Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 05 March at 08:18 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «clergy»:


Total: 90 results - 0.211 seconds

pre1924ecumenism8eng 100%

Orthodox Bishop Raphael Hawaweeny Accepted the Mysteries  of the Anglicans In 1910 and Then Changed His Mind in 1912.  He Was Not Judged By Any Council For This Mistake. Did He  and His Flock Lose Grace During Those Two Years?    His  Grace,  the  Right  Reverend  [Saint]  Raphael  Hawaweeny,  late  Bishop of Brooklyn and head of the Syrian Greek Orthodox Catholic Mission  of  the  Russian  Church  in  North  America,  was  a  far‐sighted  leader.  Called  from  Russia  to  New  York  in  1895,  to  assume  charge  of  the  growing  Syrian  parishes  under  the  Russian  jurisdiction  over  American  Orthodoxy,  he  was  elevated  to  the  episcopate  by  order  of  the  Holy  Synod  of  Russia  and  was  consecrated  Bishop  of  Brooklyn  and  head  of  the  Syrian  Mission  by  Archbishop  Tikhon  and  Bishop  Innocent  of  Alaska  on  March  12,  1904.  This  was the first consecration of an Orthodox Catholic Bishop in the New World  and  Bishop  Raphael  was  the  first  Orthodox  prelate  to  spend  his  entire  episcopate, from consecration to burial, in America. [Ed. note—In August 1988  the  remains  of  Bishop  Raphael  along  with  those  of  Bishops  Emmanuel  and  Sophronios  and  Fathers  Moses  Abouhider,  Agapios  Golam  and  Makarios  Moore  were  transferred  to  the  Antiochian  Village  in  southwestern  Pennsylvania  for  re‐burial.  Bishop  Raphaelʹs  remains  were  found  to  be  essentially incorrupt. As a result a commission under the direction of Bishop  Basil (Essey) of the Antiochian Archdiocese was appointed to gather materials  concerning the possible glorification of Bishop Raphael.]    With  his  broad  culture  and  international  training  and  experience  Bishop  Raphael  naturally  had  a  keen  interest  in  the  universal  Orthodox  aspiration  for  Christian  unity.  His  work  in  America,  where  his  Syrian  communities  were  widely  scattered  and  sometimes  very  small  and  without  the  services  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  gave  him  a  special  interest  in  any  movement which promised to provide a way by which acceptable and valid  sacramental  ministrations  might  be  brought  within  the  reach  of  isolated  Orthodox  people.  It  was,  therefore,  with  real  pleasure  and  gratitude  that  Bishop  Raphael  received  the  habitual  approaches  of  ʺHigh  Churchʺ  prelates  and  clergy  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Assured  by  ʺcatholic‐mindedʺ  Protestants, seeking the recognition of real Catholic Bishops, that the Anglican  Communion and Episcopal Church were really Catholic and almost the same  as  Orthodox,  Bishop  Raphael  was  filled  with  great  happiness.  A  group  of  these  ʺHigh  Episcopalianʺ  Protestants  had  formed  the  American  branch  of  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Unionʺ  (since  revised  and  now  existing  as  ʺThe  Anglican  and  Eastern  Churches  Association,ʺ  chiefly  active  in  England,  where  it  publishes  a  quarterly  organ  called  The  Christian  East).  This  organization,  being  well  pleased  with  the  impression  its  members  had  made  upon  Bishop  Raphael,  elected  him  Vice‐President  of  the  Union.  Bishop  Raphael  accepted,  believing  that  he  was  associating  himself with truly Catholic but unfortunately separated [from the Church]  fellow priests and  bishops in  a movement that  would promote  Orthodoxy  and true catholic unity at the same time.    As is their usual custom with all prelates and clergy of other bodies,  the  Episcopal  bishop  urged  Bishop  Raphael  to  recognize  their  Orders  and  accept  for  his  people  the  sacramental  ministrations  of  their  Protestant  clergy on  a basis of equality with the Sacraments of the Orthodox Church  administered  by  Orthodox  priests.  It  was  pointed  out  that  the  isolated  and  widely‐scattered  Orthodox  who  had  no  access  to  Orthodox  priests  or  Sacraments could be easily reached by clergy of the Episcopal Church, who,  they persuaded Bishop Raphael to believe, were priests and Orthodox in their  doctrine  and  belief  though  separated  in  organization.  In  this  pleasant  delusion, but under carefully specified restrictions, Bishop Raphael issued  in  1910  permission  for  his  faithful,  in  emergencies  and  under  necessity  when  an  Orthodox  priest  and  Sacraments  were  inaccessible,  to  ask  the  ministrations  of  Episcopal  clergy  and  make  comforting  use  of  what  these  clergy could provide in the absence of Orthodox priests and Sacraments.    Being Vice‐President of the Eastern Orthodox side of the Anglican and  Orthodox Churches Union and having issued on Episcopal solicitation such a  permission  to  his  people,  Bishop  Raphael  set  himself  to  observe  closely  the  reaction  following  his  permissory  letter  and  to  study  more  carefully  the  Episcopal Church and Anglican teaching in the hope that the Anglicans might  really  be  capable  of  becoming  actually  Orthodox.  But,  the  more  closely  he  observed  the  general  practice  and  the  more  deeply  he  studied  the  teaching  and faith of the Episcopal Church, the more painfully shocked, disappointed,  and  disillusioned  Bishop  Raphael  became.  Furthermore,  the  very  fact  of  his  own  position  in  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Union  made  the  confusion  and  deception of Orthodox people the more certain and serious. The existence and  cultivation  of  even  friendship  and  mutual  courtesy  was  pointed  out  as  supporting  the  Episcopal  claim  to  Orthodox  sacramental  recognition  and  intercommunion.  Bishop  Raphael  found  that  his  association  with  Episcopalians  became  the  basis  for  a  most  insidious,  injurious,  and  unwarranted  propaganda  in  favor  of  the  Episcopal  Church  among  his  parishes  and  faithful.  Finally,  after  more  than  a  year  of  constant  and  careful  study and observation, Bishop Raphael felt that it was his duty to resign from  the  association  of  which  he  was  Vice‐President.  In  doing  this  he  hoped  that  the  end  of  his  connection  with  the  Union  would  end  also  the  Episcopal  interferences and uncalled‐for intrusions in the affairs and religious harmony  of  his  people.  His  letter  of  resignation  from  the  Anglican  and  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  published  in  the  Russian  Orthodox  Messenger,  February  18,  1912, stated his convictions in the following way:    I have a personal opinion about the usefulness of the Union. Study has  taught me that there is a vast difference between the doctrine, discipline, and  even  worship  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  and  those  of  the  Anglican  Communion;  while,  on  the  other  hand,  experience  has  forced  upon  me  the  conviction that to promote courtesy and friendship, which seems to be the only  aim of the Union at present, not only amounts to killing precious time, at best,  but also is somewhat hurtful to the religious  and  ecclesiastical welfare of  the  Holy Orthodox Church in these United States.    Very many of the bishops of the Holy Orthodox Church at the present  time—and  especially  myself  have  observed  that  the  Anglican  Communion  is  associated  with  numerous  Protestant  bodies,  many  of  whose  doctrines  and  teachings, as well as practices, are condemned by the Holy Orthodox Church. I  view  union  as  only  a  pleasing  dream.  Indeed,  it  is  impossible  for  the  Holy  Orthodox Church to receive—as She has a thousand times proclaimed, and as  even  the  Papal  See  of  Rome  has  declaimed  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Churchʹs  credit—anyone into Her Fold or into union with Her who does not accept Her  Faith in full without any qualifications—the Faith which She claims is most  surely  Apostolic.  I  cannot  see  how  She  can  unite,  or  the  latter  expect  in  the  near future to unite with Her while the Anglican Communion holds so many  Protestant tenets and doctrines, and also is so closely associated with the non‐ Catholic religions about her.    Finally, I am in perfect accord with the views expressed by His Grace,  Archbishop  Platon,  in  his  address  delivered  this  year  before  the  Philadelphia  Episcopalian  Brotherhood,  as  to  the  impossibility  of  union  under  present  circumstances.    One would suppose that the publication of such a letter in the official  organ  of  the  Russian  Archdiocese  would  have  ended  the  misleading  and  subversive propaganda of the Episcopalians among the Orthodox faithful. But  the Episcopal members simply addressed a reply to Bishop Raphael in which  they  attempted  to  make  him  believe  that  the  Episcopal  Church  was  not  Protestant and had adopted none of the errors held by Protestant bodies. For  nearly  another  year  Bishop  Raphael  watched  and  studied  while  the  subversive  Episcopal propaganda  went  on among his people  on the basis  of  the letter of permission he had issued under a misapprehension of the nature  and teaching of the Episcopal Church and its clergy. Seeing that there was no  other means of protecting Orthodox faithful from being misled and deceived,  Bishop Raphael finally issued, late in 1912, the following pastoral letter which  has  remained  in  force  among  the  Orthodox  of  this  jurisdiction  in  America  ever  since  and  has  been  confirmed  and  reinforced  by  the  pronouncement  of  his successor, the present Archbishop Aftimios.  Pastoral Letter of Bishop Raphael  To  My  Beloved  Clergy  and  Laity  of  the  Syrian  Greek‐Orthodox  Catholic Church in North America:  Greetings in Christ Jesus, Our Incarnate Lord and God.  My Beloved Brethren:  Two  years  ago,  while  I was  Vice‐President  and  member  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Orthodox  Churches  Union,  being  moved  with  compassion  for  my  children  in  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith  once  delivered  to  the  saints  (Jude  1:3),  scattered  throughout  the  whole  of  North  America  and  deprived  of  the  ministrations  of  the  Church;  and  especially  in  places  far  removed  from  Orthodox  centers;  and  being  equally  moved  with  a  feeling  that  the  Episcopalian  (Anglican)  Church  possessed  largely  the  Orthodox  Faith,  as  many of the prominent clergy professed the same to me before I studied deeply  their doctrinal authorities and their liturgy—the Book of Common Prayer—I  wrote a letter as Bishop and Head of the Syrian‐Orthodox Mission in North  America,  giving  permission,  in  which  I  said  that  in  extreme  cases,  where  no  Orthodox priest could be called upon at short notice, the ministrations of the  Episcopal (Anglican) clergy might be kindly requested. However, I was most  explicit  in defining when  and how the  ministrations should be accepted,  and  also what exceptions should be made. In writing that letter I hoped, on the one  hand, to help my people spiritually, and, on the other hand, to open the way  toward  bringing  the  Anglicans  into  the  communion  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Faith.  On  hearing  and  in  reading  that  my  letter,  perhaps  unintentionally,  was  misconstrued by some of the Episcopalian (Anglican) clergy, I wrote a second  letter  in  which  I  pointed  out  that  my  instructions  and  exceptions  had  been  either overlooked or ignored by many, to wit:  a)  They  (the  Episcopalians)  informed  the  Orthodox  people  that  I  recognized  the Anglican Communion (Episcopal Church) as being united with the Holy  Orthodox Church and their ministry, that is holy orders, as valid.  b) The Episcopal (Anglican) clergy offered their ministrations even when my  Orthodox clergy were residing in the same towns and parishes, as pastors.  c) Episcopal clergy said that there was no need of the Orthodox people seeking  the  ministrations  of  their  own  Orthodox  priests,  for  their  (the  Anglican)  ministrations were all that were necessary.  I,  therefore, felt bound  by  all  the  circumstances  to  make  a  thorough  study  of  the Anglican Churchʹs faith and orders, as well as of her discipline and ritual.  After serious consideration I realized that it was my honest duty, as a member  of the College of the Holy Orthodox Greek Apostolic Church, and head of the  Syrian Mission in North America, to  resign from the  vice‐presidency of  and  membership in the Anglican and  Eastern  Orthodox Churches  Union.  At  the  same time, I set forth, in my letter of resignation, my reason for so doing.  I  am  convinced  that  the  doctrinal  teaching  and  practices,  as  well  as  the  discipline,  of  the  whole  Anglican  Church  are  unacceptable  to  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church.  I  make  this apology  for  the Anglicans  whom  as  Christian  gentlemen  I  greatly  revere,  that  the  loose  teaching  of  a  great  many  of  the  prominent Anglican theologians are so hazy in their definitions of truths, and  so  inclined  toward  pet  heresies  that  it  is  hard  to  tell  what  they  believe.  The  Anglican  Church  as  a  whole  has  not  spoken  authoritatively  on  her  doctrine.  Her  Catholic‐minded  members  can  call  out  her  doctrines  from  many  views,  but  so  nebulous  is her pathway in the doctrinal world that those  who would  extend a hand of both Christian and ecclesiastical fellowship dare not, without  distrust,  grasp  the  hand  of  her  theologians,  for  while  many  are  orthodox  on  some  points,  they  are  quite  heterodox  on  others.  I  speak,  of  course,  from  the  Holy  Orthodox  Eastern  Catholic  point  of  view.  The  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has never perceptibly changed from Apostolic times, and, therefore, no one can  go astray in finding out what She teaches. Like Her Lord and Master, though  at times surrounded with human malaria—which He in His mercy pardons— She is the same yesterday, and today, and forever (Heb. 13:8) the mother and  safe deposit of the truth as it is in Jesus (cf. Eph. 4:21).  The  Orthodox  Church  differs  absolutely  with  the  Anglican  Communion  in  reference  to  the  number  of  Sacraments  and  in  reference  to  the  doctrinal  explanation of the same. The Anglicans say in their Catechism concerning the  Sacraments that there are ʺtwo only as generally necessary to salvation, that  is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord.ʺ I am well aware that, in their  two books of homilies (which are not of a binding authority, for the books were  prepared only in the reign of Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth for priests who  were not permitted to preach their own sermons in England during times both  politically  and  ecclesiastically  perilous),  it  says  that  there  are  ʺfive  others  commonly  called  Sacramentsʺ  (see  homily  in  each  book  on  the  Sacraments),  but long since they have repudiated in different portions of their Communion  this very teaching and absolutely disavow such definitions in their ʺArticles of 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pre1924ecumenism8eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

livingsynodofbishops 94%

HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons.      The  Canons  themselves  offer  three  forms  of  punishment,  namely,  deposition, excommunication and anathematization. Deposition is applied to  clergy. Excommunication is applied to laity. Anathematization can be applied  to either clergy or laity. Deposition does not remove the priestly rank, but is  simply a prohibition from the clergyman to perform priestly functions. If the  deposition  is  later  revoked,  the  clergyman  does  not  require  reordination.  In  the same way, excommunication does not remove a layman’s baptism. It only  prohibits the layman to commune. If the excommunication is later lifted, the  layman  does  not  require  rebaptism.  Anathematization  causes  the  clergyman  or layman to be cut off from the Church and assigned to the devil. But even  anathematizations can be revoked if the clergyman or layman repents.     There Is a Hierarchy of Authority in Canon Law      The authority of one Canon over another  is determined by the  power  of the Council the Canons were ratified by. For example, a canon ratified by  an  Ecumenical  Council  overruled  any  canon  ratified  by  a  local  Council.  The  hierarchy of authority, from most binding Canons to least, is as follows:      Apostolic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  compiled  by  the  Holy  Apostles  and  their  immediate  successors.  These  Canons  were  approved  and  confirmed by the First Ecumenical Council and again by the Quinisext Council.  Not  even  an  Ecumenical  Council  can  overrule  or  overthrow  an  Apostolic  Canon.  There  are  only  very  few  cases  where  Ecumenical  Councils  have  amended  the  command  of  an  Apostolic  Canon  by  either  strengthening  or  weakening  it.  But  by  no  means  were  any  Apostolic  Canons  overruled  or  abolished.  For  instance,  the  1st  Apostolic  Canon  which  states  that  a  bishop  must  be  ordained  by  two  or  three  other  bishops.  Several  Canons  of  the  Ecumenical Councils declare that even two bishops do not suffice, but that a  bishop must be ordained by the consent of all the bishops in the province, and  the ordination itself must take place by no less than three bishops. This does  not abolish nor does it overrule the 1st Apostolic Canon, but rather it confirms  and  reinforces  the  “spirit  of  the  law”  behind  that  original  Canon.  Another  example is the 5th Apostolic Canon which states that Bishops, Presbyters and  Deacons are not permitted to put away their wives by force, on the pretext of  reverence.  Meanwhile,  the  12th  Canon  of  Quinisext  advises  a  bishop  (or  presbyters who has been elected as a bishop) to first receive his wife’s consent  to separate and for both of them to become celibate. This does not oppose the  Apostolic  Canon  because  it  is  not  a  separation  by  force  but  by  consent.  The  13th  Canon  of  Quinisext  confirms  the  5th  Apostolic  Canon  by  prohibiting  a  presbyters or deacons to separate from his wife. Thus the 5th Apostolic Canon  is not abolished, but amended by an Ecumenical Council for the good of the  Church.  After  all,  the  laws  exist  to  serve  the  Church  and  not  to  enslave  the  Church. In the same way, Christ declared: “The sabbath was made for man, and  not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).”    Ecumenical  Canons  (Universal)  are  those  pronounced  by  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils.  These  Councils  received  this  name  because  they  were  convened  by  Roman  Emperors  who  were  regarded  to  rule  the  Ecumene  (i.e.,  “the  known  world”).  Ecumenical  Councils  all  took  place  in  or  around  Constantinople,  also  known  as  New  Rome,  the  Reigning  City,  or  the  Universal  City. The president was always the hierarch in attendance that happened to be  the first‐among‐equals. Ecumenical Councils cannot abolish Apostolic Canons,  nor  can  they  abolish  the  Canons  of  previous  Ecumenical  Councils.  But  they  can overrule Regional and Patristic Canons.      Regional  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Regional  Councils that were later confirmed by an Ecumenical Council. This approval  gave these Regional Canons a universal authority, almost equal to Ecumenical  Canons.  These  Canons  are  not  only  valid  within  the  Regional  Church  in  which  the  Council  took  place,  but  are  valid  for  all  Orthodox  Christians.  For  this  reason  the  Canons  of  these  approved  Regional  Councils  cannot  be  abolished, but must be treated as those of Ecumenical Councils.       Patristic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  the  Canons  of  individual  Holy  Fathers  that  were  confirmed  by  an  Ecumenical  Council.  Their  authority  is  only  lesser  than  the  Apostolic  Canons,  Ecumenical  Canons  and  Universal  Regional Canons. But because they were approved by an Ecumenical Council,  these Patristic Canons binding on all Orthodox Christians.      Pan‐Orthodox  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Pan‐ Orthodox Councils. Since Constantinople had fallen to the Ottomans in 1453,  there  could  no  longer  be  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils,  since  there  was  no  longer a ruling Emperor of the Ecumene (the Roman or Byzantine Empire). But  the Ottoman Sultan appointed the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople as  both  the  political  and  religious  leader  of  the  enslaved  Roman  Nation  (all  Orthodox  Christians  within  the  Roman  Empire,  regardless  of  language  or  ethnic origin). In this capacity, having replaced the Roman Emperor as leader  of  the  Roman  Orthodox  Christians,  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  took  the  responsibility  of  convening  General  Councils  which  were  not  called  Ecumenical Councils (since there was no longer an Ecumene), but instead were  called  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils.  Since  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  was  also  the  first‐among‐equals  of  Orthodox  hierarchs,  he  would  also  preside  over  these  Councils. Thus he became both the convener and the president. The Primates  of  the  other  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  were  also  invited,  along with their Synods of Bishops. If the Ecumenical Patriarch was absent or  the one accused, the Patriarch of Alexandria would preside over the Synod. If  he too could not attend in person, then the Patriarchs of Antioch or Jerusalem  would  preside.  If  no  Patriarchs  could  attend,  but  only  send  their  representatives,  these  representatives  would  not  preside  over  the  Council.  Instead, whichever bishop present who held the highest see would preside. In  several  chronologies,  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  are  referred  to  as  Ecumenical. In any case, the Canons pertaining to these Councils are regarded  to be universally binding for all Orthodox Christians.       National  Canons  (Local)  are  those  valid  only  within  a  particular  National Church. The Canons of these National Councils are only accepted if  they  are  in  agreement  with  the  Canons  ratified  by  the  above  Apostolic,  Ecumenical, Regional, Patristic and Pan‐Orthodox Councils.      Provincial  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  Metropolitan  and  his  suffragan  bishops.  They  are  only  binding  within  that  Metropolis.      Prefectural  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  single  bishop and his subordinate clergy. They are only valid within that Diocese.       Parochial  Canons  are  the  by‐laws  of  a  local  Parish  or  Mission,  which  are  chartered  and  endorsed  by  the  Rector  or  Founder  of  a  Parish  and  the  Parish Council. These by‐laws are only applicable within that Parish.      Monastic Canons are the rules of a local Monastery or Monastic Order,  which  are  chartered  by  the  Abbot  or  Founder  of  the  Skete  or  Monastery.  These by‐laws are only applicable within that Monastery.      Sometimes  Canons  are  only  recommendations  explaining  how  clergy  and laity are to conduct themselves. Other times they are actually penalties to  be  executed  upon  laity  and  clergy  for  their  misdeeds.  But  the  penalties  contained  within  Canons  are  simply  recommendations  and  not  the  actual  executions of the penalties themselves. The recommendation of the law is one  thing and the execution of the law is another.     Canon Law Can Only Be Executed By Those With Authority       For  the  execution  of  the  law  to  take  place  it  requires  a  competent  authority  to  execute  the  law.  A  competent  authority  is  reckoned  by  the  principle  of  “the  greater  judges  the  lesser.”  Thus,  there  are  Canons  that  explain who has the authority to judge individuals according to the Canons.      A  layman  can  only  be  judged,  excommunicated  or  anathematized  by  his own bishop, or by his own priest, provided the priest has the permission  of  his own  bishop (i.e., a priest who  is  a pneumatikos).  This law  is ratified  by  the 6th Canon of Carthage, which has been made universal by the authority of  the Sixth Ecumenical Council. The Canon states: “The application of chrism and  the  consecration  of  virgin  girls  shall  not  be  done  by  Presbyters;  nor  shall  it  be  permissible for a Presbyter to reconcile anyone at a public liturgy. This is the  decision  of  all  of  us.”  St.  Nicodemus’  interprets  the  Canon  as  follows:  “The  present  Canon  prohibits  a  priest  from  doing  three  things…  and  remission  of  the  penalty for a sin to a penitent, and thereafter through communion of the Mysteries the  reconciliation  of  him  with  God,  to  whom  he  had  become  an  enemy  through  sin,  making  him  stand  with  the  faithful,  and  celebrating  the  Liturgy  openly…  For  these  three functions have to be exercised by a bishop…. By permission of the bishop even a  presbyter can reconcile penitents, though. And read Ap. c. XXXIX, and c. XIX of the  First EC. C.” Thus the only authority competent to judge a layman is a bishop  or a presbyter who has the permission of his bishop to do so. However, those  who are among the low rank of clergy (readers, subdeacons, etc) require their  own local bishop to try them, because a presbyter cannot depose them.      A  deacon  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  three  other  bishops,  and  a  presbyter  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  six  other  bishops.  The  28th  Canon  of  Carthage  thus  states:  “If  Presbyters  or  Deacons  be  accused,  the  legal  number  of  Bishops  selected  from the nearby locality, whom the accused demand, shall be empaneled — that is, in  the case of a Presbyter six, of a Deacon three, together with the Bishop of the accused  — to investigate their causes; the same form being observed in respect of days, and of  postponements,  and  of  examinations,  and  of  persons,  as  between  accusers  and  accused. As for the rest of the Clerics, the local Bishop alone shall hear and conclude  their  causes.”  Thus,  one  bishop  is  insufficient  to  submit  a  priest  or  deacon  to  trial or deposition. This can only be done by a Synod of Bishops with enough  bishops present to validly apply the canons. The amount of bishops necessary  to  judge  and  depose  a  priest  are  seven  (one  local  plus  six  others),  and  for  a  deacon the minimum amount of bishops is four (one local plus three others).      A  bishop  must  be  judged  by  his  own  metropolitan  together  with  at  least twelve other bishops. If the province does not have twelve bishops, they  must  invite  bishops  from  other  provinces  to  take  part  in  the  trial  and  deposition. Thus the 12th Canon of Carthage states: “If any Bishop fall liable to  any charges, which is to be deprecated, and an emergency arises due to the fact that  not many can convene, lest he be left exposed to such charges, these may be heard by  twelve Bishops, or in the case of a Presbyter, by six Bishops besides his own; or in the  case  of  a  Deacon,  by  three.”  Notice  that  the  amount  of  twelve  bishops  is  the  minimum  requirement  and  not  the  maximum.  The  maximum  is  for  all  the  bishops, even if they are over one hundred in number, to convene for the sake  of  deposing  a  bishop.  But  if  this  cannot  take  place,  twelve  bishops  assisting 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

uaoc 2015credentials 84%

UKRAINIAN AUTOCEPHALOUS ORTHODOX CHURCH IN THE AMERICAS To the Attention of All Ordained Clergy of the UAOC in the Americas Renewal of Statements of Suitability Dear Brothers in Christ:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/10/26/uaoc-2015credentials/

26/10/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

MORI Veracity Index November 2016 - Charts 84%

For each would you tell me if you generally trust them to tell the truth, or not?” Nurses Doctors Teachers Judges Scientists The Police Clergy/priests Hairdressers Television news readers The ordinary man/woman in the street Civil Servants Lawyers Pollsters Managers in the NHS Economists Charity chief executives Trade union officials Local councillors Bankers Business leaders Estate agents Journalists Government Ministers Politicians generally 93% 91% 88% 81% 80% 71% 69% 68% 67% 65% 56% 52% 49% 48% 48% 46% 43% 43% 37% 33% 30% 24% 20% 15% % trust to tell the truth Base:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/14/mori-veracity-index-november-2016-charts/

14/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CM-Civilisation-S2 81%

In 1531 Henry first challenged the Pope when he demanded £100,000 from the Clergy in exchange for a royal pardon for their illegal jurisdiction, and that he should be recognised as their sole protector and supreme head.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/09/cm-civilisation-s2/

08/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

communiontombroseng 80%

Fr. Eugene Tombros “Regarding Frequent Communion” in 1966      In  1966,  Fr.  Eugene  Tombros,  the  arch‐chancellor  of  the  Matthewite  Synod, published a Prayer Book in Greek. On the last page, he provides a quote  from the book “Regarding Continuous Communion” by St. Macarius Notaras of  Corinth. This means that Fr. Eugene Tombros, the most influential person in the  Matthewite Synod between 1940 and 1974, knew about this book and respected  its contents enough to desire to quote from it. The quote is as follows:        A QUOTE FROM THE BOOK   “REGARDING CONTINUOUS COMMUNION”      If  you  like  the  kindle  in  your  heart  divine  love  and  to  acquire love towards Christ and with this to also acquire all  the  rest  of  the  virtues,  regularly  attend  Holy  Communion  and  you  will  enjoy  that  which  you  desire.  Because  it  is  absolutely impossible for somebody not to love Christ, when  he  conscientiously  and  continually  communes  of  His  Holy  Body and drinks His Precious Blood.”    - St. Macarius Notaras          It is clear, therefore, that Fr. Eugene Tombros was aware of the Kollyvades  movement and in favour of it. The quote below advocates frequent communion.  This  falls  perfectly  in  place  with  an  earlier  work  by  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  published in 1933, which also was written in the spirit of the Kollyvades Fathers.       This  makes  one  ask  the  question:  If  the  most  important  Matthewite  leaders, namely, Bishop Matthew of Bresthena in 1933 and Fr. Eugene Tombros  in  1966,  published  works  regarding  Frequent  Holy  Communion  that  clearly  reflected  the  beliefs  of  the  Kollyvades  Fathers  such  as  St.  Macarius  Notaras,  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos,  St.  Athanasius  of  Paros,  St.  Pachomius  of  Chios,  St.  Nectarius of Aegina, etc, how did this all change in the Matthewite Synod? Why  did their practices become so anti‐Kollyvadic from the 1970s onwards?       The  answer  is  that  in  1979  during  a  week‐long  “clergy  synaxis”  at  Kouvara  Monastery,  all  of  the  bishops  and  priests  were  trained  to  demand  laymen to adhere to a strict fast for a week, and the last three days without oil,  while  making  this  exempt  from  clergy.  The  people  who  led  this  course  at  Kouvara were the laymen theologians, Mr. Gkoutzidis and Mr. Kontogiannis, the  latter of whom lated became Bp. Kirykos.       Just  as  usual,  the  same  people  who  “systematized”  (changed)  the  ecclesiology, the same people who re‐wrote Matthewite history “their own way,”  are the same people who removed the spirit of the Kollyvades Fathers from the  Matthewites.  After  over  three  decades  of  this,  the  majority  of  Matthewites  now  think  their  practices  are  normal,  and  if  they  read  the  book  of  St.  Macarius  Notaras or of St. Nicodemus of Athos regarding Frequent Holy Communion they  would shudder. But it is time for the brainwashing to end and for truth to shine.       May the prayers of the Holy Kollyvades Fathers enlighten us all. Amen. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communiontombroseng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

CheirothesiaEuthymiusEpiphaniou1991eng 78%

Archimandrite Euthymius K. Epiphaniou  Faidrou 1‐3‐8 Pakgrati,  Athens 1135 GREECE    In Athens on October 11, 1991    ENCYCLICAL – EPISTLE  of he who relies on the Lordʹs mercy, Euthymius K. Epiphaniou the Cypriot,  To the Reverend Clergy of all the parishes, the Monks and Nuns of the Holy  Monasteries and Hermitages of the Church of the Genuine Orthodox  Christians of Greece and elsewhere.    Brethren, Fathers and Sisters, bless!      ʺWhen sin becomes chief, it draws everyone to perditionʺ and ʺWe are  guilty  for  these  things,  but  suffer  for  other  things.ʺ  By  diverting  from  these  reasonings, God granted and arranged a great winter [suffering] in the realms  of our Church for 20 years and more, accelerating recently, with innumerable  consequences.      This  is  because,  beloved  brethren,  we  displaced  the  order  of  the  Church, we departed from the line of navigation and tradition of the Holy  Father  kyr  Matthew  Karpathakis  and  we  accepted  a  cheirothesia  from  the  Russians of the Diaspora, the apostasy of eight clergy from the Church of the  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians  occurred,  and  the  falling  away  of  the  reposed  Monk Callistus (former [Bishop] of Corinth Callistus), who were all deposed  and moreover Callistus with the accusation of rejection and destruction of the  icon  of  the  Holy  Trinity  and  for  fighting  against  saints  (See  K.G.O.  October,  1977, page 9). [Here Fr. Euthymius refers to the very tampering and additions  he  made  to  the  original  acts  prior  to  their  publication  in  the  official  periodical.]      This  is  because,  in  1979,  the  ʺgroup  of  new  theologiansʺ  surrounding  our  Archbishop  Andrew,  put  together  a  speech  and  by  the  mouth  of  the  Archbishop  the  following  blasphemy  was  voiced:  ʺThe  presence  of  the  struggle of the Church of Genuine Orthodox Christians, as we are well aware  is  of  the  highest  importance,  equates  with  the  incarnation  of  the  Lord,  his  Good  News,  his  Crucifixion  and  His  Holy  Resurrection,  to  wit,  it  is  the  Church  of  Christ,ʺ  and  through  the  periodical  ʺChurch  of  the  Genuine  Orthodoxʺ  (See  the  issue  for  June,  1979)  it  was  circulated  ʺurbi  et  orbiʺ  and  although  many  of  us  protested  that  this  blasphemy  be  removed,  it  never  happened. [Here  Fr.  Euthymius  refers  to  his  own  tampering  of  the  original  text and quotes it as ʺThe presence of the struggle of the Church, despite the  official  clarification  that  the  real  text  is  ʺThe  presence  of  the  Struggling  Church.ʺ  Thus  he  ignores  the  three  subsequent  corrections  and  explanations  given  in  the  official  periodical  in  the  following  issues:  October,  1979,  p.  21;  April,  1980,  p.  31;  and  February,  1983,  p.  57.  After  a  decade  since  this  issue  was  settled,  Fr.  Euthymius  brought  it  up  again  in  his  present  ʺencyclicalʺ  simply in order to satisfy his demands that the Genuine Orthodox Church not  be identified with the Church of Christ.]      This  is  because  the  new  theologians  (according  to  the  opinion  and  support of our Church of the Genuine Orthodox Christians), since they were  lacking a means of financial support, they decided to enterprise [the Church]  as  a  bankrupt  company,  and  they  renamed  [the  Church]  ʺUninnovatedʺ  [Akainotometos],  and  unfortunately  the  Hierarchs  placed  their  seal  [on  this]  because the new theologians, instead of correcting themselves and repenting  for the damage that they provoked in the Church, they placed a schedule of  income for their group and they invented unorthodox ways for various clergy  to  receive  ʺDegreesʺ  in  theology,  they  also  puffed  out  the  minds  of  various  assisting  garb‐bearers  [rasophoroi]  who  have  declared  a  war  once  more  against  Orthodoxy. They  abysmally  war  against  and  reject  the  tradition  of  the  Church,  refusing  to  venerate  the  icon  of  the  Holy  Trinity  (Father,  Son  and Holy Spirit), the icon of the Resurrection of the Lord, replacing it with  the Descent into Hades, the icon of the Pentecost if our Lady the Theotokos  is present in it, and they accept the icon of the Nativity of Christ (with the  bathtub  and  the  midwives).  And  by  these  means  having  become  iconomachs‐iconoclasts,  and  deniers  of  their  faith,  regardless  of  whether  they are girdled in priesthood. Wearing the skin of sheep, they work towards  the destruction of the flock, by writing and circulating pamphlets against the  abovementioned holy icons. They impose their heretical opinions upon those  that  are  submitted  to  them.  They  create  civil  splintering  and  division  in  the  Monasteries.  They  question  various  Fathers  of  the  Church,  particularly  St.  Nicodemus  of  Mt.  Athos,  and  the  new  pillar  of  Orthodoxy  kyr  Archbishop  Matthew  Karpathakis.  They  provoke  quarrels  and  disputes  like  what  happened last Pascha at Lebadia [Diaulia] and Bolus [Demetrias] on the day  of the Resurrection, and the worst is that they work together for the purpose  of  placing  canons  [of  penance]  on  Nuns  of  the  Convent  [of  the  Entry  of  the  Mother of God at Keratea] and Monks, by various Spiritual Fathers, under the  accusation that the Nuns and Monks praiseworthily insist upon keeping what  the Catholic Church upholds and preserves.      They  who  behave  as  neo‐iconoclasts  are:  the  Hieromonks  Cassian  Braun,  Amphilochius  Tambouras,  Neophytus  Tsakiroglou,  Tarasius  Karagounis, and the foreign [incomer] Archpastor of the Holy Monastery of  the  Transfiguration  [at  Kouvara]  Hegumen  Stephan  Tsakiroglou,  who  declares that he is a rationalist.      My beloved, by giving in to one evil, ten thousand others follow, and  the words are fulfilled to the maximum: we are at fault and for this we suffer,  not as persons, but as a Church, and, explicitly, because:    1. we are stained by the iniquity of the cheirothesia of 1971    2. the voiced blasphemy of 1979 remains      Let us not be entertained by the evil that has befallen the realms of our  Church.  It  is  necessary  for  us  to  pray,  to  censure  the  paranoia  of  the  newfound iconoclasts, to request  from our honorable  Hierarchy,  as  soon  as  possible,  the  cleansing  [catharsis]  from  the  realms  of  our  Church,  these  nonsensical  iconoclasts  and  those  who  are  likeminded  unto  them,  [to  request]  their  condemnation,  regardless  of  how  high  their  position  is, because these [people] are led astray from the truth, and we must declare  in  a  stentorian  manner,  that  whether  alone  or  with  many  others,  we  will  champion  the  saving  truth,  faithful  to  what  we  have  been  taught,  what  we  have  learned  and  what  we  have  received,  adding  nothing  and  subtracting  nothing,  whatever  the  Catholic  Church  contains  and  upholds  undiminished  and uninnovated.      Do not fall, brethren. A winter [suffering] has befallen our Church. The  Lord our God lives, so that he is among us and he is for us.      May  the  prayers  of  the  Confessors  of  our  Faith,  the  older  and  the  newer,  as  well  as  of  the  newfound  pillar  of  Orthodoxy,  ever‐memorable  Archbishop  Matthew  the  Cretan,  enlighten  us,  bring  us  to  our  senses,  and  guide all of us towards the path of salvation, which requires truth, faith and  invincible struggle.      To  those  who  do  not  correctly  receive  the  divine  voices  of  the  Holy  Teachers  of  the  Church  of  God,  and  what  has  been  fittingly  and  manifestly  explained  in  [the  Church]  by  the  grace  of  the  Holy  Spirit,  and  attempts  to  misinterpret them and rotate them, they are the curse, and the wrath is upon  their shoulders.    Farewell in the Lord, my beloved brethren,  The least among all ‐ brother and concelebrant,  Archimandrite Euthymius K. Epiphaniou 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cheirothesiaeuthymiusepiphaniou1991eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

communionpachomioseng 76%

THE FREQUENCY OF HOLY COMMUNION        By Elder Pachomius of Chios      Who  would  not  weep  at  the  ignorance  and  wretched  state  of  our  contemporary clergy?  Where has it ever been heard, that the Christians should  go to Church, seeking to receive Holy Communion, and the priests hinder them,  saying  to  them,  “Is  Communion  soup?    Forty  days  have  not  passed  since  you  received Holy Communion, and you come to receive again?”      In like manner, regarding the first week of the Great Lent, I know of many  men  and  women  who  keep  the  three‐day  fast  [an  optional  tradition  of  fasting  from  food  and  water],  and  they  go  to  church  on  Wednesday  for  the  Liturgy  of  the  Presanctified  Gifts,  and  the  clergy  do  not  allow  them  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  saying,  “Just  the  other  day  you  were  eating  meat,  and  today  you  come to receive Communion?”      “And secondly,” they say, “the Presanctified is for the priests, and not for  the  laity.”    Fie!    on  our  ignorance  and  lack  of  understanding!    You,  on  the  one  hand, O ordained man, are eating meat the night before, and many times you are  even  drunk,  and  perhaps  also  irreverent,  and  you  go  to  serve  the  Liturgy,  and  you  hinder  the  one  who  has  been  fasting  with  so  much  reverence?    And  you  deprive him of so much benefit and sanctification?      Do  you  see  what  lack  of  learning  our  priests  have?    “The  Presanctified,”  say they, “is for the priests, and not for the laypeople.”  St. Basil the Great says, “I  commune  my  parishioners  four  times  a  week.”    St.  John  Chrysostom  and  the  entire Church of Christ do likewise.  They had this custom of Communion four  times a week.  And since the Liturgy is not served during the weekdays in Great  Lent, the Holy Fathers in their wisdom devised to have the Presanctified, only so  that  the  Christians  might  have  the  opportunity  to  commune  during  the  week;  and you say the Presanctified is only for the ordained?      And  observe,  O  reader,  that  as  long  as  this  discipline  prevailed,  and  the  Christians communed frequently, their hearts were warmed by the grace of Holy  Communion, and they ran to martyrdom like sheep.      Therefore,  the  priests  who  hinder  the  Christians  from  receiving  the  Immaculate  Communion  should  know  well  that  they  sin  greatly.    I  do  not  say  that  the  people  should  commune  simply  and  indiscriminately,  but  that  they  should approach with the fitting preparation.      However, I heard what some priests say: “I” (say they) “am a priest and I  serve the Liturgy frequently, and I commune, but the layman does not have this  permission.”    In  this  matter,  O  priest,  my  brother,  you  are  greatly  mistaken.   Because, in the matter of Holy Communion, the priest differs in nothing from the  layman.  You, O priest, are a minister of the Mystery, but this does not mean that  you have the right to receive frequently, and the layman does not.  In this matter  I can bring you many proofs from the Saints, demonstrating that it is permitted  equally to bishops and priests and laypeople, both men and women, to partake  of  the  Immaculate  Mysteries  continuously  –  unless  they  have  been  married  a  third time.  As many as have married three times commune three times a year.      I  have  myriads  of  proofs  concerning  this  issue,  but  which  one  should  I  present to you first?  Chrysostom, Clement, Symeon of Thessalonica, David?  As  I said, which one should I mention first?  In this matter, I can bring you so many  proofs, I could fill a whole book!  For this cause, I cut short what I am saying and  tell  you  only  this  in  brief.    If  you  don’t  want  the  Christians  to  commune  frequently, why do you hold the Holy Chalice, and  display it to the Christians,  and  cry  out  from  the  Holy  Bema,  “With  the  fear  of  God,  faith,  and  love,  draw  near, and approach the Mysteries that you may commune?”  And yet again, you  yourselves  hinder  them,  and  you  lie  openly?    Why,  on  the  one  hand,  do  you  invite them, and, on the other, do you push them away?... 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communionpachomioseng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii09 71%

ARE CHRISTIANS MEANT TO COMMUNE ONLY ON  A SATURDAY AND NEVER ON A SUNDAY?    In  the  second  paragraph  of  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  Bp.  Kirykos  writes: “Also, all Christians, when they are going to commune, know that they must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday  (since  it  is  preceded  by  the  fast  of  Friday)  and on Sunday only by economia, so that they are not compelled to break the fast of  Saturday and violate the relevant Holy Canon [sic: here he accidentally speaks of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means  observing  a  fast  on  Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].”    The first striking remark is “All Christians.” Does Bp. Kirykos consider  himself to be a Christian? If so, why does he commune every Sunday without  exception, seeing as though “all Christians” are supposed to “know” that they  are only allowed to commune on a Saturday, and never on Sunday, except by  “economia.”  Or  perhaps  Bp.  Kirykos  does  not  consider  himself  a  Christian,  and  for  this  reason  he  is  exempt  of  this  rule  for  “all  Christians.”  It  makes  perfect sense that he excludes himself from those called Christians because his  very ideas and practices are not Christian at all.     Is  communion  on  Saturdays  alone,  and  never  on  Sundays,  really  a  Christian  practice?  Is  this  what  Christians  have  always  believed?  Was  Saturday the day that the early Christians ʺbroke breadʺ (i.e., communed)? Let  us look at what the Holy Scriptures have to say.     St.  Luke  the  Evangelist  (+18  October,  86),  in  the  Acts  of  the  Holy  Apostles, writes: “And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to  break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow (Acts 20:7).”  Thus the Holy Apostle Paul would meet with the faithful on the first day of  the  week,  to  wit,  Sunday,  and  on  this  day  he  would  break  bread,  that  is,  he  would serve Holy Communion.     St. Paul the Apostle (+29 June, 67) also advises in his first epistle to the  Corinthians:  “On  the  first  day  of  the  week,  let  every  one  of  you  put  apart  with  himself, laying up what it shall well please him: that when I come, the collections be  not  then  to  be  made  (1  Corinthians  16:2).”  Thus  St.  Paul  indicates  that  the  Christians would meet with one another on the first day of the week, that is,  Sunday, not only for Liturgy, but also for collection of goods for the poor.     The reason why the Christians would meet for prayer and breaking of  bread on Sunday is because our Lord Jesus Christ arose from the dead on one  day after the Sabbath, on the first day of the week, that is, the Lordʹs Day or Sunday  (Matt. 28:1‐7; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1).     Another  reason  for  the  Christians  meeting  together  on  Sundays  is  because the Holy Spirit was delivered to the Apostles on the day of Pentecost,  which was a Sunday, and this event signified the beginning of the Christian  community.  That  Pentecost  took  place  on  a  Sunday  is  clear  from  Godʹs  command in the Old Testament Scriptures: “You shall count fifty days to the day  after  the  seventh  Sabbath;  then  you  shall  present  a  new  grain  offering  to  the  Lord  (Leviticus 23:16).” The reference to “fifty days” and “seventh Sabbath” refers to  counting fifty days from the first Sabbath, or seven weeks plus one day; while  “the day after the seventh Sabbath” clearly refers to a Sunday, since the day after  the Sabbath day (Saturday) is always the Lord’s Day (Sunday).    It was on the Sunday of Pentecost that the Holy Spirit descended upon  the Apostles. Thus we read:  “When the day of Pentecost  had  come, they  were  all  together  in  one  place.  And  suddenly  there  came  from  heaven  a  noise  like  a  violent  rushing  wind,  and  it  filled  the  whole  house  where  they  were  sitting.  And  there  appeared to them tongues as of fire distributing themselves, and they rested on each  one  of  them.  And  they  were  all  filled  with  the  Holy  Spirit  and  began  to  speak  with  other tongues, as the Spirit was giving them utterance (Acts 2:1‐4).”     A  final  reason  for  Sunday  being  the  day  that  the  Christians  met  for  prayer and breaking of bread was in order to remember the promised Second  Coming or rather Second Appearance (Δευτέρα Παρουσία) of the Lord. The  reference  to  Sunday  is  found  in  the  Book  of  Revelation,  in  which  Christ  appeared and delivered the prophecy to St. John the Theologian on “Kyriake”  (Κυριακή),  which  means  “the  main  day,”  or  “the  first  day,”  but  more  correctly means “the Lordʹs Day.” (Revelation 1:10).     For the above three reasons (that Sunday is the day of the Resurrection,  the  Pentecost  and  the  Second  Appearance)  the  Apostles  themselves,  and  the  early Christians immediately made Sunday the new Sabbath, the new day of  rest,  and  the  new  day  for  Godʹs  people  to  gather  together  for  prayer  (i.e.,  Liturgy)  and  breaking of bread (i.e.,  Holy Communion) Thus we read  in  the  Didache of the Holy Apostles: “On the Lordʹs Day (i.e., Kyriake) come together  and break bread. And give thanks (i.e., offer the Eucharist), after confessing your  sins  that  your  sacrifice  may  be  pure  (Didache  14).”  Thus  the  Christians  met  together  on  the  Lord’s  Day,  that  is,  Sunday,  for  the  breaking  of  bread  and  giving of thanks, to wit, the Divine Liturgy and Holy Eucharist.     St.  Barnabas  the  Apostle  (+11  June,  61),  First  Bishop  of  Salamis  in  Cyprus, in the Epistle of Barnabas, writes: “Wherefore, also, we keep the eighth  day  with  joyfulness,  the  day  also  on  which  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  (Barnabas  15).”  The  eighth  day  is  a  reference  to  Sunday,  which  is  known  as  the first as well as the eighth day of the week. How more appropriate to keep  the eighth day with joyfulness other than by communing of the joyous Gifts?     St. Ignatius the God‐bearer (+20 December, 108), Bishop of Antioch, in  his  Epistle  to  the  Magnesians,  insists  that  the  Jews  who  became  Christian  should  be  “no  longer  observing  the  Sabbath,  but  living  in  the  observance  of  the  Lord’s  Day,  on  which  also  our  Life  rose  again  (Magnesians  9).”  What  could commemorate the Lord’s Day as the day Life rose again, other than by  receiving Life incarnate,  to  wit, that  precious  Body and  Blood of  Christ? For  he who partakes of it shall never die but live forever!    St. Clemes, also known as St. Clement (+24 November, 101), Bishop of  Rome,  in  the  Apostolic  Constitutions,  also  declares  that  Divine  Liturgy  is  especially for Sundays more than any other day. Thus we read: “On the day  of  the  resurrection  of  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord’s  day,  assemble  yourselves  together,  without  fail,  giving  thanks  to  God,  and  praising  Him  for  those  mercies  God  has  bestowed  upon  you  through  Christ,  and  has  delivered  you  from  ignorance,  error, and bondage, that your sacrifice may be unspotted, and acceptable to God, who  has  said  concerning  His  universal  Church:  In  every  place  shall  incense  and  a  pure  sacrifice be offered unto me; for I am a great King, saith the Lord Almighty, and my  name  is  wonderful  among  the  nations  (Apostolic  Constitutions,  ch.  30).”  The  reference to “pure sacrifice” is the oblation of Christ’s Body and Blood; “giving  thanks to God” is the celebration of the Eucharist (εὐχαριστία = giving thanks).    The  Apostolic  Constitutions  also  state  clearly  that  Sunday  is  not  only  the most important day for Divine Liturgy, but that it is also the ideal day for  receiving  Holy  Communion.  It  is  written:  “And  on  the  day  of  our  Lord’s  resurrection,  which  is  the  Lord’s  day,  meet  more  diligently,  sending  praise  to  God  that  made  the  universe  by  Jesus,  and  sent  Him  to  us,  and  condescended  to  let  Him suffer, and raised Him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to  God  who  does  not  assemble  on  that  day  to  hear  the  saving  word  concerning  the  resurrection, on which we pray thrice standing in memory of Him who arose in three  days, in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the Gospel,  the  oblation  of  the  sacrifice,  the  gift  of  the  holy  food?  (Apostolic  Constitutions, ch. 59).” The “gift of the holy food” refers to Holy Communion.    The Holy Canons of the Orthodox Church also distinguish Sunday as  the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. The 19th Canon of the Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  mentions  the  importance  of  Sunday  as  a  day  for  gathering  and  preaching  the  Gospel  sermon:  “We  declare  that  the  deans  of  churches, on every day, but more especially on Sundays, must teach all the clergy  and the laity words of truth out of the Holy Bible…”    The  80th  Canon  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  states  that  all  clergy  and laity are forbidden to be absent from Divine Liturgy for three consecutive  Sundays: “In case any bishop or presbyter or deacon or anyone else on the list of the  clergy,  or  any  layman,  without  any  grave  necessity  or  any  particular  difficulty  compelling him to absent himself from his own church for a very long time, fails to  attend church on Sundays for three consecutive weeks, while living in the city, if  he  be  a  clergyman,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  he  be  a  layman,  let  him  be  removed  from  communion.”  Take  note  that  if  one  attends  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  consecutive  Saturdays,  but  not  on  the  Sundays,  he  still  falls  under  the  penalty  of  this  canon  because  it  does  not  reprimand  someone  who  simply  doesn’t  attend  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  weeks,  but  rather  one  who  “fails  to  attend  church  on  Sundays.”  The  reference  to  “church”  must  refer  to  a  parish  where Holy Communion is offered every Sunday, for an individual who does  not  attend  for  three  consecutive  Sundays  cannot  be  punished  by  being  “removed from  communion” if this is  not  even  offered  to begin with. Also, the  fact  that  this  is  the  penalty  must  mean  that  the  norm  is  for  the  faithful  to  commune every Sunday, or at least every third Sunday.    The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares that: “All those faithful who  enter  and  listen  to  the  Scriptures,  but  do  not  stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  they  are  causing  the  Church a breach of order.” The 2nd Canon of the Council of Antioch states: “As  for all those persons who enter the church and listen to the sacred Scriptures, but who  fail  to  commune  in  prayer  together  and  at  the  same  time  with  the  laity,  or  who  shun  the  participation  of  the  Eucharist,  in  accordance  with  some  irregularity,  we  decree  that  these  persons  be  outcasts  from  the  Church  until,  after  going to confession and exhibiting fruits of repentance and begging forgiveness, they  succeed  in  obtaining  a  pardon…”  Both  of  these  canons  prove  quite  clearly  that  all faithful who attend Divine Liturgy and are not under any kind of penance  or excommunication, must partake of Holy Communion. Thus, if clergy and  laity are equally expected to attend Divine Liturgy every Sunday, or at least  every third Sunday, they are equally expected to Commune every Sunday, or  at least every third Sunday. Should they fail, they are to be excommunicated.    St.  Timothy  of  Alexandria  (+20  July,  384),  in  his  Questions  and  Answers, and specifically in the 3rd Canon, writes: “Question: If anyone who is a  believer is possessed of a demon, ought he to partake of the Holy Mysteries, or not?  Answer: If he does not repudiate the Mystery, nor otherwise in any way blaspheme,  let him have communion, not, however, every day in the week, for it is sufficient for  him  on  the  Lord’s  Day  only.”  So  then,  if  even  those  who  are  possessed  with  demons  are  permitted  to  commune  on  every  Sunday,  how  is  it  that  Bp.  Kirykos  advises  that  all  Christians  are  only  permitted  to  commune  on  a  Saturday,  and  never  on  a  Sunday  except  by  extreme  economia?  Are  today’s  healthy,  faithful  and  practicing  Orthodox  Christians,  who  do  not  have  a  canon  of  penance  or  any  excommunication,  and  who  desire  communion  every Sunday, forbidden this, despite the fact that of old even those possessed  of demons were permitted it?    The  above  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  are  the  Law  of  God  that the Church abides to in order to prevent scandal or discord. Let us now  compare  this  Law  of  God  to  the  “traditions  of  men,”  namely,  the  Sabbatian,  Pharisaic statement found in Bp. Kirykos’s first letter to Fr. Pedro: “… I request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess  to  you,  that  in  order  to  approach  Holy  Communion,  they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday and not Sunday.“ Clearly, Bp. Kirykos has turned the whole world  upside down, and has made the Holy Canons and the Law of the Church of  God  as  a matter  of  “discord  and  scandal,”  and  instead  insists  upon  his  own  self‐invented “tradition” which is nowhere to be found in the writings of the  Holy Fathers, in the Holy Canons, or in the Holy Tradition of Orthodoxy.    The  truth  is  that  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  is  the  one  who  introduced  “disorder  and  scandal”  when  he  trampled  all  over  the  Holy  Canons  and  insisted that his priest, Fr. Pedro, and other laymen do likewise! The truth is  that Fr. Pedro and the laymen supporting him are not at all causing “disorder  and  scandal”  in  the  Church,  but  they  are  the  ones  preventing  disorder  and  scandal by objecting to the unorthodox demands of Bp. Kirykos.    Throughout  the  history  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  Sunday  has  always  been the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. This was declared so  by  the  Holy  Apostles  themselves,  was  also  maintained  in  the  post‐apostolic  era, and continues even until our day. Nowhere in the doctrines, practices or  history  of  Orthodox  Christianity  is  there  ever  a  teaching  that  laymen  are  supposedly only to commune on a Saturday and never on a Sunday. The only  day of the week throughout the year upon which Liturgy is guaranteed to be  celebrated is on a Sunday. The Liturgy is only performed on a few Saturdays  per  year  in  most  parishes,  and  mostly  only  during  the  Great  Fast  or  on  the  Saturday  of  Souls.  Liturgy  is  more  seldom  on  weekdays  as  the  Liturgies  of  Wednesday  and Friday nights have been made  Pre‐sanctified  and  limited  to  only within the Great Fast. Liturgy is now only performed on weekdays if it is  a  feastday  of  a  major  saint.  But  Liturgy  is  always  performed  on  a  Sunday  without  fail,  in  every  city,  village  and  countryside,  because  it  is  the  Lord’s  Day. The purpose of Liturgy is to receive Holy Communion, and the reason  for it being celebrated on the Lord’s Day without fail is because this is the day  of salvation, and therefore the most important day of the week, especially for  receiving Holy Communion. For, “This is the day that the Lord hath made, let us  rejoice  and  be  glad  in  it  (Psalm  118:24).”  What  greater  way  to  rejoice  on  the  Lord’s Day than to commune of the very Lord Himself?    The  theory  of  diminishing  Sunday  as  the  day  of  salvation  and  communion,  and  instead  opting  for  Saturday,  is  actually  a  heresy  known  as 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii09/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 70%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Presiding Bishop of Methodist Church calls for peace 69%

He said the clergy and the Laity are connected as one to build the church together with each playing his or her divergent role.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/presiding-bishop-of-methodist-church-calls-for-peace/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

A Tale of Two Wives 68%

Great, the clergy had to remember all what they had done all week, on the busiest day of the week for them!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/10/08/a-tale-of-two-wives/

08/10/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 6th Sunday May 17 2020 66%

In our Diocesan cycle of prayer, we give thanks today for the Clergy and people of St Philip the Apostle in Lemon Grove.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/17/easter-6th-sunday-may-17-2020/

17/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

EPAnglicanOrders1922 66%

Encyclical on Anglican Orders  from the Oecumenical Patriarch to the Presidents of the  Particular Eastern Orthodox Churches, 1922  [The Holy Synod has studied the report of the Committee and notes:]  1.  That  the  ordination  of  Matthew  Parker  as  Archbishop  of  Canterbury  by  four bishops is a fact established by history.  2.  That  in  this  and  subsequent  ordinations  there  are  found  in  their  fullness  those  orthodox  and  indispensable,  visible  and  sensible  elements  of  valid  episcopal ordination ‐ viz. the laying on of hands, the Epiclesis of the All‐Holy  Spirit and also the purpose to transmit the charisma of the Episcopal ministry.  3.  That  the  orthodox  theologians  who  have  scientifically  examined  the  question  have  almost  unanimously  come  to  the  same  conclusions  and  have  declared themselves as accepting the validity of Anglican Orders.  4.  That  the  practice  in  the  Church  affords  no  indication  that  the  Orthodox  Church has ever officially treated the validity of Anglican Orders as in doubt,  in  such  a  way  as  would  point  to  the  re‐ordination  of  the  Anglican  clergy  as  required in the case of the union of the two Churches.  +  Meletios  [Metaxakis],  Archbishop  of  Constantinople  New  Rome  and  Oecumenical Patriarch        http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucgbmxd/patriarc.htm 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/epanglicanorders1922/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

WESTERN UBE FLYER 2017(1) 66%

GUY LEEMHUIS AT guyleemhuis@gmail.com or (323) 286-2770 Clergy will Process :

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/02/10/western-ube-flyer-2017-1/

10/02/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Church Facilities Officer GSM 65%

 as  well  as  clergy   and  music  staff.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/05/church-facilities-officer-gsm/

05/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Spencer Lee Chaplaincy Scholarship 65%

Clergy Development Church of the Nazarene 17001 Prairie Star Parkway Lenexa, KS 66220 SPENCER/LEE CHAPLAINCY SCHOLARSHIP F or many years, chaplains have been some of the Church of the Nazarene’s most effective missional leaders.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/17/spencer-lee-chaplaincy-scholarship/

17/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Allen Dareus 65%

They rushed him to the clergy to bless him and determine if he was cursed.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/12/allen-dareus/

12/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii11 64%

IS IT SINFUL TO EAT MEAT?   ARE MARITAL RELATIONS IMPURE?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “Regarding the Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without  fasting  beforehand,  it  is  correct,  but  it  must  be  interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics and temperate and fasters, and only they remained until the end of the Divine  Liturgy and communed. They fasted in the fine and broader sense, that is, they were  worthy to commune.”      In  the  above  quote,  Bp.  Kirykos  displays  the  notion  that  early  Christians  supposedly  abstained  from  meat  and  from  marriage,  and  were  thus all supposedly “ascetics and temperate and fasters,” and that this is what  gave them the right to commune daily. But the truth of the matter is that the  majority of Christians were not ascetics, yet they did commune every day. In  fact, the ascetics were the ones who lived far away from cities where Liturgy  would  have  been  available,  and  it  was  these  ascetics  who  would  commune  rarely.  This  can  be  ascertained  from  studying  the  Patrologia  and  the  ecclesiastical histories written by Holy Fathers.      The  theories  that  Bp.  Kirykos  entertains  are  also  followed  by  those  immediately  surrounding  him.  His  sister,  the  nun  Vincentia,  for  instance,  actually believes that people that eat meat or married couples that engaged in  legal nuptial relations are supposedly sinning! She actually believes that meat  and  marriage  are  sinful  and  should  be  avoided.  This  theory  appears  much  more extreme in the person of the nun Vincentia, but this notion is also found  in the teachings of Bp. Kirykos, and the spirit of this error can also be found in  the  above  quote,  where  he  believes  that  only  people  who  are  “ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters”  are  “worthy  of  communion,”  as  if  a  man  who  eats  meat or has marital relations with his own wife is “sinful” and “unworthy.”      But is this the teaching of the Orthodox Church? Certainly  not! These  teachings  are  actually  found  in  Gnosticism,  Manichaeism,  Paulicianism,  Bogomilism, and various “New Age” movements which arise from a mixture  of Christianity with Hinduism or Buddhism, religions that consider meat and  marriage to be sinful due to their erroneous belief in reincarnation.      The  Holy  Apostle  Paul  warns  us  against  these  heresies.  In  the  First  Epistle to Timothy, the Apostle to the Nations writes: “Now the Spirit speaketh  expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to  seducing  spirits,  and  doctrines  of  devils;  speaking  lies  in  hypocrisy;  having  their  conscience  seared  with  a  hot  iron;  Forbidding  to  marry,  and  commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with  thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth. For every creature of God is  good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving: For it is sanctified  by  the  word  of  God  and  prayer.”  If  all  of  the  early  Christians  abstained  from  meat  and  marriage,  as  Bp.  Kirykos  dares  to  say,  how  is  it  that  the  Apostle  Paul warns his disciple, Timothy, that in the future people shall “depart from  the faith,” shall preach “doctrines of demons,” shall “speak lies in hypocrisy,” shall  “forbid marriage” and shall “command to abstain from meats?”      The heresy that the Holy Apostle Paul was prophesying about is most  likely  that  called  Manichaeism.  This  heresy  finds  its  origins  in  a  Babylonian  man called Shuraik, son of Fatak Babak. Shuraik became a Mandaean Gnostic,  and was thus referred to as Rabban Mana (Teacher of the Light‐Spirit). For this  reason, Shuraik became commonly‐known throughout the world as Mani. His  followers became known as Manicheans in order to distinguish them from the  Mandaeans, and the religion he founded became known as Manichaeism. The  basic doctrines and principles of this religion were as follows:      The  Manicheans  believed  that  there  was  no  omnipotent  God.  Instead  they believed that there were two equal powers, one good and one evil. The  good power was ruled by the “Prince of Light” while the evil power was led  by  the  “Prince  of  Darkness.”  They  believed  that  the  material  world  was  inherently evil from its very creation, and that it was created by the Prince of  Darkness.  This  explains  why  they  held  meat  and  marriage  to  be  evil,  since  anything  material  was  considered  evil  from  its  very  foundation.  They  also  believed  that  each  human  consisted  of  a  battleground  between  these  two  opposing  powers  of  light  and  darkness,  where  the  soul  endlessly  battles  against the body, respectively. They divided their followers into four groups:  1)  monks,  2)  nuns,  3)  laymen,  4)  laywomen.  The  monks  and  nuns  abstained  from  meat  and  marriage  and  were  therefore  considered  “elect”  or  “holy,”  whereas  the  laymen  and  laywomen  were  considered  only  “hearers”  and  “observers”  but  not  real  “bearers  of  the  light”  due  to  their  “sin”  of  eating  meat and engaging in marital relations.       The above principles of the Manichean religion are entirely opposed to  the Orthodox Faith, on account of the following reasons:        The  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  one  God  who  is  eternal,  uncreated,  without beginning  and without  end, and  forever good and  omnipotent.  Evil  has  never  existed  in  the  uncreated  Godhead,  and  it  shall  never  exist  in  the  uncreated Godhead.       The  power  of  evil  is  not  uncreated  but  it  has  a  beginning  in  creation.  Yet the power of evil was not created by God. Evil exists because the prince of  the  angels  abused  his  free  will,  which  caused  him  to  fall  and  take  followers  with him. He became the devil and his followers became demons. Prior to this  event there was no evil in the created world.       The material world was not created by the devil, but by God Himself.  By  no  means  is  the  material  world  evil.  God  looked  upon  the  world  he  created and said “it was very good.” For this reason partaking of meat is not  evil, but God blessed Noah and all of his successors to partake of meat. For all  material things in the world exist to serve man, and man exists to serve God.       If  there  is  any  evil  in  the  created  world  it  derives  from  mankind’s  abuse of his free will, which took place in Eden, due to the enticement of the  devil. The history of mankind, both good and bad, is not a product of good or  evil forces fighting one another, but every event in the history of mankind is  part  of  God’s  plan  for  mankind’s  salvation.  The  devil  has  power  over  this  world  only  forasmuch  as  mankind  is  enslaved  by  his  own  egocentrism  and  his desire to sin. Once mankind denies his ego and submits to the will of God,  and ceases relying on his own  works but rather places his hope and trust in  God,  mankind  shall  no  longer  follow  or  practice  evil.  But  man  is  inherently  incapable of achieving this on his own because no man is perfect or sinless.       For this reason, God sent his only‐begotten Son, the Word of God, who  became  incarnate  and  was  born  and  grew  into  the  man  known  as  Jesus  of  Nazareth. By his virginal conception; his nativity; his baptism; his fast (which  he underwent himself but never forced upon his disciples); his miracles (the  first of which he performed at a wedding); his teaching (which was contrary  to the Pharisees); his gift of his immaculate Body and precious Blood for the  eternal life of mankind; his betrayal; his crucifixion; his death; his defeating of  death and hades; his Resurrection from the tomb (by which he also raised the  whole  human  nature);  his  ascension  and  heavenly  enthronement;  and  his  sending down of the Holy Spirit which proceeds from the Father—our  Lord,  God and Savior, Jesus Christ, accomplished the salvation of mankind.       Among the followers of Christ are people who are married as well as  people  who  live  monastic  lives.  Both  of  these  kinds  of  people,  however,  are  sinners,  each  in  their  own  way,  and  their  actions,  no  matter  how  good  they  may be, are nothing but a menstruous rag in the eyes of God, according to the  Prophet Isaiah. Whether married or unmarried, they can accomplish nothing  without the saving grace of the crucified and third‐day Risen Lord. Although  being a monastic allows one to spend more time devoted to prayer and with  less responsibilities and earthly cares, nevertheless, being married is not at all  sinful, but rather it is a blessing. Marital relations between a lawfully married  couple, in moderation and at the appointed times (i.e., not on Sundays, not on  Great  Feasts,  and  outside  of  fasting  periods)  are  not  sinful  but  are  rather  an  expression  of  God’s  love  and  grace  which  He  has  bestowed  upon  each  married man and woman, through the Mystery of Holy Matrimony.      The  Orthodox  Church  went  through  great  extremes  to  oppose  the  heresy  of  Manichaeism,  especially  because  this  false  religion’s  devotion  to  fasting and monasticism enticed many people to think it was a good religion.  In reality though, Manichaeism is a satanic folly. Yet over the years this folly  began  to  seep  into  the  fold  of  the  faithful.  Manichaeism  spread  wildly  throughout the Middle East, and throughout Asia as far as southern China. It  also  spread  into  Africa,  and  even  St.  Aurelius  Augustinus,  also  known  as  Blessed Augustine of Hippo (+28 August, 430), happened to be a Manichaean  before  he  became  an  Orthodox  Christian.  The  heresy  began  to  spread  into  Western Europe, which is why various pockets in the Western Church began  enforcing  the  celibacy  of  all  clergy.  They  also  began  reconstructing  the  meaning of fasting. Instead of demanding laymen to only fast on Wednesday  and  Friday  during  a  normal  week,  they  began  enforcing  a  strict  fast  on  Saturday as well. The reason for this is because they no longer viewed fasting  as  a  spiritual  exercise  for  the  sake  of  remembering  Christ’s  betrayal  and  his  crucifixion. Instead they began viewing fasting as a method of purifying one’s  body from “evil foods.” Thus they adopted the Manichean heresy that meat,  dairy  or  eggs  are  supposedly  evil.  Thinking  that  these  foods  were  evil,  they  demanded laymen to  fast on Saturday  so as  to  be  “pure”  when they  receive  Holy Communion on Sunday. In so doing, they cast aside the Holy Canons of  the All‐famed Apostles, for the sake of following their newly‐found “tradition  of men,” which is nothing but the heresy of Manichaeism.      The  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council,  in  its  55th  Canon,  strongly  admonishes  the Church of Rome to abandon this practice. St. Photius the Great, Patriarch  of  Constantinople  New  Rome  (+6  February,  893),  in  his  Encyclical  to  the  Eastern  Patriarchs,  in  his  countless  writings  against  Papism  and  his  work  against  Manichaeism,  clearly  explains  that  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  has  fallen  into  Manichaeism  by  demanding  the  fast  on  Saturdays  and  by  enforcing  all  clergy  to  be  celibate.  Thanks  to  these  works  of  St.  Photius  the  Great,  the  heretical  practices  of  the  Manicheans  did  not  prevail  in  the  East,  and the mainstream Orthodox Christians did not adopt this Manichaeism.      However,  the  Manicheans  did  manage  to  set  up  their  own  false  churches in Armenia and Bulgaria. The Manicheans in Armenia were referred  to as Paulicians. Those in Bulgaria were called Bogomils. They flourished from  the 9th century even until the 15th century, until the majority of them converted  to  Islam  under  Ottoman  Rule.  Today’s  Muslim  Azerbaijanis,  Kurds,  and  various  Caucasian  nationalities  are  descendants  of  those  who  were  once  Paulicians.  Today’s  Muslim  Albanians,  Bosnians  and  Pomaks  descend  from  those  who  were  once  Bogomils.  Some  Bogomils  migrated  to  France  where  they  established  the  sect  known  as  the  Albigenses,  Cathars  or  Puritans.  But  several Bogomils did not convert to Islam, nor did they leave the realm of the  Ottoman Empire, but instead they converted to Orthodoxy. The sad thing is,  though,  that  they  brought  their  Manichaeism  with  them.  Thus  from  the  15th  century  onwards,  Manichaeism  began  to  infiltrate  the  Church,  and  this  is  what  led  to  the  outrageous  practices  of  the  17th  and  18th  centuries,  wherein  hardly  any  laymen  would  ever  commune,  except  for  once,  twice  or  three  times per year. It is this error that the Holy Kollyvades Fathers fought.      Various  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  condemn  the  notions  that it is “sinful” or “impure” for one to eat meat or engage in lawful marital  relations. Some of these Holy Canons and Decisions are presented below:      The 51st Canon of the Holy Apostles reads: “If any bishop, or presbyter, or  deacon,  or  anyone  at  all  on  the  sacerdotal  list,  abstains  from  marriage,  or  meat,  or  wine, not as a matter of mortification, but out of abhorrence thereof, forgetting that all  things are exceedingly good, and that God made male and female, and blasphemously  misinterpreting  God’s  work  of  creation,  either  let  him  mend  his  ways  or  let  him  be  deposed from office and expelled from the Church. Let a layman be treated similarly.”  Thus, clergy and  laymen are only permitted to abstain from these things for  reasons  of mortification,  and such mortification is what one  should apply to  himself  and  not  to  others.  By  no  means  are  they  permitted  to  abstain  from  these things out of abhorrence towards them, in other words, out of belief that  these things are disgusting, sinful or impure, or that they cause unworthiness.      The 1st Canon of the Holy Council of Gangra reads: “If anyone disparages  marriage,  or  abominates  or  disparages  a  woman  sleeping  with  her  husband,  notwithstanding  that  she  is  faithful and reverent,  as though she  could not enter the  Kingdom,  let  him  be  anathema.”  Here  the  Holy  Council  anathematizes  those  who  believe  that  a  lawfully  married  husband  and  wife  supposedly  sin  whenever  they  have  nuptial  relations.  Note  that  the  reference  “as  though  she  could  not  enter  the  Kingdom”  can  also  have  the  interpretation  “as  though  she  could  not  receive  Communion.”  For  according  to  the  Holy  Fathers,  receiving  Communion  is  an  entry  into  the  Kingdom.  This  is  why  when  we  are  approaching  Communion  we  chant  “Remember  me,  O  Lord,  in  Thy  Kingdom.”  Therefore, anyone who believes that a woman who lawfully sleeps with  her  own  husband,  or  that  a  man  who  lawfully  sleeps  with  his  own  wife,  is  somehow  “impure,”  “sinful,”  or  “evil,”  is  entertaining  notions  that  are  not  Orthodox but rather Manichaean. Such a person is anathematized. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii11/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii10 64%

DEMANDING A STRICT FAST ON SATURDAYS   IS THE FIRST HERESY OF THE PAPISTS    In his two letters to Fr. Pedro, in several other writings on the internet,  as well as through his verbal discussions, Bp. Kirykos presents the idea that a  Christian is forbidden to ever commune on a Sunday, except by “economia,”  and  that  if  per  chance  a  Christian  is  granted  this  “economia,”  he  would  nevertheless be compelled to fast strictly without oil on the Saturday, that is,  the day prior to receiving Holy Communion.       For  instance,  outside  of  fasting  periods,  Bp.  Kirykos,  his  sister,  Vincentia, and the “theologian” Mr. Eleutherios Gkoutzidis insist that laymen  must  fast  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without oil, and one day without even olives or sesame pulp, for fear of these  things  containing  oil.  If  someone  prepares  to  commune  on  a  Sunday,  this  means that from the previous Sunday he cannot eat meat. From the Tuesday  onwards he cannot eat dairy either. On the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday  he  cannot  partake  of  oil  or  wine.  While  on  the  Saturday  he  must  perform  a  xerophagy in which he cannot have any processed foods, and not even olives  or  sesame  pulp.  This  means  that  the  strictest  fast  will  be  performed  on  the  Saturday, in violation of the Canons. This also means that for a layman to ever  be  able  to  commune  every  Sunday,  he  would  need  to  fast  for  his  entire  life  long. Yet, Bp. Kirykos and his priests exempt themselves from this rule, and  are allowed to partake of any foods all week long except for Wednesday and  Friday.  They  can  even  partake  of  all  foods  as  late  as  midnight  on  Saturday  night,  and  commune  on  Sunday  morning  without  feeling  the  least  bit  “unworthy.”  But  should  a  layman  dare  to  partake  of  oil  even  once  on  a  Saturday, he is brushed off as “unworthy” for Communion on Sunday.      Meanwhile during fasting periods such as Great Lent, since Monday to  Friday  is  without  oil  anyway,  Bp.  Kirykos,  Sister  Vincentia  and  Mr.  Gkoutzidis believe that laymen should also fast on Saturday without oil, and  even without olives and sesame pulp, in order for such laymen to be able to  commune on Sunday. Thus again they require a layman to violate Apostolic,  Ecumenical,  Local  and  Patristic  Canons,  and  even  fall  under  the  penalty  of  excommunication (according to these same canons) in order to be “worthy” of  communion. What an absurdity! What a monstrosity! A layman must become  worthy of excommunication in order to become “worthy” of Communion!      The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles advises: “If any clergyman be found  fasting  on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday  (except  for  one  only),  let  him  be  deposed  from  office. If, however, he is a layman, let him be excommunicated.” The term “fasting”  refers to the strict form of fasting, not permitting oil or wine. The term “except  for  one”  refers  to  Holy  and  Great  Saturday,  the  only  day  of  the  year  upon  which fasting without oil and wine is expected.      But  it  was  not  only  the  Holy  Apostles  who  commanded  against  this  Pharisaic  Sabbatian  practice  of  fasting  on  Saturdays.  But  this  issue  was  also  addressed  by  the  Quintisext  Council  (Πενδέκτη  Σύνοδος  =  Fifth‐and‐Sixth  Council),  which  was  convened  for  the  purpose  of  setting  Ecclesiastical  Canons, since the Fifth and Sixth Ecumenical Councils had not provided any.  The reason why this Holy Ecumenical Council addressed this issue is because  the Church of Old Rome had slowly been influenced by the Arian Visigoths  and  Ostrogoths  who  invaded  from  the  north,  by  the  Manicheans  who  migrated from Africa and from the East through the Balkans, as well as by the  Jews and Judaizers, who had also migrated to the West from various parts of  the East, seeking asylum in Western lands that were no longer under Roman  (Byzantine)  rule.  Thus  there  arose  in  the  West  a  most  Judaizing  practice  of  clergy forcing the laymen to fast from oil and wine on every Saturday during  Great Lent, instead of permitting this only on Holy and Great Saturday.      Thus, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council, we  read: “Since we have learned that those in the city of the Romans during the holy  fast  of  Lent  are  fasting  on  the  Saturdays  thereof,  contrary  to  the  ecclesiastical  practice handed down, it has seemed best to the Holy Council for the Church of the  Romans to hold rigorously the Canon saying: If any clergyman be found fasting on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday,  with  the  exception  of  one  only,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office.  If,  however,  a  layman,  let  him  be  excommunicated.”  Thus  the  Westerners  were admonished by the Holy Ecumenical Council, and requested to refrain  from this unorthodox practice of demanding a strict fast on Saturdays.      Now,  just  in  case  anyone  thinks  that  a  different  kind  of  fast  was  observed on the Saturdays by the Romans, by Divine Economy, the very next  canon  admonishes  the  Armenians  for  not  fasting  properly  on  Saturdays  during Great Lent. Thus the 56th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council reads:  “Likewise we have learned that in the country of the Armenians and in other regions  on the Saturdays and on the Sundays of Holy Lent some persons eat eggs and  cheese.  It  has  therefore  seemed  best  to  decree  also  this,  that  the  Church  of  God  throughout the inhabited earth, carefully following a single procedure, shall  carry  out  fasting,  and  abstain,  precisely  as  from  every  kind  of  thing  sacrificed,  so  and  especially  from  eggs  and  cheese,  which  are  fruit  and  produce from which we have to abstain. As for those who fail to observe this rule,  if they are clergymen, let them be deposed from office; but if they are laymen, let them  be  excommunicated.”  Thus,  just  as  the  Roman  Church  was  admonished  for  fasting  strictly  on  the  Saturdays  within  Great  Lent,  the  Armenian  Church  is  equally admonished for overly relaxing the fast of Saturdays in Great Lent.      Here the Holy Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council clearly gives us the  exact  definition  of  what  the  Holy  Fathers  deem  fit  for  consumption  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent.  For  if  this  canon  forbids  the  Armenians  to  consume  eggs  and  cheese  on  the  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent,  whereas  the  previous canon forbids the Westerners to fast on the Saturdays of Great Lent,  it  means  that  the  midway  between  these  two  extremes  is  the  Orthodox  definition  of  fasting  on  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent.  The  Orthodox  definition  is  clearly marked in the Typicon as well as most calendar almanacs produced by  the various Local Orthodox Churches, including the very almanac as well as  the  wall  calendar  published  yearly  by  Bp.  Kirykos  himself.  These  all  mark  that oil, wine and various forms of seafood are to be consumed on Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  except  of  course  for  Holy  and  Great  Saturday  which  is  marked as a strict fast without oil, in keeping with the Apostolic Canon.      Now,  if  one  is  to  assume  that  partaking  of  oil,  wine  and  various  seafood on the Saturdays of Great Lent is only for those who are not planning  to  commune  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent,  may  he  consider  the  following.  The  very  meaning  of  the  term  “excommunicate”  is  to  forbid  a  layman  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  So  then,  if  people  who  partake  of  oil,  wine  and  various permissible seafood  on  Saturdays  during  Great Lent are  supposedly  forbidden to commune on the Sundays of Great Lent, then this means that the  55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council would be entirely without purpose.  For  if  those  who  do  partake  of  such  foods  on  Saturdays  are  supposedly  disqualified  from  communion  on  Sundays,  then  what  is  the  purpose  of  also  disqualifying those who do not partake of oil on Saturdays from being able to  commune  on  Sundays,  since  this  canon  requires  their  excommunication?  In  other  words,  such  a  faulty  interpretation  of  the  canons  by  anyone  bearing  such  a  notion  would  need  to  call  the  Holy  Fathers  hypocrites.  They  would  need  to  consider  that  the  Holy  Fathers  in  their  Canon  Law  operated  with  a  system whereby “you’re damned if you do, and you’re damned if you don’t!”       Thus,  according  to  this  faulty  interpretation,  if  you  do  partake  of  oil  and  wine  on  Saturdays  of  Great  lent,  you  are  disqualified  from  communion  due  to  your  consumption  of  those  foods.  But  if  you  do  not  partake  of  these  foods on Saturday you are also disqualified from communion on Sunday, for  this canon demands your excommunication. In other words, whatever you do  you cannot win! Fast without oil or fast with oil, you are still disqualified the  next day. So how does Bp. Kirykos interpret this Canon in order to keep his  Pharisaical  custom?  He  declares  that  “all  Christians”  are  excommunicated  from  ever  being  able  to  commune  on  a  Sunday!  He  demands  that  only  by  extreme  economy  can  Christians  commune  on  Sunday,  and  that  they  are  to  only commune on Saturdays, declaring this the day “all Christians” ought to  “know”  to  be  their  day  of  receiving  Holy  Communion!  Thus  the  very  trap  that  Bp.  Kirykos  has  dug  for  himself  is  based  entirely  on  his  inability  to  interpret  the  canons  correctly.  Yet  hypocritically,  in  his  second  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro  he  condemns  others  of  supposedly  “not  interpreting  the  canons  correctly,” simply because they disagree with his Pharisaical Sabbatianism!      But the hypocrisies continue. Bp. Kirykos continuously parades himself  in his printed periodicals, on his websites, and on his various online blogs, as  some  kind  of “confessor” of Orthodoxy against Papism and Ecumenism. He  even dares to openly call himself a “confessor” on Facebook, where he spends  several  hours  per  day  in  gossip  and  idletalk  as  can  be  seen  by  his  frequent  status  updates  and  constant  chatting.  This  kind  of  pastime  is  clearly  unbecoming for an Orthodox Christian, let alone a hierarch who claims to be  “Genuine  Orthodox”  and  a  “confessor.”  So  great  is  his  “confession,”  that  when the entire Kiousis Synod, representatives from the Makarian Synod, the  Abbot  of  Esphigmenou,  members  from  all  other  Old  Calendarist  Synods  in  Greece,  as  well  as  members  of  the  State  Hierarchy,  had  gathered  in  Athens  forming crowds of clergy and thousands of laity, to protest against the Greek  Government’s antagonism towards Greek culture and religion, our wonderful  “confessor” Bp. Kirykos was spending that whole day chatting on Facebook.  The people present at the protest made a joke about Bp. Kirykos’s absence by  writing the following remark on an empty seat: “Bp. Kirykos, too busy being  an  online  confessor  to  bother  taking  part  in  a  real  life  confession.”  When  various monastics and laymen of Bp. Kirykos’s own metropolis informed him  that  he should have been  there, he  yelled  at  them and told  them “This is all  rubbish, I don’t care about these issues, the only real issue is the cheirothesia  of  1971.”  How  lovely.  Greece  is  on  the  verge  of  geopolitical  and  economical  self‐destruction, and Bp. Kirykos’s only care is for his own personal issue that  he has repeated time and time again for three decades, boring us to death.      But what does Bp. Kirykos claim to “confess” against, really? He claims  he confesses against “Papo‐Ecumenism.” In other words, he views himself as  a fighter against the idea of the Orthodox Church entering into a syncretistic  and ecumenistic union with Papism. Yet Bp. Kirykos does not realize that he  has already fallen into what St. Photius the Great has called “the first heresy  of the Westerners!” For as indicated above, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐ Sixth  Ecumenical  Council,  it  was  the  “Church  of  the  Romans”  (that  is  what  became  the  Papists)  that  fell  into  the  unorthodox  practice  of  demanding  laymen  to  fast  strictly  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  as  a  prerequisite  to  receiving  Holy  Communion  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent.  This  indeed  was  the  first  error  of  the  Papists.  It  arrived  at  the  same  time  the  filioque  also  arrived,  to  wit,  during  the  6th  and  7th  centuries.  This  is  why  St.  Photius  the  Great,  who  was  a  real  confessor  against  Papism,  calls  the  error  of  enforced  fasting without oil on Saturdays “the first heresy of the Westerners.” Thus, let  us depart from the hypocrisies of Bp. Kirykos and listen to the voice of a real  confessor against Papism. Let us read the opinion of St. Photius the Great, that  glorious champion and Pillar of Orthodoxy!      In  his  Encyclical  to  the  Eastern  Patriarchs  (written  in  866),  our  Holy  Father,  St.  Photius  the  Great  (+6  February,  893),  Archbishop  of  the  Imperial  City of Constantinople New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch, writes:    St. Photius the Great: Encyclical to the Eastern Patriarchs (866)    Countless have been the evils devised by the cunning devil against the race of  men,  from the beginning  up  to the coming of  the Lord. But even afterwards, he  has  not ceased through errors and heresies to beguile and deceive those who listen to him.  Before  our  times,  the  Church,  witnessed  variously  the  godless  errors  of  Arius,  Macedonius, Nestorius, Eutyches, Discorus, and a foul host of others, against which  the  holy  Ecumenical  Synods  were  convened,  and  against  which  our  Holy  and  God‐ bearing  Fathers  battled  with  the  sword  of  the  Holy  Spirit.  Yet,  even  after  these  heresies  had  been  overcome  and  peace  reigned,  and  from  the  Imperial  Capital  the  streams of Orthodoxy  flowed throughout  the world;  after  some people who had  been  afflicted by the Monophysite heresy returned to the True Faith because of your holy  prayers;  and  after  other  barbarian  peoples,  such  as  the  Bulgarians,  had  turned  from  idolatry to the knowledge of God and the Christian Faith: then was the cunning devil  stirred up because of his envy.    For the Bulgarians had not been baptised even two years when dishonourable  men  emerged  out  of  the  darkness  (that  is,  the  West),  and  poured  down  like  hail  or,  better,  charged  like  wild  boars  upon  the  newly‐planted  vineyard  of  the  Lord,  destroying  it  with  hoof  and  tusk,  which  is  to  say,  by  their  shameful  lives  and  corrupted  dogmas.  For  the  papal  missionaries  and  clergy  wanted  these  Orthodox  Christians to depart from the correct and pure dogmas of our irreproachable Faith.    The first error of the Westerners was to compel the faithful to fast on  Saturdays. I mention this seemingly small point because the least departure  from Tradition can lead to a scorning of every dogma of our Faith. Next, they  convinced the faithful to despise the marriage of priests, thereby sowing in their souls  the  seeds  of  the  Manichean  heresy.  Likewise,  they  persuaded  them  that  all  who  had  been  chrismated  by  priests  had  to  be  anointed  again  by  bishops.  In  this  way,  they  hoped to show that Chrismation by priests had no value, thereby ridiculing this divine  and supernatural Christian Mystery. From whence comes this law forbidding priests 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii10/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Good Shepherd Ghana Methodist Church - Worcester 63%

The reluctance/refusal of the clergy to allow the rather large Ghanaian group to periodically worship like Ghanaian Methodists gave rise to increasing dissatisfaction, which culminated in the desire to move away from the United Methodist enclose to follow the example of other full Ghanaian Churches in the Worcester area.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/16/good-shepherd-ghana-methodist-church-worcester/

16/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Iran2 63%

Asim Almugren International Relations Asim Almugren Prof.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/01/iran2/

01/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18800000.PDF 62%

no, each denomination stands Roman Catholic clergy alone are rightly "ordained of God."

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18800000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii07 61%

PELAGIANISM IS NOTHING OTHR THAN THE  “CHRISTIAN” VERSION OF PHARISAISM    Although we are speaking of the heresy of Pelagianism and not that of  Pharisaism, it is difficult not to mention the Pharisees because their positions  were also a kind of Pelagianism. In fact, the Pharisaic view of fasting is very  much identical to the view held by Bp. Kirykos, since he thinks that “fasting  in  the  finer  and  broader  sense”  makes  someone  “worthy  to  commune.”  But  our  Lord  Jesus  Christ  rebuked  the  Pharisees  for  this  error  of  theirs.  Fine  examples of these rebukes are found in the Gospels. The best example is the  parable  of  the  Pharisee  and  the  Publican,  because  it  shows  the  difference  between  a  Pharisee  who  thinks  of  himself  as  “worthy”  due  to  his  fasts,  compared to a Christian who is conscious of his unworthiness and cries to the  Lord for mercy. It is a perfect example because it mentions fasting. This well‐ known parable spoken by the Lord Himself, reads as follows:    “And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they  were  righteous,  and  despised  others:  Two  men  went  up  into  the  temple  to  pray;  the  one  a  Pharisee,  and  the  other  a  publican.  The  Pharisee  stood  and  prayed  thus  with  himself,  God,  I  thank  thee,  that  I  am  not  as  other  men  are,  extortioners,  unjust,  adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I  possess.  And  the  publican,  standing  afar  off,  would  not  lift  up  so  much  as  his  eyes  unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell  you,  this  man  went  down  to  his  house  justified  rather  than  the  other:  for  every  one  that  exalteth  himself  shall  be  abased;  and  he  that  humbleth  himself  shall  be  exalted  (Luke 18:9‐14).”    Behold the word of the Lord! The Publican was more justified than the  Pharisee!  The  Publican  was  more  worthy  than  the  Pharisee!  But  today’s  Christians  cannot  be  justified  if  they  are  “extortionists,  unjust,  adulterers  or  even… publicans.” For they have the Gospel, the Church, the guidance of the  spiritual  father,  and  the  washing  away  of  their  sins  through  the  once‐off  Mysteries of Baptism and Chrism, and the repetitive Mysteries of Confession  and Communion. They have no excuse to be sinners, and if they are they have  the  method  available  to  correct  themselves.  But  how  much  more  so  are  Christians not justified in being Pharisees? For they have this parable spoken  by the Lord Himself as clear proof of Christ’s disfavor towards “the leaven of  the  Pharisees.”  They  have  hundreds  of  Holy  Fathers’  epistles,  homilies  and  dialogues, which they must have read in their pursuit of exulting themselves!  They have before them the repeated exclamations of the Lord, “Woe unto you,  Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men!  For  ye  neither  go  in  yourselves,  neither  suffer  ye  them  that  are  entering  to  go  in  (Matthew  23:13).”  They  have  even  the  very  fact  that  it  was  an  apostle  who  betrayed the Lord, and not a mere disciple but one of the twelve! They have  the fact that it was not an idolatrous nation that judged its savior and found  him guilty, but it was God’s own chosen people that condemned the world’s  Savior to death! They have even the fact that the Scribes, Pharisees and High  Priests were the ones who crucified the King of Glory! Yet despite having all  of these clear proofs, they continue their Pharisaism, but the “Christian” kind,  namely, Pelagianism. But who are we to condemn them? After all, we are but  sinners.  Therefore  let  them  take  heed  to  the  Lord’s  rebuke:  “Ye  serpents,  ye  generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell? (Matthew 23:33).  A Genuine Orthodox Christian (i.e., non‐Pelagian, non‐Pharisee), approaches  the Holy Chalice with nothing but disdain and humiliation for his wretched  soul, and feels his utter unworthiness, and truly believes that what is found in  that Chalice is God in the Flesh, and mankind’s only source of salvation and  life. If a man is to ever be called “worthy,” the origin of that worth is not in  himself, but is in that Holy Chalice from which he is about to commune. For a  man who lives of himself will surely die. But a man who lives in Christ, and  through  Holy  Communion  allows  Christ  to  live  in  him,  such  a  man  shall  never die. As Christ said: “I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if  any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my  flesh, which I will give for the life of the world (John 6:51).”     Thus a Genuine Orthodox Christian does not boast that he “fasts twice a  week” as did the Pharisee, but recognizing only his own imperfections before  the face of the perfect Christ, he smites his breast as did the Publican, saying,  “God be merciful to me a sinner.” Like the malefactor that he is in thought, word  and deed, he imitates the malefactor that was crucified with the Lord, saying,  “I indeed justly [am condemned]; for I received the due reward for my deeds: but this  man,  [my  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,]  hath  done  nothing  amiss  (Luke  23:41).” And he says unto Jesus, “Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy  kingdom  (Luke  23:42).”  To  such  a  Genuine  Orthodox  Christian,  free  of  Pharisaism  and  Pelagianism,  the  Lord  responds,  “Verily  I  say  unto  thee,  today  shalt  thou  be  with  me  in  paradise  (Luke  23:43),”  and  “I  appoint  unto  you  a  kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me, that ye may eat and drink at my table  in my kingdom (Luke 22:29).”    How  does  all  of  the  above  compare  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  statement  that  “fasting according to one’s strength” causes one to “worthily receive the body and  blood  of  the  Lord?”  How  can  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  theory  that  the  early  Christians  supposedly  “fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Can  anyone,  no  matter  how  strictly  they  fast,  ever  be  considered  worthy  of  Holy  Communion?  Does  someone’s  work  of  fasting  make them worthy? Is Bp. Kirykos justified in believing that fasting for three  days  without  oil  or  wine  supposedly  makes  an  individual  worthy  of  Holy  Communion? If Bp. Kirykos is justified, then why does he not do this himself?  Why does he eat oil on every Saturday of Great Lent, and yet communes on  Sundays  “unworthily”  (according  to  his  own  theory)  without  shame?  Why  does he demand the three day fast from oil upon laymen, but does not apply  it to himself and his priests?     We are not speaking of laymen with penances and excommunications.  We are speaking of laymen who have confessed their sins and are permitted  by  their  spiritual  father  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  When  such  laymen  receive  Holy  Communion  they  are  not  meant  to  kiss  the  hand  of  the  priest  after  this,  because  the  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  their  equality  with  the  priest  through  the  Mysteries.  There  is  no  difference  between  priests  and  laymen when it comes to the ability to commune, except only for the fact that  the clergy  receive  the Immaculate Mysteries within the  Holy Bema,  whereas  the  laity  receives  them  from  the  Royal  Doors.  Aside  from  this,  there  is  no  difference in the preparation for Holy Communion either. The laymen cannot  be compelled to fast extra fasts simply for being laymen, whereas priests are  not required to do these extra fasts at all on account of being priests.    The equality of the clergy and laity with regards to Holy Communion  is clearly expressed by Blessed Chrysostom: “There are cases when a priest does  not differ from a layman, notably when one approaches the Holy Mysteries. We are all  equally given them, not as in the Old Testament, when one food was for the priests  and another for the people and when it was not permitted to the people to partake of  that which was for the priest. Now it is not so: but to all is offered the same Body and  the same Chalice…” (John Chrysostom, Homily 18, on 2 Corinthians 8:24)    This is why the Orthodox Church preserves this tradition whereby the  priest forbids the laymen who have communed from kissing his hand. These  are  the  pious  laymen  we  refer  to:  those  who  are  deemed  acceptable  to  approach  the  Chalice.  Aren’t  the  bishops  and  priests  obliged  to  fast  more  strictly than the laymen, especially since the bishops and priests are the ones  invoking the Holy Spirit to descend on the gifts, while the laymen only stand  in the crowd of the people? So then why does Bp. Kirykos demand the three‐ day strict fast (forbidding even oil and wine) upon laymen, while he himself  and his priests not only partake of oil and wine, but outside of fasting periods  they even partake of fish, eggs, dairy products (and for married clergy, even  meat) as late as 11:30pm on the night before they are to serve Divine Liturgy  and commune of the Holy Mysteries “worthily” yet without fasting?     Are such hypocrisies Christian or are they Pharisaic? What does Christ  have to say regarding the Pharisees who ordered laymen to fast more heavily  while the Pharisee hierarchy did not do this themselves? Christ rebuked and  condemned them harshly. Thus we read in the Gospel according to St. Luke:  “Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, saying: “The Scribes and the  Pharisees  sit  in  Mosesʹ  seat.  All  therefore  whatsoever  they  bid  you  observe,  that  observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind  heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they  themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.” (Luke 23:1‐4).      So much for the Pharisees and their successors, the Pelagians! So much  for  Bp.  Kirykos  and  those  who  agree  with  his  blasphemous  positions,  for  these men are the Pharisees and Pelagians of our time! May God have mercy  on  them and  enlighten them to  depart  from the  darkness of their  hypocrisy.  May God also enlighten us to shun all forms of Pharisaism and Pelagianism,  including  this  most  dangerous  form  adopted  by  Bp.  Kirykos.  May  we  shun  this  heresy  by  ceasing  to  rely  on  our  own  human  perfections  that  are  but  abominations  in  the  eyes  of  our  perfect  God.  Let  us  take  heed  to  the  admonition of one who himself was a Pharisee named Saul, but later became  a  Christian  named  Paul.  For,  he  was  truly  blinded  by  the  darkness  of  his  Pharisaic  self‐righteousness,  but  Christ  blinded  him  with  the  eternal  light  of  sanctifying and soul‐saving Divine Grace. This Apostle to the Nations writes:       “For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom  of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of  the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power  of  God.  For  it  is  written,  I  will  destroy  the  wisdom  of  the  wise,  and  will  bring  to  nothing the understanding of the prudent.     Where  is  the  wise?  where  is  the  scribe?  where  is  the  disputer  of  this  world?  hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of  God  the  world  by  wisdom  knew  not  God,  it  pleased  God  by  the  foolishness  of  preaching to save them that believe. For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek  after  wisdom:  But  we  preach  Christ  crucified,  unto  the  Jews  a  stumblingblock,  and  unto the  Greeks foolishness; But  unto  them which are called, both Jews and  Greeks,  Christ  the  power  of  God,  and  the  wisdom  of  God.  Because  the  foolishness  of  God  is  wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.     For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh,  not many mighty, not many noble, are called: But God hath chosen the foolish things  of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world  to  confound  the  things  which  are  mighty;  And base  things  of  the  world,  and  things  which  are  despised,  hath  God  chosen,  yea,  and  things  which  are  not,  to  bring  to  nought things that are: That no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye  in  Christ  Jesus,  who  of  God  is  made  unto  us  wisdom,  and  righteousness,  and  sanctification, and redemption: That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let  him glory in the Lord (1 Corinthians 1:17‐31).”      Yea, Lord, help us to submit entirely to Thy will, and to learn to glorify  only in Thee, and not in our own works. For in truth, even the greatest works  of  ours,  even  the  work  of  fasting,  whether  for  one  day,  three  days,  a  week,  forty  days,  or  even  a  lifetime,  is  worthless  before  Thy  sight.  As  the  prophet  declares,  our  works  are  an  abomination,  and  our  righteousness  is  but  a  menstruous rag. Therefore, O Lord, judge us according to Thy mercy and not  according to our sins. For Thou alone can make us worthy of Communion.      Note  that  in  the  above  short  prayer  by  the  present  author,  the  word  “us”  is  used  and  not  “them.”  This  is  because,  in  order  to  preserve  oneself  from  becoming  a  Pharisee,  one  must  always  include  himself  among  those  who  are  lacking  in  conduct,  and  must  ask  God  for  guidance  as  well  as  for  others. In this manner, one does not fall into the danger of the Pharisee who  said “God, I thank thee that I am not as other men are…” but rather acknowledges  his own misconduct, and thereby includes himself in the prayer, imitating the  publican  who  said  “God  be  merciful  to  me  a  sinner.”  For  there  is  no  point  preaching  against  Pharisaism  unless  one  first  admonishes  and  reproves  his  own soul, and asks God to cleans himself from this hypocrisy of the Pharisees.  For we are not to hate the sinners, but rather the sin itself; and we are not to  hate  the  heretics,  but  rather  the  heresy  itself.  In  so  doing,  our  Confession  against the sins and heresies themselves constitute a “work of love.”      But when it comes to people judging Christians for food, or Sabbaths,  such  as  what  Bp.  Kirykos  has  done  by  his  two  blasphemous  letters  to  Fr.  Pedro,  this  is  definitely  not  a  “work  of  love”  but  is  in  fact  the  leaven  of  the  Pharisees in its fullness. It is a work of demonic self‐righteousness and satanic  hatred towards mankind. For rather than being a true spiritual father towards  his spiritual children, he proves to be a negligent and self‐serving, and a user  of  his  flock  for  his  own  personal  gain.  He  allows  himself  to  commune  very  frequently  without  the  slightest  fast,  while  demanding  strict  fasting  on  his  flock while also forbidding them to ever commune on Sundays. Thus it is well  that  Mr.  Christos  Noukas,  the  advisor  to  Fr.  Pedro,  asked  Bp.  Kirykos:  “Are  you  a  father  or  a  stepfather?”  By  this  he  meant,  “Do  you  truly  love  your  spiritual children as a true spiritual father should, or do you consider them to  be another man’s children and nothing but a burden to you?”      Our  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,  in  the  sermon  in  which  he  taught us to pray to “Our Father,” explained the love of a true father towards  his  children.  The  account,  as  contained  in  the  Gospel  of  Luke,  is  as  follows:  “And [Jesus] said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him  at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves; For a friend of mine in  his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him? And he from within  shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii07/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com