch; cc. Ill, XIII of Tim.).    Interpretation.  Both  exegetes of the sacred Canons — Zonaras,  I mean,  and Balsamon  —  in  interpreting the present Apostolical Canon agree in saying that all Christians  who  enter  the  church  when  the  divine  liturgy  is  being  celebrated,  and  who  listen to the divine Scriptures, but do not remain to the end nor partake, must  be excommunicated, as causing a disorder to  the  church. Thus  Zonaras says  verbatim: “The present Canon demands that all those who are in the church  when the  holy sacrifice is being performed shall patiently remain to the end  for  prayer  and  holy  communion.”  For  even  the  laity  then  were  required  to  partake continually. Balsamon says: “The ordainment of the present Canon is  very  acrid;  for  it  excommunicates  those  attending  church  but  not  staying  to  the end nor partaking.”    Concord.  Agreeably with the present Canon c. II of Antioch ordains that all those who  enter the church during the time of divine liturgy and listen to the Scriptures,  but  turn  away  and  avoid  (which  is  the  same  as  to  say,  on  account  of  pretended  reverence  and  humility  they  shun,  according  to  interpretation  of  the  best  interpreter,  Zonaras)  divine  communion  in  a  disorderly  manner  are  to be excommunicated. The continuity of communion is confirmed also by c.  LXVI  of  the  6th,  which  commands  Christians  throughout  Novational  Week  (i.e.,  Easter  Week)  to  take  time  off  for  psalms  and  hymns,  and  to  indulge  in  the  divine  mysteries  to  their  hearts’  content.  But  indeed  even  from  the  third  canon of St. Timothy the continuity of communion can be inferred. For if he  permits  one  possessed  by  demons  to  partake,  not  however  every  day,  but  only on Sunday (though in other copies it is written, on occasions only), it is  likely  that  those  riot  possessed  by  demons  are  permitted  to  communicate  even more frequently. Some contend that for this reason it was that the same  Timothy,  in  c.  Ill,  ordains  that  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  that  a  man  and  his  wife  should  not  have  mutual  intercourse,  in  order,  that  is,  that  they  might  partake, since in that period it was only on those days, as we have said, that  the  divine  liturgy  was  celebrated.  This  opinion  of  theirs  is  confirmed  by  divine Justin, who says in his second apology that “on the day of the sun” —  meaning, Sunday — all Christians used to assemble in the churches (which on  this account were also called “Kyriaka,” i.e., places of the Lord) and partook of  the divine mysteries. That, on the other hand, all Christians ought to frequent  divine communion is confirmed from the West by divine Ambrose, who says  thus:  “We  see  many  brethren  coming  to  church  negligently,  and  indeed  on  Sundays  not  even  being  present  at  the  mysteries.”  And  again,  in  blaming  those who fail to partake continually, the same saint says of the mystic bread:  “God  gave  us  this  bread  as  a  daily  affair,  and  we  make  it  a  yearly  affair.”  From Asia, on the other hand, divine Chrysostom demands this of Christians,  and, indeed, par excellence. And see in his preamble to his commentary of the  Epistle to the Romans, discourse VIII, and to the Hebrews, discourse XVIII, on  the Acts, and Sermon V on the First Epistle to Timothy, and Sermon XVII on  the  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews,  and  his  discourse  on  those  at  first  fasting  on  Easter,  Sermon  III  to  the  Ephesians,  discourse  addressed  to  those  who  leave  the  divine  assemblies  (synaxeis),  Sermon  XXVIII  on  the  First  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians,  a  discourse  addressed  to  blissful  Philogonius,  and  a  discourse  about  fasting.  Therein  you  can  see  how  that  goodly  tongue  strives  and  how  many  exhortations  it  rhetorically  urges  in  order  to  induce  Christians  to  partake at the same time, and worthily, and continually. But see also Basil the  Great,  in  his  epistle  to  Caesaria  Patricia  and  in  his  first  discourse  about  baptism.  But  then  how can it  be  thought  that whoever pays any  attention  to  the  prayers  of  all  the  divine  liturgy  can  fail  to  see  plainly  enough  that  all  of  these are aimed at having it arranged that Christians assembled at the divine  liturgy should partake — as many, that is to say, as are worthy?      10.  If anyone pray in company with one who has been excommunicated, he  shall be excommunicated himself.    Interpretation.  The  noun  akoinonetos  has  three  significations:  for,  either  it  denotes  one  standing  in  church  and  praying  in  company  with  the  rest  of  the  Christians,  but not communing with the divine mysteries; or it denotes one who neither  communes nor stands and prays with the faithful in the church, but who has  been excommunicated from them and is excluded from church and prayer; or  finally it may denote any clergyman who becomes excommunicated from the  clergy,  as,  say,  a  bishop  from  his  fellow  bishops,  or  a  presbyter  from  his  fellow  presbyters,  or  a  deacon  from  his  fellow  deacons,  and  so  on.  Accordingly,  every  akoinonetos  is  the  same  as  saying  excommunicated  from  the  faithful  who  are  in  the  church;  and  he  is  at  the  same  time  also  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries.  But  not  everyone  that  is  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries  is  also  excommunicated  from  the  congregation  of  the  faithful,  as  are  deposed  clergymen;  and  from  the  peni‐ tents those who stand together and who neither commune nor stay out of the  church  like  catechumens,  as  we  have  said.  In  the  present  Canon  the  word  akoinonetos is taken in the second sense of the word. That is why it says that  whoever prays in company with one who has been excommunicated because  of sin from the congregation and prayer of the faithful, even though he should  not  pray  along  with  them  in  church,  but  in  a  house,  whether  he  be  in  holy  orders  or  a  layman,  he  is  to  be  excommunicated  in  the  same way  as  he  was  from church and prayer with Christians: because that common engagement in  prayer  which  he  performs  in  conjunction  with  a  person  that  has  been  excommunicated,  wittingly  and  knowingly  him  to  be  such,  is  aimed  at  dishonoring  and  condemning  the  excommunicator,  and  traduces  him  as  having excommunicated him wrongly and unjustly. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pamphlet2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

WitnessStavros2eng 89%

OPEN RESPONSE  to the Letter of Mr. Anthonios Markou  (Translation from the original Greek)    Dear brother in Christ Anthony,    With  much  grief  I  read  your  letter  to  brother  Theoharis.    I  was  grieved  because  you  said  other  things  when  I  visited  you  with  Father  Pedro,  his  wife  Lucia  and  Theoharis,  and  now  you  write  other  things  in  your  letter.    Do  you  know about the truth?  Of course, you know. Do you know about Orthodoxy? Of  course, you know. Do you know about the Holy Fathers?  Of course, you know.   Do you know about the canonical order of the Church?  Of course, you know all  these things.  But how do you ignore them now?                On the first paragraph of your letter you write:       “Theoharis, my child, I send you this message in order to express my sadness. Iʹd  ask you if you are ashamed of your behaviour, but shame is a virtue and I don’t think you  have it...”    Brother  Anthony,  Theoharis  is  a  golden  child,  and  very  shy.  Whoever  knows  him  very  well  knows  that  a  pure  and  God‐fearing  lad  like  Theoharis  is  rare to find in today’s society.  Although he grew up as Evangelical (Protestant)  and  comes  from  a  third‐generation  Evengalical  Greek  family,  he  decided  to  investigate  matters  of  Faith  and  was  baptized  five  years  ago  in  the  Russian   Orthodox  Church  in  Exile.  The  fact  that  Theoharis  went  from  being  an  Evangelical  to  discovering  Genuine  Orthodoxy  is  a  small  miracle.  The  fact  he  remained  and  lives  as  a  chaste  lad,  a  zealot  for  things  divine,  a  struggler  for  Patristic  Piety,  and  with  temperance  and  respect,  is  the  greater  miracle.  Admiration and high esteem is due.  If only there were others like Theoharis in  Greece  and  in  the  world  in  general,  Orthodoxy  would  also  shine!    There  wouldn’t be today’s chaos we see among the “GOC” of whichever faction.    The truth must be said. Theoharis is very shy.  He has the virtue of shame,  and those who know him can verify this truth.  And for this reason he couldn’t  endure the disgracefulness of Bp. Kirykos Kontogiannis!  Those who do not have  the  virtue  of  shame  are  those  who  accept  Bp.  Kirykos’  scandals  and  especially  those who give excuses in order for the scandals to continue!  So if there is any  lack of shame, it does not concern Theoharis, but rather Bp. Kirykos himself and  those profane people, yourself among them, who justify his scandals!                 In your letter you continue:      “...Come on, my child, one year near Bishop Kirykos (he gave you hospitality, as  he  could,  he  gave  you  shelter,  and  he  fed  you)  and  your  thanks  is  your  scandalization,  that he sleeps in the same building with sister Valentina? Did you understand this  so  long  near  him?  I  known  him  for  almost  40  years,  as  a  person  he  has  his  faults,  but  nobody has ever accused him of immorality...”    First,  brother  Anthony,  I  want  to  thank  you  because  by  writing  the  sentence “...he sleeps in the same building with sister Valentina...” you testify in  writing the sad REALITY that was also told to us by the nun Vikentia (Kirykos’  sister according to the flesh), which she said with many tears. Now she may deny  that she told us these things, but she didn’t tell them to just one person. She told  them to several people: two from Australia, one from the Unites States, two from  Canada, others from Larissa, others from various parts of Greece and abroad. She  didn’t  tell  them  with  a  smile,  she  told  them  with  tears  and  pain,  because  these  are indeed very sad things. Now if she is in denial, it is in order for her to escape  from  her  brother.    But  since  Presbytera  (Matushka)  Antonina  and  five  different  families  in  Menidi  who  are  really  scandalized  by  Valentina’s  case,  told  us  the  same thing, and since we saw with our own eyes that Kirykos actually lives and  sleeps with Valentina, how can it be possible to act as if all is “milk and honey?”    And  what  exactly  was  revealed  by  Nun  Vikentia,  Presbytera  Antonina,  the five families, various monks, the former novices of Koropi, and other people  who  are  witnesses  and  know  all  these  things  first‐hand?    That  Bp.  Kirykos  SLEEPS (as you wrote) in the same building with a woman, Ms. Valentina, who  is  not  blood‐related  to  him,  she  is  not  even  a  nun,  but  a  simple  unmarried  laywoman,  who  for    22  years  acts  as  Kirykos’  “housemaid,”  and  for  several  of  these  years  “sleeps”  with  him,  earlier  at  Kalithea,  at  Peristeri,  at  Koropi  (until  Valentina  was  expelled  by  nun  Vikentia  when  the  latter  entered  Koropi  Monastery  and  “found  them  together,”  as  she  said),  and  now  the  couple  lives  and  even  sleep  day  and  night  at  the  “Hermitage  of  Our  Lady  of  Paramythia  (Consolation)”  in  Menidi,  where  the  walls  were  built  very  high,  and  the  doors  are always locked, so only God knows what happens inside this “hermitage.”    Let us note here that  when Ms. Valentina started collecting thousands of  euros  in  order  to  build  the  actual  building  at  Menidi,  she  used  the  idea  that  a  NURSING HOME would be built to aid the community.  You cannot ignore this  truth  that  the  people  happily  gave their  donations  because it was  for a  nursing  home!    If  only  these  unfortunate  souls  knew  that  the  the  term  “nursing  home”  was only a ploy used by Kirykos and Valentina to raise money!  If they told the  Pontians of Menidi “We are building a house so Kirykos can sleep there together  with  his  housemaid,”  would  the  Pontians  have  given  their  money?  Of  course  not!  They would not have given a single cent!    But  some  old  people  are  naïve  and  just  don’t  understand.    One  old  man  from  Menidi  used  to  smoke.    At  confession,  Kirykos  told  him  “Stop  smoking.”   Τhe old man came back after a few months and told Kirykos:  “I want to thank  you for telling me to stop smoking!  Now I feel very well! To thank you, I made  two chairs: one for  you, and one…  for  your wife!”  (!!!).  How  was  the  wretched  man to know that Valentina is not Bishop Kirykos’ wife, but she simply “sleeps  in the same building” with him, as you have just written it?    In  any  case  the  poor  people  were  cheated.  They  gave  thousands  upon  thousands of euros, but when the work was finished and they expected some old  people  to  move  into  the  nursing  home…  What  a  strange  surprise!    Kirykos  nestled  there  himself…  with  his  Valentina!    And  you  cannot  deny  this  fact  because  the  day  Valentina  started  moving  her  belongings  in  there,  the  tears  of  the other women were heard throughout Menidi!  Because their offerings, their  money, their hard work, etc., for the “nursing home” was all lost!  They realized  that there was never a “nursing home,” but only disorder and deceit!    If  it  were  a  proper  Convent  it  would  be  another  thing.  But  Bp.  Kirykos  tonsured  a  new  nun  (Nun  Kyranna)  in  December  2009,  but  instead  of  living  at  the  “hermitage”  as  it  should  be,  this  nun  continues  living  in  the  house  of  her  daughter  (Barbara).  And  who  lives  at  the  “hermitage?”    Kirykos  with  his  Valentina!   He has kept Valentina as a laywoman for 22 years, and she dresses as  a presbytera (priest’s wife).  She dresses as the presbytera of Bishop Kirykos!    Even  if  she  were  a  nun,  this  “blessed”  woman  it  is  not  allowed  to  live  alone with the Bishop if there are not other nuns living there.  And even if there  were other nuns, the bishop must sleep outside, in another place, as is the norm  in other Old Calendarist Convents. For example, at the Convent of Our Lady of  Axion  Estin  (It  is  Truly  Meet),  in  Methoni,  Pieria,  His  Grace,  Bishop  Tarasios,  sleeps in a completely different building and far from the nuns. And these nuns  are many, and not just one, and they are truly nuns, and not laywomen serving  as  “housemaids.”    This  canonical  order  is  neglected  in  the  person  of  Bishop  Kirykos  Kontogiannis,  who  claims  to  be  an  exceptional  zealot  and  a  “super”  confessor!   But his claims are all talk, and he puts nothing into practice.      Brother  Anthony,  it  is  not  a  matter  of  “shame.”    It  is  a  matter  of  Holy  Canons.    It  is  a  matter  of  Ecclesiastical  Tradition  and  Order.  It  is  a  matter  of  Orthopraxia.  It is a matter of Orthodoxia. The 1923 “Pan‐Orthodox” (rather Pan‐ heretical) Conference by Meletios Metaxakis did not require only a change of the  calendar, but also other even worse cacodoxies, such as the marriage of bishops,  etc.  If  we  disavow  the  change  of  calendar,  how  can  we  accept  the  marriage  of  bishops?  And indeed, in the Apostolic times, Bishops were married, but legally!   They  did  not  have  a  laywoman  residing  with  them  that  “sleeps  in  the  same  building”  (as  you  wrote)  and  plays  the  “housemaid.”  And  if  perchance  this  disorder  was  taking  place,  the  bishop  would  be  defrocked  immediately!    They  would not permit the scandal to continue for 22 years!      Even if nothing happens between Bishop Kirykos and Ms. Valentina (God  knows!),  even  if  she  is  simply  “the  bishop’s  housemaid,”  the  fact  that  Bishop  Kirykos “sleeps in the same building with sister Valentina” (as you expressed it)  makes Bishop Kirykos liable not only to deposition but also to excommunion!                We quote the relevant Sacred Canons.      Canon  3  of  the  First  Ecumenical  Council  writes:  “The  great  Council  has  forbidden  generally  any  Bishop  or  Presbyter  or  Deacon,  and  anyone  else  at  all  among  those in the clergy, the privilege of having a subintroducta [i.e., housemaid]. Unless she  is  either  a  mother,  or  a  sister,  or  an  aunt,  or  a  person  above  suspicion.”  The  interpretation  of  St.  Nicodemus:  “Men  in  holy  orders  and  clergymen  ought  not  to  cause the laity any suspicion or scandal. On this account the present Canon ordains that  this  great  Council—the  First  Ecumenical,  that  is  to  say—has  entirely  forbidden  any  bishop  or  presbyter  or  deacon  or  any  other  clergyman  to  have  a  strange  woman  in  his  house,  and  to  live  with  her,  excepting  only  a  mother,  or  a  sister,  or  an  aunt,  or  other  persons that do not arouse any suspicion.” (The Rudder in English, O.C.I.S., p. 165)    Do  you  see,  brother  Anthony,  what  the  Holy  First  Ecumenical  Council  writes?    Valentina  is  neither  a  nun,  nor  an  aunt,  nor  any  person  who  does  not  give suspicion. On the contrary, she is not related at all to Bishop Kirykos. But for  22  years  she  works  as  a  “housemaid”  of  the  then  hieromonk  and  later  bishop.  And for some of these years they were living together, alone, earlier at Kallithea,  at  Peristeri,  at  Koropi,  and  now  at  Menidi.  Bishop  Kirykos  has  a  real  sister  according to the flesh, namely, nun Vikentia, who lives at Koropi, at Kirykos’ so‐ called “Episcopal House.” But Kirykos does not live with his real sister, rather he  sleeps  and  lives  with  his  fake  presbytera  (or  rather  episkopissa)  Valentina  at  Menidi! He goes to Koropi only when a stranger comes, so it may “appear” that  he supposedly lives there. Bishop Kirykos argues that he is fighting for the Old  Calendar for the preservation of the resolutions of the First Ecumenical Council.   If that is the case, how does he ignore the 3rd Canon of the same Council? How  does he disregard it, while simultaneously posing to be “super” canonical?    Canon  5  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  writes:  “Let  no  one  on  the  sacerdotal list acquire a woman or housemaid except persons mentioned in the Canon as  being  above  suspicion,  but  let  him  safeguard  his  reputation  in  this  respect.  Let  even  eunuchs  safeguard  themselves  in  this  very  same  situation  too,  by  providing  themselves  with  a  blameless  character.  As  for  those  who  transgress  this  injunction,  if  they  are  Clergymen,  let  them  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  they  are  laymen  let  them  be  excommunicated.”  The  interpretation  of  St.  Nicodemus:  “What  the  present  Canon  decrees is the following. Let none of those in holy orders who are living modestly have a  woman staying in their house, or a servant girl, unless she be among those specified in a  Canon  as  being  above  suspicion—this  refers  to  c.  III  of  the  First  Ec.  C.—such  persons  being  a  mother  and  a  sister  and  an  aunt;  so  as  to  keep  himself  from  becoming  liable  to  incur blame form either the father or the mother in relation to the laity. Anyone among  persons that transgresses this  Canon, let  him be  deposed from  office.  Likewise  eunuchs,  too, must keep themselves safe from any accusation against them, and therefore let them  not  dwell  together  with  suspicious  persons.  In  case  they  dare  to  do  this,  if  they  are  clergymen (as having been involuntarily, that is to say, or by nature made eunuchs), let  them be  deposed from office; but if they are laymen, let  them  be excommunicated. Read  also c. III of the First Ec. C.” (The Rudder in English, O.C.I.C., p. 298)    Do  you  see,  then,  brother  Antony,  that  bishop  Kirykos  is  worthy  of  deposition?  It is not enough that he was deposed by the Synod of the “Five,” it is  not enough that he was deposed by the Synod of Archbishop Nicholas, but even  now Kirykos’ own “Pan‐Orthodox Synod,” if only it really loved and appreciated  the  Sacred  Canons,  would  also  consider  Kirykos  liable  to  deposition!    Kirykos  knows  how  to  open  the  Rudder  (Pedalion)  on  the  heads  of  other  Bishops  of  various  factions.  He  never  opens  the  Rudder  on  his  own  head.    And  this  is  because he is not a Christian but a Pharisee, and this Phariseeism drove him to  his current condition of delusion and schismatoheresy.      Canon  18  of  the  Seventh  Ecumenical  Council  writes:  “Be  ye  unoffending  even  to  outsiders,  says  the  Apostle  (1  Cor.  10:32).  But  for  women  to  be  dwelling  in  bishoprics, or in monasteries, is a cause for everyone’s taking offense. If, therefore, anyone 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/witnessstavros2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Christianity Written 88%

The Old Testament canons of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches include several books (deuterocanonical, or apocryphal) that do not appear in the Jewish canon.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/12/07/christianity-written/

07/12/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii09 88%

ARE CHRISTIANS MEANT TO COMMUNE ONLY ON  A SATURDAY AND NEVER ON A SUNDAY?    In  the  second  paragraph  of  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  Bp.  Kirykos  writes: “Also, all Christians, when they are going to commune, know that they must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday  (since  it  is  preceded  by  the  fast  of  Friday)  and on Sunday only by economia, so that they are not compelled to break the fast of  Saturday and violate the relevant Holy Canon [sic: here he accidentally speaks of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means  observing  a  fast  on  Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].”    The first striking remark is “All Christians.” Does Bp. Kirykos consider  himself to be a Christian? If so, why does he commune every Sunday without  exception, seeing as though “all Christians” are supposed to “know” that they  are only allowed to commune on a Saturday, and never on Sunday, except by  “economia.”  Or  perhaps  Bp.  Kirykos  does  not  consider  himself  a  Christian,  and  for  this  reason  he  is  exempt  of  this  rule  for  “all  Christians.”  It  makes  perfect sense that he excludes himself from those called Christians because his  very ideas and practices are not Christian at all.     Is  communion  on  Saturdays  alone,  and  never  on  Sundays,  really  a  Christian  practice?  Is  this  what  Christians  have  always  believed?  Was  Saturday the day that the early Christians ʺbroke breadʺ (i.e., communed)? Let  us look at what the Holy Scriptures have to say.     St.  Luke  the  Evangelist  (+18  October,  86),  in  the  Acts  of  the  Holy  Apostles, writes: “And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to  break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow (Acts 20:7).”  Thus the Holy Apostle Paul would meet with the faithful on the first day of  the  week,  to  wit,  Sunday,  and  on  this  day  he  would  break  bread,  that  is,  he  would serve Holy Communion.     St. Paul the Apostle (+29 June, 67) also advises in his first epistle to the  Corinthians:  “On  the  first  day  of  the  week,  let  every  one  of  you  put  apart  with  himself, laying up what it shall well please him: that when I come, the collections be  not  then  to  be  made  (1  Corinthians  16:2).”  Thus  St.  Paul  indicates  that  the  Christians would meet with one another on the first day of the week, that is,  Sunday, not only for Liturgy, but also for collection of goods for the poor.     The reason why the Christians would meet for prayer and breaking of  bread on Sunday is because our Lord Jesus Christ arose from the dead on one  day after the Sabbath, on the first day of the week, that is, the Lordʹs Day or Sunday  (Matt. 28:1‐7; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1).     Another  reason  for  the  Christians  meeting  together  on  Sundays  is  because the Holy Spirit was delivered to the Apostles on the day of Pentecost,  which was a Sunday, and this event signified the beginning of the Christian  community.  That  Pentecost  took  place  on  a  Sunday  is  clear  from  Godʹs  command in the Old Testament Scriptures: “You shall count fifty days to the day  after  the  seventh  Sabbath;  then  you  shall  present  a  new  grain  offering  to  the  Lord  (Leviticus 23:16).” The reference to “fifty days” and “seventh Sabbath” refers to  counting fifty days from the first Sabbath, or seven weeks plus one day; while  “the day after the seventh Sabbath” clearly refers to a Sunday, since the day after  the Sabbath day (Saturday) is always the Lord’s Day (Sunday).    It was on the Sunday of Pentecost that the Holy Spirit descended upon  the Apostles. Thus we read:  “When the day of Pentecost  had  come, they  were  all  together  in  one  place.  And  suddenly  there  came  from  heaven  a  noise  like  a  violent  rushing  wind,  and  it  filled  the  whole  house  where  they  were  sitting.  And  there  appeared to them tongues as of fire distributing themselves, and they rested on each  one  of  them.  And  they  were  all  filled  with  the  Holy  Spirit  and  began  to  speak  with  other tongues, as the Spirit was giving them utterance (Acts 2:1‐4).”     A  final  reason  for  Sunday  being  the  day  that  the  Christians  met  for  prayer and breaking of bread was in order to remember the promised Second  Coming or rather Second Appearance (Δευτέρα Παρουσία) of the Lord. The  reference  to  Sunday  is  found  in  the  Book  of  Revelation,  in  which  Christ  appeared and delivered the prophecy to St. John the Theologian on “Kyriake”  (Κυριακή),  which  means  “the  main  day,”  or  “the  first  day,”  but  more  correctly means “the Lordʹs Day.” (Revelation 1:10).     For the above three reasons (that Sunday is the day of the Resurrection,  the  Pentecost  and  the  Second  Appearance)  the  Apostles  themselves,  and  the  early Christians immediately made Sunday the new Sabbath, the new day of  rest,  and  the  new  day  for  Godʹs  people  to  gather  together  for  prayer  (i.e.,  Liturgy)  and  breaking of bread (i.e.,  Holy Communion) Thus we read  in  the  Didache of the Holy Apostles: “On the Lordʹs Day (i.e., Kyriake) come together  and break bread. And give thanks (i.e., offer the Eucharist), after confessing your  sins  that  your  sacrifice  may  be  pure  (Didache  14).”  Thus  the  Christians  met  together  on  the  Lord’s  Day,  that  is,  Sunday,  for  the  breaking  of  bread  and  giving of thanks, to wit, the Divine Liturgy and Holy Eucharist.     St.  Barnabas  the  Apostle  (+11  June,  61),  First  Bishop  of  Salamis  in  Cyprus, in the Epistle of Barnabas, writes: “Wherefore, also, we keep the eighth  day  with  joyfulness,  the  day  also  on  which  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  (Barnabas  15).”  The  eighth  day  is  a  reference  to  Sunday,  which  is  known  as  the first as well as the eighth day of the week. How more appropriate to keep  the eighth day with joyfulness other than by communing of the joyous Gifts?     St. Ignatius the God‐bearer (+20 December, 108), Bishop of Antioch, in  his  Epistle  to  the  Magnesians,  insists  that  the  Jews  who  became  Christian  should  be  “no  longer  observing  the  Sabbath,  but  living  in  the  observance  of  the  Lord’s  Day,  on  which  also  our  Life  rose  again  (Magnesians  9).”  What  could commemorate the Lord’s Day as the day Life rose again, other than by  receiving Life incarnate,  to  wit, that  precious  Body and  Blood of  Christ? For  he who partakes of it shall never die but live forever!    St. Clemes, also known as St. Clement (+24 November, 101), Bishop of  Rome,  in  the  Apostolic  Constitutions,  also  declares  that  Divine  Liturgy  is  especially for Sundays more than any other day. Thus we read: “On the day  of  the  resurrection  of  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord’s  day,  assemble  yourselves  together,  without  fail,  giving  thanks  to  God,  and  praising  Him  for  those  mercies  God  has  bestowed  upon  you  through  Christ,  and  has  delivered  you  from  ignorance,  error, and bondage, that your sacrifice may be unspotted, and acceptable to God, who  has  said  concerning  His  universal  Church:  In  every  place  shall  incense  and  a  pure  sacrifice be offered unto me; for I am a great King, saith the Lord Almighty, and my  name  is  wonderful  among  the  nations  (Apostolic  Constitutions,  ch.  30).”  The  reference to “pure sacrifice” is the oblation of Christ’s Body and Blood; “giving  thanks to God” is the celebration of the Eucharist (εὐχαριστία = giving thanks).    The  Apostolic  Constitutions  also  state  clearly  that  Sunday  is  not  only  the most important day for Divine Liturgy, but that it is also the ideal day for  receiving  Holy  Communion.  It  is  written:  “And  on  the  day  of  our  Lord’s  resurrection,  which  is  the  Lord’s  day,  meet  more  diligently,  sending  praise  to  God  that  made  the  universe  by  Jesus,  and  sent  Him  to  us,  and  condescended  to  let  Him suffer, and raised Him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to  God  who  does  not  assemble  on  that  day  to  hear  the  saving  word  concerning  the  resurrection, on which we pray thrice standing in memory of Him who arose in three  days, in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the Gospel,  the  oblation  of  the  sacrifice,  the  gift  of  the  holy  food?  (Apostolic  Constitutions, ch. 59).” The “gift of the holy food” refers to Holy Communion.    The Holy Canons of the Orthodox Church also distinguish Sunday as  the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. The 19th Canon of the Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  mentions  the  importance  of  Sunday  as  a  day  for  gathering  and  preaching  the  Gospel  sermon:  “We  declare  that  the  deans  of  churches, on every day, but more especially on Sundays, must teach all the clergy  and the laity words of truth out of the Holy Bible…”    The  80th  Canon  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  states  that  all  clergy  and laity are forbidden to be absent from Divine Liturgy for three consecutive  Sundays: “In case any bishop or presbyter or deacon or anyone else on the list of the  clergy,  or  any  layman,  without  any  grave  necessity  or  any  particular  difficulty  compelling him to absent himself from his own church for a very long time, fails to  attend church on Sundays for three consecutive weeks, while living in the city, if  he  be  a  clergyman,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  he  be  a  layman,  let  him  be  removed  from  communion.”  Take  note  that  if  one  attends  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  consecutive  Saturdays,  but  not  on  the  Sundays,  he  still  falls  under  the  penalty  of  this  canon  because  it  does  not  reprimand  someone  who  simply  doesn’t  attend  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  weeks,  but  rather  one  who  “fails  to  attend  church  on  Sundays.”  The  reference  to  “church”  must  refer  to  a  parish  where Holy Communion is offered every Sunday, for an individual who does  not  attend  for  three  consecutive  Sundays  cannot  be  punished  by  being  “removed from  communion” if this is  not  even  offered  to begin with. Also, the  fact  that  this  is  the  penalty  must  mean  that  the  norm  is  for  the  faithful  to  commune every Sunday, or at least every third Sunday.    The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares that: “All those faithful who  enter  and  listen  to  the  Scriptures,  but  do  not  stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  they  are  causing  the  Church a breach of order.” The 2nd Canon of the Council of Antioch states: “As  for all those persons who enter the church and listen to the sacred Scriptures, but who  fail  to  commune  in  prayer  together  and  at  the  same  time  with  the  laity,  or  who  shun  the  participation  of  the  Eucharist,  in  accordance  with  some  irregularity,  we  decree  that  these  persons  be  outcasts  from  the  Church  until,  after  going to confession and exhibiting fruits of repentance and begging forgiveness, they  succeed  in  obtaining  a  pardon…”  Both  of  these  canons  prove  quite  clearly  that  all faithful who attend Divine Liturgy and are not under any kind of penance  or excommunication, must partake of Holy Communion. Thus, if clergy and  laity are equally expected to attend Divine Liturgy every Sunday, or at least  every third Sunday, they are equally expected to Commune every Sunday, or  at least every third Sunday. Should they fail, they are to be excommunicated.    St.  Timothy  of  Alexandria  (+20  July,  384),  in  his  Questions  and  Answers, and specifically in the 3rd Canon, writes: “Question: If anyone who is a  believer is possessed of a demon, ought he to partake of the Holy Mysteries, or not?  Answer: If he does not repudiate the Mystery, nor otherwise in any way blaspheme,  let him have communion, not, however, every day in the week, for it is sufficient for  him  on  the  Lord’s  Day  only.”  So  then,  if  even  those  who  are  possessed  with  demons  are  permitted  to  commune  on  every  Sunday,  how  is  it  that  Bp.  Kirykos  advises  that  all  Christians  are  only  permitted  to  commune  on  a  Saturday,  and  never  on  a  Sunday  except  by  extreme  economia?  Are  today’s  healthy,  faithful  and  practicing  Orthodox  Christians,  who  do  not  have  a  canon  of  penance  or  any  excommunication,  and  who  desire  communion  every Sunday, forbidden this, despite the fact that of old even those possessed  of demons were permitted it?    The  above  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  are  the  Law  of  God  that the Church abides to in order to prevent scandal or discord. Let us now  compare  this  Law  of  God  to  the  “traditions  of  men,”  namely,  the  Sabbatian,  Pharisaic statement found in Bp. Kirykos’s first letter to Fr. Pedro: “… I request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess  to  you,  that  in  order  to  approach  Holy  Communion,  they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday and not Sunday.“ Clearly, Bp. Kirykos has turned the whole world  upside down, and has made the Holy Canons and the Law of the Church of  God  as  a matter  of  “discord  and  scandal,”  and  instead  insists  upon  his  own  self‐invented “tradition” which is nowhere to be found in the writings of the  Holy Fathers, in the Holy Canons, or in the Holy Tradition of Orthodoxy.    The  truth  is  that  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  is  the  one  who  introduced  “disorder  and  scandal”  when  he  trampled  all  over  the  Holy  Canons  and  insisted that his priest, Fr. Pedro, and other laymen do likewise! The truth is  that Fr. Pedro and the laymen supporting him are not at all causing “disorder  and  scandal”  in  the  Church,  but  they  are  the  ones  preventing  disorder  and  scandal by objecting to the unorthodox demands of Bp. Kirykos.    Throughout  the  history  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  Sunday  has  always  been the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. This was declared so  by  the  Holy  Apostles  themselves,  was  also  maintained  in  the  post‐apostolic  era, and continues even until our day. Nowhere in the doctrines, practices or  history  of  Orthodox  Christianity  is  there  ever  a  teaching  that  laymen  are  supposedly only to commune on a Saturday and never on a Sunday. The only  day of the week throughout the year upon which Liturgy is guaranteed to be  celebrated is on a Sunday. The Liturgy is only performed on a few Saturdays  per  year  in  most  parishes,  and  mostly  only  during  the  Great  Fast  or  on  the  Saturday  of  Souls.  Liturgy  is  more  seldom  on  weekdays  as  the  Liturgies  of  Wednesday  and Friday nights have been made  Pre‐sanctified  and  limited  to  only within the Great Fast. Liturgy is now only performed on weekdays if it is  a  feastday  of  a  major  saint.  But  Liturgy  is  always  performed  on  a  Sunday  without  fail,  in  every  city,  village  and  countryside,  because  it  is  the  Lord’s  Day. The purpose of Liturgy is to receive Holy Communion, and the reason  for it being celebrated on the Lord’s Day without fail is because this is the day  of salvation, and therefore the most important day of the week, especially for  receiving Holy Communion. For, “This is the day that the Lord hath made, let us  rejoice  and  be  glad  in  it  (Psalm  118:24).”  What  greater  way  to  rejoice  on  the  Lord’s Day than to commune of the very Lord Himself?    The  theory  of  diminishing  Sunday  as  the  day  of  salvation  and  communion,  and  instead  opting  for  Saturday,  is  actually  a  heresy  known  as 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii09/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii00 87%

CONCISE SUMMARY  of the Soteriological Heresies of Bp. Kirykos Kontogiannis      Bp. Kirykos tells his followers that those who have reacted against his  policy  regarding  the  issue  of  Holy  Communion,  supposedly  teach  that  believers should eat meat and dairy products in preparation for Communion.  But this slander is most ludicrous. He spreads this slander solely in order to  cover up his two heretical letters to Fr. Pedro. The aforesaid letters were sent  during  Great  Lent,  during  which  not  only  is  there  no  consumption  of  meat,  but even oil and wine are not partaken save for Saturdays and Sundays only.  Therefore,  since  the  scandal  occurred  on  the  Sunday  of  Orthodoxy  and  continued further on the Sunday of the Veneration of the Cross (both of which  fall  in  Great  Lent),  and  since  Fr.  Pedro  denounced  Bp.  Kirykos  prior  to  the  commencement  of  Holy  Week,  how  can  Bp.  Kirykos’  slander  be  believed,  regarding  meat‐eating?  In  reality,  it  is  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  who  blasphemes  and preaches heresies without the slightest sign of repentance.      Heretical  is  the  theory  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  Christians  should  not  commune  on  Sundays,  but  only  on  Saturdays.  He  destroys  the  Christian  Soteriological meaning of Sunday as the day of Salvation and of Eternal Life,  and he replaces it with the Saturday of the Jews! (Heresy = Sabbatianism)      Heretical is the theory of Bp. Kirykos that fasting without oil makes a  Christian  “worthy”  of  Communion  without  any  reference  to  the  Mystery  of  Confession and the teaching of the Church that only God makes man worthy,  because without God, no one is worthy. (Heresy = Pelagianism).      Heretical  is  the  theory  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  continuous  Holy  Communion  was  permitted  to  the  early  Christians  supposedly  because  they  were  all  ascetics  and  fasters,  and  that  it  was  this  fasting  that  made  them  “worthy to commune,” when in  reality the early Christians lived  among the  world, and even the bishops were married, and they only knew of the fasts of  Great  Lent  and  of  every  Wednesday  and  Friday,  whereas  today’s  Orthodox  Christians  have  several  more  fasts  (Dormition,  Nativity,  Apostles,  etc).  The  Holy  Apostles  in  their  Canons  forbid  us  to  fast  on  Saturdays.  The  Synod  of  Gangra anathematizes those who call meat or marriage unclean or a reason of  unworthiness  to  commune,  as  is  written  in  the  1st  and  2nd  canons  of  that  Synod. (Heresy of Bp. Kirykos = Manichaeanism).      Heretical is the theory of Bp. Kirykos that if “by economy” he permits  someone  “lucky”  to  commune  on  a  Sunday  during  Great  Lent,  that  such  a  person must fast  strictly  on  the  Saturday prior,  without oil,  whereas the 64th  Apostolic  Canon  forbids  this,  and  the  55th  Canon  of  the  Quinisext  Council  admonishes  the  Church  of  Old  Rome,  in  order  for  this  cacodoxy  and  cacopraxy to cease. Additionally, St. Photius the Great in his “Encyclical to the  Eastern  Patriarchs”  calls  the  act  of  fasting  strictly  on  the  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent “the first heresy of the Westerners” (Heresy of Bp. Kirykos = Frankism).      Heretical is the theory of Bp. Kirykos that laymen are unworthy due to  the  fact  they  are  laymen,  and  that  outside  of  the  fasting  periods  they  must  prepare  for  Communion by  fasting  for  7  days without meat,  5 days without  dairy, 3 days without oil or wine, 1 day without olives and sesame products.  He  demands this fast  upon all laymen, whether married or virgins,  whether  old  or  young,  and  without  allowing  the  spiritual  father  to  judge  those  who  confess to him with either a stricter or easier fast, according to one’s sins. In  other  words, their only sin causing the necessity for this long fast  is the fact  that  they  are  laymen!  Paradoxically,  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  eats  eggs,  cheese,  milk,  etc,  as  late  as  midnight  on  a  Saturday  night  and  then  he  serves  the  Liturgy and Communes on Sunday without feeling “unworthy.” He justifies  his hypocrisy by saying “I am permitted to eat whatever I want because I am  a Bishop!” Phew! In other words, he believes that his Episcopal dignity makes  him  “worthy”  of  communion  without  having  the  need  to  fast  even  for  one  day, whereas laymen need to fast for an entire week simply because they are  laymen! This system was kept by the Pharisees, and they were condemned by  the Lord because they placed heavy burdens on the shoulders of men, while  they would not lift the weight of even a single finger. (Heresy = Pharisaism).      Heretical  is  the  theory  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  the  Holy  Canons  do  not  apply  in  our  times  but  that  they  are  only  for  the  Apostolic  era.  He  preaches  that back then the Church was “worthy” to commune but that now we are all  fallen  and  because  of  this  the  Holy  Canons  must  be  interpreted  differently,  and not in the same context as they were interpreted by the Holy Fathers. In  other words, Bp. Kirykos preaches that of one kind was the Apostolic Church,  and of another kind are we today, and that “we must return.” In so saying, he  forgets  that  the  Lord’s  promise  that  “the  gates  of  hell  shall  not  prevail”  against  the Church, and he blasphemes the verse in the Symbol of the Faith in which  we  confess  that  also  we  today,  by  God’s  mercy,  belong  to  the  “One,  Holy,  Catholic and APOSTOLIC Church,” and that there is no such thing as another  Church  of  the  Apostolic  times  and  a  different  Church  today,  but  that  there  exists ONLY THE ONE CHURCH OF CHRIST, both then and now, with the  same requirement to abide by the Holy Canons and to interpret them exactly  how the Holy Fathers interpreted them. The only ones who believe in a first  “Apostolic Church” and a later fall, and that “we must return,” are the Chiliasts  and  Ecumenists,  these  very  heretics  that  Bp.  Kirykos  supposedly  battles,  yet  he preaches their cacodoxies (Heresies = Chiliasm and Ecumenism). 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii00/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Short Internal Report Example 87%

! ! ! ! ! ! ! Recommendation!on!Model!of!Printer!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/12/13/short-internal-report-example/

13/12/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

padrepedro 02 eng 86%

In reference to the preeminence of Sunday.    You write that the only day on which the faithful are able to receive  Communion is Saturday, strictly urging them not to receive Communion  on  Sunday,  thus  denying  the  ancient  Apostolic  tradition  as  well  as  the  Paschal character of Sunday and the age‐old practice of the Church, thus  introducing a multitude of innovations.      The  Holy  Tradition  of  the  Church,  however,  honors  Sunday,  the  first day after the Sabbaths, as the preeminent day of the week and invites  the  faithful  to  receive  Holy  Communion  on  this  Resurrectional  and  Paschal day.      By Your Eminence attributing a great importance to Saturday as the  preeminent  day  to  receive  Communion  and  nearly  forbidding  this  on  Sunday,  as  unsuitable  for  receiving  the  Immaculate  Mysteries,  You  are  professing a return to Jewish morals and customs and spreading Judaized  opinions in violation of the anathema of the Holy Canons.      3.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/padrepedro-02-eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Canon Eos 7D 86%

Canon Eos 7D 2015. november 23.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/23/canon-eos-7d/

23/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com