Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 25 October at 15:41 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «chrism»:


Total: 8 results - 0.117 seconds

JoachimIIImasonEng 100%

The Apostolic Succession of the Matthewites Derives  From A Freemason and Ecumenist “Patriarch”      In his book “Elenchos Kai Anatrope” Mr. Gkoutzidis writes about the  various ecclesiological books that were printed by the Zealot Athonite fathers:  “At  the  very  same  time  important  documents  of  an  ecclesiological  nature  are  circulated  by  the  Zealot  Hieromonks  who  had  departed  Mt.  Athos,  the  foremost  of  which  was  the  then  Hieromonk  and  later  Bishop  and  Archbishop  of  the  G.O.C.,  Matthew Karpathakis. From among these documents we mention the most important,  namely,  ‘Apostasias  Elenchos,’  ‘Distomos  Romphaia’  published  in  1934  and  ‘Phos  tois  en  Skotei’  published  in  1936,  which  widely  shocked  the  innovative  process  of  Chrysostom Papadopoulos…”      From the last of these Athonite books, ‘Phos tois en Skotei’ of 1936, we  provide  the  following  quote:  “…Therefore,  the  Official  Church  of  Chrysostom  Papadopoulos, recognized by the State, is naked and deprived of the grace and gift of  God, because it betrayed the Faith of our Christ by its tolerance and collaboration with  atheistic Judeo‐Masonry!!!...”      Below is a photocopy of the actual page from which the quote is taken:        We  agree  wholeheartedly  with  the  above  quote,  that  if  a  bishop  enslaves himself to antichristian and satanic Judeo‐Masonry, his mysteries are  invalid  and  his  hierarchical  status  is  “naked  and  deprived  of  the  grace  and  gift of God.” But unfortunately, “Archbishop” Chrysostom of Athens was not  the first, nor was he the last, of these Mason “hierarchs.”      Among  the  masons  of  high  rank  also  happened  to  be  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  Joachim  III,  the  first  Masonic  “Patriarch”  of  Constantinople.  This  information is derived firstly from the official website of the “Grand Lodge of  Greece,”  as  well  as  from  several  books  published  by  the  Zealot  Fathers  themselves, many of which refer to Joachim III as “the first Mason Ecumenical  Patriarch.”  On  the  Greek  version  of  Wikipedia,  in  the  article  regarding  Joachim  III,  we  read:  “According  to  the  official  website  of  the  Grand  Lodge  of  Greece, he was a member of the Masonic Lodge called ‘Progress.’ (Πρόοδος).”      And he wasn’t only a Mason, but also an Ecumenist. In the Patriarchal  Encyclical  of  1904  he  asked  of  the  Primates  of  the  Autocephalous  Orthodox  Churches  to  discuss  the  following:  “a)  the  meeting  and  strengthening  by  concordance  and  love,  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Churches  of  God,  b)  the  possibility  of  relation  and  Christian  love  and  rapprochement  of  our  Churches  with  the  two  great  branches of Christianity, namely, Catholicism and Protestantism, c) how it is possible  for the Orthodox Church to approach the so‐called Old Catholics, who desire a union  with us, and d) whether it is possible or not for us to formulate and better adjust our  current Calendar.”      He  also  wrote:  “It  is  beloved  of  God  and  Evangelical  for  me  to  ask  of  the  leadership  of  the  Holy  Autocephalous  Churches  regarding  our  present  and  future  relations  with  the  two  great  branches  of  Christianity,  the  Western  Church  and  the  Protestant  Churches.  And  it  is  known  that  every  genuine  Christian  must  pray  and  petition, as is found in the texts of our Church, for the Evangelical Unity, a teaching  constituting a pious and heartfelt desire in the Orthodox Faith, for the unity of them  and all who believe in Christ…”      Further  down he writes: “Not  without worth  is  our attention towards  the  issue  of  a  common  calendar,  so  that  we  can  adequate  document  things  said  and  written, using the same proposed systems of reform of our Julian Calendar, which has  been kept by the Orthodox Church for a long time. [This reform shall take place] either  by  adopting  the  Gregorian  Calendar,  since  [the  Julian  Calendar]  is  scientifically  lacking,  whereas  this  one  is  more accurate.  We  must  consequently  also  consider  the  transformation of our ecclesiastical Paschalion. Regarding this topic, the opinions are  divided, as we can see from the resulted specific opinions of our Orthodox people…”      Thus,  ‘Ecumenical  Patriarch’  Joachim  III  was  not  only  a  Mason  (member  of  the  Lodge  called  ‘Progress’),  but  he  was  also  a  branch  theory  Ecumenist (he called Catholicism and Protestantism ‘branches of Christianity’  and  he  expressed  a  desire  for  unity  with  them).  Additionally  he  was  also  in  favour  of  the  reform  of  the  ecclesiastical  calendar,  either  by  the  adoption  of  the  Gregorian  Calendar  or  the  creation  of  a  new  calendar.  In  any  case  his  purpose is spelled out quite clearly as “common calendar,” meaning a single  calendar  for  Westerns  and  Orthodox,  to  better  promote  their  unity.  In  other  words, ‘Patrarch’ Joachim III was the forerunner of ‘Archbishop’ Chrysostom  Papadopoulos! He was the ‘Metaxakis’ before Meletius Metaxakis!!!      But this very Mason, Ecumenist and very‐well‐would‐have‐been New  Calendarist  ‘Patriarch’  is  the  very  bishop  who  consecrated  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  Kavouridis  of  Florina  in  1909,  who  in  turn  consecrated  Bishop  Matthew of Bresthena in 1935! In other words, the Apostolic Succession of the  Matthewites derives from a Mason, Ecumenist and Modernist ‘Patriarch’!!!      So by what means does Bp. Kirykos Kontogiannis and Mr. Eleutherius  Gkoutzidis  preach  to  us  that  supposedly  Bishop  Matthew  offered  a  “pure”  line of Apostolic Succession, whereas all other lines (Russian Church Abroad,  etc)  are  looked  upon  as  “unclean”?  What  could  be  more  unclean  than  a  consecration  derived  from  a  Mason,  Ecumenist  and  Modernist  ‘Patriarch’  such  as  Joachim  III???  Such  a  line  of  Apostolic  Succession  is  by  far  as  “unclean” as one can possibly get! Yet Bp. Kirykos presents it as some kind of  “spotless  bastion”  of  Apostolic  Succession!  The  fact  that  Joachim  III  was  a  Mason  is  enough  to  disqualify  the  validity  of  this  line,  without  even  mentioning the fact he was also a ‘branch‐theory’ believing Ecumenist heretic,  and was also in favour of the reformation of the ecclesiastical calendar!      But  the  hypocrisy  doesn’t  stop  there.  This  Mason,  Ecumenist  and  Modernist  ‘Patriarch’  Joachim  III  did  not  only  pass  on  the  Apostolic  Succession to the Matthewites. He was also the very ‘Patriarch’ who blessed  the  Holy  Chrism  in  1903  and  again  in  1912,  the  very  Holy  Chrism  that  the  Matthewites  were  using  until  as  late  as  1958!  Thus  the  Matthewites  were  rechrismating  converts  from  New  Calendarism  by  anointing  them  with  the  Holy Chrism blessed by a Freemason, Ecumenist and Modernist ‘Patriarch’!!!      Behold  a  photograph  of  ‘Patriarch’  Joachim  III  and  the  Synod  of  the  Ecumenical Patriarchate shortly after the blessing of the Holy Chrism on Holy  Thursday, 1912:      The consecration of Holy Chrism by Patriarch Joachim III in 1912      Now let us again read the quote from “Phos tois en Skotei” published  in 1936: “…Therefore, the Official Church of Chrysostom Papadopoulos, recognized  by the State, is naked and deprived of the grace and gift of God, because it betrayed the  Faith  of  our  Christ  by  its  tolerance  and  collaboration  with  atheistic  Judeo‐ Masonry!!!...”      What  does  this  mean?  This  means  that  according  to  their  own  ecclesiology,  the  Matthewites  THEMSELVES  are  “naked  and  deprived  of  the  grace and gift of God” because they derive not only their Apostolic Succession  but  even  their  Holy  Chrism  from  a  ‘Patriarch’  who  “betrayed  the  Faith  of  our  Christ by his tolerance and collaboration with atheistic Judeo‐Masonry!!!...”      Alas! But let the Matthewites rethink as to whether they truly do have  “pure” Apostolic Succession and “valid mysteries” before they dare to judge  or doubt the Apostolic Succession and Valid Mysteries of the historic Russian  Orthodox Church Abroad, and the Acacian hierarchy it founded in Greece. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/joachimiiimasoneng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

pre1924ecumenism2eng 88%

THE PAN‐HERESY OF ECUMENISM EXISTED   AMONG THE ORTHODOX PRIOR TO 1924    In 1666‐1667 the Pan‐Orthodox  Synod of  Moscow  decided  to  receive  Papists  by simple confession of Faith, without rebaptism or rechrismation!    At the beginning of the 18th century at Arta, Greece, the Holy Mysteries would  be administered by Orthodox Priests to Westerners, despite this scandalizing  the Orthodox faithful.    In 1863 an Anglican clergyman was permitted to commune in Serbia, by the  official decision of the Holy Synod of the Serbian Orthodox Church.    In the 1800s, Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow wrote that the schisms within  Christianity  “do  not  reach  the  heavens.”  In  other  words,  he  believed  that  heresy doesn’t divide Christians from the Kingdom of God!    In 1869, at the funeral of Metropolitan Chrysanthus of Smyrna, an Archbishop  of  the  Armenian  Monophysites  and  a  Priest  of  the  Anglicans  actively  participated in the service!    In  1875,  the  Orthodox  Archbishop  of  Patras,  Greece,  concelebrated  with  an  Anglican priest in the Mystery of Baptism!    In  1878  the  first  Masonic  Ecumenical  Patriarch,  Joachim  III,  was  enthroned.  He  was  Patriarch  for  two  periods  (1878‐1884  and  1901‐1912).  This  Masonic  Patriarch Joachim III is the one who performed the Episcopal consecration of  Bp. Chrysostom Kavouridis, who in turn was the bishop who consecrated Bp.  Matthew of Bresthena. Thus the Matthewites trace their Apostolic Succession  in part from this Masonic “Patriarch.” In 1903 and 1912, Patriarch Joachim III  blessed  the  Holy  Chrism,  which  was  used  by  the  Matthewites  until  they  blessed their own chrism in 1958! Thus until 1958 they were using the Chrism  blessed by a Masonic Patriarch!    In 1879 the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Constantinople decided that in  times of great necessity, it is permitted to have sacramental communion with  the Armenians. In other words, an Orthodox priest can perform the mysteries  for Armenian laymen, and an Armenian priest for Orthodox laymen!    In  1895  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  Anthimus  VII  declared  his  desire  for  al  Christians to calculate days according to the new calendar!    In  1898,  Patriarch  Gerasimus  of  Jerusalem  permitted  the  Greeks  and  Syrians  living in Melbourne to receive communion in Anglican parishes!    In 1902 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical Patriarchate refers to the  heresies  of  the  west  as  “Churches”  and  “Branches  of  Christianity”!  Thus  it  was an official Orthodox declaration that espouses the branch theory heresy!    In 1904 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical Patriarchate refers to the  heretics  as  “those  who  believe  in  the  All‐Holy  Trinity,  and  who  honour  the  name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and hope in the salvation of God’s grace”!    In  1907  at  Portsmouth,  England,  there  was  a  joint  doxology  of  Russian  and  Anglican clergy!    Prior  to  1910  the  Russian  Bishop  Innokenty  of  Alaska,  made  a pact  with  the  Anglican  Bishop  Row  of  America,  that  the  priests  belonging  to  each  Church  would  be  permitted  to  offer  the  mysteries  to  the  laymen  of  one  another.  In  other  words,  for  Orthodox  priests  to  commune  Anglican  laymen,  and  for  Anglican priests to commune Orthodox laymen!    In  1910  the  Syrian/Antiochian  Orthodox  Bishop  Raphael  (Hawaweeny)  permitted  the  Orthodox  faithful,  in  his  Encyclical,  to  accept  the  mysteries  of  Baptism, Communion, Confession,  Marriage,  etc,  from Anglicna  priests!  The  same  bishop  took  part  in  an  Anglican  Vespers,  wearing  his  mandya  and  seated on the throne!    In 1917 the Greek Orthodox Exarch of America Alexander of Rodostolus took  part  in  an  Anglican  Vespers.  The  same  hierarch  also  took  part  in  the  ordination of an Anglican bishop in Pensylvania.    In  1918,  Archbishop  Anthimus  of  Cyprus  and  Metropolitan  Meletius  mataxakis of Athens, took part in Anglican services at St. Paul’s Cathedral in  London!    In  1919,  the  leaders  of  the  Orthdoxo  Churches  in  America  took  part  in  Anglican  services  at  the  “General  Assembly  of  Anglican  Churches  in  America”!    In 1920 the Patriarchal Encyclical of the Ecumenical patriarchate refers to the  heresies as “Churches of God” and advises the adoption of the new calendar!    In 1920, Metropolitan Philaret of Didymotichus, while in London, serving as  the  representative  of  the  Ecumenical  Patriarchate  at  the  Conference  of  Lambeth, took part in joint services in an Anglican church!    In  1920,  Patriarch  Damian  of  Jerusalem  (he  who  was  receiving  the  Holy  Light), took part in an Anglican liturgy at the Anglican Church of Jerusalem,  where he read the Gospel in Greek, wearing his full Hierarchical vestments!    In  1921,  the  Anglican  Archbishop  of  Canterbury  took  part  in  the  funeral  of  Metropolitan Dorotheus of Prussa in London, at which he read the Gospel!    In  1022,  Archbishop  Germanus  of  Theathyra,  the  representative  of  the  Ecumenical  Patriarchate  in  London,  took  part  in  a  Vespers  service  at  Westminster Abbey, wearing his Mandya and holding his pastoral staff!    In 1923, the Ecumenical Patriarchate recognized the mysteries of the “Living  Church” which had been anathematized by Patriarch Tikhon of Russia!    In 1923, the Ecumenical Patriarchate recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In 1923, the Patriarchate of Jerusalem recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In 1923, the Church of Cyprus recognized Anglican mysteries as valid!    In  1923,  the  “Pan‐Orthodox  Congress”  under  Ecumenical  Patriarch  Meletius  Metaxakis proposed the adoption of the new “Revised Julian Calendar.”    In  December  1923,  the  Holy  Synod  of  the  Church  of  Greece  officially  approved  the  adoption  of  the  New  Calendar  to  take  place  in  March  1924.  Among  the bishops who signed  the  decision  to  adopt the new calendar was  Metropolitan  Germanus  of  Demetrias,  one  of  the  bishops  who  later  consecrated Bishop Matthew of Bresthena in 1935. Thus the Matthewites trace  their Apostolic Succession from a bishop who was personally responsible (by  his signature) for the adoption of the New Calendar in Greece. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii01 74%

CAN FASTING MAKE ONE “WORTHY” TO COMMUNE?    In the first paragraph of his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes:  “...  according  to  the  tradition  of  our  Fathers  (and  that  of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  must  be  suitably prepared, in order to worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord. This  preparation indispensably includes fasting according to one’s strength.” To further  prove that he interprets this worthiness as being based on fasting, Metropolitan  Kirykos  continues  further  down  in  reference  to  his  unhistorical  understanding  about the  early  Christians:  “They fasted  in the fine and  broader  sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    Here Bp. Kirykos tries to fool the reader by stating the absolutely false  notion  that  the  Holy  Fathers  (among  them  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena)  supposedly agree with his unorthodox views. The truth is that not one single  Holy Father of the Orthodox Church agrees with Bp. Kirykosʹs views, but in  fact, many of them condemn these views as heretical. And as for referring to  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  this  is  extremely  misleading,  which  is  why  Bp.  Kirykos  was  unable  to  provide  a  quote.  In  reality,  St.  Matthew’s  five‐page‐ long treatise on Holy Communion, published in 1933, repeatedly stresses the  importance  of  receiving  Holy  Communion  frequently  and  does  not  mention  any  such  pre‐communion  fast  at  all.  He  only  mentions  that  one  must  go  to  confession,  and  that  confession  is  like  a  second  baptism  which  washes  the  soul and prepares it for communion. If St. Matthew really thought a standard  week‐long  pre‐communion  fast  for  all  laymen  was  paramount,  he  certainly  would have mentioned it somewhere in his writings. But in the hundreds of  pages  of  writings  by  St.  Matthew  that  have  been  collected,  no  mention  is  made of such a fast. The reason for this is because St. Matthew was a Kollyvas  Father  just  as  was  his  mentor,  St.  Nectarius  of  Aegina.  Also,  the  fact  St.  Matthew left Athos and preached throughout Greece and Asia Minor during  his earlier life, is another example of his imitation of the Kollyvades Fathers.    As  much  as  Bp.  Kirykos  would  like  us  to  think  that  the  Holy  Fathers  preach that a Christian, simply by fasting, can somehow “worthily receive the  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,”  the  Holy  Fathers  of  the  Orthodox  Church  actually  teach  quite  clearly  that  NO  ONE  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion,  except by the grace of God Himself. Whether someone eats oil on a Saturday  or  doesnʹt  eat  oil,  cannot  be  the  deciding  point  of  a  person’s  supposed  “worthiness.”  In  fact,  even  fasting,  confession,  prayer,  and  all  other  things  donʹt  come  to  their  fulfillment  in  the  human  soul  until  one  actually  receives  Holy  Communion.  All  of  these  things  such  as  fasting,  prayers,  prostrations,  repentance,  etc,  do  indeed  help  one  quench  his  passions,  but  they  by  no  means make him “worthy.” Yes, we confess our sins to the priest. But the sins  aren’t loosened from our soul until the priest reads the prayer of pardon, and  the  sins  are  still  not  utterly  crushed  until  He  who  conquered  death  enters  inside the human soul through the Mystery of Holy Communion. That is why  Christ  said  that  His  Body  and  Blood  are  shed  “for  the  remission  of  sins.”  (Matthew 26:28).     Fasting  is  there  to  quench  our  passions  and  prevent  us  from  sinning,  confession is there so that we can recall our sins and repent of them, but it is  the  Mysteries  of  the  Church  that  operate  on  the  soul  and  grant  to  it  the  “worthiness” that the human soul can by no means attain by itself. Thus, the  Mystery  of  Pardon  loosens  the  sins,  and  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion  remits  the  sins.  For  of  the  many  Mysteries  of  the  Church,  the  seven  highest  mysteries have this very purpose, namely, to remit the sins of mankind by the  Divine  Economy.  Thus,  Baptism  washes  away  the  sins  from  the  soul,  while  Chrism  heals  anything  ailing  and  fills  all  voids.  Thus,  Absolution  washes  away the sins, while Communion heals the soul and body and fills it with the  grace of God. Thus, Unction cures the maladies of soul and body, causing the  body  and  soul  to  no  longer  be  divided  but  united  towards  a  life  in  Christ;  while Marriage (or Monasticism) confirms the plurality of persons or sense of  community that God desired when he said of old “Be fruitful and multiply”  (or in the case of Monasticism, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for  brethren  to  dwell  together  in  unity!”).  Finally,  the  Mystery  of  Priesthood  is  the  authority  given  by  Christ  for  all  of  these  Mysteries  to  be  administered.  Certainly, it is an Apostolic Tradition for mankind to be prepared by fasting  before  receiving  any  of  the  above  Mysteries,  be  it  Baptism,  Chrism,  Absolution,  Communion,  Unction,  Marriage  or  Priesthood.  But  this  act  of  fasting itself does not make anyone “worthy!”    If  someone  thinks  they  are  “worthy”  before  approaching  Holy  Communion,  then  the  Holy  Communion  would  be  of  no  positive  affect  to  them.  In  actuality,  they  will  consume  fire  and  punishment.  For  if  anyone  thinks  that  their  own  works  make  themselves  “worthy”  before  the  eyes  of  God, then surely Christ would have died in vain. Christ’s suffering, passion,  death  and  Resurrection would have  been  completely unnecessary.  As Christ  said,  “They  that  be  whole  need  not  a  physician,  but  they  that  are  sick  (Matthew 9:12).” If a person truly thinks that by not partaking of oil/wine on  Saturday,  in  order  to  commune  on  Sunday,  that  this  has  made  them  “worthy,”  then  by  merely  thinking  such  a  thing  they  have  already  proved  themselves unworthy of Holy Communion. In fact, they are deniers of Christ,  deniers  of  the  Cross  of  Christ,  and  deniers  of  their  own  salvation  in  Christ.  They  rather  believe  in  themselves  as  their  own  saviors.  They  are  thus  no  longer Christians but humanists.     But  is  humanism  a  modern  notion,  or  has  it  existed  before  in  the  history  of  the  Church?  In  reality,  the  devil  has  hurled  so  many  heresies  against  the  Church  that  he  has  run  out  of  creativity.  Thus,  the  traps  and  snares he sets are but fancy recreations of ancient heresies already condemned  by the Church. The humanist notions entertained by Bp. Kirykos are actually  an offshoot of an ancient heresy known as Pelagianism. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii01/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

MetaxakisAnglicans1918 59%

Project Canterbury  The Episcopal and Greek Churches  Report of an Unofficial Conference on Unity  Between Members of the Episcopal Church in America and  His Grace, Meletios Metaxakis, Metropolitan of Athens,  And His Advisers.  October 26, 1918.  New York: Department of Missions, 1920    PREFACE  THE desire for closer communion between the Eastern Orthodox Church and  the various branches of the Anglican Church is by no means confined to the  Anglican  Communion.  Many  interesting  efforts  have  been  made  during  the  past two centuries, a resume of which may be found in the recent publication  of  the  Department  of  Missions  of  the  Episcopal  Church  entitled  Historical  Contact Between the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches.  The most significant approaches of recent times have been those between the  Anglican  and  the  Russian  and  the  Greek  Churches;  and  of  late  the  Syrian  Church of India which claims foundation by the Apostle Saint Thomas.  Evdokim, the last Archbishop sent to America by the Holy Governing Synod  of Russia in the year 1915, brought with him instructions that he should work  for a closer understanding with the Episcopal Church in America. As a result,  a series of conferences were held in the Spring of 1916. At these conferences  the  question  of  Anglican  Orders,  the  Apostolical  Canons  and  the  Seventh  Oecumenical Council were discussed. The Russians were willing to accept the  conclusions  of  Professor  Sokoloff,  as  set  forth  in  his  thesis  for  the  degree  of  Doctor of Divinity, approved by the Holy Governing Synod of Russia. In this  thesis  he  proved  the  historical  continuity  of  Anglican  Orders,  and  the  intention to conform to the practice of the ancient Church. He expressed some  suspicion concerning the belief of part of the Anglican Church in the nature of  the sacraments, but maintained that this could not be of sufficient magnitude  to prevent the free operation of the Holy Spirit. The Russian members of the  conference,  while  accepting  this  conclusion,  pointed  out  that  further  steps  toward inter‐communion could only be made by an oecumenical council. The  following is quoted from the above‐mentioned publication:  The  Apostolical  Canons  were  considered  one  by  one.  With  explanations  on  both sides, the two Churches were found to be in substantial agreement.  In  connection  with  canon  forty‐six,  the  Archbishop  stated  that  the  Russian  Church  would  accept  any  Anglican  Baptism  or  any  other  Catholic  Baptism.  Difficulties  concerning  the  frequent  so‐called  ʺperiods  of  fastingʺ  were  removed by rendering the word ʺfastingʺ as ʺabstinence.ʺ Both Anglicans and  Russians  agreed  that  only  two  fast‐days  were  enjoined  on  their  members‐‐ Ash‐Wednesday and Good Friday.  The  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council  was  fully  discussed.  Satisfactory  explanations  were  given  by  both  sides,  but  no  final  decision  was  reached.  Before  the  conference  could  be  reconvened,  the  Archbishop  was  summoned  to a General Conference of the Orthodox Church at Moscow.  During  the  past  year  the  Syrian  Church  and  the  Anglican  Church  in  India  have  been  giving  very  full  and  careful  consideration  to  the  question  of  Reunion and it is hoped that some working basis may be speedily established.  As  a  preliminary  to  this  present  conference,  the  writer  addressed,  with  the  approval  of  the  members  of  the  conference  representing  the  Episcopal  Church,  a  letter  to  the  Metropolitan  which  became  the  basis  of  discussion.  This letter has been published as one of the pamphlets of this series under the  title, An Anglican Programme for Reunion. These conferences were followed by  a series of other conferences in England which took up the thoughts contained  in the American programme, as is shown in the following quotation from the  preface to the above‐mentioned letter:  At  the  first  conference  the  American  position  was  reviewed  and  it  was  mutually agreed that the present aim of such conference was not for union in  the  sense  of  ʺcorporate  solidarityʺ  based  on  the  restoration  of  intercommunion,  but  through  clear  understanding  of  each  otherʹs  position.  The  general  understanding  was  that  there  was  no  real  bar  to  communion  between  the  two  Churches  and  it  was  desirable  that  it  should  be  permitted,  but that such permission could only be given through the action of a General  Council.  The  third  of  these  series  of  conferences  was  held  at  Oxford.  About  forty  representatives  of  the  Anglican  Church  attended.  The  questions  of  Baptism  and  Confirmation  were  considered  by  this  conference.  It  was  shown  that,  until  the  eighteenth  century,  re‐baptism  of  non‐Orthodox  was  never  practiced. It was then introduced as a protest against the custom in the Latin  Church  of  baptizing,  not  only  living  Orthodox,  but  in  many  cases,  even  the  dead.  Under  order  of  Patriarch  Joachim  III,  it  has  become  the  Greek  custom  not to re‐baptize Anglicans who have been baptized by English priests. In the  matter  of  Confirmation  it  was  shown  that  in  the  cases  of  the  Orthodox,  the  custom of anointing with oil, called Holy Chrism, differs to some extent from  our  Confirmation.  It  is  regarded  as  a  seal  of  orthodoxy  and  should  not  be  viewed  as  repetition  of  Confirmation.  Even  in  the  Orthodox  Church  lapsed  communicants must receive Chrism again before restoration.  The  fourth  conference  was  held  in  the  Jerusalem  Chapel  of  Westminster  Abbey, under the presidency of the Bishop of Winchester. This discussion was  confined  to  the  consideration  of  the  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council.  It  is  not  felt by the Greeks that the number of differences on this point touch doctrinal  or  even  disciplinary  principles.  The  Metropolitan  stated  that  there  was  no  difficulty  tin  the  subject.  From  what  he  had  seen  of  Anglican  Churches,  he  was  assured  as  to  our  practice.  He  further  stated  that  he  was  strongly  opposed  to  the  practice  of  ascribing  certain  virtues  and  power  to  particular  icons, and that he himself had written strongly against this practice, and that  the Holy Synod of Greece had issued directions against it.ʺ  Those  brought  in  contact  with  the  Metropolitan  of  Athens,  and  those  who  followed  the  work  of  the  Commission  on  Faith  and  Order  can  testify  to  the  evident desire of the authorities of the East for closer union with the Anglican  Church as soon as conditions permit.  This  report  is  submitted  because  there  is  much  loose  thinking  and  careless  utterance on every side concerning the position of the Orthodox Church and  the  relation  of  the  Episcopal  Church  to  her  sister  Churches  of  the  East.  It  seems  not  merely  wise,  but  necessary,  to  place  before  Church  people  a  document showing how the minds of leading thinkers of both Episcopal and  Orthodox  Churches  are  approaching  this  most  momentous  problem  of  Intercommunion and Church Unity.    THE CONFERENCE  BY  common  agreement,  representatives  of  the  Greek  Orthodox  Church  and  delegates from the American Branch of the Anglican and Eastern Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation  of  the  Episcopal  Church,  met  in  the  Bible  Room  of  the  Library  of  the  General  Theological  Seminary,  Saturday,  October 26, 1918, at ten oʹclock. There were present as representing the Greek  Orthodox  Church:  His  Grace,  the  Most  Reverend  Meletios  Metaxakis,  Metropolitan  of  Greece;  the  Very  Reverend  Chrysostomos  Papadopoulos,  D.D.,  Professor  of  the  University  of  Athens  and  Director  of  the  Theological  Seminary  ʺRizariosʺ;  Hamilcar  Alivisatos,  D.D.,  Director  of  the  Ecclesiastical  Department  of  the  Ministry  of  Religion  and  Education,  Athens,  and  Mr.  Tsolainos,  who  acted  as  interpreter.  The  Episcopal  Church  was  represented  by  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney;  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  J.  Kinsman, Bishop of Delaware; the Right Reverend James H. Darlington, D.D.,  Bishop  of  Harrisburg;  the  Very  Reverend  Hughell  Fosbroke,  Dean  of  the  General Theological Seminary; the Reverend Francis J. Hall, D.D., Professor of  Dogmatic  Theology  in  the  General  Theological  Seminary;  the  Reverend  Rockland T. Homans, the Reverend William Chauncey Emhardt, Secretary of  the  American  Branch  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation;  Robert  H.  Gardiner,  Esquire,  Secretary  of  the  Commission  for  a  World  Conference  on  Faith  and  Order;  and  Seraphim  G.  Canoutas, Esquire. The Right Reverend Edward M. Parker, D.D.,  Bishop of New Hampshire, telegraphed his inability to be present. His Grace  the Metropolitan presided over the Greek delegation and Dr. Alivisatos acted  as  secretary.  The  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney  presided  over  the  American delegation and the Reverend W. C. Emhardt acted as secretary.  Bishop Courtney opened the conference with prayer and made the following  remarks:  ʺOur  brethren  of  the  Greek  Church,  as  well  as  the  Anglican,  have  received copies of the letter to His Grace which our secretary has drawn up;  and which lies before us this morning. It is clear to all those who have taken  active  part  in  efforts  to  draw  together,  that  it  is  of  no  use  any  longer  to  congratulate each  other  upon points on  which  we agree, so  long as we hold  back those things on which we differ. The points on which we agree are not  those which have caused the separation, but the things concerning which we  differ.  So  long  as  we  assume  that  the  conditions  which  separate  us  now  are  the same as those which have held us apart, we are in line for removing those  things  which  separate  us.  We  are  making  the  valleys  to  be  filled  and  the  mountains  to  be  brought  low  and  making  possible  a  revival  of  the  spirit  of  unity.  It  is  in  the  hope  of  effecting  this  that  we  are  gathered  together.  Doctrinal differences underlie the things that differentiate us from each other.  The  proper  way  to  begin  this  conference  would  be  to  ask  the  Greeks  what  they think of some of the propositions laid down in the letter, beginning first  with the question of the Validity of Anglican Orders, and then proceeding to  the ʺFilioque Clauseʺ in the Creed and other topics suggested.  ʺWill  His  Grace  kindly  state  what  is  his  view  concerning  the  Validity  of  Anglican Orders?ʺ  The Metropolitan: ʺI am greatly moved indeed, and it is with feelings of great  emotion  that  I  come  to  this  conference  around  the  table  with  such  learned  theologians  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Because  it  is  the  first  time  I  have  been  given the opportunity to express, not only my personal desire, but the desire  of  my  Church,  that  we  may  all  be  one.  I  understand  that  this  conference  is  unofficial.  Neither  our  Episcopal  brethren,  nor  the  Orthodox,  officially  represent  their  Churches.  The  fact,  however,  that  we  have  come  together  in  the spirit of prayer and love to discuss these questions, is a clear and eloquent  proof  that  we  are  on  the  desired  road  to  unity.  I  would  wish,  that  in  discussing these questions of ecclesiastical importance in the presence of such  theological experts,  that I were  as  well equipped  for  the  undertaking  as you  are.  Unfortunately,  however,  from  the  day  that  I  graduated  from  the  Theological Seminary at Jerusalem, I have been absorbed in the great question  of the day, which has been the salvation of Christians from the sword of the  invader of the Orient.  ʺUnfortunately, because  we  have  been confronted  in  the  Near East with this  problem of paramount importance, we leaders have not had the opportunity  to  think  of  these  equally  important  questions.  The  occupants  of  three  of  the  ancient thrones of Christendom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, the Patriarch  of  Antioch  and  the  Patriarch  of  Jerusalem,  have  been  constantly  confronted  with  the  question  of  how  to  save  their  own  fold  from  extermination.  These  patriarchates represent a great number of Orthodox and their influence would  be  of  prime  importance  in  any  deliberation.  But  they  have  not  had  time  to  send their bishops to a round‐table conference to deliberate on the questions  of  doctrine.  A  general  synod,  such  as  is  so  profitably  held  in  your  Church  when you come together every three years, would have the same result, if we  could  hold  the  same  sort  of  synod  in  the  Near  East.  A  conference  similar  to  the one held by your Church was planned by the Patriarch of Constantinople  in  September,  1911,  but  he  did  not  take  place,  owing  to  command  of  the  Sultan that the bishops who attended would be subject to penalty of death.  ʺIn 1906, when the Olympic games took place in Athens, the Metropolitan of  Drama, now of Smyrna, passed through Athens. That was sufficient to cause  an  imperative  demand  of  the  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  that  the  Metropolitan  be  punished,  and  in  consequence  he  was  transferred  from  Drama  to  Smyrna.  From  these  facts  you  can  see  under  what  conditions  the  evolution of the Greek Church has been taking place.  ʺAs I have stated in former conversations with my brethren of the Episcopal  Church, we hope that, by the Grace of God, freedom and liberty will come to  our race, and our bishops will be free to attend such conferences as we desire.  I assure you that a great spirit of revival will be inaugurated and give proof of  the revival of Grecian life of former times.  ʺThe question of the freedom of the territory to be occupied in the Near East is  not merely a question of the liberty of the people and the individual, but also 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/metaxakisanglicans1918/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 52%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

HolyFathersReBaptismEng 50%

The Position of Bp. Kirykos Regarding Re‐Baptism  Differs From the Canons of the Ecumenical Councils      In  the  last  few  years,  Bp.  Kirykos  has  begun  receiving  New  Calendarists and even Florinites and ROCOR faithful under his omophorion  by  re‐baptism,  even  if  these  faithful  received  the  correct  form  of  baptism  by  triple  immersion  completely  under  water  with  the  invocation  of  the  Holy  Trinity.  He  also  has  begun  re‐ordaining  such  clergy  from  scratch  instead  of  reading  a  cheirothesia.  But  this  strict  approach,  where  he  applies  akriveia  exclusively for these people, is different from the historical approach taken by  the Holy Fathers of the Ecumenical Councils.       Canon  7  of  the  Second  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  Arians,  Macedonians,  Sabbatians,  Novatians,  Cathars,  Aristeri,  Quartodecimens  and  Apollinarians are to be received only by a written libellus and re‐chrismation,  because  their  baptism  was  already  valid  in  form  and  did  not  require  repetition. The Canon reads as follows:      “As for those heretics who betake themselves to Orthodoxy, and to the  lot of the saved, we accept them in accordance with the subjoined sequence and  custom; viz.: Arians, and Macedonians, and Sabbatians, and Novatians, those  calling themselves  Cathari,  and  Aristeri,  and the  Quartodecimans,  otherwise  known as Tetradites, and Apollinarians, we accept when they offer libelli (i.e.,  recantations in writing) and anathematize every heresy that does not hold the  same beliefs  as the catholic and  apostolic  Church of  God,  and are  sealed first  with holy chrism on their forehead and their eyes, and nose, and mouth, and  ears; and in sealing them we say: “A seal of a free gift of Holy Spirit”…”      The same Canon only requires a re‐baptism of individuals who did not  receive the correct form of baptism originally (i.e. those who were sprinkled  or who were baptized by single immersion instead of triple immersion, etc).  The Canon reads as follows:      “As  for  Eunomians,  however,  who  are  baptized  with  a  single  immersion,  and  Montanists,  who  are  here  called  Phrygians,  and  the  Sabellians,  who  teach  that  Father  and  Son  are  the  same  person,  and  who  do  some  other bad  things, and  (those belonging  to)  any  other heresies (for  there  are  many  heretics  here,  especially  such  as  come  from  the  country  of  the  Galatians:    all  of  them  that  want  to  adhere  to  Orthodoxy  we  are  willing  to  accept as Greeks. Accordingly, on the first day we make them Christians; on  the second day, catechumens; then, on the third day, we exorcize them with the  act  of  blowing  thrice  into  their  face  and  into  their  ears;  and  thus  do  we  catechize them, and we make them tarry a while in the church and listen to the  Scriptures; and then we baptize them.”      Thus  it  is  wrong  to  re‐baptize  those  who  have  already  received  the  correct form by triple immersion. The Holy Fathers advise in this Holy Canon  that  only  those  who  did  not  receive  the  correct  form  are  to  be  re‐baptized.  Now then, if the Holy Second Ecumenical Council declares that such heretics  as  Arians,  Macedonians,  Quartodecimens,  Apollinarians,  etc,  are  to  be  received  only  by  libellus  and  chrismation,  how  on  earth  does  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  refusal  to  receive  Florinites  and  ROCOR  faithful  by  chrismation,  but instead insists upon their rebaptism as if they are worse than Arians?      The  95th  Canon  of  the  Quinisext  (Fifth‐and‐Sixth)  Ecumenical  Council  declares  that  those  baptized  by  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  are  to  be  received  into  the  Orthodox  Church  by  a  simple  libellus  and  anathematization of the heresies, without needing to be re‐baptized, and even  without needing to be re‐chrismated! The Canon reads:      As  for  Nestorians,  and  Eutychians  (Monophysites),  and  Severians  (Monothelites),  and  those  from  similar  heresies,  they  have  to  give  us  certificates (called  libelli)  and  anathematize  their  heresy,  the  Nestorians,  and  Nestorius, and Eutyches and Dioscorus, and Severus, and the other exarchs of  such heresies, and those who entertain their beliefs, and all the aforementioned  heresies, and thus they are allowed to partake of holy Communion.      Now  then,  if  the  Quinisext  Ecumenical  Council  allows  even  Nestorians,  Monophysites  and  Monothelites  to  be  received  by  mere  libellus,  without requiring to be baptized or even chrismated, and following this mere  libellus  they  are  immediately  free  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  how  is  Bp.  Kirykos’s  approach  patristic,  if  he  requires  the  re‐baptism  of  even  Florinites  and ROCOR faithful?!!! Is Bp. Kirykos not trying to outdo the Holy Fathers in  his  attempt  to  be  “super‐Orthodox”?  Can  such  an  approach  taken  by  Bp.  Kirykos be  considered Orthodox  if the  Holy Fathers in their  Canons request  otherwise? Are the Canons of Ecumenical Councils invalid for Bp. Kirykos?      Certainly  the  Latins  (Franks,  Papists)  are  unbaptised,  because  their  baptisms  consist  of  mere  sprinklings  instead  of  triple  immersion.  Likewise,  various  New  Calendarists  are  also  unbaptised  if  they  were  not  dunked  completely  under  the  water  three  times.  But  can  such  be  said  for  those  Orthodox  Christians,  and  even  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians  (be  they  Florinite, ROCOR or otherwise), who do have the correct form of baptism?      In the Patriarchal Oros of 1755 regarding the re‐baptism of Latins, the  Orthodox Patriarchs make it quite clear that their reason for requiring the re‐ baptism  of  Latins  is  because  the  Latins  do  not  have  the  correct  form  of  baptism, but rather sprinkle instead of immersing. The text of the Patriarchal  Oros  actually  refers  to  the  Canons  of  the  Second  and  Quinisext  Councils  as  their  reasons  for  re‐baptizing  the  Latins.  The  relevant  text  of  the  Patriarchal  Oros of 1755 is as follows:    “...And we follow the Second and Quinisext holy Ecumenical Councils,  which  order  us  to  receive  as  unbaptized  those  aspirants  to  Orthodoxy  who  were  not  baptized  with  three  immersions  and  emersions,  and  in  each  immersion  did  not  loudly  invoke  one  of  the  divine  hypostases,  but  were  baptized in some other fashion...”    Thus we see in the above Patriarchal Oros of 1755, that even as late as  this  year,  the  Orthodox  Church  was  carrying  out  the  very  principles  of  the  Second and Quinisext Ecumenical Councils, namely that it is only those who  were  baptized  by  some  obscure  form  other  than  triple  immersion  and  invocation of the Holy Trinity, that were required to be re‐baptized.    How  then  can  the  positions  of  the  Holy  Ecumenical Councils  and  the  Holy  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  be  compared  to  the  extremist  methods  of  Bp.  Kirykos and his fellow hierarchs of late? Is Bp. Kirykos’ current practice really  Orthodox? Is it possible to preach contrary to the teachings of the Ecumenical  and Pan‐Orthodox Councils and yet remain Orthodox? And as for those who  believe that there is nothing wrong with being strict, let them remember that  the Pharisees were also strict, but it was they who crucified the Lord of Glory!  The Orthodox Faith is a Royal Path. Just as it is possible to fall to the left (as  the New Calendarists and Ecumenists have done), it is also quite possible to  fall  to  the  right  and spin off on  a wrong  turn far  away from  the tradition of  the  Holy  Fathers.  It  is  this  latter  type  of  fall  that  has  occurred  with  Bp.  Kirykos.  In  fact,  even  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  quite  moderate  compared  to  Bp.  Kirykos.  For  Bp.  Matthew  of  Bresthena  knew  the  Canons  quite well, and required New Calendarists to be received only by chrismation,  or in some cases by only a libellus or Confession of Faith.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/holyfathersrebaptismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

livingsynodofbishops 37%

HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons.      The  Canons  themselves  offer  three  forms  of  punishment,  namely,  deposition, excommunication and anathematization. Deposition is applied to  clergy. Excommunication is applied to laity. Anathematization can be applied  to either clergy or laity. Deposition does not remove the priestly rank, but is  simply a prohibition from the clergyman to perform priestly functions. If the  deposition  is  later  revoked,  the  clergyman  does  not  require  reordination.  In  the same way, excommunication does not remove a layman’s baptism. It only  prohibits the layman to commune. If the excommunication is later lifted, the  layman  does  not  require  rebaptism.  Anathematization  causes  the  clergyman  or layman to be cut off from the Church and assigned to the devil. But even  anathematizations can be revoked if the clergyman or layman repents.     There Is a Hierarchy of Authority in Canon Law      The authority of one Canon over another  is determined by the  power  of the Council the Canons were ratified by. For example, a canon ratified by  an  Ecumenical  Council  overruled  any  canon  ratified  by  a  local  Council.  The  hierarchy of authority, from most binding Canons to least, is as follows:      Apostolic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  compiled  by  the  Holy  Apostles  and  their  immediate  successors.  These  Canons  were  approved  and  confirmed by the First Ecumenical Council and again by the Quinisext Council.  Not  even  an  Ecumenical  Council  can  overrule  or  overthrow  an  Apostolic  Canon.  There  are  only  very  few  cases  where  Ecumenical  Councils  have  amended  the  command  of  an  Apostolic  Canon  by  either  strengthening  or  weakening  it.  But  by  no  means  were  any  Apostolic  Canons  overruled  or  abolished.  For  instance,  the  1st  Apostolic  Canon  which  states  that  a  bishop  must  be  ordained  by  two  or  three  other  bishops.  Several  Canons  of  the  Ecumenical Councils declare that even two bishops do not suffice, but that a  bishop must be ordained by the consent of all the bishops in the province, and  the ordination itself must take place by no less than three bishops. This does  not abolish nor does it overrule the 1st Apostolic Canon, but rather it confirms  and  reinforces  the  “spirit  of  the  law”  behind  that  original  Canon.  Another  example is the 5th Apostolic Canon which states that Bishops, Presbyters and  Deacons are not permitted to put away their wives by force, on the pretext of  reverence.  Meanwhile,  the  12th  Canon  of  Quinisext  advises  a  bishop  (or  presbyters who has been elected as a bishop) to first receive his wife’s consent  to separate and for both of them to become celibate. This does not oppose the  Apostolic  Canon  because  it  is  not  a  separation  by  force  but  by  consent.  The  13th  Canon  of  Quinisext  confirms  the  5th  Apostolic  Canon  by  prohibiting  a  presbyters or deacons to separate from his wife. Thus the 5th Apostolic Canon  is not abolished, but amended by an Ecumenical Council for the good of the  Church.  After  all,  the  laws  exist  to  serve  the  Church  and  not  to  enslave  the  Church. In the same way, Christ declared: “The sabbath was made for man, and  not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).”    Ecumenical  Canons  (Universal)  are  those  pronounced  by  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils.  These  Councils  received  this  name  because  they  were  convened  by  Roman  Emperors  who  were  regarded  to  rule  the  Ecumene  (i.e.,  “the  known  world”).  Ecumenical  Councils  all  took  place  in  or  around  Constantinople,  also  known  as  New  Rome,  the  Reigning  City,  or  the  Universal  City. The president was always the hierarch in attendance that happened to be  the first‐among‐equals. Ecumenical Councils cannot abolish Apostolic Canons,  nor  can  they  abolish  the  Canons  of  previous  Ecumenical  Councils.  But  they  can overrule Regional and Patristic Canons.      Regional  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Regional  Councils that were later confirmed by an Ecumenical Council. This approval  gave these Regional Canons a universal authority, almost equal to Ecumenical  Canons.  These  Canons  are  not  only  valid  within  the  Regional  Church  in  which  the  Council  took  place,  but  are  valid  for  all  Orthodox  Christians.  For  this  reason  the  Canons  of  these  approved  Regional  Councils  cannot  be  abolished, but must be treated as those of Ecumenical Councils.       Patristic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  the  Canons  of  individual  Holy  Fathers  that  were  confirmed  by  an  Ecumenical  Council.  Their  authority  is  only  lesser  than  the  Apostolic  Canons,  Ecumenical  Canons  and  Universal  Regional Canons. But because they were approved by an Ecumenical Council,  these Patristic Canons binding on all Orthodox Christians.      Pan‐Orthodox  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Pan‐ Orthodox Councils. Since Constantinople had fallen to the Ottomans in 1453,  there  could  no  longer  be  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils,  since  there  was  no  longer a ruling Emperor of the Ecumene (the Roman or Byzantine Empire). But  the Ottoman Sultan appointed the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople as  both  the  political  and  religious  leader  of  the  enslaved  Roman  Nation  (all  Orthodox  Christians  within  the  Roman  Empire,  regardless  of  language  or  ethnic origin). In this capacity, having replaced the Roman Emperor as leader  of  the  Roman  Orthodox  Christians,  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  took  the  responsibility  of  convening  General  Councils  which  were  not  called  Ecumenical Councils (since there was no longer an Ecumene), but instead were  called  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils.  Since  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  was  also  the  first‐among‐equals  of  Orthodox  hierarchs,  he  would  also  preside  over  these  Councils. Thus he became both the convener and the president. The Primates  of  the  other  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  were  also  invited,  along with their Synods of Bishops. If the Ecumenical Patriarch was absent or  the one accused, the Patriarch of Alexandria would preside over the Synod. If  he too could not attend in person, then the Patriarchs of Antioch or Jerusalem  would  preside.  If  no  Patriarchs  could  attend,  but  only  send  their  representatives,  these  representatives  would  not  preside  over  the  Council.  Instead, whichever bishop present who held the highest see would preside. In  several  chronologies,  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  are  referred  to  as  Ecumenical. In any case, the Canons pertaining to these Councils are regarded  to be universally binding for all Orthodox Christians.       National  Canons  (Local)  are  those  valid  only  within  a  particular  National Church. The Canons of these National Councils are only accepted if  they  are  in  agreement  with  the  Canons  ratified  by  the  above  Apostolic,  Ecumenical, Regional, Patristic and Pan‐Orthodox Councils.      Provincial  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  Metropolitan  and  his  suffragan  bishops.  They  are  only  binding  within  that  Metropolis.      Prefectural  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  single  bishop and his subordinate clergy. They are only valid within that Diocese.       Parochial  Canons  are  the  by‐laws  of  a  local  Parish  or  Mission,  which  are  chartered  and  endorsed  by  the  Rector  or  Founder  of  a  Parish  and  the  Parish Council. These by‐laws are only applicable within that Parish.      Monastic Canons are the rules of a local Monastery or Monastic Order,  which  are  chartered  by  the  Abbot  or  Founder  of  the  Skete  or  Monastery.  These by‐laws are only applicable within that Monastery.      Sometimes  Canons  are  only  recommendations  explaining  how  clergy  and laity are to conduct themselves. Other times they are actually penalties to  be  executed  upon  laity  and  clergy  for  their  misdeeds.  But  the  penalties  contained  within  Canons  are  simply  recommendations  and  not  the  actual  executions of the penalties themselves. The recommendation of the law is one  thing and the execution of the law is another.     Canon Law Can Only Be Executed By Those With Authority       For  the  execution  of  the  law  to  take  place  it  requires  a  competent  authority  to  execute  the  law.  A  competent  authority  is  reckoned  by  the  principle  of  “the  greater  judges  the  lesser.”  Thus,  there  are  Canons  that  explain who has the authority to judge individuals according to the Canons.      A  layman  can  only  be  judged,  excommunicated  or  anathematized  by  his own bishop, or by his own priest, provided the priest has the permission  of  his own  bishop (i.e., a priest who  is  a pneumatikos).  This law  is ratified  by  the 6th Canon of Carthage, which has been made universal by the authority of  the Sixth Ecumenical Council. The Canon states: “The application of chrism and  the  consecration  of  virgin  girls  shall  not  be  done  by  Presbyters;  nor  shall  it  be  permissible for a Presbyter to reconcile anyone at a public liturgy. This is the  decision  of  all  of  us.”  St.  Nicodemus’  interprets  the  Canon  as  follows:  “The  present  Canon  prohibits  a  priest  from  doing  three  things…  and  remission  of  the  penalty for a sin to a penitent, and thereafter through communion of the Mysteries the  reconciliation  of  him  with  God,  to  whom  he  had  become  an  enemy  through  sin,  making  him  stand  with  the  faithful,  and  celebrating  the  Liturgy  openly…  For  these  three functions have to be exercised by a bishop…. By permission of the bishop even a  presbyter can reconcile penitents, though. And read Ap. c. XXXIX, and c. XIX of the  First EC. C.” Thus the only authority competent to judge a layman is a bishop  or a presbyter who has the permission of his bishop to do so. However, those  who are among the low rank of clergy (readers, subdeacons, etc) require their  own local bishop to try them, because a presbyter cannot depose them.      A  deacon  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  three  other  bishops,  and  a  presbyter  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  six  other  bishops.  The  28th  Canon  of  Carthage  thus  states:  “If  Presbyters  or  Deacons  be  accused,  the  legal  number  of  Bishops  selected  from the nearby locality, whom the accused demand, shall be empaneled — that is, in  the case of a Presbyter six, of a Deacon three, together with the Bishop of the accused  — to investigate their causes; the same form being observed in respect of days, and of  postponements,  and  of  examinations,  and  of  persons,  as  between  accusers  and  accused. As for the rest of the Clerics, the local Bishop alone shall hear and conclude  their  causes.”  Thus,  one  bishop  is  insufficient  to  submit  a  priest  or  deacon  to  trial or deposition. This can only be done by a Synod of Bishops with enough  bishops present to validly apply the canons. The amount of bishops necessary  to  judge  and  depose  a  priest  are  seven  (one  local  plus  six  others),  and  for  a  deacon the minimum amount of bishops is four (one local plus three others).      A  bishop  must  be  judged  by  his  own  metropolitan  together  with  at  least twelve other bishops. If the province does not have twelve bishops, they  must  invite  bishops  from  other  provinces  to  take  part  in  the  trial  and  deposition. Thus the 12th Canon of Carthage states: “If any Bishop fall liable to  any charges, which is to be deprecated, and an emergency arises due to the fact that  not many can convene, lest he be left exposed to such charges, these may be heard by  twelve Bishops, or in the case of a Presbyter, by six Bishops besides his own; or in the  case  of  a  Deacon,  by  three.”  Notice  that  the  amount  of  twelve  bishops  is  the  minimum  requirement  and  not  the  maximum.  The  maximum  is  for  all  the  bishops, even if they are over one hundred in number, to convene for the sake  of  deposing  a  bishop.  But  if  this  cannot  take  place,  twelve  bishops  assisting 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii07 34%

PELAGIANISM IS NOTHING OTHR THAN THE  “CHRISTIAN” VERSION OF PHARISAISM    Although we are speaking of the heresy of Pelagianism and not that of  Pharisaism, it is difficult not to mention the Pharisees because their positions  were also a kind of Pelagianism. In fact, the Pharisaic view of fasting is very  much identical to the view held by Bp. Kirykos, since he thinks that “fasting  in  the  finer  and  broader  sense”  makes  someone  “worthy  to  commune.”  But  our  Lord  Jesus  Christ  rebuked  the  Pharisees  for  this  error  of  theirs.  Fine  examples of these rebukes are found in the Gospels. The best example is the  parable  of  the  Pharisee  and  the  Publican,  because  it  shows  the  difference  between  a  Pharisee  who  thinks  of  himself  as  “worthy”  due  to  his  fasts,  compared to a Christian who is conscious of his unworthiness and cries to the  Lord for mercy. It is a perfect example because it mentions fasting. This well‐ known parable spoken by the Lord Himself, reads as follows:    “And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they  were  righteous,  and  despised  others:  Two  men  went  up  into  the  temple  to  pray;  the  one  a  Pharisee,  and  the  other  a  publican.  The  Pharisee  stood  and  prayed  thus  with  himself,  God,  I  thank  thee,  that  I  am  not  as  other  men  are,  extortioners,  unjust,  adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I  possess.  And  the  publican,  standing  afar  off,  would  not  lift  up  so  much  as  his  eyes  unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell  you,  this  man  went  down  to  his  house  justified  rather  than  the  other:  for  every  one  that  exalteth  himself  shall  be  abased;  and  he  that  humbleth  himself  shall  be  exalted  (Luke 18:9‐14).”    Behold the word of the Lord! The Publican was more justified than the  Pharisee!  The  Publican  was  more  worthy  than  the  Pharisee!  But  today’s  Christians  cannot  be  justified  if  they  are  “extortionists,  unjust,  adulterers  or  even… publicans.” For they have the Gospel, the Church, the guidance of the  spiritual  father,  and  the  washing  away  of  their  sins  through  the  once‐off  Mysteries of Baptism and Chrism, and the repetitive Mysteries of Confession  and Communion. They have no excuse to be sinners, and if they are they have  the  method  available  to  correct  themselves.  But  how  much  more  so  are  Christians not justified in being Pharisees? For they have this parable spoken  by the Lord Himself as clear proof of Christ’s disfavor towards “the leaven of  the  Pharisees.”  They  have  hundreds  of  Holy  Fathers’  epistles,  homilies  and  dialogues, which they must have read in their pursuit of exulting themselves!  They have before them the repeated exclamations of the Lord, “Woe unto you,  Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men!  For  ye  neither  go  in  yourselves,  neither  suffer  ye  them  that  are  entering  to  go  in  (Matthew  23:13).”  They  have  even  the  very  fact  that  it  was  an  apostle  who  betrayed the Lord, and not a mere disciple but one of the twelve! They have  the fact that it was not an idolatrous nation that judged its savior and found  him guilty, but it was God’s own chosen people that condemned the world’s  Savior to death! They have even the fact that the Scribes, Pharisees and High  Priests were the ones who crucified the King of Glory! Yet despite having all  of these clear proofs, they continue their Pharisaism, but the “Christian” kind,  namely, Pelagianism. But who are we to condemn them? After all, we are but  sinners.  Therefore  let  them  take  heed  to  the  Lord’s  rebuke:  “Ye  serpents,  ye  generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell? (Matthew 23:33).  A Genuine Orthodox Christian (i.e., non‐Pelagian, non‐Pharisee), approaches  the Holy Chalice with nothing but disdain and humiliation for his wretched  soul, and feels his utter unworthiness, and truly believes that what is found in  that Chalice is God in the Flesh, and mankind’s only source of salvation and  life. If a man is to ever be called “worthy,” the origin of that worth is not in  himself, but is in that Holy Chalice from which he is about to commune. For a  man who lives of himself will surely die. But a man who lives in Christ, and  through  Holy  Communion  allows  Christ  to  live  in  him,  such  a  man  shall  never die. As Christ said: “I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if  any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my  flesh, which I will give for the life of the world (John 6:51).”     Thus a Genuine Orthodox Christian does not boast that he “fasts twice a  week” as did the Pharisee, but recognizing only his own imperfections before  the face of the perfect Christ, he smites his breast as did the Publican, saying,  “God be merciful to me a sinner.” Like the malefactor that he is in thought, word  and deed, he imitates the malefactor that was crucified with the Lord, saying,  “I indeed justly [am condemned]; for I received the due reward for my deeds: but this  man,  [my  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,]  hath  done  nothing  amiss  (Luke  23:41).” And he says unto Jesus, “Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy  kingdom  (Luke  23:42).”  To  such  a  Genuine  Orthodox  Christian,  free  of  Pharisaism  and  Pelagianism,  the  Lord  responds,  “Verily  I  say  unto  thee,  today  shalt  thou  be  with  me  in  paradise  (Luke  23:43),”  and  “I  appoint  unto  you  a  kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me, that ye may eat and drink at my table  in my kingdom (Luke 22:29).”    How  does  all  of  the  above  compare  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  statement  that  “fasting according to one’s strength” causes one to “worthily receive the body and  blood  of  the  Lord?”  How  can  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  theory  that  the  early  Christians  supposedly  “fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Can  anyone,  no  matter  how  strictly  they  fast,  ever  be  considered  worthy  of  Holy  Communion?  Does  someone’s  work  of  fasting  make them worthy? Is Bp. Kirykos justified in believing that fasting for three  days  without  oil  or  wine  supposedly  makes  an  individual  worthy  of  Holy  Communion? If Bp. Kirykos is justified, then why does he not do this himself?  Why does he eat oil on every Saturday of Great Lent, and yet communes on  Sundays  “unworthily”  (according  to  his  own  theory)  without  shame?  Why  does he demand the three day fast from oil upon laymen, but does not apply  it to himself and his priests?     We are not speaking of laymen with penances and excommunications.  We are speaking of laymen who have confessed their sins and are permitted  by  their  spiritual  father  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  When  such  laymen  receive  Holy  Communion  they  are  not  meant  to  kiss  the  hand  of  the  priest  after  this,  because  the  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  their  equality  with  the  priest  through  the  Mysteries.  There  is  no  difference  between  priests  and  laymen when it comes to the ability to commune, except only for the fact that  the clergy  receive  the Immaculate Mysteries within the  Holy Bema,  whereas  the  laity  receives  them  from  the  Royal  Doors.  Aside  from  this,  there  is  no  difference in the preparation for Holy Communion either. The laymen cannot  be compelled to fast extra fasts simply for being laymen, whereas priests are  not required to do these extra fasts at all on account of being priests.    The equality of the clergy and laity with regards to Holy Communion  is clearly expressed by Blessed Chrysostom: “There are cases when a priest does  not differ from a layman, notably when one approaches the Holy Mysteries. We are all  equally given them, not as in the Old Testament, when one food was for the priests  and another for the people and when it was not permitted to the people to partake of  that which was for the priest. Now it is not so: but to all is offered the same Body and  the same Chalice…” (John Chrysostom, Homily 18, on 2 Corinthians 8:24)    This is why the Orthodox Church preserves this tradition whereby the  priest forbids the laymen who have communed from kissing his hand. These  are  the  pious  laymen  we  refer  to:  those  who  are  deemed  acceptable  to  approach  the  Chalice.  Aren’t  the  bishops  and  priests  obliged  to  fast  more  strictly than the laymen, especially since the bishops and priests are the ones  invoking the Holy Spirit to descend on the gifts, while the laymen only stand  in the crowd of the people? So then why does Bp. Kirykos demand the three‐ day strict fast (forbidding even oil and wine) upon laymen, while he himself  and his priests not only partake of oil and wine, but outside of fasting periods  they even partake of fish, eggs, dairy products (and for married clergy, even  meat) as late as 11:30pm on the night before they are to serve Divine Liturgy  and commune of the Holy Mysteries “worthily” yet without fasting?     Are such hypocrisies Christian or are they Pharisaic? What does Christ  have to say regarding the Pharisees who ordered laymen to fast more heavily  while the Pharisee hierarchy did not do this themselves? Christ rebuked and  condemned them harshly. Thus we read in the Gospel according to St. Luke:  “Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, saying: “The Scribes and the  Pharisees  sit  in  Mosesʹ  seat.  All  therefore  whatsoever  they  bid  you  observe,  that  observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind  heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they  themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.” (Luke 23:1‐4).      So much for the Pharisees and their successors, the Pelagians! So much  for  Bp.  Kirykos  and  those  who  agree  with  his  blasphemous  positions,  for  these men are the Pharisees and Pelagians of our time! May God have mercy  on  them and  enlighten them to  depart  from the  darkness of their  hypocrisy.  May God also enlighten us to shun all forms of Pharisaism and Pelagianism,  including  this  most  dangerous  form  adopted  by  Bp.  Kirykos.  May  we  shun  this  heresy  by  ceasing  to  rely  on  our  own  human  perfections  that  are  but  abominations  in  the  eyes  of  our  perfect  God.  Let  us  take  heed  to  the  admonition of one who himself was a Pharisee named Saul, but later became  a  Christian  named  Paul.  For,  he  was  truly  blinded  by  the  darkness  of  his  Pharisaic  self‐righteousness,  but  Christ  blinded  him  with  the  eternal  light  of  sanctifying and soul‐saving Divine Grace. This Apostle to the Nations writes:       “For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom  of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of  the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power  of  God.  For  it  is  written,  I  will  destroy  the  wisdom  of  the  wise,  and  will  bring  to  nothing the understanding of the prudent.     Where  is  the  wise?  where  is  the  scribe?  where  is  the  disputer  of  this  world?  hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of  God  the  world  by  wisdom  knew  not  God,  it  pleased  God  by  the  foolishness  of  preaching to save them that believe. For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek  after  wisdom:  But  we  preach  Christ  crucified,  unto  the  Jews  a  stumblingblock,  and  unto the  Greeks foolishness; But  unto  them which are called, both Jews and  Greeks,  Christ  the  power  of  God,  and  the  wisdom  of  God.  Because  the  foolishness  of  God  is  wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.     For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh,  not many mighty, not many noble, are called: But God hath chosen the foolish things  of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world  to  confound  the  things  which  are  mighty;  And base  things  of  the  world,  and  things  which  are  despised,  hath  God  chosen,  yea,  and  things  which  are  not,  to  bring  to  nought things that are: That no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye  in  Christ  Jesus,  who  of  God  is  made  unto  us  wisdom,  and  righteousness,  and  sanctification, and redemption: That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let  him glory in the Lord (1 Corinthians 1:17‐31).”      Yea, Lord, help us to submit entirely to Thy will, and to learn to glorify  only in Thee, and not in our own works. For in truth, even the greatest works  of  ours,  even  the  work  of  fasting,  whether  for  one  day,  three  days,  a  week,  forty  days,  or  even  a  lifetime,  is  worthless  before  Thy  sight.  As  the  prophet  declares,  our  works  are  an  abomination,  and  our  righteousness  is  but  a  menstruous rag. Therefore, O Lord, judge us according to Thy mercy and not  according to our sins. For Thou alone can make us worthy of Communion.      Note  that  in  the  above  short  prayer  by  the  present  author,  the  word  “us”  is  used  and  not  “them.”  This  is  because,  in  order  to  preserve  oneself  from  becoming  a  Pharisee,  one  must  always  include  himself  among  those  who  are  lacking  in  conduct,  and  must  ask  God  for  guidance  as  well  as  for  others. In this manner, one does not fall into the danger of the Pharisee who  said “God, I thank thee that I am not as other men are…” but rather acknowledges  his own misconduct, and thereby includes himself in the prayer, imitating the  publican  who  said  “God  be  merciful  to  me  a  sinner.”  For  there  is  no  point  preaching  against  Pharisaism  unless  one  first  admonishes  and  reproves  his  own soul, and asks God to cleans himself from this hypocrisy of the Pharisees.  For we are not to hate the sinners, but rather the sin itself; and we are not to  hate  the  heretics,  but  rather  the  heresy  itself.  In  so  doing,  our  Confession  against the sins and heresies themselves constitute a “work of love.”      But when it comes to people judging Christians for food, or Sabbaths,  such  as  what  Bp.  Kirykos  has  done  by  his  two  blasphemous  letters  to  Fr.  Pedro,  this  is  definitely  not  a  “work  of  love”  but  is  in  fact  the  leaven  of  the  Pharisees in its fullness. It is a work of demonic self‐righteousness and satanic  hatred towards mankind. For rather than being a true spiritual father towards  his spiritual children, he proves to be a negligent and self‐serving, and a user  of  his  flock  for  his  own  personal  gain.  He  allows  himself  to  commune  very  frequently  without  the  slightest  fast,  while  demanding  strict  fasting  on  his  flock while also forbidding them to ever commune on Sundays. Thus it is well  that  Mr.  Christos  Noukas,  the  advisor  to  Fr.  Pedro,  asked  Bp.  Kirykos:  “Are  you  a  father  or  a  stepfather?”  By  this  he  meant,  “Do  you  truly  love  your  spiritual children as a true spiritual father should, or do you consider them to  be another man’s children and nothing but a burden to you?”      Our  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,  in  the  sermon  in  which  he  taught us to pray to “Our Father,” explained the love of a true father towards  his  children.  The  account,  as  contained  in  the  Gospel  of  Luke,  is  as  follows:  “And [Jesus] said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him  at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves; For a friend of mine in  his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him? And he from within  shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii07/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com