Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 June at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «condemn»:


Total: 300 results - 0.061 seconds

The Muslim World Denouncing Terrorism 100%

"I most seriously condemn the terrorist attacks in Paris and the murder of innocent people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/08/the-muslim-world-denouncing-terrorism/

08/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18830700 79%

Thus, it will be seen, that the Law which was to bless them was found to curse or condemn the Jew, and was for this reason reckoned his enemy— called “ the enmity,” or o p p o s i t i o n , or c o n d e m n a t i o n .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18830700/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

pedro1eng 78%

based  upon  which  Holy  Canon  do  you  condemn  me  and  prohibit  me  from  hearing  confessions  and  deprive  me  of  my  spiritual  flock,  without  any  witnesses  approaching  beforehand  to  testify  against  me  and  me  having  the  opportunity  to  defend  myself  d.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pedro1eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

2VAC5-210-10 – 80. OMPS 76%

Virginia Administrative Code Title 2.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/23/2vac5-210-10-80-omps/

23/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

PressReleaseARMCommentsPDF 76%

AML Queensland Chairman Tristan Rogers stated “You would think ARM would instantly condemn and remove this comment, but the comment remains, it really is a complete disgrace and reflection upon the Australian Republican Movement”.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2010/11/02/pressreleasearmcommentspdf/

02/11/2010 www.pdf-archive.com

20180128 Bulletin 71%

Has no one condemned you?” 11 She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/30/20180128-bulletin/

30/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18880000 71%

But how, in what sense, did God through Christ’s flesh condemn the tyrant Sin?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18880000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

EarlyFactionalismofGOCeng 69%

The Division of the G.O.C. Into Factions      The first division among the Old Calendarists occurred in 1936, when  three  of  the  seven  bishops  returned  to  the  New  Calendarist  State  Church  of  Greece.  The  fallen  hierarchs  were  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  Demetriou  of  Zacynthus, Bishop Christopher Hatziz of Megara and Bishop Polycarp Liosis  of  Diaulia.  The  remaining  hierarchs  of  the  Synod  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  of  Greece  were  Metropolitan  Germanus  Mavromatis  of  Demetrias,  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  Kavouridis  of  Florina,  Bishop  Germanus  Varykopoulos of the Cyclades and Bishop Matthew Karpathakis of Bresthena.      The second division among the Old Calendarists also occurred in 1936,  when the government‐recognized entity of the “Religious Community of the  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians”  (a  group  of  laymen  theoloigians  without  any  bishops or priests) severed communion with the President of the Holy Synod,  Metropolitan Germanus, and also severed communion with all the remaining  hierarchs of the Synod, and went off alone, forming a parasynagogue.      The third division among the Old Calendarists occurred in September  1937,  when  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena  severed  communion  with  the  Synodal  President,  Metropolitan  Germanus,  and  instead  formed  his  own  party, and took over the leadership of the schismatic “Religious Community  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians”  which  had  severed  communion  from  the  Church a year earlier. Bishop Matthew left for ecclesiological reasons.      The fourth division occurred in October 1937, when Bishop Germanus  of  the  Cyclades  severed  communion  with  the  President  of  the  Holy  Synod,  Metropolitan Germanus of Demetrias, and instead joined Bishop Matthew.      The  fifth  division  occurred  in  1942,  when  Bishops  Germanus  of  the  Cyclades  and  Matthew  of  Bresthena  severed  communion  with  one  another  due  to  dogmatic  reasons.  Bishop  Germanus  of  Cyclades  condemned  Bishop  Matthew for his writings and publications, which included a statement that if  it were not for the birth of St. John Chrysostom, there would have needed to  be a “second incarnation of Christ,” and another statement that Christ’s teeth  were  supposedly  broken,  etc.  Bishop  Matthew  retaliated  against  this  by  stating  that  Bishop  Germanus  was  guilty  of  blaspheming  against  King  Abgar’s  letter  to  Christ,  and  the  response  from  Christ  to  Abgar,  and  for  mocking the “symbols of the Theotokos” that Bishop Matthew had published  in his book “Garden of Graces.”       The sixth division among the Old Calendarists occurred in 1943, when  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  of  Florina  severed  communion  with  the  Synodal  President, Metropolitan Germanus of Demetrias, due to political reasons.      In other words, by 1943, there were four Old Calendarist bishops, and  four factions! Each of the four bishops was the “president” of his own faction.  Unfortunately,  these  hierarchs  managed  to  preserve  themselves  from  new  calendarism, but they fell into the passion of factionalism, a passion that still  runs  wild  among  the  Old  Calendarist  hierarchs  even  today.  This  is  what  occurs  when  bishops  are  led  by  their  passions,  make  hasty  decisions  to  condemn their brothers, and make themselves leaders of their own parties.      In  1946,  this  factionalism  began  to  come  to  an  end  when  Bishops  Christopher and Polycarp returned to the Old Calendar and joined the Synod  of  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  of  Florina.  Soon  after  this,  Bishop  Germanus  of  the Cyclades also began meeting with the above three bishops for the sake of  reuniting all the factions of the Old Calendarists of Greece. However, he was  placed in prison from 1947 to 1949, and it was not until he was released that  he  joined  formally  with  the  Synod  of  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  of  Florina.  The only bishop who remained separated was Bishop Matthew of Bresthena,  mainly for ecclesiological reasons, but he was much more open to unity than  were those immediately surrounding him.      The  below  photograph  is  of  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  of  Florina  and  Bishops  Germanus  of  Cyclades,  Christopher  of  Megaris  and  Polycarp  of  Diaulia  in  1946,  when  the  factionalism  began  to  end  and  a  united  Synod  began to form again (with the exclusion of Bishop Matthew who did not meet  in person with any of the remaining hierarchs).      Germanus of Cyclades, Chrysostom of Florina, Christopher of Megaris, Polycarp of Diaulia  

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/earlyfactionalismofgoceng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18841200 69%

and if you think best state for us our position as clearly, strongly, and simply, as possible, that we may compel them to prove us guilty of violating their creed (the Bible) before they condemn us;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18841200/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

freedom 65%

The Book of Life.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/25/freedom/

25/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18941001 65%

God won’t condemn all these.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18941001/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

newsletter (1) 64%

GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH OF ST.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/27/newsletter-1/

27/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18830000 64%

HERALD OF CHRIST’S PRESENCE.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18830000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 63%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii07 62%

PELAGIANISM IS NOTHING OTHR THAN THE  “CHRISTIAN” VERSION OF PHARISAISM    Although we are speaking of the heresy of Pelagianism and not that of  Pharisaism, it is difficult not to mention the Pharisees because their positions  were also a kind of Pelagianism. In fact, the Pharisaic view of fasting is very  much identical to the view held by Bp. Kirykos, since he thinks that “fasting  in  the  finer  and  broader  sense”  makes  someone  “worthy  to  commune.”  But  our  Lord  Jesus  Christ  rebuked  the  Pharisees  for  this  error  of  theirs.  Fine  examples of these rebukes are found in the Gospels. The best example is the  parable  of  the  Pharisee  and  the  Publican,  because  it  shows  the  difference  between  a  Pharisee  who  thinks  of  himself  as  “worthy”  due  to  his  fasts,  compared to a Christian who is conscious of his unworthiness and cries to the  Lord for mercy. It is a perfect example because it mentions fasting. This well‐ known parable spoken by the Lord Himself, reads as follows:    “And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they  were  righteous,  and  despised  others:  Two  men  went  up  into  the  temple  to  pray;  the  one  a  Pharisee,  and  the  other  a  publican.  The  Pharisee  stood  and  prayed  thus  with  himself,  God,  I  thank  thee,  that  I  am  not  as  other  men  are,  extortioners,  unjust,  adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I  possess.  And  the  publican,  standing  afar  off,  would  not  lift  up  so  much  as  his  eyes  unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell  you,  this  man  went  down  to  his  house  justified  rather  than  the  other:  for  every  one  that  exalteth  himself  shall  be  abased;  and  he  that  humbleth  himself  shall  be  exalted  (Luke 18:9‐14).”    Behold the word of the Lord! The Publican was more justified than the  Pharisee!  The  Publican  was  more  worthy  than  the  Pharisee!  But  today’s  Christians  cannot  be  justified  if  they  are  “extortionists,  unjust,  adulterers  or  even… publicans.” For they have the Gospel, the Church, the guidance of the  spiritual  father,  and  the  washing  away  of  their  sins  through  the  once‐off  Mysteries of Baptism and Chrism, and the repetitive Mysteries of Confession  and Communion. They have no excuse to be sinners, and if they are they have  the  method  available  to  correct  themselves.  But  how  much  more  so  are  Christians not justified in being Pharisees? For they have this parable spoken  by the Lord Himself as clear proof of Christ’s disfavor towards “the leaven of  the  Pharisees.”  They  have  hundreds  of  Holy  Fathers’  epistles,  homilies  and  dialogues, which they must have read in their pursuit of exulting themselves!  They have before them the repeated exclamations of the Lord, “Woe unto you,  Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men!  For  ye  neither  go  in  yourselves,  neither  suffer  ye  them  that  are  entering  to  go  in  (Matthew  23:13).”  They  have  even  the  very  fact  that  it  was  an  apostle  who  betrayed the Lord, and not a mere disciple but one of the twelve! They have  the fact that it was not an idolatrous nation that judged its savior and found  him guilty, but it was God’s own chosen people that condemned the world’s  Savior to death! They have even the fact that the Scribes, Pharisees and High  Priests were the ones who crucified the King of Glory! Yet despite having all  of these clear proofs, they continue their Pharisaism, but the “Christian” kind,  namely, Pelagianism. But who are we to condemn them? After all, we are but  sinners.  Therefore  let  them  take  heed  to  the  Lord’s  rebuke:  “Ye  serpents,  ye  generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell? (Matthew 23:33).  A Genuine Orthodox Christian (i.e., non‐Pelagian, non‐Pharisee), approaches  the Holy Chalice with nothing but disdain and humiliation for his wretched  soul, and feels his utter unworthiness, and truly believes that what is found in  that Chalice is God in the Flesh, and mankind’s only source of salvation and  life. If a man is to ever be called “worthy,” the origin of that worth is not in  himself, but is in that Holy Chalice from which he is about to commune. For a  man who lives of himself will surely die. But a man who lives in Christ, and  through  Holy  Communion  allows  Christ  to  live  in  him,  such  a  man  shall  never die. As Christ said: “I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if  any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my  flesh, which I will give for the life of the world (John 6:51).”     Thus a Genuine Orthodox Christian does not boast that he “fasts twice a  week” as did the Pharisee, but recognizing only his own imperfections before  the face of the perfect Christ, he smites his breast as did the Publican, saying,  “God be merciful to me a sinner.” Like the malefactor that he is in thought, word  and deed, he imitates the malefactor that was crucified with the Lord, saying,  “I indeed justly [am condemned]; for I received the due reward for my deeds: but this  man,  [my  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,]  hath  done  nothing  amiss  (Luke  23:41).” And he says unto Jesus, “Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy  kingdom  (Luke  23:42).”  To  such  a  Genuine  Orthodox  Christian,  free  of  Pharisaism  and  Pelagianism,  the  Lord  responds,  “Verily  I  say  unto  thee,  today  shalt  thou  be  with  me  in  paradise  (Luke  23:43),”  and  “I  appoint  unto  you  a  kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me, that ye may eat and drink at my table  in my kingdom (Luke 22:29).”    How  does  all  of  the  above  compare  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  statement  that  “fasting according to one’s strength” causes one to “worthily receive the body and  blood  of  the  Lord?”  How  can  Bp.  Kirykos  justify  his  theory  that  the  early  Christians  supposedly  “fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Can  anyone,  no  matter  how  strictly  they  fast,  ever  be  considered  worthy  of  Holy  Communion?  Does  someone’s  work  of  fasting  make them worthy? Is Bp. Kirykos justified in believing that fasting for three  days  without  oil  or  wine  supposedly  makes  an  individual  worthy  of  Holy  Communion? If Bp. Kirykos is justified, then why does he not do this himself?  Why does he eat oil on every Saturday of Great Lent, and yet communes on  Sundays  “unworthily”  (according  to  his  own  theory)  without  shame?  Why  does he demand the three day fast from oil upon laymen, but does not apply  it to himself and his priests?     We are not speaking of laymen with penances and excommunications.  We are speaking of laymen who have confessed their sins and are permitted  by  their  spiritual  father  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  When  such  laymen  receive  Holy  Communion  they  are  not  meant  to  kiss  the  hand  of  the  priest  after  this,  because  the  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  their  equality  with  the  priest  through  the  Mysteries.  There  is  no  difference  between  priests  and  laymen when it comes to the ability to commune, except only for the fact that  the clergy  receive  the Immaculate Mysteries within the  Holy Bema,  whereas  the  laity  receives  them  from  the  Royal  Doors.  Aside  from  this,  there  is  no  difference in the preparation for Holy Communion either. The laymen cannot  be compelled to fast extra fasts simply for being laymen, whereas priests are  not required to do these extra fasts at all on account of being priests.    The equality of the clergy and laity with regards to Holy Communion  is clearly expressed by Blessed Chrysostom: “There are cases when a priest does  not differ from a layman, notably when one approaches the Holy Mysteries. We are all  equally given them, not as in the Old Testament, when one food was for the priests  and another for the people and when it was not permitted to the people to partake of  that which was for the priest. Now it is not so: but to all is offered the same Body and  the same Chalice…” (John Chrysostom, Homily 18, on 2 Corinthians 8:24)    This is why the Orthodox Church preserves this tradition whereby the  priest forbids the laymen who have communed from kissing his hand. These  are  the  pious  laymen  we  refer  to:  those  who  are  deemed  acceptable  to  approach  the  Chalice.  Aren’t  the  bishops  and  priests  obliged  to  fast  more  strictly than the laymen, especially since the bishops and priests are the ones  invoking the Holy Spirit to descend on the gifts, while the laymen only stand  in the crowd of the people? So then why does Bp. Kirykos demand the three‐ day strict fast (forbidding even oil and wine) upon laymen, while he himself  and his priests not only partake of oil and wine, but outside of fasting periods  they even partake of fish, eggs, dairy products (and for married clergy, even  meat) as late as 11:30pm on the night before they are to serve Divine Liturgy  and commune of the Holy Mysteries “worthily” yet without fasting?     Are such hypocrisies Christian or are they Pharisaic? What does Christ  have to say regarding the Pharisees who ordered laymen to fast more heavily  while the Pharisee hierarchy did not do this themselves? Christ rebuked and  condemned them harshly. Thus we read in the Gospel according to St. Luke:  “Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, saying: “The Scribes and the  Pharisees  sit  in  Mosesʹ  seat.  All  therefore  whatsoever  they  bid  you  observe,  that  observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not. For they bind  heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men’s shoulders; but they  themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.” (Luke 23:1‐4).      So much for the Pharisees and their successors, the Pelagians! So much  for  Bp.  Kirykos  and  those  who  agree  with  his  blasphemous  positions,  for  these men are the Pharisees and Pelagians of our time! May God have mercy  on  them and  enlighten them to  depart  from the  darkness of their  hypocrisy.  May God also enlighten us to shun all forms of Pharisaism and Pelagianism,  including  this  most  dangerous  form  adopted  by  Bp.  Kirykos.  May  we  shun  this  heresy  by  ceasing  to  rely  on  our  own  human  perfections  that  are  but  abominations  in  the  eyes  of  our  perfect  God.  Let  us  take  heed  to  the  admonition of one who himself was a Pharisee named Saul, but later became  a  Christian  named  Paul.  For,  he  was  truly  blinded  by  the  darkness  of  his  Pharisaic  self‐righteousness,  but  Christ  blinded  him  with  the  eternal  light  of  sanctifying and soul‐saving Divine Grace. This Apostle to the Nations writes:       “For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel: not with wisdom  of words, lest the cross of Christ should be made of none effect. For the preaching of  the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power  of  God.  For  it  is  written,  I  will  destroy  the  wisdom  of  the  wise,  and  will  bring  to  nothing the understanding of the prudent.     Where  is  the  wise?  where  is  the  scribe?  where  is  the  disputer  of  this  world?  hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of  God  the  world  by  wisdom  knew  not  God,  it  pleased  God  by  the  foolishness  of  preaching to save them that believe. For the Jews require a sign, and the Greeks seek  after  wisdom:  But  we  preach  Christ  crucified,  unto  the  Jews  a  stumblingblock,  and  unto the  Greeks foolishness; But  unto  them which are called, both Jews and  Greeks,  Christ  the  power  of  God,  and  the  wisdom  of  God.  Because  the  foolishness  of  God  is  wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men.     For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh,  not many mighty, not many noble, are called: But God hath chosen the foolish things  of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world  to  confound  the  things  which  are  mighty;  And base  things  of  the  world,  and  things  which  are  despised,  hath  God  chosen,  yea,  and  things  which  are  not,  to  bring  to  nought things that are: That no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye  in  Christ  Jesus,  who  of  God  is  made  unto  us  wisdom,  and  righteousness,  and  sanctification, and redemption: That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let  him glory in the Lord (1 Corinthians 1:17‐31).”      Yea, Lord, help us to submit entirely to Thy will, and to learn to glorify  only in Thee, and not in our own works. For in truth, even the greatest works  of  ours,  even  the  work  of  fasting,  whether  for  one  day,  three  days,  a  week,  forty  days,  or  even  a  lifetime,  is  worthless  before  Thy  sight.  As  the  prophet  declares,  our  works  are  an  abomination,  and  our  righteousness  is  but  a  menstruous rag. Therefore, O Lord, judge us according to Thy mercy and not  according to our sins. For Thou alone can make us worthy of Communion.      Note  that  in  the  above  short  prayer  by  the  present  author,  the  word  “us”  is  used  and  not  “them.”  This  is  because,  in  order  to  preserve  oneself  from  becoming  a  Pharisee,  one  must  always  include  himself  among  those  who  are  lacking  in  conduct,  and  must  ask  God  for  guidance  as  well  as  for  others. In this manner, one does not fall into the danger of the Pharisee who  said “God, I thank thee that I am not as other men are…” but rather acknowledges  his own misconduct, and thereby includes himself in the prayer, imitating the  publican  who  said  “God  be  merciful  to  me  a  sinner.”  For  there  is  no  point  preaching  against  Pharisaism  unless  one  first  admonishes  and  reproves  his  own soul, and asks God to cleans himself from this hypocrisy of the Pharisees.  For we are not to hate the sinners, but rather the sin itself; and we are not to  hate  the  heretics,  but  rather  the  heresy  itself.  In  so  doing,  our  Confession  against the sins and heresies themselves constitute a “work of love.”      But when it comes to people judging Christians for food, or Sabbaths,  such  as  what  Bp.  Kirykos  has  done  by  his  two  blasphemous  letters  to  Fr.  Pedro,  this  is  definitely  not  a  “work  of  love”  but  is  in  fact  the  leaven  of  the  Pharisees in its fullness. It is a work of demonic self‐righteousness and satanic  hatred towards mankind. For rather than being a true spiritual father towards  his spiritual children, he proves to be a negligent and self‐serving, and a user  of  his  flock  for  his  own  personal  gain.  He  allows  himself  to  commune  very  frequently  without  the  slightest  fast,  while  demanding  strict  fasting  on  his  flock while also forbidding them to ever commune on Sundays. Thus it is well  that  Mr.  Christos  Noukas,  the  advisor  to  Fr.  Pedro,  asked  Bp.  Kirykos:  “Are  you  a  father  or  a  stepfather?”  By  this  he  meant,  “Do  you  truly  love  your  spiritual children as a true spiritual father should, or do you consider them to  be another man’s children and nothing but a burden to you?”      Our  Lord,  God  and  Savior,  Jesus  Christ,  in  the  sermon  in  which  he  taught us to pray to “Our Father,” explained the love of a true father towards  his  children.  The  account,  as  contained  in  the  Gospel  of  Luke,  is  as  follows:  “And [Jesus] said unto them, Which of you shall have a friend, and shall go unto him  at midnight, and say unto him, Friend, lend me three loaves; For a friend of mine in  his journey is come to me, and I have nothing to set before him? And he from within  shall answer and say, Trouble me not: the door is now shut, and my children are with 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii07/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii01 62%

CAN FASTING MAKE ONE “WORTHY” TO COMMUNE?    In the first paragraph of his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes:  “...  according  to  the  tradition  of  our  Fathers  (and  that  of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  must  be  suitably prepared, in order to worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord. This  preparation indispensably includes fasting according to one’s strength.” To further  prove that he interprets this worthiness as being based on fasting, Metropolitan  Kirykos  continues  further  down  in  reference  to  his  unhistorical  understanding  about the  early  Christians:  “They fasted  in the fine and  broader  sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    Here Bp. Kirykos tries to fool the reader by stating the absolutely false  notion  that  the  Holy  Fathers  (among  them  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena)  supposedly agree with his unorthodox views. The truth is that not one single  Holy Father of the Orthodox Church agrees with Bp. Kirykosʹs views, but in  fact, many of them condemn these views as heretical. And as for referring to  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  this  is  extremely  misleading,  which  is  why  Bp.  Kirykos  was  unable  to  provide  a  quote.  In  reality,  St.  Matthew’s  five‐page‐ long treatise on Holy Communion, published in 1933, repeatedly stresses the  importance  of  receiving  Holy  Communion  frequently  and  does  not  mention  any  such  pre‐communion  fast  at  all.  He  only  mentions  that  one  must  go  to  confession,  and  that  confession  is  like  a  second  baptism  which  washes  the  soul and prepares it for communion. If St. Matthew really thought a standard  week‐long  pre‐communion  fast  for  all  laymen  was  paramount,  he  certainly  would have mentioned it somewhere in his writings. But in the hundreds of  pages  of  writings  by  St.  Matthew  that  have  been  collected,  no  mention  is  made of such a fast. The reason for this is because St. Matthew was a Kollyvas  Father  just  as  was  his  mentor,  St.  Nectarius  of  Aegina.  Also,  the  fact  St.  Matthew left Athos and preached throughout Greece and Asia Minor during  his earlier life, is another example of his imitation of the Kollyvades Fathers.    As  much  as  Bp.  Kirykos  would  like  us  to  think  that  the  Holy  Fathers  preach that a Christian, simply by fasting, can somehow “worthily receive the  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,”  the  Holy  Fathers  of  the  Orthodox  Church  actually  teach  quite  clearly  that  NO  ONE  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion,  except by the grace of God Himself. Whether someone eats oil on a Saturday  or  doesnʹt  eat  oil,  cannot  be  the  deciding  point  of  a  person’s  supposed  “worthiness.”  In  fact,  even  fasting,  confession,  prayer,  and  all  other  things  donʹt  come  to  their  fulfillment  in  the  human  soul  until  one  actually  receives  Holy  Communion.  All  of  these  things  such  as  fasting,  prayers,  prostrations,  repentance,  etc,  do  indeed  help  one  quench  his  passions,  but  they  by  no  means make him “worthy.” Yes, we confess our sins to the priest. But the sins  aren’t loosened from our soul until the priest reads the prayer of pardon, and  the  sins  are  still  not  utterly  crushed  until  He  who  conquered  death  enters  inside the human soul through the Mystery of Holy Communion. That is why  Christ  said  that  His  Body  and  Blood  are  shed  “for  the  remission  of  sins.”  (Matthew 26:28).     Fasting  is  there  to  quench  our  passions  and  prevent  us  from  sinning,  confession is there so that we can recall our sins and repent of them, but it is  the  Mysteries  of  the  Church  that  operate  on  the  soul  and  grant  to  it  the  “worthiness” that the human soul can by no means attain by itself. Thus, the  Mystery  of  Pardon  loosens  the  sins,  and  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion  remits  the  sins.  For  of  the  many  Mysteries  of  the  Church,  the  seven  highest  mysteries have this very purpose, namely, to remit the sins of mankind by the  Divine  Economy.  Thus,  Baptism  washes  away  the  sins  from  the  soul,  while  Chrism  heals  anything  ailing  and  fills  all  voids.  Thus,  Absolution  washes  away the sins, while Communion heals the soul and body and fills it with the  grace of God. Thus, Unction cures the maladies of soul and body, causing the  body  and  soul  to  no  longer  be  divided  but  united  towards  a  life  in  Christ;  while Marriage (or Monasticism) confirms the plurality of persons or sense of  community that God desired when he said of old “Be fruitful and multiply”  (or in the case of Monasticism, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for  brethren  to  dwell  together  in  unity!”).  Finally,  the  Mystery  of  Priesthood  is  the  authority  given  by  Christ  for  all  of  these  Mysteries  to  be  administered.  Certainly, it is an Apostolic Tradition for mankind to be prepared by fasting  before  receiving  any  of  the  above  Mysteries,  be  it  Baptism,  Chrism,  Absolution,  Communion,  Unction,  Marriage  or  Priesthood.  But  this  act  of  fasting itself does not make anyone “worthy!”    If  someone  thinks  they  are  “worthy”  before  approaching  Holy  Communion,  then  the  Holy  Communion  would  be  of  no  positive  affect  to  them.  In  actuality,  they  will  consume  fire  and  punishment.  For  if  anyone  thinks  that  their  own  works  make  themselves  “worthy”  before  the  eyes  of  God, then surely Christ would have died in vain. Christ’s suffering, passion,  death  and  Resurrection would have  been  completely unnecessary.  As Christ  said,  “They  that  be  whole  need  not  a  physician,  but  they  that  are  sick  (Matthew 9:12).” If a person truly thinks that by not partaking of oil/wine on  Saturday,  in  order  to  commune  on  Sunday,  that  this  has  made  them  “worthy,”  then  by  merely  thinking  such  a  thing  they  have  already  proved  themselves unworthy of Holy Communion. In fact, they are deniers of Christ,  deniers  of  the  Cross  of  Christ,  and  deniers  of  their  own  salvation  in  Christ.  They  rather  believe  in  themselves  as  their  own  saviors.  They  are  thus  no  longer Christians but humanists.     But  is  humanism  a  modern  notion,  or  has  it  existed  before  in  the  history  of  the  Church?  In  reality,  the  devil  has  hurled  so  many  heresies  against  the  Church  that  he  has  run  out  of  creativity.  Thus,  the  traps  and  snares he sets are but fancy recreations of ancient heresies already condemned  by the Church. The humanist notions entertained by Bp. Kirykos are actually  an offshoot of an ancient heresy known as Pelagianism. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii01/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii02 61%

BELIEF THAT ONE IS MADE “WORTHY” BY THEIR OWN  WORKS RATHER THAN THE MYSTERIES IS PELAGIANISM    Pelagius  (c.  354‐420)  was  a  heretic  from  Britain,  who  believed  that  it  was  possible  for  man  to  be  worthy  or  even  perfect  by  way  of  his  free  will,  without the necessity of grace. In most cases, Pelagius reverted from this strict  form  and  did  not  profess  it.  For  this  reason,  many  of  the  councils  called  to  condemn the false teaching, only condemn the heresy of Pelagianism, but do  not  condemn  Pelagius  himself.  But  various  councils  actually  do  condemn  Pelagius along with Pelagianism. Various Protestants have tried to disparage  the  Orthodox  Faith  by  calling  its  beliefs  Pelagian  or  Semipelagian.  But  the  Orthodox  Faith  is  neither  the  one,  nor  the  other,  but  is  entirely  free  from  Pelagianism.  The  Orthodox  Faith  is  also  free  from  the  opposite  extreme,  namely, Manicheanism, which believes that the world is inherently evil from  its very creation. The Orthodox Faith is the Royal Path. It neither falls to the  right nor to the left, but remains on the straight path, that is, “the Way.” The  Orthodox  Faith does  indeed  believe  that good  works are  essential, but these  are for the purpose of gaining God’s mercy. By no means can mankind grant  himself  “worthiness”  and  “perfection”  by  way  of  his  own  works.  It  is  only  through God’s uncreated grace, light, powers and energies, that mankind can  truly be granted worthiness and perfection in Christ.    The most commonly‐available source of God’s grace within the Church  is through the Holy Mysteries, particularly the Mysteries of Baptism, Chrism,  Absolution and Communion, which are necessary for salvation. Baptism can  only be received once, for it is a reconciliation of the fallen man to the Risen  Man,  where  one  no  longer  shares  in  the  nakedness  of  Adam  but  becomes  clothed with Christ. Chrism can be repeated whenever an Orthodox Christian  lapses into schism or heresy and is being reconciled to the Church. Absolution  can also serve as a method of reconciliation from the sin of heresy or schism  as well as from any personal sin that an Orthodox Christian may commit, and  in receiving the prayer of pardon one is reconciled to the Church. For as long  as  an  Orthodox  Christian  sins,  he  must  receive  this  Mystery  repeatedly  in  order to prepare himself for the next Mystery. Communion is reconciliation to  the  Immaculate  Body  and  Precious  Blood  of  Christ,  allowing  one  to  live  in  Christ. This is the ultimate Mystery, and must be received frequently for one  to experience a life in Christ. For Orthodox Christianity is not a philosophy or  a way of thought, nor is it merely a moral code, but it is the Life of Christ in  man, and the way one can truly live in Christ is through Holy Communion.    Pelagianism in the strictest form is the belief that mankind can achieve  “worthiness” and “perfection” by way of his own free will, without the need  of  God’s  grace  or  the  Mysteries  to  be  the  source  of  that  worthiness  and  perfection. Rather than viewing good works as a method of achieving God’s  mercy,  they  view  the  good  works  as  a  method  of  achieving  self‐worth  and  self‐perfection. The most common understanding of Pelagianism refers to the  supposed “worthiness” of man by way of having a good will or good works  prior  to  receiving  the  Mystery  of  Baptism.  But  the  form  of  Pelagianism  into  which  Bp.  Kirykos  falls  in  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  is  in  regards  to  the  supposed  “worthiness”  of  Christians  purely  by  their  own  work  of  fasting.  Thus, in his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos does not mention the Mystery  of  Confession  (or  Absolution)  anywhere  in  the  text  as  a  means  of  receiving  worthiness,  but  attaches  the  worthiness  entirely  to  the  fasting  alone.  Again,  nowhere in the letter does he mention the Holy Communion itself as a source  of  perfection,  but  rather  entertains  the  notion  that  mankind  is  capable  of  achieving such perfection prior to even receiving communion. This is the only  way  one  can  interpret  his  letter,  especially  his  totally  unhistorical  statement  regarding the early Christians, in which he claims: “They fasted in the fine and  broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    St. Aurelius Augustinus, otherwise known as St. Augustine of Hippo  (+28 August, 430), writes: “It is not by their works, but by grace, that the doers  of the law are justified… Now [the Apostle Paul] could not mean to contradict himself  in  saying,  ‘The  doers  of  the  law  shall  be  justified  (Romans  2:13),’  as  if  their  justification came through their works, and not through grace; since he declares that a  man  is  justified  freely  by  His  grace  without  the  works  of  the  law  (Romans  3:24,28)   intending  by  the  term  ‘freely’  nothing  else  than  that  works  do  not  precede  justification.  For  in  another  passage  he  expressly  says,  ‘If  by  grace,  then  is  it  no  more of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace (Romans 11:6).’ But the statement  that ‘the doers of the law shall be justified (Romans 2:13)’ must be so understood, as  that  we  may  know  that  they  are  not  otherwise  doers  of  the  law,  unless  they  be  justified, so that justification does not subsequently accrue to them as doers of the law,  but  justification  precedes  them  as  doers  of  the  law.  For  what  else  does  the  phrase  ‘being justified’ signify than being made righteous,—by Him, of course, who justifies  the ungodly man, that he may become a godly one instead? For if we were to express a  certain  fact  by  saying,  ‘The  men  will  be  liberated,’  the  phrase  would  of  course  be  understood  as  asserting  that  the  liberation  would  accrue  to  those  who  were  men  already;  but  if  we  were  to  say,  The  men  will  be  created,  we  should  certainly  not  be  understood as asserting that the creation would happen to those who were already in  existence,  but  that  they  became  men  by  the  creation  itself.  If  in  like  manner  it  were  said, The doers of the law shall be honoured, we should only interpret the statement  correctly  if  we  supposed  that  the  honour  was  to  accrue  to  those  who  were  already  doers of the law: but when the allegation is, ‘The doers of the law shall be justified,’  what else does it mean than that the just shall be justified? for of course the doers of  the law are just persons. And thus it amounts to the same thing as if it were said,  The doers of the law shall be created,—not those who were so already, but that they  may  become  such;  in  order  that  the  Jews  who  were  hearers  of  the  law  might  hereby  understand that they wanted the grace of the Justifier, in order to be able to become its  doers also. Or else the term ‘They shall be justified’ is used in the sense of, They shall  be deemed, or reckoned as just, as it is predicated of a certain man in the Gospel, ‘But  he,  willing  to  justify  himself  (Luke  10:29),’—meaning  that  he  wished  to  be  thought  and  accounted  just.  In  like  manner,  we  attach  one  meaning  to  the  statement,  ‘God  sanctifies  His  saints,’  and  another  to  the  words,  ‘Sanctified  be  Thy  name (Matthew 6:9);’  for in the former case we suppose the words to mean that He  makes those to be saints who were not saints before, and in the latter, that the  prayer  would  have  that  which  is  always  holy  in  itself  be  also  regarded  as  holy  by  men,—in  a  word,  be  feared  with  a  hallowed  awe.”  (Augustine  of  Hippo,  Antipelagian Writings, Chapter 45)    Thus the doers of the law are justified by God’s grace and not by their  own good works. The purpose of their own good works is to obtain the mercy  of  God,  but  it  is  God’s  grace  through  the  Holy  Mysteries  that  bestows  the  worthiness  and  perfection  upon  mankind.  Blessed  Augustine  does  not  only  speak  of  this  in  regards  to  the  Mystery  of  Baptism, but  applies  it  also  to  the  Mystery of Communion. Thus he writes of both Mysteries as follows:     “Now  [the  Pelagians]  take  alarm  from  the  statement  of  the  Lord,  when  He  says,  ‘Except  a  man  be  born  again,  he  cannot  see  the  kingdom  of  God  (John  3:3);’  because in His own explanation of the passage He affirms, ‘Except a man be born of  water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God (John 3:5).’ And so  they  try to ascribe to unbaptized  infants, by the  merit  of  their innocence, the gift of  salvation  and  eternal  life,  but  at the  same  time,  owing  to  their  being  unbaptized,  to  exclude them from the kingdom of heaven. But how novel and astonishing is such  an  assumption,  as  if  there  could  possibly  be  salvation  and  eternal  life  without heirship with Christ, without the kingdom of heaven! Of course they  have  their  refuge,  whither  to  escape  and  hide  themselves,  because  the  Lord  does  not  say,  Except  a  man  be  born  of  water  and  of  the  Spirit,  he  cannot  have  life,  but—‘he  cannot  enter  into  the  kingdom  of  God.’  If  indeed  He  had  said  the  other,  there  could  have  risen  not  a  moment’s  doubt.  Well,  then,  let  us  remove  the  doubt;  let  us  now  listen to the Lord, and not to men’s notions and conjectures; let us, I say, hear what  the Lord says—not indeed concerning the sacrament of the laver, but concerning the  sacrament of His own holy table, to which none but a baptized person has a right  to approach: ‘Except ye eat my flesh and drink my blood, ye shall have no life  in you  (John  6:53).’ What do we want more? What  answer  to  this can be  adduced,  unless it be by that obstinacy which ever resists the constancy of manifest truth?” (op.  cit., Chapter 26)    Blessed  Augustine  continues  on  the  same  subject  of  how  the  early  Orthodox  Christians  of  Carthage  perceived  the  Mysteries  of  Baptism  and  Communion:  “The  Christians  of  Carthage  have  an  excellent  name  for  the  sacraments,  when  they  say  that  baptism  is  nothing  else  than  ‘salvation,’  and  the  sacrament of the body of Christ nothing else than ‘life.’ Whence, however, was  this derived, but from that primitive, as I suppose, and apostolic tradition, by which  the Churches of Christ maintain it to be an inherent principle, that without baptism  and partaking of the supper of the Lord it is impossible for any man to attain either to  the kingdom of God or to salvation and everlasting life? So much also does Scripture  testify,  according  to  the  words  which  we  already  quoted.  For  wherein  does  their  opinion, who designate baptism by the term salvation, differ from what is written: ‘He  saved us by the washing of regeneration (Titus 3:5)?’ or from Peter’s statement: ‘The  like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (1 Peter 3:21)?’ And what  else do they say who call the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper ‘life,’ than that  which is written: ‘I am the living  bread which came down from heaven (John  6:51);’  and  ‘The  bread  that  I  shall  give  is  my  flesh,  for  the  life  of  the  world  (John  6:51);’  and  ‘Except  ye  eat  the  flesh  of  the  Son  of  man,  and  drink  His  blood, ye shall have no life in you (John 6:53)?’ If, therefore, as so many and such  divine  witnesses  agree,  neither  salvation  nor  eternal  life  can  be  hoped  for  by  any man without baptism and the Lord’s body and blood, it is vain to promise  these blessings to infants without them. Moreover, if it be only sins that separate man  from salvation and eternal life, there is nothing else in infants which these sacraments  can be the means of removing, but the guilt of sin,—respecting which guilty nature it  is written, that “no one is clean, not even if his life be only that of a day (Job  14:4).’ Whence also that exclamation of the Psalmist: ‘Behold, I was conceived in  iniquity; and in sins did my mother bear me (Psalm 50:5)! This is either said in  the  person of our common  humanity, or if of  himself  only David speaks,  it does  not  imply that he was born of fornication, but in lawful wedlock. We therefore ought not  to doubt that even for infants yet to be baptized was that precious blood shed, which  previous to its actual effusion was so given, and applied in the sacrament, that it was  said, ‘This is my blood, which shall be shed for many for the remission of sins  (Matthew 26:28).’  Now they who will not allow that they are under sin, deny that  there is any liberation. For what is there that men are liberated from, if they are held  to be bound by no bondage of sin? (op. cit., Chapter 34)    Now, what of Bp. Kirykos’ opinion that early Christians “fasted in the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune?”  Is  this  because  they  were  saints?  Were  all  of  the  early  Christians  who  were  frequent  communicants ascetics who fasted “in the finer and broader sense” and were  actual  saints?  Even  if  so,  does  the  Orthodox  Church  consider  the  saints  “worthy” by their act of fasting, or is their act of fasting only a plea for God’s  mercy,  while  God’s  grace  is  what  delivers  the  worthiness?  According  to  Bp.  Kirykos,  the  early  Christians,  whether they  were  saints or  not, “fasted in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  But  is  this  a  teaching  of  Orthodoxy  or  rather  of  Pelagianism?  Is  this  what  the  saints  believed  of  themselves,  that  they  were  “worthy?”  And  if  they  didn’t  believe  they  were  worthy,  was  that  just  out  of  humility,  or  did  they  truly  consider  themselves unworthy? Blessed Augustine of Hippo, one of the champions of  his time against the heresy of Pelagianism, writes:    “In that, indeed, in the praise of the saints, they will not drive us with the zeal  of  that  publican  (Luke  18:10‐14)  to  hunger  and  thirst  after  righteousness,  but  with  the vanity of the Pharisees, as it were, to overflow with sufficiency and fulness; what  does  it  profit  them  that—in  opposition  to  the  Manicheans,  who  do  away  with  baptism—they  say  ‘that  men  are  perfectly  renewed  by  baptism,’  and  apply  the  apostle’s testimony for this,—‘who testifies that, by the washing of water, the Church  is made holy and spotless from the Gentiles (Ephesians 5:26),’—when, with a proud  and perverse meaning, they put forth their arguments in opposition to the prayers of  the Church itself. For they say this in order that the Church may be believed after holy  baptism—in which is accomplished the forgiveness of all sins—to have no further sin;  when, in opposition to them, from the rising of the sun even to its setting, in all  its members it cries to God, ‘Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12).’ But if they  are  interrogated  regarding  themselves  in  this  matter,  they  find  not  what  to  answer.  For if they should say that they have no sin, John answers them, that ‘they deceive  themselves, and the  truth  is not in them (1 John 1:8).’  But if they  confess their  sins, since they wish themselves to be members of Christ’s body, how will that body,  that  is,  the  Church,  be  even  in  this  time  perfectly,  as  they  think,  without  spot  or  wrinkle, if its members without falsehood confess themselves to have sins? Wherefore  in baptism all sins are forgiven, and, by that very washing of water in the word, the  Church is set forth in Christ without spot or wrinkle (Ephesians 5:27);  and unless it  were baptized, it would fruitlessly say, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ until it be brought to  glory, when there is in it absolutely no spot or wrinkle.” (op. cit., Chapter 17).    Again,  in  his  chapter  called  ‘The  Opinion  of  the  Saints  Themselves  About  Themselves,’  Blessed  Augustine  writes:  “It  is  to  be  confessed  that  ‘the  Holy Spirit, even in the old times,’ not only ‘aided good dispositions,’ which even they  allow, but that it even made them good, which they will not have. ‘That all, also, of the  prophets and apostles or saints, both evangelical and ancient, to whom God gives His  witness, were righteous, not in comparison with the wicked, but by the rule of virtue,’  is not doubtful. And this is opposed to the Manicheans, who blaspheme the patriarchs  and  prophets;  but  what  is  opposed  to  the  Pelagians  is,  that  all  of  these,  when  interrogated  concerning  themselves  while  they  lived  in  the  body,  with  one  most  accordant voice would answer, ‘If we should say that we have no sin, we deceive  ourselves, and the truth is not in us (1 John 1:8).’ ‘But in the future time,’ it is  not to be denied ‘that there will be a reward as well of good works as of evil, and that  no  one  will  be  commanded  to  do  the  commandments  there  which  here  he  has  contemned,’  but  that  a  sufficiency  of  perfect  righteousness  where  sin  cannot  be,  a  righteousness which is here hungered and thirsted after by the saints, is here hoped for 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii02/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

tmp 17909-lista-verbos-ingles-658122575 61%

≡ dup kan d kanál = ed káncel ≡ ied kérry ≡ ed kásh = i cast ≡ i kátch = d sís = d célebreit ≡ ed cénter ied cértifai = ed chéin ≡ d chéing ≡ d chárg = d chéis = ed chít ≡ ed chék i cháid ≡ i chús − dup chóp = d sórcl − d sórkiuleit ≡ ed kléim dup kláp ≡ ed klás − i klásifai = ed klín ≡ ed klíor ≡ i kláimb − i klíng ≡ d klóus − ed comb ≡ d kombáin ≡ i kom = d comíunkeit ≡ d kómper − d cómpeseit − d compáiel = ed kómplein ≡ d cómplikéit = d cómpous − ed kompáond ed komprejénd ed cómpres = d kómpromais d kompiúter − d koncíd − d konsíf ≡ d kóncentréit ≡ ed konsórn d konsílieit ≡ d konclúd = ed kondém d kondéns = ed konfés ≡ ed konfórm = ed konfrónt ≡ d konfiús ed kongést = d congrátuleit d cóngregeit ≡ ed conéct − ed kónker d kósikreit present tense can canalize cancel carry cash cast catch cease celebrate center certify chain change charge chase cheat check chide choose chop circle circulate claim clap class classify clean clear climb cling close comb combine come communicate compare compensate compile complain complicate compose compound comprehend compress compromise computerize concede conceive concentrate concern conciliate conclude condemn condense confess confirm confront confuse congest congratulate congregate connect conquer consecrate © 2012 neoparaiso.com/imprimir past tense canned canalized canceled carried cashed cast caught ceased celebrated centered certified chained changed charged chased cheated checked chid chose chopped circled circulated claimed clapped classed classified cleaned cleared climbed | clomb clung closed combed combined came communicated compared compensated compiled complained complicated composed compounded comprehended compressed compromised computerized conceded conceived concentrated concerned conciliated concluded condemned condensed confessed confirmed confronted confused congested congratulated congregated connected conquered consecrated past participle canned canalized canceled carried cashed cast caught ceased celebrated centered certified chained changed charged chased cheated checked chid chosen chopped circled circulated claimed clapped classed classify cleaned cleared climbed | clomben clung closed combed combined come communicated compared compensated compiled complained complicated composed compounded comprehended compressed compromised computerized conceded conceived concentrated concerned conciliated concluded condemned condensed confessed confirmed confronted confused congested congratulated congregated connected conquered consecrated spanish enlatar canalizar cancelar cargar hacer efectivo enyesar | tirar (dados) atajar cesar celebrar centrar certificar encadenar cambiar cargar persegir hacer trampa chequear reprender escoger tajar girar circular reclamar aplaudir clasificar clasificar limpiar aclarar trepar trepar cerrar peinar combinar venir comunicar comparar compensar recopilar quejarse complicar componer combinar comprender comprimir comprometer computarizar conceder concebir concentrar concernir conciliar concluir condenar condensar confesar confirmar confrontar confundir congestionar felicitar congregar conectar conquistar consagrar Versión 2012-03-19 -5freq type pronun.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/05/tmp-17909-lista-verbos-ingles-658122575/

05/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

temporary-platform-committee-report 60%

Due to abuse such as suffered by the Gibson Guitar Company, we condemn the over criminalization nature of the Lacey Act.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/06/05/temporary-platform-committee-report/

05/06/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

resolution1A 59%

Resolution 1A Sponsors:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/03/resolution1a/

03/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com