Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «excommunication»:


Total: 22 results - 0.058 seconds

contracerycii10 84%

DEMANDING A STRICT FAST ON SATURDAYS   IS THE FIRST HERESY OF THE PAPISTS    In his two letters to Fr. Pedro, in several other writings on the internet,  as well as through his verbal discussions, Bp. Kirykos presents the idea that a  Christian is forbidden to ever commune on a Sunday, except by “economia,”  and  that  if  per  chance  a  Christian  is  granted  this  “economia,”  he  would  nevertheless be compelled to fast strictly without oil on the Saturday, that is,  the day prior to receiving Holy Communion.       For  instance,  outside  of  fasting  periods,  Bp.  Kirykos,  his  sister,  Vincentia, and the “theologian” Mr. Eleutherios Gkoutzidis insist that laymen  must  fast  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without oil, and one day without even olives or sesame pulp, for fear of these  things  containing  oil.  If  someone  prepares  to  commune  on  a  Sunday,  this  means that from the previous Sunday he cannot eat meat. From the Tuesday  onwards he cannot eat dairy either. On the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday  he  cannot  partake  of  oil  or  wine.  While  on  the  Saturday  he  must  perform  a  xerophagy in which he cannot have any processed foods, and not even olives  or  sesame  pulp.  This  means  that  the  strictest  fast  will  be  performed  on  the  Saturday, in violation of the Canons. This also means that for a layman to ever  be  able  to  commune  every  Sunday,  he  would  need  to  fast  for  his  entire  life  long. Yet, Bp. Kirykos and his priests exempt themselves from this rule, and  are allowed to partake of any foods all week long except for Wednesday and  Friday.  They  can  even  partake  of  all  foods  as  late  as  midnight  on  Saturday  night,  and  commune  on  Sunday  morning  without  feeling  the  least  bit  “unworthy.”  But  should  a  layman  dare  to  partake  of  oil  even  once  on  a  Saturday, he is brushed off as “unworthy” for Communion on Sunday.      Meanwhile during fasting periods such as Great Lent, since Monday to  Friday  is  without  oil  anyway,  Bp.  Kirykos,  Sister  Vincentia  and  Mr.  Gkoutzidis believe that laymen should also fast on Saturday without oil, and  even without olives and sesame pulp, in order for such laymen to be able to  commune on Sunday. Thus again they require a layman to violate Apostolic,  Ecumenical,  Local  and  Patristic  Canons,  and  even  fall  under  the  penalty  of  excommunication (according to these same canons) in order to be “worthy” of  communion. What an absurdity! What a monstrosity! A layman must become  worthy of excommunication in order to become “worthy” of Communion!      The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles advises: “If any clergyman be found  fasting  on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday  (except  for  one  only),  let  him  be  deposed  from  office. If, however, he is a layman, let him be excommunicated.” The term “fasting”  refers to the strict form of fasting, not permitting oil or wine. The term “except  for  one”  refers  to  Holy  and  Great  Saturday,  the  only  day  of  the  year  upon  which fasting without oil and wine is expected.      But  it  was  not  only  the  Holy  Apostles  who  commanded  against  this  Pharisaic  Sabbatian  practice  of  fasting  on  Saturdays.  But  this  issue  was  also  addressed  by  the  Quintisext  Council  (Πενδέκτη  Σύνοδος  =  Fifth‐and‐Sixth  Council),  which  was  convened  for  the  purpose  of  setting  Ecclesiastical  Canons, since the Fifth and Sixth Ecumenical Councils had not provided any.  The reason why this Holy Ecumenical Council addressed this issue is because  the Church of Old Rome had slowly been influenced by the Arian Visigoths  and  Ostrogoths  who  invaded  from  the  north,  by  the  Manicheans  who  migrated from Africa and from the East through the Balkans, as well as by the  Jews and Judaizers, who had also migrated to the West from various parts of  the East, seeking asylum in Western lands that were no longer under Roman  (Byzantine)  rule.  Thus  there  arose  in  the  West  a  most  Judaizing  practice  of  clergy forcing the laymen to fast from oil and wine on every Saturday during  Great Lent, instead of permitting this only on Holy and Great Saturday.      Thus, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council, we  read: “Since we have learned that those in the city of the Romans during the holy  fast  of  Lent  are  fasting  on  the  Saturdays  thereof,  contrary  to  the  ecclesiastical  practice handed down, it has seemed best to the Holy Council for the Church of the  Romans to hold rigorously the Canon saying: If any clergyman be found fasting on  Sunday,  or  on  Saturday,  with  the  exception  of  one  only,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office.  If,  however,  a  layman,  let  him  be  excommunicated.”  Thus  the  Westerners  were admonished by the Holy Ecumenical Council, and requested to refrain  from this unorthodox practice of demanding a strict fast on Saturdays.      Now,  just  in  case  anyone  thinks  that  a  different  kind  of  fast  was  observed on the Saturdays by the Romans, by Divine Economy, the very next  canon  admonishes  the  Armenians  for  not  fasting  properly  on  Saturdays  during Great Lent. Thus the 56th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council reads:  “Likewise we have learned that in the country of the Armenians and in other regions  on the Saturdays and on the Sundays of Holy Lent some persons eat eggs and  cheese.  It  has  therefore  seemed  best  to  decree  also  this,  that  the  Church  of  God  throughout the inhabited earth, carefully following a single procedure, shall  carry  out  fasting,  and  abstain,  precisely  as  from  every  kind  of  thing  sacrificed,  so  and  especially  from  eggs  and  cheese,  which  are  fruit  and  produce from which we have to abstain. As for those who fail to observe this rule,  if they are clergymen, let them be deposed from office; but if they are laymen, let them  be  excommunicated.”  Thus,  just  as  the  Roman  Church  was  admonished  for  fasting  strictly  on  the  Saturdays  within  Great  Lent,  the  Armenian  Church  is  equally admonished for overly relaxing the fast of Saturdays in Great Lent.      Here the Holy Fifth‐and‐Sixth Ecumenical Council clearly gives us the  exact  definition  of  what  the  Holy  Fathers  deem  fit  for  consumption  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent.  For  if  this  canon  forbids  the  Armenians  to  consume  eggs  and  cheese  on  the  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent,  whereas  the  previous canon forbids the Westerners to fast on the Saturdays of Great Lent,  it  means  that  the  midway  between  these  two  extremes  is  the  Orthodox  definition  of  fasting  on  Saturdays  of  Great  Lent.  The  Orthodox  definition  is  clearly marked in the Typicon as well as most calendar almanacs produced by  the various Local Orthodox Churches, including the very almanac as well as  the  wall  calendar  published  yearly  by  Bp.  Kirykos  himself.  These  all  mark  that oil, wine and various forms of seafood are to be consumed on Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  except  of  course  for  Holy  and  Great  Saturday  which  is  marked as a strict fast without oil, in keeping with the Apostolic Canon.      Now,  if  one  is  to  assume  that  partaking  of  oil,  wine  and  various  seafood on the Saturdays of Great Lent is only for those who are not planning  to  commune  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent,  may  he  consider  the  following.  The  very  meaning  of  the  term  “excommunicate”  is  to  forbid  a  layman  to  receive  Holy  Communion.  So  then,  if  people  who  partake  of  oil,  wine  and  various permissible seafood  on  Saturdays  during  Great Lent are  supposedly  forbidden to commune on the Sundays of Great Lent, then this means that the  55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐Sixth Council would be entirely without purpose.  For  if  those  who  do  partake  of  such  foods  on  Saturdays  are  supposedly  disqualified  from  communion  on  Sundays,  then  what  is  the  purpose  of  also  disqualifying those who do not partake of oil on Saturdays from being able to  commune  on  Sundays,  since  this  canon  requires  their  excommunication?  In  other  words,  such  a  faulty  interpretation  of  the  canons  by  anyone  bearing  such  a  notion  would  need  to  call  the  Holy  Fathers  hypocrites.  They  would  need  to  consider  that  the  Holy  Fathers  in  their  Canon  Law  operated  with  a  system whereby “you’re damned if you do, and you’re damned if you don’t!”       Thus,  according  to  this  faulty  interpretation,  if  you  do  partake  of  oil  and  wine  on  Saturdays  of  Great  lent,  you  are  disqualified  from  communion  due  to  your  consumption  of  those  foods.  But  if  you  do  not  partake  of  these  foods on Saturday you are also disqualified from communion on Sunday, for  this canon demands your excommunication. In other words, whatever you do  you cannot win! Fast without oil or fast with oil, you are still disqualified the  next day. So how does Bp. Kirykos interpret this Canon in order to keep his  Pharisaical  custom?  He  declares  that  “all  Christians”  are  excommunicated  from  ever  being  able  to  commune  on  a  Sunday!  He  demands  that  only  by  extreme  economy  can  Christians  commune  on  Sunday,  and  that  they  are  to  only commune on Saturdays, declaring this the day “all Christians” ought to  “know”  to  be  their  day  of  receiving  Holy  Communion!  Thus  the  very  trap  that  Bp.  Kirykos  has  dug  for  himself  is  based  entirely  on  his  inability  to  interpret  the  canons  correctly.  Yet  hypocritically,  in  his  second  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro  he  condemns  others  of  supposedly  “not  interpreting  the  canons  correctly,” simply because they disagree with his Pharisaical Sabbatianism!      But the hypocrisies continue. Bp. Kirykos continuously parades himself  in his printed periodicals, on his websites, and on his various online blogs, as  some  kind  of “confessor” of Orthodoxy against Papism and Ecumenism. He  even dares to openly call himself a “confessor” on Facebook, where he spends  several  hours  per  day  in  gossip  and  idletalk  as  can  be  seen  by  his  frequent  status  updates  and  constant  chatting.  This  kind  of  pastime  is  clearly  unbecoming for an Orthodox Christian, let alone a hierarch who claims to be  “Genuine  Orthodox”  and  a  “confessor.”  So  great  is  his  “confession,”  that  when the entire Kiousis Synod, representatives from the Makarian Synod, the  Abbot  of  Esphigmenou,  members  from  all  other  Old  Calendarist  Synods  in  Greece,  as  well  as  members  of  the  State  Hierarchy,  had  gathered  in  Athens  forming crowds of clergy and thousands of laity, to protest against the Greek  Government’s antagonism towards Greek culture and religion, our wonderful  “confessor” Bp. Kirykos was spending that whole day chatting on Facebook.  The people present at the protest made a joke about Bp. Kirykos’s absence by  writing the following remark on an empty seat: “Bp. Kirykos, too busy being  an  online  confessor  to  bother  taking  part  in  a  real  life  confession.”  When  various monastics and laymen of Bp. Kirykos’s own metropolis informed him  that  he should have been  there, he  yelled  at  them and told  them “This is all  rubbish, I don’t care about these issues, the only real issue is the cheirothesia  of  1971.”  How  lovely.  Greece  is  on  the  verge  of  geopolitical  and  economical  self‐destruction, and Bp. Kirykos’s only care is for his own personal issue that  he has repeated time and time again for three decades, boring us to death.      But what does Bp. Kirykos claim to “confess” against, really? He claims  he confesses against “Papo‐Ecumenism.” In other words, he views himself as  a fighter against the idea of the Orthodox Church entering into a syncretistic  and ecumenistic union with Papism. Yet Bp. Kirykos does not realize that he  has already fallen into what St. Photius the Great has called “the first heresy  of the Westerners!” For as indicated above, in the 55th Canon of the Fifth‐and‐ Sixth  Ecumenical  Council,  it  was  the  “Church  of  the  Romans”  (that  is  what  became  the  Papists)  that  fell  into  the  unorthodox  practice  of  demanding  laymen  to  fast  strictly  on  Saturdays  during  Great  Lent,  as  a  prerequisite  to  receiving  Holy  Communion  on  the  Sundays  of  Great  Lent.  This  indeed  was  the  first  error  of  the  Papists.  It  arrived  at  the  same  time  the  filioque  also  arrived,  to  wit,  during  the  6th  and  7th  centuries.  This  is  why  St.  Photius  the  Great,  who  was  a  real  confessor  against  Papism,  calls  the  error  of  enforced  fasting without oil on Saturdays “the first heresy of the Westerners.” Thus, let  us depart from the hypocrisies of Bp. Kirykos and listen to the voice of a real  confessor against Papism. Let us read the opinion of St. Photius the Great, that  glorious champion and Pillar of Orthodoxy!      In  his  Encyclical  to  the  Eastern  Patriarchs  (written  in  866),  our  Holy  Father,  St.  Photius  the  Great  (+6  February,  893),  Archbishop  of  the  Imperial  City of Constantinople New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch, writes:    St. Photius the Great: Encyclical to the Eastern Patriarchs (866)    Countless have been the evils devised by the cunning devil against the race of  men,  from the beginning  up  to the coming of  the Lord. But even afterwards, he  has  not ceased through errors and heresies to beguile and deceive those who listen to him.  Before  our  times,  the  Church,  witnessed  variously  the  godless  errors  of  Arius,  Macedonius, Nestorius, Eutyches, Discorus, and a foul host of others, against which  the  holy  Ecumenical  Synods  were  convened,  and  against  which  our  Holy  and  God‐ bearing  Fathers  battled  with  the  sword  of  the  Holy  Spirit.  Yet,  even  after  these  heresies  had  been  overcome  and  peace  reigned,  and  from  the  Imperial  Capital  the  streams of Orthodoxy  flowed throughout  the world;  after  some people who had  been  afflicted by the Monophysite heresy returned to the True Faith because of your holy  prayers;  and  after  other  barbarian  peoples,  such  as  the  Bulgarians,  had  turned  from  idolatry to the knowledge of God and the Christian Faith: then was the cunning devil  stirred up because of his envy.    For the Bulgarians had not been baptised even two years when dishonourable  men  emerged  out  of  the  darkness  (that  is,  the  West),  and  poured  down  like  hail  or,  better,  charged  like  wild  boars  upon  the  newly‐planted  vineyard  of  the  Lord,  destroying  it  with  hoof  and  tusk,  which  is  to  say,  by  their  shameful  lives  and  corrupted  dogmas.  For  the  papal  missionaries  and  clergy  wanted  these  Orthodox  Christians to depart from the correct and pure dogmas of our irreproachable Faith.    The first error of the Westerners was to compel the faithful to fast on  Saturdays. I mention this seemingly small point because the least departure  from Tradition can lead to a scorning of every dogma of our Faith. Next, they  convinced the faithful to despise the marriage of priests, thereby sowing in their souls  the  seeds  of  the  Manichean  heresy.  Likewise,  they  persuaded  them  that  all  who  had  been  chrismated  by  priests  had  to  be  anointed  again  by  bishops.  In  this  way,  they  hoped to show that Chrismation by priests had no value, thereby ridiculing this divine  and supernatural Christian Mystery. From whence comes this law forbidding priests 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii10/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

livingsynodofbishops 73%

HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons.      The  Canons  themselves  offer  three  forms  of  punishment,  namely,  deposition, excommunication and anathematization. Deposition is applied to  clergy. Excommunication is applied to laity. Anathematization can be applied  to either clergy or laity. Deposition does not remove the priestly rank, but is  simply a prohibition from the clergyman to perform priestly functions. If the  deposition  is  later  revoked,  the  clergyman  does  not  require  reordination.  In  the same way, excommunication does not remove a layman’s baptism. It only  prohibits the layman to commune. If the excommunication is later lifted, the  layman  does  not  require  rebaptism.  Anathematization  causes  the  clergyman  or layman to be cut off from the Church and assigned to the devil. But even  anathematizations can be revoked if the clergyman or layman repents.     There Is a Hierarchy of Authority in Canon Law      The authority of one Canon over another  is determined by the  power  of the Council the Canons were ratified by. For example, a canon ratified by  an  Ecumenical  Council  overruled  any  canon  ratified  by  a  local  Council.  The  hierarchy of authority, from most binding Canons to least, is as follows:      Apostolic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  compiled  by  the  Holy  Apostles  and  their  immediate  successors.  These  Canons  were  approved  and  confirmed by the First Ecumenical Council and again by the Quinisext Council.  Not  even  an  Ecumenical  Council  can  overrule  or  overthrow  an  Apostolic  Canon.  There  are  only  very  few  cases  where  Ecumenical  Councils  have  amended  the  command  of  an  Apostolic  Canon  by  either  strengthening  or  weakening  it.  But  by  no  means  were  any  Apostolic  Canons  overruled  or  abolished.  For  instance,  the  1st  Apostolic  Canon  which  states  that  a  bishop  must  be  ordained  by  two  or  three  other  bishops.  Several  Canons  of  the  Ecumenical Councils declare that even two bishops do not suffice, but that a  bishop must be ordained by the consent of all the bishops in the province, and  the ordination itself must take place by no less than three bishops. This does  not abolish nor does it overrule the 1st Apostolic Canon, but rather it confirms  and  reinforces  the  “spirit  of  the  law”  behind  that  original  Canon.  Another  example is the 5th Apostolic Canon which states that Bishops, Presbyters and  Deacons are not permitted to put away their wives by force, on the pretext of  reverence.  Meanwhile,  the  12th  Canon  of  Quinisext  advises  a  bishop  (or  presbyters who has been elected as a bishop) to first receive his wife’s consent  to separate and for both of them to become celibate. This does not oppose the  Apostolic  Canon  because  it  is  not  a  separation  by  force  but  by  consent.  The  13th  Canon  of  Quinisext  confirms  the  5th  Apostolic  Canon  by  prohibiting  a  presbyters or deacons to separate from his wife. Thus the 5th Apostolic Canon  is not abolished, but amended by an Ecumenical Council for the good of the  Church.  After  all,  the  laws  exist  to  serve  the  Church  and  not  to  enslave  the  Church. In the same way, Christ declared: “The sabbath was made for man, and  not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).”    Ecumenical  Canons  (Universal)  are  those  pronounced  by  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils.  These  Councils  received  this  name  because  they  were  convened  by  Roman  Emperors  who  were  regarded  to  rule  the  Ecumene  (i.e.,  “the  known  world”).  Ecumenical  Councils  all  took  place  in  or  around  Constantinople,  also  known  as  New  Rome,  the  Reigning  City,  or  the  Universal  City. The president was always the hierarch in attendance that happened to be  the first‐among‐equals. Ecumenical Councils cannot abolish Apostolic Canons,  nor  can  they  abolish  the  Canons  of  previous  Ecumenical  Councils.  But  they  can overrule Regional and Patristic Canons.      Regional  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Regional  Councils that were later confirmed by an Ecumenical Council. This approval  gave these Regional Canons a universal authority, almost equal to Ecumenical  Canons.  These  Canons  are  not  only  valid  within  the  Regional  Church  in  which  the  Council  took  place,  but  are  valid  for  all  Orthodox  Christians.  For  this  reason  the  Canons  of  these  approved  Regional  Councils  cannot  be  abolished, but must be treated as those of Ecumenical Councils.       Patristic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  the  Canons  of  individual  Holy  Fathers  that  were  confirmed  by  an  Ecumenical  Council.  Their  authority  is  only  lesser  than  the  Apostolic  Canons,  Ecumenical  Canons  and  Universal  Regional Canons. But because they were approved by an Ecumenical Council,  these Patristic Canons binding on all Orthodox Christians.      Pan‐Orthodox  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Pan‐ Orthodox Councils. Since Constantinople had fallen to the Ottomans in 1453,  there  could  no  longer  be  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils,  since  there  was  no  longer a ruling Emperor of the Ecumene (the Roman or Byzantine Empire). But  the Ottoman Sultan appointed the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople as  both  the  political  and  religious  leader  of  the  enslaved  Roman  Nation  (all  Orthodox  Christians  within  the  Roman  Empire,  regardless  of  language  or  ethnic origin). In this capacity, having replaced the Roman Emperor as leader  of  the  Roman  Orthodox  Christians,  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  took  the  responsibility  of  convening  General  Councils  which  were  not  called  Ecumenical Councils (since there was no longer an Ecumene), but instead were  called  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils.  Since  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  was  also  the  first‐among‐equals  of  Orthodox  hierarchs,  he  would  also  preside  over  these  Councils. Thus he became both the convener and the president. The Primates  of  the  other  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  were  also  invited,  along with their Synods of Bishops. If the Ecumenical Patriarch was absent or  the one accused, the Patriarch of Alexandria would preside over the Synod. If  he too could not attend in person, then the Patriarchs of Antioch or Jerusalem  would  preside.  If  no  Patriarchs  could  attend,  but  only  send  their  representatives,  these  representatives  would  not  preside  over  the  Council.  Instead, whichever bishop present who held the highest see would preside. In  several  chronologies,  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  are  referred  to  as  Ecumenical. In any case, the Canons pertaining to these Councils are regarded  to be universally binding for all Orthodox Christians.       National  Canons  (Local)  are  those  valid  only  within  a  particular  National Church. The Canons of these National Councils are only accepted if  they  are  in  agreement  with  the  Canons  ratified  by  the  above  Apostolic,  Ecumenical, Regional, Patristic and Pan‐Orthodox Councils.      Provincial  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  Metropolitan  and  his  suffragan  bishops.  They  are  only  binding  within  that  Metropolis.      Prefectural  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  single  bishop and his subordinate clergy. They are only valid within that Diocese.       Parochial  Canons  are  the  by‐laws  of  a  local  Parish  or  Mission,  which  are  chartered  and  endorsed  by  the  Rector  or  Founder  of  a  Parish  and  the  Parish Council. These by‐laws are only applicable within that Parish.      Monastic Canons are the rules of a local Monastery or Monastic Order,  which  are  chartered  by  the  Abbot  or  Founder  of  the  Skete  or  Monastery.  These by‐laws are only applicable within that Monastery.      Sometimes  Canons  are  only  recommendations  explaining  how  clergy  and laity are to conduct themselves. Other times they are actually penalties to  be  executed  upon  laity  and  clergy  for  their  misdeeds.  But  the  penalties  contained  within  Canons  are  simply  recommendations  and  not  the  actual  executions of the penalties themselves. The recommendation of the law is one  thing and the execution of the law is another.     Canon Law Can Only Be Executed By Those With Authority       For  the  execution  of  the  law  to  take  place  it  requires  a  competent  authority  to  execute  the  law.  A  competent  authority  is  reckoned  by  the  principle  of  “the  greater  judges  the  lesser.”  Thus,  there  are  Canons  that  explain who has the authority to judge individuals according to the Canons.      A  layman  can  only  be  judged,  excommunicated  or  anathematized  by  his own bishop, or by his own priest, provided the priest has the permission  of  his own  bishop (i.e., a priest who  is  a pneumatikos).  This law  is ratified  by  the 6th Canon of Carthage, which has been made universal by the authority of  the Sixth Ecumenical Council. The Canon states: “The application of chrism and  the  consecration  of  virgin  girls  shall  not  be  done  by  Presbyters;  nor  shall  it  be  permissible for a Presbyter to reconcile anyone at a public liturgy. This is the  decision  of  all  of  us.”  St.  Nicodemus’  interprets  the  Canon  as  follows:  “The  present  Canon  prohibits  a  priest  from  doing  three  things…  and  remission  of  the  penalty for a sin to a penitent, and thereafter through communion of the Mysteries the  reconciliation  of  him  with  God,  to  whom  he  had  become  an  enemy  through  sin,  making  him  stand  with  the  faithful,  and  celebrating  the  Liturgy  openly…  For  these  three functions have to be exercised by a bishop…. By permission of the bishop even a  presbyter can reconcile penitents, though. And read Ap. c. XXXIX, and c. XIX of the  First EC. C.” Thus the only authority competent to judge a layman is a bishop  or a presbyter who has the permission of his bishop to do so. However, those  who are among the low rank of clergy (readers, subdeacons, etc) require their  own local bishop to try them, because a presbyter cannot depose them.      A  deacon  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  three  other  bishops,  and  a  presbyter  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  six  other  bishops.  The  28th  Canon  of  Carthage  thus  states:  “If  Presbyters  or  Deacons  be  accused,  the  legal  number  of  Bishops  selected  from the nearby locality, whom the accused demand, shall be empaneled — that is, in  the case of a Presbyter six, of a Deacon three, together with the Bishop of the accused  — to investigate their causes; the same form being observed in respect of days, and of  postponements,  and  of  examinations,  and  of  persons,  as  between  accusers  and  accused. As for the rest of the Clerics, the local Bishop alone shall hear and conclude  their  causes.”  Thus,  one  bishop  is  insufficient  to  submit  a  priest  or  deacon  to  trial or deposition. This can only be done by a Synod of Bishops with enough  bishops present to validly apply the canons. The amount of bishops necessary  to  judge  and  depose  a  priest  are  seven  (one  local  plus  six  others),  and  for  a  deacon the minimum amount of bishops is four (one local plus three others).      A  bishop  must  be  judged  by  his  own  metropolitan  together  with  at  least twelve other bishops. If the province does not have twelve bishops, they  must  invite  bishops  from  other  provinces  to  take  part  in  the  trial  and  deposition. Thus the 12th Canon of Carthage states: “If any Bishop fall liable to  any charges, which is to be deprecated, and an emergency arises due to the fact that  not many can convene, lest he be left exposed to such charges, these may be heard by  twelve Bishops, or in the case of a Presbyter, by six Bishops besides his own; or in the  case  of  a  Deacon,  by  three.”  Notice  that  the  amount  of  twelve  bishops  is  the  minimum  requirement  and  not  the  maximum.  The  maximum  is  for  all  the  bishops, even if they are over one hundred in number, to convene for the sake  of  deposing  a  bishop.  But  if  this  cannot  take  place,  twelve  bishops  assisting 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii12 69%

ARE THE HOLY CANONS ONLY VALID FOR THE  APOSTOLIC PERIOD AND NOT FOR OUR TIMES?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “After this, I request of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend to those who confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion,  they must prepare by fasting, and to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday.  Regarding  the  Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be interpreted correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy  and  communed.  They  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune. The  rest did not remain until  the end and  withdrew  together with  the catechumens. As for those who were in repentance, they remained outside  the gates of the church. If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only knew  how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”      From  the  above  explanation  by  Bp.  Kirykos,  one  is  given  the  impression that he believes and commands:     a) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  forbid  laymen  to  commune  on  Sundays  during  Great  Lent  in  order  to  ensure  “the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  canons  declare  that  it  is  those who do not commune on Sundays that are causers of disorder, as  the 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares: “All the faithful who come to  Church and hear the Scriptures, but do not stay for the prayers and the Holy  Communion, are to be excommunicated as causing disorder in the Church;”  b) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  advise  his  flock  “to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday,” thereby commanding his flock to become Sabbatians;  c) that  the  Canon  which  advises  people  to  receive  Holy  Communion  every  day  even  outside  of  fasting  periods  is  “correct”  but  must  be  “interpreted correctly and applied to everybody,” which, in the solution that  Bp. Kirykos offers, amounts to a complete annulment of the Canon in  regards to laymen, while enforcing the Canon liberally upon the clergy;  d) that  “we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,”  as  if  the  Orthodox  Church  today  is  not  still  the  unchanged  and  unadulterated  Apostolic  Church as confessed in the Symbol of the Faith, “In One, Holy, Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church,”  with  the  same  Head,  the  same  Body,  and  the  e) f) g) h) same requirement to abide by the Canons, but that we are supposedly  some kind of fallen Church in need of “return” to a former status;  that supposedly in apostolic times “all of the Christians were ascetics and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy and communed,” meaning that Communion is annulled for later  generations supposedly due to a lack of celibacy and vegetarianism;  that  supposedly  only  the  celibate  and  vegetarians  communed  in  the  early Church, and that “the rest did not remain until the end and withdrew  together with the catechumens,” as if marriage and eating meat amounted  to  a  renunciation  of  one’s  baptism  and  a  reversion  to  the  status  of  catechumen,  which  is  actually  the  teaching  and  practice  of  the  Manicheans, Paulicians and Bogomils and not of the Apostolic Church,  and  the  9th  Apostolic  Canon  declares  that  if  any  layman  departs  with  the catechumens and does not remain until the end of Liturgy and does  not commune, such a layman is to be excommunicated, yet Bp. Kirykos  promotes this practice as something pious, patristic and acceptable;  that Christians who have confessed their sins and prepared themselves  and  their  spiritual  father  has  deemed  them  able  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  are  supposedly  still  in  the  rank  of  the  penitents  either  due to being married or due to being meat‐eaters, as can be seen from  Bp. Kirykos’ words: “If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only  knew how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”  that  we  are  not  to  interpret  and  implement  the  Holy  Canons  the  way  they  are  written  and  the  way  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has  always  historically interpreted and implemented them, but that these Canons  supposedly need to be reinterpreted in Bp. Kirykos’s own way, or as he  says,  “interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody,”  and  that  “if  we  implemented this Canon today, everyone would have to go out of the church.”      All of the above notions held by Bp. Kirykos can be summed up by the  statement that he believes the Canons only apply for the apostolic era or the  time of the early Christians, but that these Canons are now to be reinterpreted  or nullified because today’s Christians are not worthy to be treated according  to  the  Holy  Canons.  He  also  believes  that  to  follow  the  advice  of  the  Holy  Canons  is  a  cause  of  “disorder  and  scandal,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  very  purpose of the Holy Canons is to prevent disorder and scandal. These notions  held by Bp. Kirykos are entirely erroneous, and they are another variant of the  same blasphemies preached by the Modernists and Ecumenists who desire to  set the Holy Canons aside by claiming that they are not suitable for our times.      Bp.  Kirykos’  incorrect  notions  regarding  the  supposed  inapplicability  of the Holy Canons in our times are notions that the Rudder itself condemns.  For  in  the  Holy  Rudder  (published  in  the  17th  century),  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos  included  an  excellent  introductory  note  regarding  the  importance  of  the  Holy  Canons,  and  that  they  are  applicable  for  all  times,  and  must  be  adhered to faithfully by all Orthodox Christians. This introductory note by St.  Nicodemus, as contained in the Holy Rudder, is provided below.    PROLEGOMENA IN GENERAL TO THE SACRED CANONS    What Is a Canon?      A canon, according to Zonaras (in his interpretation of the 39th letter of  Athansius the Great), properly speaking and in the main sense of the word, is  a piece of wood, commonly called a rule, which artisans use to get the wood  and  stone  they  are  working  on  straight.  For,  when  they  place  this  rule  (or  straightedge) against their work, if this be crooked, inwards or outwards, they  make  it  straight  and  right.  From  this,  by  metaphorical  extension,  votes  and  decisions  are  also  called  canons,  whether  they  be  of  the  Apostles  or  of  the  ecumenical  and  regional  Councils  or  those  of  the  individual  Fathers,  which  are contained in the present Handbook: for they too, like so many straight and  right rules, rid men in holy orders, clergymen and laymen, of every disorder  and  obliquity  of  manners,  and  cause  them  to  have  every  normality  and  equality of ecclesiastical and Christian condition and virtue.    That the divine Canons must be kept rigidly by all;   for those who fail to keep them are made liable to horrible penances      “These instructions regarding Canons have been enjoined upon you by us, O  Bishops. If you adhere to them, you shall be saved, and shall have peace; but if  you  disobey  them,  you  shall  be  sorely  punished,  and  shall  have  perpetual  war  with one another, thus paying the penalty deserved for heedlessness.” (The Apostles  in their epilogue to the Canons)      “We have decided that it is right and just that the canons promulgated by  the holy Fathers at each council hitherto should remain in force.” (1st Canon  of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It  has  seemed  best  to  this  holy  Council  that  the  85  Canons  accepted  and  validated by the holy and blissful Fathers before us, and handed down to us, moreover,  in the name of the holy and glorious Apostles, should remain henceforth certified  and  secured  for  the  correction  of  souls  and  cure  of  diseases…  [of  the  four  ecumenical councils according to name, of the regional councils by name, and of the  individual Fathers by name]… And that no one should be allowed to counterfeit  or tamper with the aforementioned Canons or to set them aside.” (2nd Canon  of the Sixth Ecumenical Council)      “If anyone be caught innovating or undertaking to subvert any of the  said Canons, he shall be responsible with respect to such Canon and undergo  the penance therein specified in order to be corrected thereby of that very thing in  which he is at fault.” (2nd Canon of the Second Ecumenical Council)      “Rejoicing  in  them  like  one  who  has  found  a  lot  of  spoils,  we  gladly  embosom the divine Canons, and we uphold their entire tenor and strengthen  them  all  the  more,  so  far  as  concerns  those  promulgated  by  the  trumpets  of  the  Spirit  of  the  renowned  Apostles,  of  the  holy  ecumenical  councils,  and  of  those  convened  regionally…  And  of  our  holy  Fathers…  And  as  for  those  whom  they  consign to anathema, we anathematize them, too; as for those whom they consign to  deposition  or  degradation,  we  too  depose  or  degrade  them;  as  for  those  whom  they  consign  to  excommunication,  we  too  excommunicate  them;  and  as  for  those  whom  they condemn to a penance, we too subject them thereto likewise.” (1st Canon of the  Seventh Ecumenical Council)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the four holy councils, namely, that held in Nicaea, and  that  held  in  Constantinople,  and  the  first  one  held  in  Ephesus,  and  that  held  in  Chalcedon, shall take the rank of laws.” (Novel 131 of Emperor Justinian)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the seven holy councils shall take the rank of laws.”  (Ed.  note—The  word  “confirmed”  alludes  to  the  canons  of  the  regional  councils  and  of  the  individual  Fathers  which  had  been  confirmed  by  the  ecumenical councils, according to Balsamon.)      “For we accept the dogmas of the aforesaid holy councils precisely as we do the  divine Scriptures, and we keep their Canons as laws.” (Basilica, Book 5, Title 3,  Chapter 2)      “The  third  provision  of  Title  2  of  the  Novels  commands  the  Canons  of  the  seven  councils  and  their  dogmas  to  remain  in  force,  in  the  same  way  as  the  divine Scriptures.” (In Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “I accept the seven councils and their dogmas to remain in force, in the  same way as the divine Scriptures.” (Emperor Leo the Wise in Basilica, Book  5, Title 3, Chapter 1)    “It has been prescribed by the holy Fathers that even after death those men  must  be  anathematized  who  have  sinned  against  the  faith  or  against  the  Canons.”  (Fifth  Ecumenical  Council  in  the  epistle  of  Justinian,  page  392  of  Volume 2 of the Conciliars)      “Anathema on those who hold in scorn the sacred and divine Canons of  our sacred Fathers, who prop up the holy Church and adorn all the Christian polity,  and  guide  men  to  divine  reverence.”  (Council  held  in  Constantinople  after  Constantine Porphyrogenitus, page 977 of Volume 2 of the Conciliars)    That the divine Canons override the imperial laws      “It  pleased  the  most  divine  Despot  of  the  inhabited  earth  (i.e.  Emperor  Marcian)  not  to  proceed  in  accordance  with  the  divine  letters  or  pragmatic  forms  of  the  most  devout  bishops,  but  in  accordance  with  the  Canons  laid  down as laws by the holy Fathers. The council said: As against the Canons, no  pragmatic sanction is effective.  Let the Canons of the Fathers remain in force.  And  again:  We  pray  that  the  pragmatic  sanctions  enacted  for  some  in  every  province  to  the  detriment  of  the  Canons  may  be  held  in  abeyance  incontrovertibly; and that the Canons may come into force through all… all of us  say  the  same  things.  All  the  pragmatic  sanctions  shall  be  held  in  abeyance.  Let  the  Canons  come  into  force…  In  accordance  with  the  vote  of  the  holy  council,  let  the  injunctions of Canons come into force also in all the other provinces.” (In Act  5 of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It has  seemed  best to all the holy  ecumenical council  that if  anyone  offers  any  form  conflicting  with  those  now  prescribed,  let  that  form  be  void.”  (8th  Canon of the Third Ecumenical Council)      “Pragmatic  forms  opposed  to  the  Canons  are  void.”  (Book  1,  Title  2,  Ordinances 12, Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “For those Canons which have been promulgated, and supported, that  is  to  say,  by  emperors  and  holy  Fathers,  are  accepted  like  the  divine  Scriptures. But the laws have been accepted or composed only by the emperors; and  for  this  reason  they  do  not  prevail  over  and  against  the  divine  Scriptures  nor  the  Canons.” (Balsamon, comment on the above chapter 2 of Photius)      “Do  not  talk  to  me  of  external  laws.  For  even  the  publican  fulfills  the  outer  law,  yet  nevertheless  he  is  sorely  punished.”  (Chrysostom,  Sermon  57  on  the  Gospel of Matthew)   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii12/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii09 66%

ARE CHRISTIANS MEANT TO COMMUNE ONLY ON  A SATURDAY AND NEVER ON A SUNDAY?    In  the  second  paragraph  of  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  Bp.  Kirykos  writes: “Also, all Christians, when they are going to commune, know that they must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday  (since  it  is  preceded  by  the  fast  of  Friday)  and on Sunday only by economia, so that they are not compelled to break the fast of  Saturday and violate the relevant Holy Canon [sic: here he accidentally speaks of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means  observing  a  fast  on  Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].”    The first striking remark is “All Christians.” Does Bp. Kirykos consider  himself to be a Christian? If so, why does he commune every Sunday without  exception, seeing as though “all Christians” are supposed to “know” that they  are only allowed to commune on a Saturday, and never on Sunday, except by  “economia.”  Or  perhaps  Bp.  Kirykos  does  not  consider  himself  a  Christian,  and  for  this  reason  he  is  exempt  of  this  rule  for  “all  Christians.”  It  makes  perfect sense that he excludes himself from those called Christians because his  very ideas and practices are not Christian at all.     Is  communion  on  Saturdays  alone,  and  never  on  Sundays,  really  a  Christian  practice?  Is  this  what  Christians  have  always  believed?  Was  Saturday the day that the early Christians ʺbroke breadʺ (i.e., communed)? Let  us look at what the Holy Scriptures have to say.     St.  Luke  the  Evangelist  (+18  October,  86),  in  the  Acts  of  the  Holy  Apostles, writes: “And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to  break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow (Acts 20:7).”  Thus the Holy Apostle Paul would meet with the faithful on the first day of  the  week,  to  wit,  Sunday,  and  on  this  day  he  would  break  bread,  that  is,  he  would serve Holy Communion.     St. Paul the Apostle (+29 June, 67) also advises in his first epistle to the  Corinthians:  “On  the  first  day  of  the  week,  let  every  one  of  you  put  apart  with  himself, laying up what it shall well please him: that when I come, the collections be  not  then  to  be  made  (1  Corinthians  16:2).”  Thus  St.  Paul  indicates  that  the  Christians would meet with one another on the first day of the week, that is,  Sunday, not only for Liturgy, but also for collection of goods for the poor.     The reason why the Christians would meet for prayer and breaking of  bread on Sunday is because our Lord Jesus Christ arose from the dead on one  day after the Sabbath, on the first day of the week, that is, the Lordʹs Day or Sunday  (Matt. 28:1‐7; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1).     Another  reason  for  the  Christians  meeting  together  on  Sundays  is  because the Holy Spirit was delivered to the Apostles on the day of Pentecost,  which was a Sunday, and this event signified the beginning of the Christian  community.  That  Pentecost  took  place  on  a  Sunday  is  clear  from  Godʹs  command in the Old Testament Scriptures: “You shall count fifty days to the day  after  the  seventh  Sabbath;  then  you  shall  present  a  new  grain  offering  to  the  Lord  (Leviticus 23:16).” The reference to “fifty days” and “seventh Sabbath” refers to  counting fifty days from the first Sabbath, or seven weeks plus one day; while  “the day after the seventh Sabbath” clearly refers to a Sunday, since the day after  the Sabbath day (Saturday) is always the Lord’s Day (Sunday).    It was on the Sunday of Pentecost that the Holy Spirit descended upon  the Apostles. Thus we read:  “When the day of Pentecost  had  come, they  were  all  together  in  one  place.  And  suddenly  there  came  from  heaven  a  noise  like  a  violent  rushing  wind,  and  it  filled  the  whole  house  where  they  were  sitting.  And  there  appeared to them tongues as of fire distributing themselves, and they rested on each  one  of  them.  And  they  were  all  filled  with  the  Holy  Spirit  and  began  to  speak  with  other tongues, as the Spirit was giving them utterance (Acts 2:1‐4).”     A  final  reason  for  Sunday  being  the  day  that  the  Christians  met  for  prayer and breaking of bread was in order to remember the promised Second  Coming or rather Second Appearance (Δευτέρα Παρουσία) of the Lord. The  reference  to  Sunday  is  found  in  the  Book  of  Revelation,  in  which  Christ  appeared and delivered the prophecy to St. John the Theologian on “Kyriake”  (Κυριακή),  which  means  “the  main  day,”  or  “the  first  day,”  but  more  correctly means “the Lordʹs Day.” (Revelation 1:10).     For the above three reasons (that Sunday is the day of the Resurrection,  the  Pentecost  and  the  Second  Appearance)  the  Apostles  themselves,  and  the  early Christians immediately made Sunday the new Sabbath, the new day of  rest,  and  the  new  day  for  Godʹs  people  to  gather  together  for  prayer  (i.e.,  Liturgy)  and  breaking of bread (i.e.,  Holy Communion) Thus we read  in  the  Didache of the Holy Apostles: “On the Lordʹs Day (i.e., Kyriake) come together  and break bread. And give thanks (i.e., offer the Eucharist), after confessing your  sins  that  your  sacrifice  may  be  pure  (Didache  14).”  Thus  the  Christians  met  together  on  the  Lord’s  Day,  that  is,  Sunday,  for  the  breaking  of  bread  and  giving of thanks, to wit, the Divine Liturgy and Holy Eucharist.     St.  Barnabas  the  Apostle  (+11  June,  61),  First  Bishop  of  Salamis  in  Cyprus, in the Epistle of Barnabas, writes: “Wherefore, also, we keep the eighth  day  with  joyfulness,  the  day  also  on  which  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  (Barnabas  15).”  The  eighth  day  is  a  reference  to  Sunday,  which  is  known  as  the first as well as the eighth day of the week. How more appropriate to keep  the eighth day with joyfulness other than by communing of the joyous Gifts?     St. Ignatius the God‐bearer (+20 December, 108), Bishop of Antioch, in  his  Epistle  to  the  Magnesians,  insists  that  the  Jews  who  became  Christian  should  be  “no  longer  observing  the  Sabbath,  but  living  in  the  observance  of  the  Lord’s  Day,  on  which  also  our  Life  rose  again  (Magnesians  9).”  What  could commemorate the Lord’s Day as the day Life rose again, other than by  receiving Life incarnate,  to  wit, that  precious  Body and  Blood of  Christ? For  he who partakes of it shall never die but live forever!    St. Clemes, also known as St. Clement (+24 November, 101), Bishop of  Rome,  in  the  Apostolic  Constitutions,  also  declares  that  Divine  Liturgy  is  especially for Sundays more than any other day. Thus we read: “On the day  of  the  resurrection  of  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord’s  day,  assemble  yourselves  together,  without  fail,  giving  thanks  to  God,  and  praising  Him  for  those  mercies  God  has  bestowed  upon  you  through  Christ,  and  has  delivered  you  from  ignorance,  error, and bondage, that your sacrifice may be unspotted, and acceptable to God, who  has  said  concerning  His  universal  Church:  In  every  place  shall  incense  and  a  pure  sacrifice be offered unto me; for I am a great King, saith the Lord Almighty, and my  name  is  wonderful  among  the  nations  (Apostolic  Constitutions,  ch.  30).”  The  reference to “pure sacrifice” is the oblation of Christ’s Body and Blood; “giving  thanks to God” is the celebration of the Eucharist (εὐχαριστία = giving thanks).    The  Apostolic  Constitutions  also  state  clearly  that  Sunday  is  not  only  the most important day for Divine Liturgy, but that it is also the ideal day for  receiving  Holy  Communion.  It  is  written:  “And  on  the  day  of  our  Lord’s  resurrection,  which  is  the  Lord’s  day,  meet  more  diligently,  sending  praise  to  God  that  made  the  universe  by  Jesus,  and  sent  Him  to  us,  and  condescended  to  let  Him suffer, and raised Him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to  God  who  does  not  assemble  on  that  day  to  hear  the  saving  word  concerning  the  resurrection, on which we pray thrice standing in memory of Him who arose in three  days, in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the Gospel,  the  oblation  of  the  sacrifice,  the  gift  of  the  holy  food?  (Apostolic  Constitutions, ch. 59).” The “gift of the holy food” refers to Holy Communion.    The Holy Canons of the Orthodox Church also distinguish Sunday as  the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. The 19th Canon of the Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  mentions  the  importance  of  Sunday  as  a  day  for  gathering  and  preaching  the  Gospel  sermon:  “We  declare  that  the  deans  of  churches, on every day, but more especially on Sundays, must teach all the clergy  and the laity words of truth out of the Holy Bible…”    The  80th  Canon  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  states  that  all  clergy  and laity are forbidden to be absent from Divine Liturgy for three consecutive  Sundays: “In case any bishop or presbyter or deacon or anyone else on the list of the  clergy,  or  any  layman,  without  any  grave  necessity  or  any  particular  difficulty  compelling him to absent himself from his own church for a very long time, fails to  attend church on Sundays for three consecutive weeks, while living in the city, if  he  be  a  clergyman,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  he  be  a  layman,  let  him  be  removed  from  communion.”  Take  note  that  if  one  attends  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  consecutive  Saturdays,  but  not  on  the  Sundays,  he  still  falls  under  the  penalty  of  this  canon  because  it  does  not  reprimand  someone  who  simply  doesn’t  attend  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  weeks,  but  rather  one  who  “fails  to  attend  church  on  Sundays.”  The  reference  to  “church”  must  refer  to  a  parish  where Holy Communion is offered every Sunday, for an individual who does  not  attend  for  three  consecutive  Sundays  cannot  be  punished  by  being  “removed from  communion” if this is  not  even  offered  to begin with. Also, the  fact  that  this  is  the  penalty  must  mean  that  the  norm  is  for  the  faithful  to  commune every Sunday, or at least every third Sunday.    The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares that: “All those faithful who  enter  and  listen  to  the  Scriptures,  but  do  not  stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  they  are  causing  the  Church a breach of order.” The 2nd Canon of the Council of Antioch states: “As  for all those persons who enter the church and listen to the sacred Scriptures, but who  fail  to  commune  in  prayer  together  and  at  the  same  time  with  the  laity,  or  who  shun  the  participation  of  the  Eucharist,  in  accordance  with  some  irregularity,  we  decree  that  these  persons  be  outcasts  from  the  Church  until,  after  going to confession and exhibiting fruits of repentance and begging forgiveness, they  succeed  in  obtaining  a  pardon…”  Both  of  these  canons  prove  quite  clearly  that  all faithful who attend Divine Liturgy and are not under any kind of penance  or excommunication, must partake of Holy Communion. Thus, if clergy and  laity are equally expected to attend Divine Liturgy every Sunday, or at least  every third Sunday, they are equally expected to Commune every Sunday, or  at least every third Sunday. Should they fail, they are to be excommunicated.    St.  Timothy  of  Alexandria  (+20  July,  384),  in  his  Questions  and  Answers, and specifically in the 3rd Canon, writes: “Question: If anyone who is a  believer is possessed of a demon, ought he to partake of the Holy Mysteries, or not?  Answer: If he does not repudiate the Mystery, nor otherwise in any way blaspheme,  let him have communion, not, however, every day in the week, for it is sufficient for  him  on  the  Lord’s  Day  only.”  So  then,  if  even  those  who  are  possessed  with  demons  are  permitted  to  commune  on  every  Sunday,  how  is  it  that  Bp.  Kirykos  advises  that  all  Christians  are  only  permitted  to  commune  on  a  Saturday,  and  never  on  a  Sunday  except  by  extreme  economia?  Are  today’s  healthy,  faithful  and  practicing  Orthodox  Christians,  who  do  not  have  a  canon  of  penance  or  any  excommunication,  and  who  desire  communion  every Sunday, forbidden this, despite the fact that of old even those possessed  of demons were permitted it?    The  above  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  are  the  Law  of  God  that the Church abides to in order to prevent scandal or discord. Let us now  compare  this  Law  of  God  to  the  “traditions  of  men,”  namely,  the  Sabbatian,  Pharisaic statement found in Bp. Kirykos’s first letter to Fr. Pedro: “… I request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess  to  you,  that  in  order  to  approach  Holy  Communion,  they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday and not Sunday.“ Clearly, Bp. Kirykos has turned the whole world  upside down, and has made the Holy Canons and the Law of the Church of  God  as  a matter  of  “discord  and  scandal,”  and  instead  insists  upon  his  own  self‐invented “tradition” which is nowhere to be found in the writings of the  Holy Fathers, in the Holy Canons, or in the Holy Tradition of Orthodoxy.    The  truth  is  that  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  is  the  one  who  introduced  “disorder  and  scandal”  when  he  trampled  all  over  the  Holy  Canons  and  insisted that his priest, Fr. Pedro, and other laymen do likewise! The truth is  that Fr. Pedro and the laymen supporting him are not at all causing “disorder  and  scandal”  in  the  Church,  but  they  are  the  ones  preventing  disorder  and  scandal by objecting to the unorthodox demands of Bp. Kirykos.    Throughout  the  history  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  Sunday  has  always  been the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. This was declared so  by  the  Holy  Apostles  themselves,  was  also  maintained  in  the  post‐apostolic  era, and continues even until our day. Nowhere in the doctrines, practices or  history  of  Orthodox  Christianity  is  there  ever  a  teaching  that  laymen  are  supposedly only to commune on a Saturday and never on a Sunday. The only  day of the week throughout the year upon which Liturgy is guaranteed to be  celebrated is on a Sunday. The Liturgy is only performed on a few Saturdays  per  year  in  most  parishes,  and  mostly  only  during  the  Great  Fast  or  on  the  Saturday  of  Souls.  Liturgy  is  more  seldom  on  weekdays  as  the  Liturgies  of  Wednesday  and Friday nights have been made  Pre‐sanctified  and  limited  to  only within the Great Fast. Liturgy is now only performed on weekdays if it is  a  feastday  of  a  major  saint.  But  Liturgy  is  always  performed  on  a  Sunday  without  fail,  in  every  city,  village  and  countryside,  because  it  is  the  Lord’s  Day. The purpose of Liturgy is to receive Holy Communion, and the reason  for it being celebrated on the Lord’s Day without fail is because this is the day  of salvation, and therefore the most important day of the week, especially for  receiving Holy Communion. For, “This is the day that the Lord hath made, let us  rejoice  and  be  glad  in  it  (Psalm  118:24).”  What  greater  way  to  rejoice  on  the  Lord’s Day than to commune of the very Lord Himself?    The  theory  of  diminishing  Sunday  as  the  day  of  salvation  and  communion,  and  instead  opting  for  Saturday,  is  actually  a  heresy  known  as 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii09/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Krew Life 59%

Dear Jahan and Yasmine!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/08/krew-life/

08/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

padrepedro 02 eng 57%

In reference to the Mystery of Holy Communion    The  Orthodox  Church,  guarding  the  ancient  Apostolic  tradition,  does  not  only  urge  the  participation  in  the  preeminent  Mystery,  but  requires, by the 8th and 9th Apostolic Canons, the 66th and the 80th canons of  the 6th Ecumenical Council and the 2nd canon of the Council in Antioch, all  of  the  faithful  in  church,  laypeople  and  clergymen  to  partake  of  the  common Chalice, under the penalty of excommunication and deposition.      Only  the  prohibited,  those  who  have  fallen  into  mortal  sins,  are  excluded  from  this  Eucharistic  participation,  by  the  suggestion  of  their  spiritual  father  and  confessor,  as  the  102nd  canon  of  the  6th  Ecumenical  Council dictates.    The  philokalic  fathers,  who  were  mockingly  called  Kollyvades  by  everyone, from their adversaries to their mortal enemies, were attempting  to revive and teach this ancient, revered Apostolic Tradition on the Holy  Mountain  and  were  criticized  and  slandered  and  sent  away  from  Athos  and some of them were killed.      So  it  is  a  valid  apprehension  as  to  why  Your  Eminence  remains  completely  silent  and  openly  ignores  the  now  known  book  of  the  philokalic fathers, which is the book of Saints Makarios Notaras, formerly  of  Corinth,  and  Nikodemos  of  the  Holy  Mountain,  Concerning  the  Continuous  Communion  of  the  Immaculate  Mysteries  of  Christ,  which  constitutes a summary and recapitulation of the teachings of the Holy and  God‐bearing Fathers about the Mystery of Holy Communion, and as such  proclaims  both  the  synodal  decision  of  Patriarch  Neophytos  of  Constantinople from Maroneia, and the synodal decision of the Church of  Greece in 1886.    It  is  strange  that  this  very  well  known  book  is  absent  from  the  sources  and  references  about  Holy  Communion  in  the  above  mentioned  book by Archbishop Andrew of the G.O.C., Concerning Holy Communion.    The  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  Gregory  V  also  invokes  this  ancient Apostolic Tradition by his synodal decision in the year 1819 which  says that “the pious have the duty to approach and receive the life‐giving Body,  for this reason they are called by the priest.”    But  also  the  Church  of  Greece,  by  its  synodal  decision  in  the  year  1878, condemns the different teachings of Makrakis, among which are the  abolition  of  the  Mystery  of  Confession,  and  appeals  to  this  ancient  Apostolic Tradition by saying that “but not only does the Church by no means  forbid  the  truly  worthy  to  present  themselves  more  frequently  to  Holy  Communion,  but  indeed  in  every  liturgy,  by  the  sounding  of  ‘with  the  fear  of  God,  faith  and  love  draw  near’  She  calls  them  to  present  themselves  to  Holy  Communion.”    The  previously  mentioned  bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena  also  invokes  this  Apostolic  Tradition  concerning  frequent  Communion  in  his  book “The Mystery of Confession,” (Concerning Holy Communion, pp. 107‐ 111,  Hieromonk  Matthew,  Spiritual  Father,  Pilgrim  to  the  All‐holy  and  Life‐giving Tomb, Athonite, Cretan, Lavriotan, Athens 1933).    All  Holy  Tradition  speaks  about  the  necessary  preparation  before  Holy Communion, which concerns clergymen and laypeople, and consists  of  the  continual  cleansing  of  the  heart  and  mind,  by  Repentance  and  Confession, by the obligatory complete fast from midnight and  after and  by  the  Pre‐Communion  fast  according  to  one’s  strength,  in  accordance  with the opinion of one’s spiritual father and confessor.      Your  Eminence,  however,  writes  that  the  only  necessary  preparation  and  obligatory  prerequisite  for  Holy  Communion  is  fasting  and nothing else.    But  the  question  easily  arises  of  why  the  clergymen  do  not  fast  before  Holy  Communion,  maybe  because,  according  to  Your  view  they  have some privilege over laypeople?      Why does Your Eminence completely  silence the basic criterion of  Holy  Communion,  which  is  the  clean  conscience,  as  the  Church  has  believed from the beginning, and impose objective criteria for those who  will receive Communion in the future?  Who will inspect these, forbidding  and allowing Holy Communion?  Will someone give us a reference?  Did the God‐bearing Holy Fathers, who did not establish a canon of  obligatory  fasting  before  Holy  Communion,  do  this  by  oversight  or  mistake?      By  Your  Eminence  setting  and  imposing  new  canons  and  morals,  under the pretext of devoutness and ascetic piety, do You consider that it  is necessary to cover the void of what was unforeseen and omitted by the  God‐bearing Holy Fathers?    Does  Your  Eminence  believe  that  the  Holy  God‐bearing  Fathers  have erred and that You are able to make an examination and correction  of them?    In  Your  Eminence’s  reference  to  the  unworthiness  of  the  faithful,  do  You  consider  that  we  the  clergymen  and  shepherds  are  worthy  and  holy and above any censure and criticism?    Truly,  if  as  You  write,  due  to  their  unworthiness  none  of  the  faithful  should  remain  in  the  church,  then  this  means  two  things,  either  the  congregation  is  not  baptized  Orthodox  or  we  the  clergymen  and  shepherds  are  unworthy  of  the  Master’s  calling  and  have  no  concern  for  the salvation of the logical sheep, which the Master Christ has entrusted to  us,  because we  have not  made them  worthy of the grace  of  the  All‐Holy  Spirit  so  that  they  may  continuously  receive  the  life‐giving  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,  and  rather  the  absence  of  our  spiritual  guidance  will  end up in our sure condemnation on the day of the just judgment.      Therefore the faithful have every right not to call us shepherds and  spiritual fathers, but oppressive wolves and stepfathers, because the total  absence  of  love,  indifference  and  contempt  for  the  flock  is  what  characterizes  us.    We,  whose  chief  characteristics  are  lack  of  feeling  and  the strict observance of the letter of the law, as we exclusively understand  it,  present  ourselves  as  managers  of  the  power  of  Christ.    We  are  only  concerned  with  our  personal  interests  and  we  offer  the  logical  sheep  of  Christ as prey to the noetic wolf who is the ruler of this world, that is, the  devil.      Truly, which of us clergymen and shepherds, moved by pure love,  and  without  ulterior  motives  and  expedience,  as  our  Lord,  literally  ran 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/padrepedro-02-eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Chapitre 1 - Contexte économique et institutionnel 47%

excommunication pour le roi n'obéissant pas aux injonctions de l’Église.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/15/chapitre-1-contexte-economique-et-institutionnel/

15/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

03 Série de cours éclaircissant 42%

Série de cours éclaircissant des questions liées au manhaj (méthodologie) Troisième cours L’excommunication des polythéistes (Takfîr al-muchrikîn) Au nom d’Allah, Le Tout Miséricordieux, Le Très Miséricordieux.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/04/03-serie-de-cours-eclaircissant/

04/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

ByzantiumBrochure 40%

Met with much consternation in the West, the Empire's Western Synod decreed any attempt to remove icons would result in excommunication.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/03/28/byzantiumbrochure/

28/03/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

img012 36%

Tolstoy's salvation came about when he hit upon a way to disown coherence and sidle up to religion, even though it was not religion of the common sort and led to his excommunication from the Russian Orthodox Church.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/15/img012/

15/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Nobility (1) 35%

Nobility! A Game of Worldbuilding, Politics and Revolution Introduction:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/05/nobility-1/

05/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18940315 14%

I am sure the church [ 16 35 ] ZION' S WATCH would not do such violence to its love for one of the disciples of our Lord as to drop your name, leaving the record to be inteipicted by those vho, not knowing the cause, might infer excommunication.” He then adds, “ \\ itli your consent, therefoie.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18940315/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18870000 13%

* WATC OVER HERALD OF CHRIST’S PRESENCE.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18870000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18800000.PDF 13%

WATC HERALD OF CHRIST'S PRESENCE.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18800000/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

w E 18940401 13%

ZION' S WATCH would not do such violence to its love for one of the disciples of our Lord as to drop your name, leaving the record to be inteipicted by those vho, not knowing the cause, might infer excommunication.” He then adds, “ \\ itli your consent, therefoie.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/04/w-e-18940401/

04/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com