PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 25 November at 14:09 - Around 95000 files indexed.

Show results per page

Results for «chinese»:


Total: 800 results - 0.095 seconds

follow up report on Chinese speaking corp in Goons 100%

Follow up report on a new Ascee like Chinese speaking corporation in Goons, and future plans New Eden Three-body Organization Corporation current status Since Mittani gave me the greenlight to head a Chinese corporation within gsf, we have grow steadily since inception.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/26/follow-up-report-on-chinese-speaking-corp-in-goons/

26/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

20151102 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/02/20151102-exchange-rate/

02/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

20151103 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/03/20151103-exchange-rate/

03/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

20151105 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/05/20151105-exchange-rate/

05/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

20151209 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/09/20151209-exchange-rate/

09/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

20160610 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/10/20160610-exchange-rate/

10/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

20160614 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/14/20160614-exchange-rate/

14/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

20160615 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/15/20160615-exchange-rate/

15/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

IS ZHANG YIMOU A SELFORIENTALIST 97%

                IS ZHANG YIMOU A SELF­ORIENTALIST?            Lawson Jiang  Film 132B: International Cinema, 1960­present  February 5, 2016  TA: Isabelle Carbonell  Section D          Along with the rise of the Fifth Generation directors,1 the contemporary Chinese cinema  has gained more popularities on the international film festivals since the early 1990s. While these  films presenting the local Chinese culture are well received internationally, the Fifth Generation  directors, particularly Zhang Yimou, are often denounced for their self­Orientalist filmmaking  practice of selling films packaged with exoticized Chineseness to the Western audience. Based  on the belief that the interpretations on cinema can result differently according to various  ideological reading, the assertion that Zhang deploys Orientalism in his films can be a result of  misinterpretation. This article—through reviewing several books and journals about his 1992  film adaptation ​ Raised the Red Lantern​ —will explore how Zhang is perceived by various  Chinese and Hong Kong scholars in order to find out whether or not he is a self­Orientalist.  Zhang, the cinematographer­turned­director who began his career after graduated from  Beijing Film Academy in 1983, has been receiving both extreme acknowledgments and  criticisms on his films such as ​ Hero​  (2002), ​ House of Flying Daggers​  (2004), ​ Curse of the  Golden Flower​  (2006) from the Chinese film critics. On the one hand, Zhang is recognized as a  successful director of commercial productions; on the other hand, these commercial titles are  also criticized for their banalities due to the lack of depth in storytelling.2 ​ Hero​ , along with his  earlier work ​ Raise the Red Lantern​ ,​  ​ are criticized by some Chinese journalist as self­Orientalist  exercises catering the West. Despite ​ Red Lantern ​ astonishes many Western audience, the film, in  1   The  Fifth  Generation  refers  to   the  group  of  Chinese  directors began  their  filmmaking  since  the 1980s.  Some  of  the  notable  figures  are  Zhang  Yimou, Zhang Yimou, Feng Xiaogang, and Chen Kaige. Although the Sixth  Generation  emerged  in  the  mid­1990s,  some  the  Fifth  Generation directors  like  Zhang  Yimou  and  Feng  Xiaogang  continues their productions and has become more commercial­oriented in Mainland China.  2   I  found  a  brief comment  in  the  entry  page  of  ​ Hero  ​ on  Douban.com during  the  research,  it  goes  “Zhang,  you should stick back to your cinematography, but not directing.”    Lawson Jiang  1    the eyes of a native Beijinger, as Dai Qing3  comments, is “really shot for the casual pleasures of  foreigners [who] can go on and muddle­headedly satisfy their oriental fetishisms.”4  Dai, from a  native perspective, criticizes that ​ Red Lantern​ —though the red lanterns provide stunning visual  motif—represents a false image of China in terms of the mise­en­scene.   First, Dai notices the Zhang­ish Chineseness on the walls of the third wife’s room are  decorated with large Peking opera masks, which is a major symbol of Chineseness that did not  come into fashion until the 1980s and even then only among certain “self­styled avant­garde”  artists would like to show off their “hipness” through these mask decorations. The third wife  “would never have thought of decking her walls with those oversized masks,”5 hinting that  Zhang is the one who is responsible for this historical mistake in his production. Second, Dai  points out that Zhang has also made a fundamental—and the foremost—mistake on the portrayal  of the Master:  I  have  never  seen  nor  heard  nor  read  in  any   book  anything  remotely  resembling  the  high­handed and  flagrant  way  in  which  this “master”  flaunts  the details of  his sex life.  Even  Ximen  Qing,  the  protagonist  of  the  erotic Chinese  classic  ​ Jin  Ping  Mei  and  the  archetype  of  the  unabashedly  libidinous  male,  saw  fit  to  maintain  a discreet demeanor  in  negotiating  his  way  among  his  numerous  wives,  concubines,  and  mistresses,   and  even then he had to resort occasionally to sending a servant to tender his excuses.6   The speaking of one’s sex life has been treated as a taboo in Chinese society—a topic that  is forbidden to be brought up publicly—even in the present. As a result, such a portrayal of the  3  Chinese people who do not have an English name, in the English context, would usually have their names  sorted in the same order as they are in the Chinese context (family name goes first and given name goes after) In this  case, Dai Qing is referred by ​ Dai​  as Zhang Yimou is referred by ​ Zhang​ .   4   Dai  Qing,  “Raised  Eyebrows for  Raise  the Red Lantern.” Translated  by Jeanne Tai. ​ Public Culture 5, no.  2 (1993): 336.   5  Ibid., 335.  6  Ibid., 334.    Lawson Jiang  2    Master’s sex life, in a traditional sense, is a major flaw of the filmic setting. Dai understands that  it is inevitable for Zhang to exoticize and to sell the Chineseness to the Western audience as  Zhang is “a serious filmmaker being forced to make a living outside his own country,”  suggesting that it is worth the Chinese audience’s sympathy to some extent.7   Dai identifies herself as a person who belongs to the generation of Chinese whose  sensibilities have been “ravaged by the Mao­style proletarian culture,”8 Dai—along with her  generation who are not allowed and are unable to interpret films from other philosophical  perspective—can only seek extreme authenticities in films. “I know nothing about film theory,  cinematic techniques, auteurs, schools,” Dai declares in the first paragraph of her journal, “my  only criterion is how I respond emotionally to a film.”9 With the Mao­styled materialistic  influence, Dai’s generation can no longer enjoy any new fashions and trends that she labels as  “half­baked” and that the experiencing of new attempts of storytelling and filmic presentation as  “sensibility­risking.”10 To Dai’s generation, authenticity is the only criteria concerned in judging  a film. Whatever reflects the real Chineseness—the Chineseness that is culturally and historically  correct—is considered a good film. That is, authenticity provides emotional satisfactions. ​ Raise  the Red Lantern​ , unfortunately, fails to accomplish these two tasks, and the lack of  understanding on film theory limits Dai’s interpretation on ​ Red Lantern​ . She would have been  surprised that the red lantern motif that makes her raising eyebrows does far more than that: a  basic reading of the lantern, for example, can be viewed as a reinforcement of male authority,  while the color of red implies the state of purgatory that the wives suffer in the household—any  7  Ibid., 337.   Ibid., 336.  9  Ibid., 333.  10  Ibid., 336.  8   Lawson Jiang  3    of these symbolic implications can easily be identified by the younger generation of Chinese  audience. Dai’s demand on authenticities leads to a deviation from reading the theme, that what  she has observed from the film are only twisted cultural products; the exotic Chineseness  contrived by Zhang. Hence, Dai’s focus on reading the filmic setting rather than the theme  results in a biased comment denouncing Zhang as a self­Orientalist.  Jane Ying Zha, a Chinese writer from Beijing—the same city where Dai is from—adopts  a relatively moderate view on ​ Red Lantern​ . In her journal “Lore Segal, Red Lantern, and  Exoticism” Zha does not perceives the film as “a work of realism in a strict sense” as “some of  the details in the movie seem exaggerated, even false, to any historically informed and  realistic­minded audience.”11 That is, ​ Red Lantern ​ does not attempt, in any sense, to accurately  reflect the history of feudal China, but to present the woman’s suffering under the patriarchy in  the feudal context. The context functions as a “stage” assisting the director to achieve his  expression that is alterable to be set in modern China—while the notion of patriarchal oppression  is remain firmly unchanged.  Zha views the film as a formalistic exercise due to Zhang’s cinematographic expertise  built up earlier in his career, which shares a similar perspective with Rey Chow, who writes in  her book ​ Primitive Passions​ , “the symmetrical screen organizations of architectural details, and  the refined­looking furniture, utensils, food, and costumes in ​ Rain the Red Lantern ​ are all part  and parcel of the recognizable cinematographic expertise of Zhang and his collaborators.”12 Zha  is impressed by the camera work that deliberately avoid giving close­up to the Master as  “[Zhang] thought nothing of shooting the awkwardly melodramatic scenes from the eyes of a   Jane Ying Zha, “Lore Segal, Red Lantern, and Exoticism.” ​ Public Culture ​ 5, no. 2 (1993): 331.   Rey Chow, ​ Primitive Passions: Visuality, Sexuality, Ethnography, and Contemporary Chinese Cinema.  (New York: Columbia University Press, 1995), 143.  11 12   Lawson Jiang  4 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/06/is-zhang-yimou-a-selforientalist/

06/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

20151104 Exchange Rate 97%

CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi AD CNY - Chinese Yuan Renminbi Please choose a currency ...

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/04/20151104-exchange-rate/

04/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Album Notes CD 1-8 97%

Chinese Ancient Music Table of Contents http://www.verycd.com/topics/2733984/ Box Name:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/12/album-notes-cd-1-8/

12/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Chinas Luxury Market - Losing Sheen 97%

The Chinese yuan’s surprise devaluation is expected to dull sales of luxury goods further.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/27/chinas-luxury-market-losing-sheen/

27/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Extended Essay Final Draft 96%

Effect of Chinese Imperial Examinations on the Great Divergence in Late Dynastic China Shamikh Hossain Research Question:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/11/extended-essay-final-draft/

11/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

1960 Tibet and the Chinese People's Republic 95%

Tibet and the Chinese People's Republic A Report to the International Commission of Jurists by its Legal Inquiry Committee on Tibet INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION O F JURISTS GENEVA 1960 "

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/16/1960-tibet-and-the-chinese-people-s-republic/

16/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

1 China Definitive Draft 03 06 2013 2 95%

Chinese Policy towards the EU Page 19 6.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/12/28/1--china-definitive-draft-03-06-2013-2/

28/12/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

2017 promo brochure 18.06 95%

+65 6635 1188 | Visit www.itb-asia.com ITB ASIA 2017 | BUYERS PROGRAM PARTNERS RWS LOGO - A GENTING RESORT RWS LOGO - A GENTING RESORT RWS LOGO - A GENTING RESORT ENGLISH 4C FULL COLOUR SIMPLIFIED CHINESE 4C FULL COLOUR TRADITIONAL CHINESE 4C FULL COLOUR ENGLISH 1C MONOTONE SIMPLIFIED CHINESE 1C MONOTONE TRADITIONAL CHINESE 1C MONOTONE ENGLISH 2 COLOUR SIMPLIFIED CHINESE 2 COLOUR TRADITIONAL CHINESE 2 COLOUR SIMPLIFIED CHINESE INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (2 COLOUR) TRADITIONAL CHINESE INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (2 COLOUR) C M Y CM MY CY CMY K ENGLISH INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (2 COLOUR) For more information on how to be a Buyer’s Program Partner, please contact Joyce at joyce.wang@itb-asia.com ENGLISH INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (4 COLOUR) SIMPLIFIED CHINESE INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (4 COLOUR) TRADITIONAL CHINESE INVERSE COLOUR / ON COLOURED BACKGROUND (4 COLOUR)

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/18/2017-promo-brochure-18-06/

18/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

WUXIA 94%

              WUXIA​ : A CINEMATIC RECONFIGURATION OF KUNG FU FIGHTING   IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION            Lawson Jiang  Film 132B: International Cinema, 1960­present  March 8, 2016  TA: Isabelle Carbonell  Section D        Wuxia​ , sometimes commonly known as ​ kung fu​ , has been a distinctive genre in the  history of Chinese cinema. Actors such as Bruce Lee, Jet Li, and Donnie Yen have become  noticeable figures in popularizing this genre internationally for the past couple decades. While  the eye­catching action choreographies provide the major enjoyment, the reading of the  ideas—which are usually hidden beneath the fights and are often culturally associated—is  critical to understand ​ wuxia​ ; the stunning fight scenes are always the vehicles that carry these  important messages. The ideas of a ​ wuxia ​ film should not be only read textually but also  contextually—one to scrutinize any hidden ideas as a character of the film, and as a spectator to  associate the acquired ideas with the context of the film. One would then think about “what  makes up the Chineseness of the film?” “Any ideology the director trying to convey?” And,  ultimately, “does every ​ wuxia ​ film necessarily functions the exact same way?” After the  worldwide success of Ang Lee’s ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon ​ in 2000, the film has  intrigued many scholars around the globe in developing new—cultural and political—readings of  the text. As of the nature that it is a very cultural product, the different perceptions of Western  and local Chinese audience, and the accelerating globalization has led to a cinematic  reconfiguration of ​ wuxia​  from its original form of fiction. Therefore, a contextual analysis of the  genre is crucial to understand what ​ wuxia ​ really is beyond a synonym of action, how has it been  interpreted and what has it been reconfigured to be.  First, it is important to define ​ wuxia​  and its associated terms ​ jiang hu ​ before an in­depth  analysis of the genre. The two terms do not simply outline the visual elements, but also implying  the core ideas of the genre. The title of this essay should be treated as a play on words, because  the meaning of the two terms does not necessarily interweave. The action genre with ​ kung fu  involved—such as the ​ Rush Hour ​ series starring Jackie Chan—does not equal to ​ wuxia​ . ​ Wuxia  itself is consist of ​ wu ​ and ​ xia ​ in its Chinese context, in which ​ wu​  equates to martial arts, and the  latter bears a more complex meaning. ​ Xia​ , as Ken­fang Lee notes, is “seen as a heroic figure who  possesses the martial arts skills to conduct his/her righteous and loyal acts;” a figure that is  “similar to the character Robin Hood in the western popular imagination. Both aiming to fight  against social injustice and right wrongs in a feudal society.1” The world where the ​ xia ​ live, act  and fight is called ​ jiang hu​ , a term that can hardly be translated, yet it refers to the ancient  outcast world that exists as an alternative universe in opposition to the disciplined reality;2 a  world where the government or the authoritative figures are underrepresented, weaken or even  omitted.  Wuxia ​ can thus be seen as a genre that provides a “Cultural China” where “different  schools of martial arts, weaponry, period costumes and significant cultural references are  portrayed in great detail to satisfy the Chinese popular imagination and to some degree represent  Chineseness;3” an idealised and glorified alternate history that reflects and criticizes the present  through its heroic proxy. The Chineseness here should not be read as a self­Orientalist product as  wuxia​  had been a very specific genre in Chinese popular culture that originated in the form of  fiction (and had later developed to comics or other visual entertainments such as TV series4)  before entering the international market with Ang Lee’s ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon​  in the  form of cinema. Ang Lee’s cultural masterpiece can be seen as an adaptation of the  contemporary ​ wuxia ​ fiction that later inspires many productions including Zhang Yimou’s ​ Hero  1  Ken­fang Lee, “Far away, so close: cultural translation in Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” ​ Inter­Asia  Cultural Studies​  4, no. 2 (2003): 284.  2  Ibid.  3  Ibid., 282.  4  Ibid.  (2002). Although the first ​ wuxia​  fiction, ​ The Water Margin​ , was written by Shih Nai’an  (1296­1372) roughly 650 years ago in the Ming dynasty, it was not until the post­war era from  1950s to 1970s had the genre reached its maturity. Since then, the contemporary fiction has  become popular in Hong Kong and Taiwan with notable authors such as Louis Cha and Gu  Long, respectively.5 The two authors has reshaped and defined the contemporary ​ wuxia ​ to their  Chinese­speaking readers and audience till today.6​  ​ The original ​ wuxia ​ as a form of fiction was  male­centric. The ​ xia​  were mostly male that a great heroine was rarely featured as the sole  protagonist in the story; female characters were usually the wives or sidekicks of the protagonists  in Louis Cha’s various novels, or sometimes appeared as femme fatale. Although most of the  female characters were richly developed and positively portrayed, it is inevitable to see such a  fact that the nature of ​ wuxia ​ is masculine. Like ​ hero ​ and ​ heroine ​ in the English context, ​ xia  refers to hero while the equivalence of heroine is ​ xia­nü ​ (​ nü ​ suggests female; the female hero).  It was not until Ang Lee’s worldwide success of ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon​ , had  the global audience—casual moviegoer, film theorists and scholars—noticed the rise of the genre  since the film “was the first foreign language film ever to make more than $127.2 million in  North America.7 ” Apart from being a huge success in Taiwan, ​ Crouching Tiger ​ is a hit from  Thailand and Singapore to Korea but not in mainland China or Hong Kong. Ken­fang Lee  observes that “many viewers in Hong Kong consider this film boring, slow and without much  action” in which “nothing new compared to other movies in the ​ wuxia ​ tradition in the Hong  5  Ibid., 284.   The contemporary fiction written by the two authors mentioned previously have also provided the fundamental  sites to many film and TV adaptations, such as Wong Kar­wai’s ​ Ashes of Time​  (Hong Kong, 1994), an art film that  is loosely based on the popular novel ​ Eagle­shooting Heroes​ , and the TV series ​ The Return of the Condor Heroes  (Mainland China, 2006) is based on ​ The Legend of the Condor Heroes​ . Both novel were authored by Louis Cha.  7  Lee, “Far away, so close: cultural translation in Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” 282.  6 Kong film industry… [they] claimed that seeing people running across roofs and trees might be  novel for Americans, but they have seen it all before.8” Moreover, some of them rebuke the film  for “pandering to the Western audience” in which “the success of this film results from its appeal  to a taste for cultural diversity that mainly satisfies the craving for the exotic;” denouncing the  film as a self­Orientalist work that “most foreign audiences are attracted by the improbable  martial art skills and the romances between the two pairs of lovers.9 ” Lee concludes that the  exoticized Chineseness and romantic elements “betray the tradition of ​ wuxia ​ movies and become  Hollywoodized;10 ” that is, ​ Crouching Tiger ​ represents an inauthentic China.   Kenneth Chan considers such negative reactions toward the film as an “ambivalence” that  is “marked by a nationalist/anti­Orientalist framework” in which the Chinese and Hong Kong  audience’s claims of inauthenticity “reveal a cultural anxiety about identity and Chineseness in a  globalized, postcolonial, and postmodern world order.11” Such an ambivalence and anxiety  toward the inauthenticity are caused by the production itself as ​ Crouching Tiger ​ is funded mostly  by Hollywood.12 Through studying Fredric Jameson’s investigations of the postmodernism, Chan  declares that “postmodernist aesthetics and cultural production are implicated and shaped by the  global forces of late capitalist logic. By extension, one could presumably argue that popular  cinema can be considered postmodern by virtue of its aesthetic configurations.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/06/wuxia/

06/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

aNewAge 93%

Aznpwned Preface - How the US Failed on its Chinese Assumptions It’s important to view the context of which Sino-American relations were normalized under President Nixon.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/29/anewage/

29/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

menu 93%

$8.65 Beef with Chinese greens .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/20/menu/

20/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

TeatimeChina 93%

  The  fifth  lifts  me  to  the  realms  of  the  unwinking  gods          Chinese  Mystic,  Tang  Dynasty     Better  to  be  deprived  of  food  for  three  days,  than  tea  for  one.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/07/teatimechina/

07/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

BI KEXUAN EGE GRAF 93%

La stampa a colori con copertina rigida 16 aperto carta patinata opaca 150gr 20pagine OF COLLECTIO XU BEIHONG The founder of modern Chinese art Distinguished painter and art educator Xu Beihong Xu Beihong (Chinese:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/09/bi-kexuan-ege-graf/

09/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Builder 8567 Hi-Res Desktop Printing[1] 93%

Trade Agreements Compliance Program ITA Helps Small Exporter Deliver on Big Sale Introduction The Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA) recently helped Klinge Corporation, a small company based in York, Pennsylvania, overcome inconsistent certification requirements that threatened to exclude it from the Chinese market.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/07/18/builder-8567-hi-res-desktop-printing-1/

18/07/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Zhejiang University 92%

certificate issued by School of Management Highlights ·With a focus on "Entrepreneurship in China” ·In one of the most dynamic areas of private economy in China – Zhejiang ·Walk around the World Heritage listed West Lake ·An opportunity to be a real “entrepreneur” in China ·Language and cultural sessions offered throughout the program Structure Orientation and welcome party Lectures Chinese language course and cultural immersion sessions City/campus exploration Company visits &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/21/zhejiang-university/

21/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

pa-kua 92%

Chinese Boxing for Fitness &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/11/pa-kua/

11/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com