PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 20 July at 20:00 - Around 220000 files indexed.

Search on pdf-archive.com All sites
Show results per page

Results for «canons»:


Total: 200 results - 0.02 seconds

livingsynodofbishops 98%

livingsynodofbishops HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii12 89%

contracerycii12 ARE THE HOLY CANONS ONLY VALID FOR THE  APOSTOLIC PERIOD AND NOT FOR OUR TIMES?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “After this, I request of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend to those who confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion,  they must prepare by fasting, and to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday.  Regarding  the  Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be interpreted correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy  and  communed.  They  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune. The  rest did not remain until  the end and  withdrew  together with  the catechumens. As for those who were in repentance, they remained outside  the gates of the church. If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only knew  how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”      From  the  above  explanation  by  Bp.  Kirykos,  one  is  given  the  impression that he believes and commands:     a) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  forbid  laymen  to  commune  on  Sundays  during  Great  Lent  in  order  to  ensure  “the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  canons  declare  that  it  is  those who do not commune on Sundays that are causers of disorder, as  the 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares: “All the faithful who come to  Church and hear the Scriptures, but do not stay for the prayers and the Holy  Communion, are to be excommunicated as causing disorder in the Church;”  b) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  advise  his  flock  “to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday,” thereby commanding his flock to become Sabbatians;  c) that  the  Canon  which  advises  people  to  receive  Holy  Communion  every  day  even  outside  of  fasting  periods  is  “correct”  but  must  be  “interpreted correctly and applied to everybody,” which, in the solution that  Bp. Kirykos offers, amounts to a complete annulment of the Canon in  regards to laymen, while enforcing the Canon liberally upon the clergy;  d) that  “we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,”  as  if  the  Orthodox 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii12/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

canon.PDF 89%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/16/canon/

16/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

HolyFathersReBaptismEng 85%

HolyFathersReBaptismEng The Position of Bp. Kirykos Regarding Re‐Baptism  Differs From the Canons of the Ecumenical Councils      In  the  last  few  years,  Bp.  Kirykos  has  begun  receiving  New  Calendarists and even Florinites and ROCOR faithful under his omophorion  by  re‐baptism,  even  if  these  faithful  received  the  correct  form  of  baptism  by  triple  immersion  completely  under  water  with  the  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  He  also  has  begun  re‐ordaining  such  clergy  from  scratch  instead  of  reading  a  cheirothesia.  But  this  strict  approach,  where  he  applies  akriveia  exclusively for these people, is different from the historical approach taken by  the Holy Fathers of the Ecumenical Councils.       Canon  7  of  the  Second  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  Arians,  Macedonians,  Sabbatians,  Novatians,  Cathars,  Aristeri,  Quartodecimens  and  Apollinarians are to be received only by a written libellus and re‐chrismation,  because  their  baptism  was  already  valid  in  form  and  did  not  require  repetition. The Canon reads as follows:      “As for those heretics who betake themselves to Orthodoxy, and to the  lot of the saved, we accept them in accordance with the subjoined sequence and  custom; viz.: Arians, and Macedonians, and Sabbatians, and Novatians, those  calling themselves  Cathari,  and  Aristeri,  and the  Quartodecimans,  otherwise  known as Tetradites, and Apollinarians, we accept when they offer libelli (i.e.,  recantations in writing) and anathematize every heresy that does not hold the  same beliefs  as the catholic and  apostolic  Church of  God,  and are  sealed first  with holy chrism on their forehead and their eyes, and nose, and mouth, and  ears; and in sealing them we say: “A seal of a free gift of Holy Spirit”…”      The same Canon only requires a re‐baptism of individuals who did not  receive the correct form of baptism originally (i.e. those who were sprinkled  or who were baptized by single immersion instead of triple immersion, etc).  The Canon reads as follows:      “As  for  Eunomians,  however,  who  are  baptized  with  a  single  immersion,  and  Montanists,  who  are  here  called  Phrygians,  and  the 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/holyfathersrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com