Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 15 May at 07:37 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «divine»:


Total: 500 results - 0.092 seconds

MasterofMiracles 100%

Master of Miracles Master of Miracles Tomes Braille Divine Tome of Carim Londor Braille Divine Tome Deep Braille Divine Tome Braille Divine Tome of Lothric Miracles Heal Aid Heal Homeward Caressing Tears Replenishment Med Heal Force Tears of Denial Bountiful Light Blessed Weapon Magic Barrier Dark Blade Vow of Silence Dead Again Deep Protection Gnaw Created by PSN GeekBaronRW (Tomes are needed to allow certain trainers to sell miracles) In the same location as Mornes Ring, below the bridge;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/19/masterofmiracles/

19/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Microlite20-Tablet-Digest-Edition-1.0-Final 98%

16  Divine (Cleric) Spells ..........................................................................

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/18/microlite20-tablet-digest-edition-1-0-final/

17/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

The Hidden Treasure 98%

Paul Nosike Divine Nature Evangelism, Awka, Nigeria ikesinenu@gmail.com

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/02/the-hidden-treasure/

02/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Total and Full Redemption in Christ 98%

The Most Controversial Quest Mankind’s greatest and most controversial quest is the quest for divine life—to become like God in the inner being.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/22/total-and-full-redemption-in-christ/

22/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

The Book of Life 97%

Eden shall have true justice in accordance with divine morality that shall emancipate the Spirit of divinity in it’s own way.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/12/the-book-of-life/

12/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

pamphlet2eng 96%

SPIRITUAL PATH  REMEMBERING SACRED TRADITION AND  REFERRING TO THE HOLY FATHERS OF THE  ORTHODOX CHURCH    Canons of the Holy Apostles  8.  If  any  Bishop,  or  Presbyter,  or  Deacon,  or  anyone  else  in  the  sacerdotal  list, fail to partake of communion when the oblation has been offered, he must  tell  the  reason,  and  if  it  is  good  excuse,  he  shall  receive  a  pardon.  But  if  he  refuses  to  tell  it,  he  shall  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  he  has  become a cause of harm to the laity and has instilled a suspicion as against the  offerer of it that the latter has failed to present it in a sound manner.    Interpretation.  It  is  the  intention  of  the  present  Canon  that  all,  and  especially  those  in  holy  orders,  should  be  prepared  beforehand  and  worthy  to  partake  of  the  divine  mysteries when the oblation is offered, or what amounts to the sacred service  of the body of Christ. In case any one of them fail to partake when present at  the  divine  liturgy,  or  communion,  he  is  required  to  tell  the  reason  or  cause  why he did not partake:  then if it is a just and righteous and reasonable one,  he is to receive a pardon, or be excused; but if he refuses to tell it, he is to be  excommunicated,  since  he  also  becomes  a  cause  of  harm  to  the  laity  by  leading the multitude to suspect that that priest who officiated at liturgy was  not worthy and that it was on this account that the person in question refused  to communicate from him.      9.  All those faithful who enter and listen to the Scriptures, but do not stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that they are causing the Church a breach of order.    (Canon LXVI of the 6th; c. II of Antioch; cc. Ill, XIII of Tim.).    Interpretation.  Both  exegetes of the sacred Canons — Zonaras,  I mean,  and Balsamon  —  in  interpreting the present Apostolical Canon agree in saying that all Christians  who  enter  the  church  when  the  divine  liturgy  is  being  celebrated,  and  who  listen to the divine Scriptures, but do not remain to the end nor partake, must  be excommunicated, as causing a disorder to  the  church. Thus  Zonaras says  verbatim: “The present Canon demands that all those who are in the church  when the  holy sacrifice is being performed shall patiently remain to the end  for  prayer  and  holy  communion.”  For  even  the  laity  then  were  required  to  partake continually. Balsamon says: “The ordainment of the present Canon is  very  acrid;  for  it  excommunicates  those  attending  church  but  not  staying  to  the end nor partaking.”    Concord.  Agreeably with the present Canon c. II of Antioch ordains that all those who  enter the church during the time of divine liturgy and listen to the Scriptures,  but  turn  away  and  avoid  (which  is  the  same  as  to  say,  on  account  of  pretended  reverence  and  humility  they  shun,  according  to  interpretation  of  the  best  interpreter,  Zonaras)  divine  communion  in  a  disorderly  manner  are  to be excommunicated. The continuity of communion is confirmed also by c.  LXVI  of  the  6th,  which  commands  Christians  throughout  Novational  Week  (i.e.,  Easter  Week)  to  take  time  off  for  psalms  and  hymns,  and  to  indulge  in  the  divine  mysteries  to  their  hearts’  content.  But  indeed  even  from  the  third  canon of St. Timothy the continuity of communion can be inferred. For if he  permits  one  possessed  by  demons  to  partake,  not  however  every  day,  but  only on Sunday (though in other copies it is written, on occasions only), it is  likely  that  those  riot  possessed  by  demons  are  permitted  to  communicate  even more frequently. Some contend that for this reason it was that the same  Timothy,  in  c.  Ill,  ordains  that  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  that  a  man  and  his  wife  should  not  have  mutual  intercourse,  in  order,  that  is,  that  they  might  partake, since in that period it was only on those days, as we have said, that  the  divine  liturgy  was  celebrated.  This  opinion  of  theirs  is  confirmed  by  divine Justin, who says in his second apology that “on the day of the sun” —  meaning, Sunday — all Christians used to assemble in the churches (which on  this account were also called “Kyriaka,” i.e., places of the Lord) and partook of  the divine mysteries. That, on the other hand, all Christians ought to frequent  divine communion is confirmed from the West by divine Ambrose, who says  thus:  “We  see  many  brethren  coming  to  church  negligently,  and  indeed  on  Sundays  not  even  being  present  at  the  mysteries.”  And  again,  in  blaming  those who fail to partake continually, the same saint says of the mystic bread:  “God  gave  us  this  bread  as  a  daily  affair,  and  we  make  it  a  yearly  affair.”  From Asia, on the other hand, divine Chrysostom demands this of Christians,  and, indeed, par excellence. And see in his preamble to his commentary of the  Epistle to the Romans, discourse VIII, and to the Hebrews, discourse XVIII, on  the Acts, and Sermon V on the First Epistle to Timothy, and Sermon XVII on  the  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews,  and  his  discourse  on  those  at  first  fasting  on  Easter,  Sermon  III  to  the  Ephesians,  discourse  addressed  to  those  who  leave  the  divine  assemblies  (synaxeis),  Sermon  XXVIII  on  the  First  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians,  a  discourse  addressed  to  blissful  Philogonius,  and  a  discourse  about  fasting.  Therein  you  can  see  how  that  goodly  tongue  strives  and  how  many  exhortations  it  rhetorically  urges  in  order  to  induce  Christians  to  partake at the same time, and worthily, and continually. But see also Basil the  Great,  in  his  epistle  to  Caesaria  Patricia  and  in  his  first  discourse  about  baptism.  But  then  how can it  be  thought  that whoever pays any  attention  to  the  prayers  of  all  the  divine  liturgy  can  fail  to  see  plainly  enough  that  all  of  these are aimed at having it arranged that Christians assembled at the divine  liturgy should partake — as many, that is to say, as are worthy?      10.  If anyone pray in company with one who has been excommunicated, he  shall be excommunicated himself.    Interpretation.  The  noun  akoinonetos  has  three  significations:  for,  either  it  denotes  one  standing  in  church  and  praying  in  company  with  the  rest  of  the  Christians,  but not communing with the divine mysteries; or it denotes one who neither  communes nor stands and prays with the faithful in the church, but who has  been excommunicated from them and is excluded from church and prayer; or  finally it may denote any clergyman who becomes excommunicated from the  clergy,  as,  say,  a  bishop  from  his  fellow  bishops,  or  a  presbyter  from  his  fellow  presbyters,  or  a  deacon  from  his  fellow  deacons,  and  so  on.  Accordingly,  every  akoinonetos  is  the  same  as  saying  excommunicated  from  the  faithful  who  are  in  the  church;  and  he  is  at  the  same  time  also  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries.  But  not  everyone  that  is  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries  is  also  excommunicated  from  the  congregation  of  the  faithful,  as  are  deposed  clergymen;  and  from  the  peni‐ tents those who stand together and who neither commune nor stay out of the  church  like  catechumens,  as  we  have  said.  In  the  present  Canon  the  word  akoinonetos is taken in the second sense of the word. That is why it says that  whoever prays in company with one who has been excommunicated because  of sin from the congregation and prayer of the faithful, even though he should  not  pray  along  with  them  in  church,  but  in  a  house,  whether  he  be  in  holy  orders  or  a  layman,  he  is  to  be  excommunicated  in  the  same way  as  he  was  from church and prayer with Christians: because that common engagement in  prayer  which  he  performs  in  conjunction  with  a  person  that  has  been  excommunicated,  wittingly  and  knowingly  him  to  be  such,  is  aimed  at  dishonoring  and  condemning  the  excommunicator,  and  traduces  him  as  having excommunicated him wrongly and unjustly. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pamphlet2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Calendar 96%

Basil New Year’s Day January 2017 Mon 2 Tue 3 Wed 4 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy No Sunday School 11:30am Coffee Hour 8 Parish Council Oath of Office 9 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School Resumes 11:30am Coffee Hour 6:30pm Parish Council 15 Food Pantry Collection 16 Martin Luther King 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School (20 min.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-calendar/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

calendar 93%

Nicholas 7 8 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School 11:30am Coffee Hour 6:30pm St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/27/calendar/

27/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

3 - O Holy Night 93%

O Holy Night Chris Tomlin [Intro] C G Am CG C Oh holy night F C The stars are brightly shining F G C It is the night of our dear Savior's birth C F C Now long lay the world in sin and error pining Em B7 Em Till he appeared and the soul felt it's worth G Dm G C The thrill of hope, the weary world rejoices G C For yonder breaks, a new and glorious morn Am Em Fall on your knees Dm Am G Oh hear the angel voices C G C F Oh night divine C G C Oh night when Christ was born G C F C G C Oh night divine, oh night, oh night divine C G Am CG C F C Truly He taught us to love one another F G C His law is love, and His gospel is peace C G F Am Chains shall He break for the slave is our brother Em B7 Em And in His name all oppression shall cease G C Sweet hymns of joy in grateful chorus raise we G C Let all within us praise His holy name Am Em Christ is the Lord Dm Am G O praise His name forever C G Am F His power and glory C G C Ever more proclaim G F C F His power and glory C G C Ever more proclaim Am Em Fall on your knees Dm Am G Oh hear the angel voices C G Am F Oh night divine C G C Oh night when Christ was born G F C Am F C G C Oh night divine, oh night, oh night divine

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/27/3-o-holy-night/

27/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii12 91%

ARE THE HOLY CANONS ONLY VALID FOR THE  APOSTOLIC PERIOD AND NOT FOR OUR TIMES?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “After this, I request of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend to those who confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion,  they must prepare by fasting, and to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday.  Regarding  the  Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be interpreted correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy  and  communed.  They  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune. The  rest did not remain until  the end and  withdrew  together with  the catechumens. As for those who were in repentance, they remained outside  the gates of the church. If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only knew  how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”      From  the  above  explanation  by  Bp.  Kirykos,  one  is  given  the  impression that he believes and commands:     a) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  forbid  laymen  to  commune  on  Sundays  during  Great  Lent  in  order  to  ensure  “the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  canons  declare  that  it  is  those who do not commune on Sundays that are causers of disorder, as  the 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares: “All the faithful who come to  Church and hear the Scriptures, but do not stay for the prayers and the Holy  Communion, are to be excommunicated as causing disorder in the Church;”  b) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  advise  his  flock  “to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday,” thereby commanding his flock to become Sabbatians;  c) that  the  Canon  which  advises  people  to  receive  Holy  Communion  every  day  even  outside  of  fasting  periods  is  “correct”  but  must  be  “interpreted correctly and applied to everybody,” which, in the solution that  Bp. Kirykos offers, amounts to a complete annulment of the Canon in  regards to laymen, while enforcing the Canon liberally upon the clergy;  d) that  “we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,”  as  if  the  Orthodox  Church  today  is  not  still  the  unchanged  and  unadulterated  Apostolic  Church as confessed in the Symbol of the Faith, “In One, Holy, Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church,”  with  the  same  Head,  the  same  Body,  and  the  e) f) g) h) same requirement to abide by the Canons, but that we are supposedly  some kind of fallen Church in need of “return” to a former status;  that supposedly in apostolic times “all of the Christians were ascetics and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy and communed,” meaning that Communion is annulled for later  generations supposedly due to a lack of celibacy and vegetarianism;  that  supposedly  only  the  celibate  and  vegetarians  communed  in  the  early Church, and that “the rest did not remain until the end and withdrew  together with the catechumens,” as if marriage and eating meat amounted  to  a  renunciation  of  one’s  baptism  and  a  reversion  to  the  status  of  catechumen,  which  is  actually  the  teaching  and  practice  of  the  Manicheans, Paulicians and Bogomils and not of the Apostolic Church,  and  the  9th  Apostolic  Canon  declares  that  if  any  layman  departs  with  the catechumens and does not remain until the end of Liturgy and does  not commune, such a layman is to be excommunicated, yet Bp. Kirykos  promotes this practice as something pious, patristic and acceptable;  that Christians who have confessed their sins and prepared themselves  and  their  spiritual  father  has  deemed  them  able  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  are  supposedly  still  in  the  rank  of  the  penitents  either  due to being married or due to being meat‐eaters, as can be seen from  Bp. Kirykos’ words: “If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only  knew how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”  that  we  are  not  to  interpret  and  implement  the  Holy  Canons  the  way  they  are  written  and  the  way  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has  always  historically interpreted and implemented them, but that these Canons  supposedly need to be reinterpreted in Bp. Kirykos’s own way, or as he  says,  “interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody,”  and  that  “if  we  implemented this Canon today, everyone would have to go out of the church.”      All of the above notions held by Bp. Kirykos can be summed up by the  statement that he believes the Canons only apply for the apostolic era or the  time of the early Christians, but that these Canons are now to be reinterpreted  or nullified because today’s Christians are not worthy to be treated according  to  the  Holy  Canons.  He  also  believes  that  to  follow  the  advice  of  the  Holy  Canons  is  a  cause  of  “disorder  and  scandal,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  very  purpose of the Holy Canons is to prevent disorder and scandal. These notions  held by Bp. Kirykos are entirely erroneous, and they are another variant of the  same blasphemies preached by the Modernists and Ecumenists who desire to  set the Holy Canons aside by claiming that they are not suitable for our times.      Bp.  Kirykos’  incorrect  notions  regarding  the  supposed  inapplicability  of the Holy Canons in our times are notions that the Rudder itself condemns.  For  in  the  Holy  Rudder  (published  in  the  17th  century),  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos  included  an  excellent  introductory  note  regarding  the  importance  of  the  Holy  Canons,  and  that  they  are  applicable  for  all  times,  and  must  be  adhered to faithfully by all Orthodox Christians. This introductory note by St.  Nicodemus, as contained in the Holy Rudder, is provided below.    PROLEGOMENA IN GENERAL TO THE SACRED CANONS    What Is a Canon?      A canon, according to Zonaras (in his interpretation of the 39th letter of  Athansius the Great), properly speaking and in the main sense of the word, is  a piece of wood, commonly called a rule, which artisans use to get the wood  and  stone  they  are  working  on  straight.  For,  when  they  place  this  rule  (or  straightedge) against their work, if this be crooked, inwards or outwards, they  make  it  straight  and  right.  From  this,  by  metaphorical  extension,  votes  and  decisions  are  also  called  canons,  whether  they  be  of  the  Apostles  or  of  the  ecumenical  and  regional  Councils  or  those  of  the  individual  Fathers,  which  are contained in the present Handbook: for they too, like so many straight and  right rules, rid men in holy orders, clergymen and laymen, of every disorder  and  obliquity  of  manners,  and  cause  them  to  have  every  normality  and  equality of ecclesiastical and Christian condition and virtue.    That the divine Canons must be kept rigidly by all;   for those who fail to keep them are made liable to horrible penances      “These instructions regarding Canons have been enjoined upon you by us, O  Bishops. If you adhere to them, you shall be saved, and shall have peace; but if  you  disobey  them,  you  shall  be  sorely  punished,  and  shall  have  perpetual  war  with one another, thus paying the penalty deserved for heedlessness.” (The Apostles  in their epilogue to the Canons)      “We have decided that it is right and just that the canons promulgated by  the holy Fathers at each council hitherto should remain in force.” (1st Canon  of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It  has  seemed  best  to  this  holy  Council  that  the  85  Canons  accepted  and  validated by the holy and blissful Fathers before us, and handed down to us, moreover,  in the name of the holy and glorious Apostles, should remain henceforth certified  and  secured  for  the  correction  of  souls  and  cure  of  diseases…  [of  the  four  ecumenical councils according to name, of the regional councils by name, and of the  individual Fathers by name]… And that no one should be allowed to counterfeit  or tamper with the aforementioned Canons or to set them aside.” (2nd Canon  of the Sixth Ecumenical Council)      “If anyone be caught innovating or undertaking to subvert any of the  said Canons, he shall be responsible with respect to such Canon and undergo  the penance therein specified in order to be corrected thereby of that very thing in  which he is at fault.” (2nd Canon of the Second Ecumenical Council)      “Rejoicing  in  them  like  one  who  has  found  a  lot  of  spoils,  we  gladly  embosom the divine Canons, and we uphold their entire tenor and strengthen  them  all  the  more,  so  far  as  concerns  those  promulgated  by  the  trumpets  of  the  Spirit  of  the  renowned  Apostles,  of  the  holy  ecumenical  councils,  and  of  those  convened  regionally…  And  of  our  holy  Fathers…  And  as  for  those  whom  they  consign to anathema, we anathematize them, too; as for those whom they consign to  deposition  or  degradation,  we  too  depose  or  degrade  them;  as  for  those  whom  they  consign  to  excommunication,  we  too  excommunicate  them;  and  as  for  those  whom  they condemn to a penance, we too subject them thereto likewise.” (1st Canon of the  Seventh Ecumenical Council)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the four holy councils, namely, that held in Nicaea, and  that  held  in  Constantinople,  and  the  first  one  held  in  Ephesus,  and  that  held  in  Chalcedon, shall take the rank of laws.” (Novel 131 of Emperor Justinian)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the seven holy councils shall take the rank of laws.”  (Ed.  note—The  word  “confirmed”  alludes  to  the  canons  of  the  regional  councils  and  of  the  individual  Fathers  which  had  been  confirmed  by  the  ecumenical councils, according to Balsamon.)      “For we accept the dogmas of the aforesaid holy councils precisely as we do the  divine Scriptures, and we keep their Canons as laws.” (Basilica, Book 5, Title 3,  Chapter 2)      “The  third  provision  of  Title  2  of  the  Novels  commands  the  Canons  of  the  seven  councils  and  their  dogmas  to  remain  in  force,  in  the  same  way  as  the  divine Scriptures.” (In Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “I accept the seven councils and their dogmas to remain in force, in the  same way as the divine Scriptures.” (Emperor Leo the Wise in Basilica, Book  5, Title 3, Chapter 1)    “It has been prescribed by the holy Fathers that even after death those men  must  be  anathematized  who  have  sinned  against  the  faith  or  against  the  Canons.”  (Fifth  Ecumenical  Council  in  the  epistle  of  Justinian,  page  392  of  Volume 2 of the Conciliars)      “Anathema on those who hold in scorn the sacred and divine Canons of  our sacred Fathers, who prop up the holy Church and adorn all the Christian polity,  and  guide  men  to  divine  reverence.”  (Council  held  in  Constantinople  after  Constantine Porphyrogenitus, page 977 of Volume 2 of the Conciliars)    That the divine Canons override the imperial laws      “It  pleased  the  most  divine  Despot  of  the  inhabited  earth  (i.e.  Emperor  Marcian)  not  to  proceed  in  accordance  with  the  divine  letters  or  pragmatic  forms  of  the  most  devout  bishops,  but  in  accordance  with  the  Canons  laid  down as laws by the holy Fathers. The council said: As against the Canons, no  pragmatic sanction is effective.  Let the Canons of the Fathers remain in force.  And  again:  We  pray  that  the  pragmatic  sanctions  enacted  for  some  in  every  province  to  the  detriment  of  the  Canons  may  be  held  in  abeyance  incontrovertibly; and that the Canons may come into force through all… all of us  say  the  same  things.  All  the  pragmatic  sanctions  shall  be  held  in  abeyance.  Let  the  Canons  come  into  force…  In  accordance  with  the  vote  of  the  holy  council,  let  the  injunctions of Canons come into force also in all the other provinces.” (In Act  5 of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It has  seemed  best to all the holy  ecumenical council  that if  anyone  offers  any  form  conflicting  with  those  now  prescribed,  let  that  form  be  void.”  (8th  Canon of the Third Ecumenical Council)      “Pragmatic  forms  opposed  to  the  Canons  are  void.”  (Book  1,  Title  2,  Ordinances 12, Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “For those Canons which have been promulgated, and supported, that  is  to  say,  by  emperors  and  holy  Fathers,  are  accepted  like  the  divine  Scriptures. But the laws have been accepted or composed only by the emperors; and  for  this  reason  they  do  not  prevail  over  and  against  the  divine  Scriptures  nor  the  Canons.” (Balsamon, comment on the above chapter 2 of Photius)      “Do  not  talk  to  me  of  external  laws.  For  even  the  publican  fulfills  the  outer  law,  yet  nevertheless  he  is  sorely  punished.”  (Chrysostom,  Sermon  57  on  the  Gospel of Matthew)   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii12/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

5-cinquième-année-1 90%

L'an de grâce 476 correspond à l’exécution des dernières racailles nepgeariennes et à la brèche dans la défense divine de Planeptune qui devait sembler éternelle à ses contemporains.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/20/5-cinquieme-annee-1/

20/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

cinquième-année 90%

L'an de grâce 476 correspond à l’exécution des dernières racailles nepgeariennes et à la brèche dans la défense divine de Planeptune qui devait sembler éternelle à ses contemporains.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/11/cinquieme-annee-1/

11/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

PhilosophyNotes1011 90%

“corporeal element which is most akin to the divine,” natural upwards tendency, towards the gods -Wing is nourished, grows by beauty, wisdom, goodness, etc.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/08/philosophynotes1011/

08/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Catholic blog - Is Catholicism True 90%

They are primary elements of a wider revelation which the Church considers divine, but they are mysteries chiefly because they have not been fully revealed to us in the physical realm.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/31/catholic-blog-is-catholicism-true/

30/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

hitler 89%

Divine Smite. ... Divine Sense.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/28/hitler/

27/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Curriculum Vitae-2012 89%

ANDREW W. PITTS Email:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/12/03/curriculum-vitae-2012/

03/12/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

March, 2018 88%

Connect with us on facebook www.Facebook.com/wordexperience www.tmmintl.blogspot.com GUEST WRITER’S COLUMN DIVINE HEALING AND HEALTH Part 2 3 John 1:2 KJV Beloved, I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/06/march-2018/

06/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 88%

Divine Liturgy - 10:00 am.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

CommunionStNicodemusAthos 87%

Frequent Reception of the Holy Mysteries   is Beneficial and Salvific  Part II, Chapter 2 from Concerning Frequent Communion  by St. Nikodemos the Hagiorite      Buy the book from “Uncut Mountain Supply”  http://www.uncutmountainsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=cfc     Webmaster Note: This book should be read by all pious Orthodox Christians. It is  not  a  ʺbook  only  for  clergy.ʺ  Rather  it  is  one  that  contains  rich  Patristic  content,  written for all the Faithful, and in a way that moves the heart deeply. It will help you  draw  closer  to  God  by  instructing  you  in  the  two‐fold  action  of  regular  ascetic  struggle  and  reception  of  the  Holy  Mysteries.  This  book  teaches  clearly  and  convincingly that much Grace is given to those who frequently and worthily partake  of Holy Communion. In reading this book you will gain a new appreciation for Holy  Communion; will increase your efforts to watch over yourself more carefully; and will  endeavor to partake whenever possible.    What  follows  is  the  second  of  three  chapters  in  Part  II,  ʺConcerning  Frequent  Communion.ʺ  Take  note  of  the  other  two  chapter  titles:  ʺIs  is  necessary  for  the  Orthodox  to  Partake  frequently  of  the  Divine  body  and  blood of our Lord,ʺ and ʺInfrequent Communion causes great harm.ʺ    Both the soul and the body of the Christian receive great benefit from  the divine Mysteries—before he communes, when he communes, and after he  communes.  Before  one  communes,  he  must  perform  the  necessary  preparation,  namely,  confess  to  his  Spiritual  Father,  have  contrition,  amend  his ways, have compunction, learn to watch over himself carefully, and keep  himself from passionate thoughts (as much as possible) and from every evil.  The more the Christian practices self‐control, prays, and keeps vigil, the more  pious  he  becomes  and  the  more  he  performs  every  other  good  work,  contemplating  what  a  fearful  King  he  will  receive  inside  of  himself.  This  is  even  more  true  when  he  considers  that  he  will  receive  grace  from  Holy  Communion  in  proportion  to  his  preparation.  The  more  often  someone  prepares himself, the more benefit he receives. [93]     When  a  Christian  partakes  of  Communion,  who  can  comprehend  the  gifts and the charismata he receives? Or how can our inept tongue enumerate  them?  For  this  reason,  let  us  again  bring  forward  one  by  one  the  sacred  teachers  of  the  Church  to  tell  us  about  these  gifts,  with  their  eloquent  and  God‐inspired mouths.     Gregory the Theologian says:    When the most sacred body of Christ is received and eaten in a proper  manner, it becomes a weapon against those who war against us, it returns to  God those who had left Him, it strengthens the weak, it causes the healthy to  be  glad,  it  heals  sicknesses,  and  it  preserves  health.  Through  it  we  become  meek and more willing to accept correction, more longsuffering in our pains,  more fervent in our love, more detailed in our knowledge, more willing to do  obedience, and keener in the workings of the charismata of the Spirit. But all  the  opposite  happens  to  those  who  do  not  receive  Communion  in  a  proper  manner. [94]    Those  who  do  not  receive  Communion  frequently  suffer  totally  opposite  things,  because  they  are  not  sealed  with  the  precious  blood  of  our  Lord, as the same Gregory the Theologian says: Then the Lamb is slain, and  with the precious blood are sealed action and reason, that is, habit and mental  activity,  the  sideposts  of  our  doors.  I  mean,  of  course,  by  doors,  the  movements  and  notions  of  the  intellect,  which  are  opened  and  closed  correctly through spiritual vision. [95]     St. Ephraim the Syrian writes:    Brothers,  let  us  practice  stillness,  fasting,  prayer,  and  tears;  gather  together in the Church; work with our hands; speak about the Holy Fathers;  be obedient to the truth; and listen to the divine Scriptures; so that our minds  do  not  become  barren  (and  sprout  the  thorns  of  evil  thoughts).  And  let  us  certainly  make  ourselves  worthy  of  partaking  of  the  divine  and  immaculate  Mysteries,  so  that  our  soul  may  be  purified  from  thoughts  of  unbelief  and  impurity,  and  so  that  the  Lord  will  dwell  within  us  and  deliver  us  from  the  evil one.    The  divine  Cyril  of  Alexandria  says  that,  because  of  divine  Communion,  those  noetic  thieves  the  demons  find  no  opportunity  to  enter  into our souls through the senses:    You  must  consider  your  senses  as  the  door  to  a  house.  Through  the  senses  all  images  of  things  enter  into  the  heart,  and,  through  the  senses,  the  innumerable multitude of lusts pour into it. The Prophet Joel calls the senses  windows,  saying:  They  shall  enter  in  at  our  windows  like  a  thief  (Jl.  2:9),  because  these  windows  have  not  been  marked  with  the  precious  blood  of  Christ. Moreover, the Law commanded that, after the slaughter (of the lamb),  the Israelites were to smear the doorposts and the lintels of their houses with  its blood, showing by this that the precious blood of Christ protects our own  earthly dwelling‐place, which is to say, our body, and that the death brought  about by the transgression is repelled through our enjoyment of the partaking  of life (that is, of life‐giving Communion). Further, through our sealing (with  the blood of Christ) we distance from ourselves the destroyer. [96]    The same divine Cyril says in another place that, through Communion,  we are cleansed from every impurity of soul and receive eagerness and fervor  to  do  good:  The  precious  blood  of  Christ  not  only  frees  us  from  every  corruption,  but  it  also  cleanses  us  from  every  impurity  lying  hidden  within  us, and it does not allow us to grow cold on account of sloth, but rather makes  us fervent in the Spirit. [97]     St. Theodore the Studite wondrously describes the benefit one receives  from frequent Communion:    Tears  and  contrition  have  great  power.  But  the  Communion  of  the  sanctified Gifts, above all, has especially great power and benefit, and, seeing  that you are so indifferent towards it and do not frequently receive it, I am in  wonder and great amazement. For I see that you only receive Communion on  Sundays,  but,  if  there  is  a  Liturgy  on  any  other  day,  you  do  not  commune,  though  when  I  was  in  the  monastery  each  one  of  you  had  permission  to  commune every day, if you so desired. But now the Liturgy is less frequently  celebrated,  and  you  still  do  not  commune.  I  say  these  things  to  you,  not  because  I  wish  for  you  simply  to  commune—haphazardly,  without  preparation (for it is written: But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat  of  the  Bread,  and  drink  of  the  Cup.  For  he  that  eateth  and  drinketh  unworthily,  eateth  and  drinketh  damnation  to  himself,  not  discerning  the  Lords body and blood [1 Cor. 11:2829]). No, I am not saying this. God forbid! I  say  that  we  should,  out  of  our  desire  for  Communion,  purify  ourselves  as  much as possible and make ourselves worthy of the Gift. For the Bread which  came down from heaven is participation in life: If any man eat of this bread,  he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is My flesh, which I will  give for the life of the world (Jn. 6:51). Again He says: He that eateth My flesh,  and drinketh My blood, dwelleth in Me, and I in him (Jn. 6:58).     Do you see the ineffable gift? He not only died for us, but He also gives  Himself  to  us  as  food.  What  could  show  more  love  than  this?  What  is  more  salvific  to  the  soul?  Moreover,  no  one  fails  to  partake  every  day  of  the  food  and drink of the common table. And, if it happens that someone does not eat,  he becomes greatly dismayed. And we are not speaking here about ordinary  bread,  but  about  the  Bread  of  life;  not  about  an  ordinary  cup,  but  about  the  Cup  of immortality.  And do we consider  Communion  an  indifferent matter,  entirely unnecessary? How is this thought not irrational and foolish? If this is  how it has been up until now, my children, I ask that we henceforth take heed  to  ourselves,  and,  knowing  the  power  of  the  Gift,  let  us  purify  ourselves  as  much as possible and partake of the sanctified Things. And if it happens that  we  are  occupied  with  a  handicraft,  as  soon  as  we  hear  the  sounding‐board  calling us to Church, let us put our work aside and go partake of the Gift with  great desire. And this (that is, frequent Communion) will certainly benefit us,  for  we  keep  ourselves  pure  through  our  preparation  for  Communion.  If  we  do  not  commune  frequently,  it  is  impossible  for  us  not  to  become  subject  to  the  passions.  Frequent  Communion  will  become  for  us  a  companion  unto  eternal life. [98]     So,  my  brothers,  if  we  practice  what  the  divine  Fathers  have  ordered  and  frequently  commune,  we  not  only  will  have  the  support  and  help  of  divine grace in this short life, but also will have the angels of God as helpers,  and the very Master of the angels Himself. Furthermore, the inimical demons  will be greatly distanced from us, as the divine Chrysostom says:    Let  us  then  return  from  that  Table  like  lions  breathing  fire,  having  become fearsome to the devil, thinking about our Head (Christ) and the love  He  has  shown  for  us.  This  blood  causes  the  image  of  our  King  to  be  fresh  within us, it produces unspeakable beauty, and, watering and nourishing our  soul  frequently,  it  does  not  permit  its  nobility  to  waste  away.  This  blood,  worthily received, drives away demons and keeps them far from us, while it  calls  to  us  the  angels  and  the  Master  of  angels.  For  wherever  they  see  the  Masters blood, devils flee and angels run to gather together. This blood is the  salvation  of  our  souls.  By  it  the  soul  is  washed,  is  made  beautiful,  and  is  inflamed;  and  it  causes  our  intellect  to  be  brighter  than  fire  and  makes  the  soul gleam more than gold....Those who partake of this blood stand with the  angels and the powers that are above, clothed in the kingly robe itself, armed  with spiritual weapons. But I have not yet said anything great by this: for they  are clothed even with the King Himself. [99]    Do you see, my beloved brother, how many wonderful charismata you  receive  if  you  frequently  commune?  Do  you  see  that  with  frequent  Communion  the  intellect  is  illumined,  the  mind  is  made  to  shine,  and  all  of  the powers of the  soul are purified? If  you also  desire  to  kill  the passions  of  the  flesh,  go  to  Communion  frequently  and  you  will  succeed.  Cyril  of  Alexandria  confirms  this  for  us:  Receive  Holy  Communion  believing  that  it  liberates  us  not  only  from  death,  but  also  from  every  illness.  And  this  is  because,  when  Christ  dwells  within  us  through  frequent  Communion,  He  pacifies and  calms the  fierce war  of  the  flesh, ignites  piety toward  God,  and  deadens the passions. [100]     Thus,  without  frequent  Communion  we  cannot  be  freed  from  the  passions and ascend to the heights of dispassion; just as the Israelites, if they  had  not  eaten  the  passover  in  Egypt,  would  not  have  been  able  to  be  freed.  For Egypt means an impassioned life, and if we do not frequently receive the  precious body and blood of our Lord (every day if it be possible), we will not  be able to be freed from the noetic Pharaonians (that is, the passions and the  demons). According to Cyril of Alexandria,     As  long  as  those  of  Israel  were  slaves  to  the  Egyptians,  they  slaughtered  the  lamb  and  ate  the  passover.  This  shows  that  the  soul  of  man  cannot be freed from the tyranny of the devil by any other means except the  partaking of Christ. For He Himself says: If the Son therefore shall make you  free, ye shall be free indeed (Jn. 8:36). [101]    Again St. Cyril says, They had to sacrifice the lamb, being that it was a  type of Christ, for they could not have been freed by any other means. [102]     So if we also desire to flee Egypt, namely, dark and oppressive sin, and  to  flee  Pharaoh,  that  is,  the  noetic  tyrant  (according  to  Gregory  the  Theologian), [103] and inherit the land of the heart and the promise, we must 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communionstnicodemusathos/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 87%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

THE PATH TO RESURRECTION 86%

divine power can easily flow from God into you through Jesus Christ.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/04/03/the-path-to-resurrection/

03/04/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Promises 86%

1:3 His divine power has given us everything we need for life and godliness through our knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and goodness.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/13/promises/

13/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18801000 85%

"partakers of the Divine nature,"

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18801000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com