Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 28 November at 11:44 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «epistle»:


Total: 60 results - 0.1 seconds

PhilaretSorrowfulEpistle1972eng 100%

PRESIDENT  OF THE SYNOD OF BISHOPS  OF THE RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH  OUTSIDE OF RUSSIA  75 EAST 93rd STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10028  Telephone: LEhigh 4‐1601  A SECOND SORROWFUL EPISTLE  TO THEIR HOLINESSES AND THEIR BEATITUDES, THE PRIMATES  OF THE HOLY ORTHODOX CHURCHES, THE MOST REVEREND  METROPOLITANS, ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS.    The  People  of  the  Lord  residing  in  his  Diocese  are  entrusted  to  the  Bishop, and he will be required to give account of their souls according to the  39th Apostolic Canon. The 34th Apostolic Canon orders that a Bishop may do  ʺthose  things  only  which  concern  his  own  Diocese  and  the  territories  belonging to it.ʺ    There  are,  however,  occasions  when  events  are  of  such  a  nature  that  their  influence  extends  beyond  the  limits  of  one  Diocese,  or  indeed  those  of  one or more of the local Churches. Events of such a general, global nature can  not be ignored by any Orthodox Bishop, who, as a successor of the Apostles,  is  charged  with  the  protection  of  his  flock  from  various  temptations.  The  lightening‐like speed with which ideas may be spread in our times make such  care all the more imperative now.    In  particular,  our  flock,  belonging  to  the  free  part  of  the  Church  of  Russia, is spread out all over the world. What has just been stated, therefore,  is most pertinent to it.    As a result of this, our Bishops, when meeting in their Councils, cannot  confine  their  discussions  to  the  narrow  limits  of  pastoral  and  administrative  problems arising in their respective Dioceses, but must in addition turn their  attention  to  matters  of  a  general  importance  to  the  whole  Orthodox  World,  since the affliction of one Church is as ʺan affliction unto them all, eliciting the  compassion of them allʺ (Phil. 4:14‐16; Heb. 10:30). And if the Apostle St. Paul  was  weak  with  those  who  were  weak  and  burning  with  those  who  were  offended, how then can we Bishops of God remain indifferent to the growth  of errors which threaten the salvation of the souls of many of our brothers in  Christ?    It is in the spirit of such a feeling that we have already once addressed  all  the  Bishops  of  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  with  a  Sorrowful  Epistle.  We  rejoiced  to  learn  that,  in  harmony  with  our  appeal,  several  Metropolitans  of  the Church of Greece have recently made reports to their Synod calling to its  attention  the  necessity  of  considering  ecumenism  a  heresy  and  the  advisability of reconsidering the matter of participation in the World Council  of  Churches.  Such  healthy  reactions  against  the  spreading  of  ecumenism  allow  us  to  hope  that  the  Church  of  Christ  will  be  spared  this  new  storm  which threatens her.    Yet,  two  years  have  passed  since  our  Sorrowful  Epistle  was  issued,  and, alas! although in the Church of Greece we have seen the new statements  regarding  ecumenism  as  un‐Orthodox,  no  Orthodox  Church  has  announced  its withdrawal from the World Council of Churches.    In the Sorrowful Epistle, we depicted in vivid colors to what extent the  organic  membership  of  the  Orthodox  Church  in  that  Council,  based  as  it  is  upon purely Protestant principles, is contrary to the very basis of Orthodoxy.  In this Epistle, having been authorized by our Council of Bishops, we would  further develop and extend our warning, showing that the participants in the  ecumenical  movement  are  involved  in  a  profound  heresy  against  the  very  foundation of the Church.    The essence of that movement has been given a clear definition by the  statement of the Roman Catholic theologian Ives M. J. Congar. He writes that  ʺthis  is  a  movement  which  prompts  the  Christian  Churches  to  wish  the  restoration of the lost unity, and to that end to have a deep understanding of  itself  and  understanding  of  each  other.ʺ  He  continues,  ʺIt  is  composed  of  all  the  feelings,  ideas,  actions  or  institutions,  meetings  or  conferences,  ceremonies, manifestations and publications which are directed to prepare the  reunion in new unity not only of (separate) Christians, but also of the actually  existing Churches.ʺ Actually, he continues, ʺthe word ecumenism, which is of  Protestant  origin,  means  now  a  concrete  reality:  the  totality  of  all  the  aforementioned  upon  the  basis  of  a  certain  attitude  and  a  certain  amount  of  very definite conviction (although not always very clear and certain). It is not  a desire or an attempt to unite those who are regarded as separated into one  Church  which  would  be  regarded  as  the  only  true  one.  It  begins  at  just  that  point  where  it  is  recognized  that,  at  the  present  state,  none  of  the  Christian  confessions  possesses  the  fullness  of  Christianity,  but  even  if  one  of  them  is  authentic, still, as a confession, it does not contain the whole truth. There are  Christian  values  outside  of  it  belonging  not  only  to  Christians  who  are  separated from it in creed, but also to other Churches and other confessions as  suchʺ  (Chretiens  Desunis,  Ed.  Unam  Sanctam,  Paris,  1937,  pp.  XI‐XII).  This  definition of the ecumenical movement made by a Roman Catholic theologian  35 years ago continues to be quite as exact even now, with the difference that  during the intervening years this movement has continued to develop further  with a newer and more dangerous scope.    In our first Sorrowful Epistle, we wrote in detail on how incompatible  with our Ecclesiology was the participation of Orthodox in the World Council  of  Churches,  and  presented  precisely  the  nature  of  the  violation  against  Orthodoxy committed in the participation of our Churches in that council. We  demonstrated  that  the  basic  principles  of  that  council  are  incompatible  with  the  Orthodox  doctrine  of  the  Church.  We,  therefore,  protested  against  the  acceptance  of  that  resolution  at  the  Geneva  Pan‐Orthodox  Conference  whereby  the  Orthodox  Church  was  proclaimed  an  organic  member  of  the  World Council of Churches.     Alas! These last few years are richly laden with evidence that, in their  dialogues with the heterodox, some Orthodox representatives have adopted a  purely Protestant ecclesiology which brings in its wake a Protestant approach  to questions of the life of the Church, and from which springs forth the now‐ popular modernism.    Modernism consists  in that bringing‐down,  that  re‐aligning of the  life  of  the  Church  according  to  the  principles  of  current  life  and  human  weaknesses. We saw it in the Renovation Movement and in the Living Church  in  Russia  in  the  twenties.  At  the  first  meeting  of  the  founders  of  the  Living  Church on May 29, 1922, its aims were determined as a ʺrevision and change  of all facets of Church life which are required by the demands of current lifeʺ  (The  New  Church,  Prof.  B.  V.  Titlinov,  Petrograd‐Moscow,  1923,  p.  11).  The  Living Church was an attempt at a reformation adjusted to the requirements  of  the  conditions  of  a  communist  state.  Modernism  places  that  compliance  with  the  weaknesses  of  human  nature  above  the  moral  and  even  doctrinal  requirements  of  the  Church.  In  that  measure  that  the  world  is  abandoning  Christian  principles,  modernism  debases  the  level  of  religious  life  more  and  more.  Within  the  Western  confessions  we  see  that  there  has  come  about  an  abolition  of  fasting,  a  radical  shortening  and  vulgarization  of  religious  services, and, finally, full spiritual devastation, even to the point of exhibiting  an  indulgent  and  permissive  attitude  toward  unnatural  vices  of  which  St.  Paul said it was shameful even to speak.     It  was  just  modernism  which  was  the  basis  of  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Conference  of sad  memory in Constantinople  in 1923, evidently not  without  some  influence  of  the  renovation  experiment  in  Russia.  Subsequent  to  that  conference,  some  Churches,  while  not  adopting  all  the  reforms  which  were  there introduced, adopted the Western calendar, and even, in some cases, the  Western Paschalia. This, then, was the first step onto the path of modernism  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  whereby  Her  way  of  life  was  changed  in  order  to  bring  it  closer  to  the  way  of  life  of  heretical  communities.  In  this  respect,  therefore, the adoption of the Western Calendar was a violation of a principle  consistent  in  the  Holy  Canons,  whereby  there  is  a  tendency  to  spiritually  isolate  the  Faithful  from  those  who  teach  contrary  to  the  Orthodox  Church,  and not to encourage closeness with such in our prayer‐life (Titus 3:10; 10th,  45th,  and  65th  Apostolic  Canons;  32nd,  33rd,  and  37th  Canons  of  Laodicea,  etc.). The unhappy fruit of that reform was the violation of the unity of the life  in  prayer  of  Orthodox  Christians  in  various  countries.  While  some  of  them  were  celebrating  Christmas  together  with  heretics,  others  still  fasted.  Sometimes such a division occurred in the same local Church, and sometimes  Easter  [Pascha]  was  celebrated  according  to  the  Western  Paschal  reckoning.  For the sake, therefore, of being nearer to the heretics, that principle, set forth  by  the  First  Ecumenical  Council  that  all  Orthodox  Christians  should  simultaneously,  with  one  mouth  and  one  heart,  rejoice  and  glorify  the  Resurrection of Christ all over the world, is violated.    This  tendency  to  introduce  reforms,  regardless  of  previous  general  decisions and practice of the whole Church in violation of the Second Canon  of  the  VI  Ecumenical  Council,  creates  only  confusion.  His  Holiness,  the  Patriarch  of  Serbia,  Gabriel,  of  blessed  memory,  expressed  this  feeling  eloquently at the Church Conference held in Moscow in 1948.    ʺIn the last decades,ʺ he said, ʺvarious tendencies have appeared in the  Orthodox Church which evoke reasonable apprehension for the purity of Her  doctrines and for Her dogmatical and canonical Unity.    ʺThe  convening  by  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  of  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Conference and the Conference at Vatopedi, which had as their principal aim  the  preparing  of  the  Prosynod,  violated  the  unity  and  cooperation  of  the  Orthodox Churches. On the one hand, the absence of the Church of Russia at  these meetings, and, on the other, the hasty and unilateral actions of some of  the  local  Churches  and  the  hasty  actions  of  their  representatives  have  introduced chaos and anomalies into the life of the Eastern Orthodox Church.    ʺThe unilateral introduction of the Gregorian Calendar by some of the  local  Churches  while  the  Old  Calendar  was  kept  yet  by  others,  shook  the  unity of the Church and incited serious dissension within those of them who  so  lightly  introduced  the  New  Calendarʺ  (Acts  of  the  Conferences  of  the  Heads  and Representatives of the Autocephalic Orthodox Churches, Moscow, 1949, Vol. II,  pp. 447‐448).    Recently, Prof. Theodorou, one of the representatives of the Church of  Greece at the Conference in Chambesy in 1968, noted that the calendar reform  in Greece was hasty and noted further that the Church there suffers even now  from  the  schism  it  caused  (Journal  of  the  Moscow  Patriarchate,  1969,  No.  1,  p.  51).    It  could  not  escape  the  sensitive  consciences  of  many  sons  of  the  Church  that  within  the  calendar  reform,  the  foundation  is  already  laid  for  a  revision  of  the  entire  order  of  Orthodox  Church  life  which  has  been  blessed  by  the  Tradition  of  many  centuries  and  confirmed  by  the  decisions  of  the  Ecumenical  Councils.  Already  at  that  Pan‐Orthodox  Conference  of  1923  at  Constantinople,  the  questions  of  the  second  marriage  of  clergy  as  well  as  other matters were raised. And recently, the Greek Archbishop of North and  South  America,  Iakovos,  made  a  statement  in  favor  of  a  married  episcopate  (The Hellenic Chronicle, December 23, 1971).    The  strength  of  Orthodoxy  has  always  lain  in  Her  maintaining  the  principles  of  Church  Tradition.  Despite  this,  there  are  those  who  are  attempting to include in the agenda of a future Great Council not a discussion  of  the  best ways to  safeguard those principles, but, on  the  contrary,  ways to  bring  about  a  radical  revision  of  the  entire  way  of  life  in  the  Church,  beginning  with  the  abolition of  fasts,  second  marriages  of  the clergy,  etc.,  so  that Her way of life would be closer to that of the heretical communities.    In  our  first  Sorrowful  Epistle  we  have  shown  in  detail  the  extent  to  which  the  principles  of  the  World  Council  of  Churches  are  contrary  to  the  doctrines  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  and  we  protested  against  the  decision  taken  in  Geneva  at  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Conference  declaring  the  Orthodox  Church to be an organic member of that council. Then we reminded all that,  ʺthe  poison  of  heresy  is  not  too  dangerous  when  it  is  preached  outside  the  Church.  Many  times  more  perilous  is  that  poison  which  is  gradually  introduced  into  the  organism  in  larger  and  larger  doses  by  those  who,  in  virtue of their position, should not be poisoners but spiritual physicians.ʺ    Alas!  Of  late  we  see  the  symptoms  of  such  a  great  development  of  ecumenism  with  the  participation  of  the  Orthodox,  that  it  has  become  a  serious  threat,  leading  to  the  utter  annihilation  of  the  Orthodox  Church  by  dissolving Her in an ocean of heretical communities. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/philaretsorrowfulepistle1972eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

pamphlet2eng 99%

SPIRITUAL PATH  REMEMBERING SACRED TRADITION AND  REFERRING TO THE HOLY FATHERS OF THE  ORTHODOX CHURCH    Canons of the Holy Apostles  8.  If  any  Bishop,  or  Presbyter,  or  Deacon,  or  anyone  else  in  the  sacerdotal  list, fail to partake of communion when the oblation has been offered, he must  tell  the  reason,  and  if  it  is  good  excuse,  he  shall  receive  a  pardon.  But  if  he  refuses  to  tell  it,  he  shall  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  he  has  become a cause of harm to the laity and has instilled a suspicion as against the  offerer of it that the latter has failed to present it in a sound manner.    Interpretation.  It  is  the  intention  of  the  present  Canon  that  all,  and  especially  those  in  holy  orders,  should  be  prepared  beforehand  and  worthy  to  partake  of  the  divine  mysteries when the oblation is offered, or what amounts to the sacred service  of the body of Christ. In case any one of them fail to partake when present at  the  divine  liturgy,  or  communion,  he  is  required  to  tell  the  reason  or  cause  why he did not partake:  then if it is a just and righteous and reasonable one,  he is to receive a pardon, or be excused; but if he refuses to tell it, he is to be  excommunicated,  since  he  also  becomes  a  cause  of  harm  to  the  laity  by  leading the multitude to suspect that that priest who officiated at liturgy was  not worthy and that it was on this account that the person in question refused  to communicate from him.      9.  All those faithful who enter and listen to the Scriptures, but do not stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that they are causing the Church a breach of order.    (Canon LXVI of the 6th; c. II of Antioch; cc. Ill, XIII of Tim.).    Interpretation.  Both  exegetes of the sacred Canons — Zonaras,  I mean,  and Balsamon  —  in  interpreting the present Apostolical Canon agree in saying that all Christians  who  enter  the  church  when  the  divine  liturgy  is  being  celebrated,  and  who  listen to the divine Scriptures, but do not remain to the end nor partake, must  be excommunicated, as causing a disorder to  the  church. Thus  Zonaras says  verbatim: “The present Canon demands that all those who are in the church  when the  holy sacrifice is being performed shall patiently remain to the end  for  prayer  and  holy  communion.”  For  even  the  laity  then  were  required  to  partake continually. Balsamon says: “The ordainment of the present Canon is  very  acrid;  for  it  excommunicates  those  attending  church  but  not  staying  to  the end nor partaking.”    Concord.  Agreeably with the present Canon c. II of Antioch ordains that all those who  enter the church during the time of divine liturgy and listen to the Scriptures,  but  turn  away  and  avoid  (which  is  the  same  as  to  say,  on  account  of  pretended  reverence  and  humility  they  shun,  according  to  interpretation  of  the  best  interpreter,  Zonaras)  divine  communion  in  a  disorderly  manner  are  to be excommunicated. The continuity of communion is confirmed also by c.  LXVI  of  the  6th,  which  commands  Christians  throughout  Novational  Week  (i.e.,  Easter  Week)  to  take  time  off  for  psalms  and  hymns,  and  to  indulge  in  the  divine  mysteries  to  their  hearts’  content.  But  indeed  even  from  the  third  canon of St. Timothy the continuity of communion can be inferred. For if he  permits  one  possessed  by  demons  to  partake,  not  however  every  day,  but  only on Sunday (though in other copies it is written, on occasions only), it is  likely  that  those  riot  possessed  by  demons  are  permitted  to  communicate  even more frequently. Some contend that for this reason it was that the same  Timothy,  in  c.  Ill,  ordains  that  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  that  a  man  and  his  wife  should  not  have  mutual  intercourse,  in  order,  that  is,  that  they  might  partake, since in that period it was only on those days, as we have said, that  the  divine  liturgy  was  celebrated.  This  opinion  of  theirs  is  confirmed  by  divine Justin, who says in his second apology that “on the day of the sun” —  meaning, Sunday — all Christians used to assemble in the churches (which on  this account were also called “Kyriaka,” i.e., places of the Lord) and partook of  the divine mysteries. That, on the other hand, all Christians ought to frequent  divine communion is confirmed from the West by divine Ambrose, who says  thus:  “We  see  many  brethren  coming  to  church  negligently,  and  indeed  on  Sundays  not  even  being  present  at  the  mysteries.”  And  again,  in  blaming  those who fail to partake continually, the same saint says of the mystic bread:  “God  gave  us  this  bread  as  a  daily  affair,  and  we  make  it  a  yearly  affair.”  From Asia, on the other hand, divine Chrysostom demands this of Christians,  and, indeed, par excellence. And see in his preamble to his commentary of the  Epistle to the Romans, discourse VIII, and to the Hebrews, discourse XVIII, on  the Acts, and Sermon V on the First Epistle to Timothy, and Sermon XVII on  the  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews,  and  his  discourse  on  those  at  first  fasting  on  Easter,  Sermon  III  to  the  Ephesians,  discourse  addressed  to  those  who  leave  the  divine  assemblies  (synaxeis),  Sermon  XXVIII  on  the  First  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians,  a  discourse  addressed  to  blissful  Philogonius,  and  a  discourse  about  fasting.  Therein  you  can  see  how  that  goodly  tongue  strives  and  how  many  exhortations  it  rhetorically  urges  in  order  to  induce  Christians  to  partake at the same time, and worthily, and continually. But see also Basil the  Great,  in  his  epistle  to  Caesaria  Patricia  and  in  his  first  discourse  about  baptism.  But  then  how can it  be  thought  that whoever pays any  attention  to  the  prayers  of  all  the  divine  liturgy  can  fail  to  see  plainly  enough  that  all  of  these are aimed at having it arranged that Christians assembled at the divine  liturgy should partake — as many, that is to say, as are worthy?      10.  If anyone pray in company with one who has been excommunicated, he  shall be excommunicated himself.    Interpretation.  The  noun  akoinonetos  has  three  significations:  for,  either  it  denotes  one  standing  in  church  and  praying  in  company  with  the  rest  of  the  Christians,  but not communing with the divine mysteries; or it denotes one who neither  communes nor stands and prays with the faithful in the church, but who has  been excommunicated from them and is excluded from church and prayer; or  finally it may denote any clergyman who becomes excommunicated from the  clergy,  as,  say,  a  bishop  from  his  fellow  bishops,  or  a  presbyter  from  his  fellow  presbyters,  or  a  deacon  from  his  fellow  deacons,  and  so  on.  Accordingly,  every  akoinonetos  is  the  same  as  saying  excommunicated  from  the  faithful  who  are  in  the  church;  and  he  is  at  the  same  time  also  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries.  But  not  everyone  that  is  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries  is  also  excommunicated  from  the  congregation  of  the  faithful,  as  are  deposed  clergymen;  and  from  the  peni‐ tents those who stand together and who neither commune nor stay out of the  church  like  catechumens,  as  we  have  said.  In  the  present  Canon  the  word  akoinonetos is taken in the second sense of the word. That is why it says that  whoever prays in company with one who has been excommunicated because  of sin from the congregation and prayer of the faithful, even though he should  not  pray  along  with  them  in  church,  but  in  a  house,  whether  he  be  in  holy  orders  or  a  layman,  he  is  to  be  excommunicated  in  the  same way  as  he  was  from church and prayer with Christians: because that common engagement in  prayer  which  he  performs  in  conjunction  with  a  person  that  has  been  excommunicated,  wittingly  and  knowingly  him  to  be  such,  is  aimed  at  dishonoring  and  condemning  the  excommunicator,  and  traduces  him  as  having excommunicated him wrongly and unjustly. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pamphlet2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Dialoog-3e-kwartaal-2017 97%

White The Epistle to the Galatians, F.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/18/dialoog-3e-kwartaal-2017/

18/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Aquinas on Romans 85%

2 The Structure of the Epistle to the Romans According to St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/14/aquinas-on-romans/

14/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 77%

Nathaniel Skinner READER of EPISTLE PROSFORA COFFEE HOUR Chanters Presvytera Efi Hickman “OPEN” Friday, January 6th Theophany Freezer Sunday, January 8th Christian &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Jumping System Guide 74%

Jumping System Guide 1234- Create a new account.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/01/jumping-system-guide/

01/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

pamphlet3eng 71%

SPIRITUAL PATH  REMEMBERING SACRED TRADITION AND  REFERRING TO THE HOLY FATHERS OF THE  ORTHODOX CHURCH    Quotes from St. Basil the Great    A. Holy Tradition.  Of  the  beliefs  and  practices  whether  generally  accepted  or  publicly  enjoined  which  are  preserved  in  the  Church    some  we  possess  derived  from  written  teaching;  others  we  have  received  delivered  to  us  ʺin  a  mysteryʺ    by  the  tradition of the apostles; and both of these in relation to true religion  have the  same force. And these no one will gainsay—no one, at all events, who is even  moderately versed in the institutions of the Church. For were we to attempt to  reject  such  customs  as  have  no  written  authority,  on  the  ground  that  the  importance they possess is small, we should unintentionally injure the Gospel  in its very vitals; or, rather, should make our public definition  a mere phrase  and nothing more.  For instance, to take the first and most general example,  who is thence who has taught us in writing to sign with the sign of the cross  those  who  have  trusted  in  the  name  of  our Lord  Jesus  Christ?  What  writing  has taught us to turn to the East at the prayer? Which of the saints  has left us  in writing the words of the invocation at the displaying   of the bread of the  Eucharist and the cup of blessing? For we are not, as is well known, content  with  what  the  apostle  or  the  Gospel  has  recorded,  but  both  in  preface  and  conclusion we add other words as being of great importance to the validity of  the ministry, and these we derive from unwritten teaching.    (Quote from St. Basil the Great’s work “On the Holy Spirit,” Patrologia Graeca 32, 188)      B. Frequent Holy Communion.  To commune each day and to partake of the holy Body and Blood of Christ is  good  and  beneficial; for He says quite plainly:  “He that  eateth my flesh and  drinketh my blood hath eternal life.” Who can doubt that to share continually  in  life  is  the  same  thing  as  having  life  abundantly?  We  ourselves  commune  four  times  a  week:  on  the  Lord’s  Day  (i.e.,  Sunday),  on  the  Third  Day  (i.e.,  Wednesday),  on  the  Preparation  Day  (i.e.,  Friday)  and  on  the  Sabbath  Day  (i.e., Saturday); and on other days if there is a commemoration of any saint.    (Quote  from  93rd  Epistle  of  St.  Basil  the  Great’s  work  “To  Caesarea  Patricia  Regarding  Communion,” Patrologia Graeca 32, 484) 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pamphlet3eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Parody 3.1 71%

Box 404, East Rochester, NY 14445 Contents On the Fear of Being Swallowed by Literature _______________________ 1 Andrew Kozma Boston Snapshot __________________ 2 John Roche Now Scheduling Shadow Days _________ 3 Epistle to a Shadow-Tailed Traveler _____ 4 Yvonne Zipter h(a ____________________________ 5 Simon Mermelstein We Make Drool ___________________ 6 Noel Sloboda The Gen-Y Dude to His Friend with Benets _________________________ 7 Melissa Balmain The Life &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/11/04/parody-3-1/

04/11/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii09 71%

ARE CHRISTIANS MEANT TO COMMUNE ONLY ON  A SATURDAY AND NEVER ON A SUNDAY?    In  the  second  paragraph  of  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  Bp.  Kirykos  writes: “Also, all Christians, when they are going to commune, know that they must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday  (since  it  is  preceded  by  the  fast  of  Friday)  and on Sunday only by economia, so that they are not compelled to break the fast of  Saturday and violate the relevant Holy Canon [sic: here he accidentally speaks of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means  observing  a  fast  on  Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].”    The first striking remark is “All Christians.” Does Bp. Kirykos consider  himself to be a Christian? If so, why does he commune every Sunday without  exception, seeing as though “all Christians” are supposed to “know” that they  are only allowed to commune on a Saturday, and never on Sunday, except by  “economia.”  Or  perhaps  Bp.  Kirykos  does  not  consider  himself  a  Christian,  and  for  this  reason  he  is  exempt  of  this  rule  for  “all  Christians.”  It  makes  perfect sense that he excludes himself from those called Christians because his  very ideas and practices are not Christian at all.     Is  communion  on  Saturdays  alone,  and  never  on  Sundays,  really  a  Christian  practice?  Is  this  what  Christians  have  always  believed?  Was  Saturday the day that the early Christians ʺbroke breadʺ (i.e., communed)? Let  us look at what the Holy Scriptures have to say.     St.  Luke  the  Evangelist  (+18  October,  86),  in  the  Acts  of  the  Holy  Apostles, writes: “And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to  break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow (Acts 20:7).”  Thus the Holy Apostle Paul would meet with the faithful on the first day of  the  week,  to  wit,  Sunday,  and  on  this  day  he  would  break  bread,  that  is,  he  would serve Holy Communion.     St. Paul the Apostle (+29 June, 67) also advises in his first epistle to the  Corinthians:  “On  the  first  day  of  the  week,  let  every  one  of  you  put  apart  with  himself, laying up what it shall well please him: that when I come, the collections be  not  then  to  be  made  (1  Corinthians  16:2).”  Thus  St.  Paul  indicates  that  the  Christians would meet with one another on the first day of the week, that is,  Sunday, not only for Liturgy, but also for collection of goods for the poor.     The reason why the Christians would meet for prayer and breaking of  bread on Sunday is because our Lord Jesus Christ arose from the dead on one  day after the Sabbath, on the first day of the week, that is, the Lordʹs Day or Sunday  (Matt. 28:1‐7; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1).     Another  reason  for  the  Christians  meeting  together  on  Sundays  is  because the Holy Spirit was delivered to the Apostles on the day of Pentecost,  which was a Sunday, and this event signified the beginning of the Christian  community.  That  Pentecost  took  place  on  a  Sunday  is  clear  from  Godʹs  command in the Old Testament Scriptures: “You shall count fifty days to the day  after  the  seventh  Sabbath;  then  you  shall  present  a  new  grain  offering  to  the  Lord  (Leviticus 23:16).” The reference to “fifty days” and “seventh Sabbath” refers to  counting fifty days from the first Sabbath, or seven weeks plus one day; while  “the day after the seventh Sabbath” clearly refers to a Sunday, since the day after  the Sabbath day (Saturday) is always the Lord’s Day (Sunday).    It was on the Sunday of Pentecost that the Holy Spirit descended upon  the Apostles. Thus we read:  “When the day of Pentecost  had  come, they  were  all  together  in  one  place.  And  suddenly  there  came  from  heaven  a  noise  like  a  violent  rushing  wind,  and  it  filled  the  whole  house  where  they  were  sitting.  And  there  appeared to them tongues as of fire distributing themselves, and they rested on each  one  of  them.  And  they  were  all  filled  with  the  Holy  Spirit  and  began  to  speak  with  other tongues, as the Spirit was giving them utterance (Acts 2:1‐4).”     A  final  reason  for  Sunday  being  the  day  that  the  Christians  met  for  prayer and breaking of bread was in order to remember the promised Second  Coming or rather Second Appearance (Δευτέρα Παρουσία) of the Lord. The  reference  to  Sunday  is  found  in  the  Book  of  Revelation,  in  which  Christ  appeared and delivered the prophecy to St. John the Theologian on “Kyriake”  (Κυριακή),  which  means  “the  main  day,”  or  “the  first  day,”  but  more  correctly means “the Lordʹs Day.” (Revelation 1:10).     For the above three reasons (that Sunday is the day of the Resurrection,  the  Pentecost  and  the  Second  Appearance)  the  Apostles  themselves,  and  the  early Christians immediately made Sunday the new Sabbath, the new day of  rest,  and  the  new  day  for  Godʹs  people  to  gather  together  for  prayer  (i.e.,  Liturgy)  and  breaking of bread (i.e.,  Holy Communion) Thus we read  in  the  Didache of the Holy Apostles: “On the Lordʹs Day (i.e., Kyriake) come together  and break bread. And give thanks (i.e., offer the Eucharist), after confessing your  sins  that  your  sacrifice  may  be  pure  (Didache  14).”  Thus  the  Christians  met  together  on  the  Lord’s  Day,  that  is,  Sunday,  for  the  breaking  of  bread  and  giving of thanks, to wit, the Divine Liturgy and Holy Eucharist.     St.  Barnabas  the  Apostle  (+11  June,  61),  First  Bishop  of  Salamis  in  Cyprus, in the Epistle of Barnabas, writes: “Wherefore, also, we keep the eighth  day  with  joyfulness,  the  day  also  on  which  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  (Barnabas  15).”  The  eighth  day  is  a  reference  to  Sunday,  which  is  known  as  the first as well as the eighth day of the week. How more appropriate to keep  the eighth day with joyfulness other than by communing of the joyous Gifts?     St. Ignatius the God‐bearer (+20 December, 108), Bishop of Antioch, in  his  Epistle  to  the  Magnesians,  insists  that  the  Jews  who  became  Christian  should  be  “no  longer  observing  the  Sabbath,  but  living  in  the  observance  of  the  Lord’s  Day,  on  which  also  our  Life  rose  again  (Magnesians  9).”  What  could commemorate the Lord’s Day as the day Life rose again, other than by  receiving Life incarnate,  to  wit, that  precious  Body and  Blood of  Christ? For  he who partakes of it shall never die but live forever!    St. Clemes, also known as St. Clement (+24 November, 101), Bishop of  Rome,  in  the  Apostolic  Constitutions,  also  declares  that  Divine  Liturgy  is  especially for Sundays more than any other day. Thus we read: “On the day  of  the  resurrection  of  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord’s  day,  assemble  yourselves  together,  without  fail,  giving  thanks  to  God,  and  praising  Him  for  those  mercies  God  has  bestowed  upon  you  through  Christ,  and  has  delivered  you  from  ignorance,  error, and bondage, that your sacrifice may be unspotted, and acceptable to God, who  has  said  concerning  His  universal  Church:  In  every  place  shall  incense  and  a  pure  sacrifice be offered unto me; for I am a great King, saith the Lord Almighty, and my  name  is  wonderful  among  the  nations  (Apostolic  Constitutions,  ch.  30).”  The  reference to “pure sacrifice” is the oblation of Christ’s Body and Blood; “giving  thanks to God” is the celebration of the Eucharist (εὐχαριστία = giving thanks).    The  Apostolic  Constitutions  also  state  clearly  that  Sunday  is  not  only  the most important day for Divine Liturgy, but that it is also the ideal day for  receiving  Holy  Communion.  It  is  written:  “And  on  the  day  of  our  Lord’s  resurrection,  which  is  the  Lord’s  day,  meet  more  diligently,  sending  praise  to  God  that  made  the  universe  by  Jesus,  and  sent  Him  to  us,  and  condescended  to  let  Him suffer, and raised Him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to  God  who  does  not  assemble  on  that  day  to  hear  the  saving  word  concerning  the  resurrection, on which we pray thrice standing in memory of Him who arose in three  days, in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the Gospel,  the  oblation  of  the  sacrifice,  the  gift  of  the  holy  food?  (Apostolic  Constitutions, ch. 59).” The “gift of the holy food” refers to Holy Communion.    The Holy Canons of the Orthodox Church also distinguish Sunday as  the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. The 19th Canon of the Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  mentions  the  importance  of  Sunday  as  a  day  for  gathering  and  preaching  the  Gospel  sermon:  “We  declare  that  the  deans  of  churches, on every day, but more especially on Sundays, must teach all the clergy  and the laity words of truth out of the Holy Bible…”    The  80th  Canon  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  states  that  all  clergy  and laity are forbidden to be absent from Divine Liturgy for three consecutive  Sundays: “In case any bishop or presbyter or deacon or anyone else on the list of the  clergy,  or  any  layman,  without  any  grave  necessity  or  any  particular  difficulty  compelling him to absent himself from his own church for a very long time, fails to  attend church on Sundays for three consecutive weeks, while living in the city, if  he  be  a  clergyman,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  he  be  a  layman,  let  him  be  removed  from  communion.”  Take  note  that  if  one  attends  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  consecutive  Saturdays,  but  not  on  the  Sundays,  he  still  falls  under  the  penalty  of  this  canon  because  it  does  not  reprimand  someone  who  simply  doesn’t  attend  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  weeks,  but  rather  one  who  “fails  to  attend  church  on  Sundays.”  The  reference  to  “church”  must  refer  to  a  parish  where Holy Communion is offered every Sunday, for an individual who does  not  attend  for  three  consecutive  Sundays  cannot  be  punished  by  being  “removed from  communion” if this is  not  even  offered  to begin with. Also, the  fact  that  this  is  the  penalty  must  mean  that  the  norm  is  for  the  faithful  to  commune every Sunday, or at least every third Sunday.    The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares that: “All those faithful who  enter  and  listen  to  the  Scriptures,  but  do  not  stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  they  are  causing  the  Church a breach of order.” The 2nd Canon of the Council of Antioch states: “As  for all those persons who enter the church and listen to the sacred Scriptures, but who  fail  to  commune  in  prayer  together  and  at  the  same  time  with  the  laity,  or  who  shun  the  participation  of  the  Eucharist,  in  accordance  with  some  irregularity,  we  decree  that  these  persons  be  outcasts  from  the  Church  until,  after  going to confession and exhibiting fruits of repentance and begging forgiveness, they  succeed  in  obtaining  a  pardon…”  Both  of  these  canons  prove  quite  clearly  that  all faithful who attend Divine Liturgy and are not under any kind of penance  or excommunication, must partake of Holy Communion. Thus, if clergy and  laity are equally expected to attend Divine Liturgy every Sunday, or at least  every third Sunday, they are equally expected to Commune every Sunday, or  at least every third Sunday. Should they fail, they are to be excommunicated.    St.  Timothy  of  Alexandria  (+20  July,  384),  in  his  Questions  and  Answers, and specifically in the 3rd Canon, writes: “Question: If anyone who is a  believer is possessed of a demon, ought he to partake of the Holy Mysteries, or not?  Answer: If he does not repudiate the Mystery, nor otherwise in any way blaspheme,  let him have communion, not, however, every day in the week, for it is sufficient for  him  on  the  Lord’s  Day  only.”  So  then,  if  even  those  who  are  possessed  with  demons  are  permitted  to  commune  on  every  Sunday,  how  is  it  that  Bp.  Kirykos  advises  that  all  Christians  are  only  permitted  to  commune  on  a  Saturday,  and  never  on  a  Sunday  except  by  extreme  economia?  Are  today’s  healthy,  faithful  and  practicing  Orthodox  Christians,  who  do  not  have  a  canon  of  penance  or  any  excommunication,  and  who  desire  communion  every Sunday, forbidden this, despite the fact that of old even those possessed  of demons were permitted it?    The  above  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  are  the  Law  of  God  that the Church abides to in order to prevent scandal or discord. Let us now  compare  this  Law  of  God  to  the  “traditions  of  men,”  namely,  the  Sabbatian,  Pharisaic statement found in Bp. Kirykos’s first letter to Fr. Pedro: “… I request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess  to  you,  that  in  order  to  approach  Holy  Communion,  they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday and not Sunday.“ Clearly, Bp. Kirykos has turned the whole world  upside down, and has made the Holy Canons and the Law of the Church of  God  as  a matter  of  “discord  and  scandal,”  and  instead  insists  upon  his  own  self‐invented “tradition” which is nowhere to be found in the writings of the  Holy Fathers, in the Holy Canons, or in the Holy Tradition of Orthodoxy.    The  truth  is  that  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  is  the  one  who  introduced  “disorder  and  scandal”  when  he  trampled  all  over  the  Holy  Canons  and  insisted that his priest, Fr. Pedro, and other laymen do likewise! The truth is  that Fr. Pedro and the laymen supporting him are not at all causing “disorder  and  scandal”  in  the  Church,  but  they  are  the  ones  preventing  disorder  and  scandal by objecting to the unorthodox demands of Bp. Kirykos.    Throughout  the  history  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  Sunday  has  always  been the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. This was declared so  by  the  Holy  Apostles  themselves,  was  also  maintained  in  the  post‐apostolic  era, and continues even until our day. Nowhere in the doctrines, practices or  history  of  Orthodox  Christianity  is  there  ever  a  teaching  that  laymen  are  supposedly only to commune on a Saturday and never on a Sunday. The only  day of the week throughout the year upon which Liturgy is guaranteed to be  celebrated is on a Sunday. The Liturgy is only performed on a few Saturdays  per  year  in  most  parishes,  and  mostly  only  during  the  Great  Fast  or  on  the  Saturday  of  Souls.  Liturgy  is  more  seldom  on  weekdays  as  the  Liturgies  of  Wednesday  and Friday nights have been made  Pre‐sanctified  and  limited  to  only within the Great Fast. Liturgy is now only performed on weekdays if it is  a  feastday  of  a  major  saint.  But  Liturgy  is  always  performed  on  a  Sunday  without  fail,  in  every  city,  village  and  countryside,  because  it  is  the  Lord’s  Day. The purpose of Liturgy is to receive Holy Communion, and the reason  for it being celebrated on the Lord’s Day without fail is because this is the day  of salvation, and therefore the most important day of the week, especially for  receiving Holy Communion. For, “This is the day that the Lord hath made, let us  rejoice  and  be  glad  in  it  (Psalm  118:24).”  What  greater  way  to  rejoice  on  the  Lord’s Day than to commune of the very Lord Himself?    The  theory  of  diminishing  Sunday  as  the  day  of  salvation  and  communion,  and  instead  opting  for  Saturday,  is  actually  a  heresy  known  as 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii09/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

FINAL Part ONE 66%

Jesus spoke in parables, and other "hidden"

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/08/final-part-one/

07/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Christian Church Origins in Britain (Gardner) 65%

Paul had actually mentioned Linus in his second epistle from Rome to his colleague Timothy,3 and it had been recorded as early as AD 68 by the Roman writer Martial that Linus was a prince who had been captured and brought from Britain.4 Furthermore, he had led the Christians of Rome since AD 58, two years before St Paul arrived in the city.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/09/christian-church-origins-in-britain-gardner/

09/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

KJB-PCE13 61%

AND WITH THE FORMER TRANSLATIONS DILIGENTLY COMPARED AND REVISED, BY HIS MAJESTY’S SPECIAL COMMAND APPOINTED TO BE READ IN CHURCHES AUTHORIZED KING JAMES VERSION PURE CAMBRIDGE EDITION MADE IN AUSTRALIA Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy Joshua Judges Ruth 1 Samuel 2 Samuel 1 Kings 2 Kings 1 Chronicles 2 Chronicles Ezra Nehemiah Esther Job Psalms Proverbs Matthew Mark Luke John The Acts Epistle to the Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians 1 Thessalonians THE NAMES AND ORDER OF ALL THE BOOKS OF THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT, WITH THE NUMBER OF THEIR CHAPTERS.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/02/kjb-pce13/

02/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

newsletter (1) 58%

Teddy Triantafyllos READER of EPISTLE PROSFORA COFFEE HOUR Chanters Elaine Notis Parish Council Tuesday, December 6th St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/27/newsletter-1/

27/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CheirothesiaEuthymiusEpiphaniou1991eng 53%

Archimandrite Euthymius K. Epiphaniou  Faidrou 1‐3‐8 Pakgrati,  Athens 1135 GREECE    In Athens on October 11, 1991    ENCYCLICAL – EPISTLE  of he who relies on the Lordʹs mercy, Euthymius K. Epiphaniou the Cypriot,  To the Reverend Clergy of all the parishes, the Monks and Nuns of the Holy  Monasteries and Hermitages of the Church of the Genuine Orthodox  Christians of Greece and elsewhere.    Brethren, Fathers and Sisters, bless!      ʺWhen sin becomes chief, it draws everyone to perditionʺ and ʺWe are  guilty  for  these  things,  but  suffer  for  other  things.ʺ  By  diverting  from  these  reasonings, God granted and arranged a great winter [suffering] in the realms  of our Church for 20 years and more, accelerating recently, with innumerable  consequences.      This  is  because,  beloved  brethren,  we  displaced  the  order  of  the  Church, we departed from the line of navigation and tradition of the Holy  Father  kyr  Matthew  Karpathakis  and  we  accepted  a  cheirothesia  from  the  Russians of the Diaspora, the apostasy of eight clergy from the Church of the  Genuine  Orthodox  Christians  occurred,  and  the  falling  away  of  the  reposed  Monk Callistus (former [Bishop] of Corinth Callistus), who were all deposed  and moreover Callistus with the accusation of rejection and destruction of the  icon  of  the  Holy  Trinity  and  for  fighting  against  saints  (See  K.G.O.  October,  1977, page 9). [Here Fr. Euthymius refers to the very tampering and additions  he  made  to  the  original  acts  prior  to  their  publication  in  the  official  periodical.]      This  is  because,  in  1979,  the  ʺgroup  of  new  theologiansʺ  surrounding  our  Archbishop  Andrew,  put  together  a  speech  and  by  the  mouth  of  the  Archbishop  the  following  blasphemy  was  voiced:  ʺThe  presence  of  the  struggle of the Church of Genuine Orthodox Christians, as we are well aware  is  of  the  highest  importance,  equates  with  the  incarnation  of  the  Lord,  his  Good  News,  his  Crucifixion  and  His  Holy  Resurrection,  to  wit,  it  is  the  Church  of  Christ,ʺ  and  through  the  periodical  ʺChurch  of  the  Genuine  Orthodoxʺ  (See  the  issue  for  June,  1979)  it  was  circulated  ʺurbi  et  orbiʺ  and  although  many  of  us  protested  that  this  blasphemy  be  removed,  it  never  happened. [Here  Fr.  Euthymius  refers  to  his  own  tampering  of  the  original  text and quotes it as ʺThe presence of the struggle of the Church, despite the  official  clarification  that  the  real  text  is  ʺThe  presence  of  the  Struggling  Church.ʺ  Thus  he  ignores  the  three  subsequent  corrections  and  explanations  given  in  the  official  periodical  in  the  following  issues:  October,  1979,  p.  21;  April,  1980,  p.  31;  and  February,  1983,  p.  57.  After  a  decade  since  this  issue  was  settled,  Fr.  Euthymius  brought  it  up  again  in  his  present  ʺencyclicalʺ  simply in order to satisfy his demands that the Genuine Orthodox Church not  be identified with the Church of Christ.]      This  is  because  the  new  theologians  (according  to  the  opinion  and  support of our Church of the Genuine Orthodox Christians), since they were  lacking a means of financial support, they decided to enterprise [the Church]  as  a  bankrupt  company,  and  they  renamed  [the  Church]  ʺUninnovatedʺ  [Akainotometos],  and  unfortunately  the  Hierarchs  placed  their  seal  [on  this]  because the new theologians, instead of correcting themselves and repenting  for the damage that they provoked in the Church, they placed a schedule of  income for their group and they invented unorthodox ways for various clergy  to  receive  ʺDegreesʺ  in  theology,  they  also  puffed  out  the  minds  of  various  assisting  garb‐bearers  [rasophoroi]  who  have  declared  a  war  once  more  against  Orthodoxy. They  abysmally  war  against  and  reject  the  tradition  of  the  Church,  refusing  to  venerate  the  icon  of  the  Holy  Trinity  (Father,  Son  and Holy Spirit), the icon of the Resurrection of the Lord, replacing it with  the Descent into Hades, the icon of the Pentecost if our Lady the Theotokos  is present in it, and they accept the icon of the Nativity of Christ (with the  bathtub  and  the  midwives).  And  by  these  means  having  become  iconomachs‐iconoclasts,  and  deniers  of  their  faith,  regardless  of  whether  they are girdled in priesthood. Wearing the skin of sheep, they work towards  the destruction of the flock, by writing and circulating pamphlets against the  abovementioned holy icons. They impose their heretical opinions upon those  that  are  submitted  to  them.  They  create  civil  splintering  and  division  in  the  Monasteries.  They  question  various  Fathers  of  the  Church,  particularly  St.  Nicodemus  of  Mt.  Athos,  and  the  new  pillar  of  Orthodoxy  kyr  Archbishop  Matthew  Karpathakis.  They  provoke  quarrels  and  disputes  like  what  happened last Pascha at Lebadia [Diaulia] and Bolus [Demetrias] on the day  of the Resurrection, and the worst is that they work together for the purpose  of  placing  canons  [of  penance]  on  Nuns  of  the  Convent  [of  the  Entry  of  the  Mother of God at Keratea] and Monks, by various Spiritual Fathers, under the  accusation that the Nuns and Monks praiseworthily insist upon keeping what  the Catholic Church upholds and preserves.      They  who  behave  as  neo‐iconoclasts  are:  the  Hieromonks  Cassian  Braun,  Amphilochius  Tambouras,  Neophytus  Tsakiroglou,  Tarasius  Karagounis, and the foreign [incomer] Archpastor of the Holy Monastery of  the  Transfiguration  [at  Kouvara]  Hegumen  Stephan  Tsakiroglou,  who  declares that he is a rationalist.      My beloved, by giving in to one evil, ten thousand others follow, and  the words are fulfilled to the maximum: we are at fault and for this we suffer,  not as persons, but as a Church, and, explicitly, because:    1. we are stained by the iniquity of the cheirothesia of 1971    2. the voiced blasphemy of 1979 remains      Let us not be entertained by the evil that has befallen the realms of our  Church.  It  is  necessary  for  us  to  pray,  to  censure  the  paranoia  of  the  newfound iconoclasts, to request  from our honorable  Hierarchy,  as  soon  as  possible,  the  cleansing  [catharsis]  from  the  realms  of  our  Church,  these  nonsensical  iconoclasts  and  those  who  are  likeminded  unto  them,  [to  request]  their  condemnation,  regardless  of  how  high  their  position  is, because these [people] are led astray from the truth, and we must declare  in  a  stentorian  manner,  that  whether  alone  or  with  many  others,  we  will  champion  the  saving  truth,  faithful  to  what  we  have  been  taught,  what  we  have  learned  and  what  we  have  received,  adding  nothing  and  subtracting  nothing,  whatever  the  Catholic  Church  contains  and  upholds  undiminished  and uninnovated.      Do not fall, brethren. A winter [suffering] has befallen our Church. The  Lord our God lives, so that he is among us and he is for us.      May  the  prayers  of  the  Confessors  of  our  Faith,  the  older  and  the  newer,  as  well  as  of  the  newfound  pillar  of  Orthodoxy,  ever‐memorable  Archbishop  Matthew  the  Cretan,  enlighten  us,  bring  us  to  our  senses,  and  guide all of us towards the path of salvation, which requires truth, faith and  invincible struggle.      To  those  who  do  not  correctly  receive  the  divine  voices  of  the  Holy  Teachers  of  the  Church  of  God,  and  what  has  been  fittingly  and  manifestly  explained  in  [the  Church]  by  the  grace  of  the  Holy  Spirit,  and  attempts  to  misinterpret them and rotate them, they are the curse, and the wrath is upon  their shoulders.    Farewell in the Lord, my beloved brethren,  The least among all ‐ brother and concelebrant,  Archimandrite Euthymius K. Epiphaniou 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cheirothesiaeuthymiusepiphaniou1991eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Curriculum Vitae-2012 53%

ANDREW W. PITTS Email:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/12/03/curriculum-vitae-2012/

03/12/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 3- Jubilate (Final) 50%

Epistle Reading 1 Peter 2:11–20 11 Beloved, I urge you as sojourners and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/03/easter-3--jubilate-final/

03/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

Christianity Written 49%

Disagreements did continue concerning several books, including Hebrews, James, 2 Peter, 2 and 3 John, Jude, Revelation, Didache, Epistle of Barnabas, Shepherd of Hermas, Diatessaron, Gospel of the Hebrews, Acts of Paul, and Apocalyps of Peter.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/12/07/christianity-written/

07/12/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Ephesians 4v8 48%

“Thou hast received gifts for men.” The word translated “received” has “a twofold meaning, i.e., receiving and giving.” The two sides of the word come out in the Psalm and the Epistle.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/13/ephesians-4v8/

13/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18970000 48%

(Acts 26:2, 3, 7) The Epistle to the Hebrews was written to those same “ twelve tribes instantly serving God” and hoping;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18970000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18931201 48%

This epistle, unlike all the other apostolic epistles, is ad­ dressed to the twelve tribes of Israel scattered abroad.* While to a large extent its teachings are applicable to various times and peoples, it will be specially applicable to converted He­ brews in the present and in the immediate future— in the dawn of the Millennial age, when their blindness is turned away, and when they turn to the Lord as “ a kind of firstfruits of his creatures”— not the very first fruits, which is the church, but the first fruits from among the nations of the earth.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18931201/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18931101-15 46%

This epistle, unlike all the other apostolic epistles, is ad­ dressed to the twelve tribes of Israel scattered abroad.* While to a large extent its teachings are applicable to various times and peoples, it will be specially applicable to converted He­ brews in the present and in the immediate future— in the dawn of the Millennial age, when their blindness is turned away, and when they turn to the Lord as “ a kind of firstfruits of his creatures”— not the very first fruits, which is the church, but the first fruits from among the nations of the earth.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18931101-15/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Leadership 44%

In his Epistle to the Romans, Saint Paul exhorts that every soul be subject to higher powers as all powers of government are ordained of God.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/11/leadership/

11/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 4th Sunday May 3 2020 44%

Amen The Epistle – 1 Peter 2:19-25 read by Collette Hurd A reading from the First letter of Peter.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/03/easter-4th-sunday-may-3-2020/

03/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

May 10^J 2020 Sunday Liturgy 44%

Amen The Epistle – 1 Peter 2:2-10 read by Hser Tha Law A reading from the First Letter of Peter Like newborn infants, long for the pure, spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow into salvation— if indeed you have tasted that the Lord is good.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/10/may-10j-2020-sunday-liturgy/

10/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com