Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «fossils»:


Total: 130 results - 0.021 seconds

prehistoric passages nc standards 100%

(Komodo dragon) 4.E.2 Understand the use of fossils and changes in the surface of the earth as evidence of the history of Earth and its changing life forms.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/30/prehistoric-passages-nc-standards/

30/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

trade war 2015 89%

US-China Solar PV Trade War:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/28/trade-war-2015/

28/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

ThrinaxodonFinal 88%

Drew Lyons  Micah Mansfield  Animal Design Project #1    Thrinaxodon    Thrinaxodon, a synapsid cynodont, was a small, mammal­like reptile that lived  253 million years ago in the late Permian. It disappeared during the extinction event 245  million years ago at the end of the ​Olenekian portion of the Triassic​ period. The  discovery of Thrinaxodon was important as a transitional fossil in the evolution of  mammals.    Cladogram showing the relationship of Thrinaxodon to mammals (Botha and  Chinsamy, 2005).    Fossils of Thrinaxodon were found in modern day South Africa and Antarctica,  providing strong evidence that Thrinaxodon once roamed an area that combined these  land masses because the physiology of Thrinaxodon suggests it could neither swim  long distances nor fly.  Current day separation of fossils by a vast ocean helped  scientists understand plate tectonics and the existence of a supercontinent called  Pangea.    Pangea: Image taken ​http://www.metafysica.nl/wings/wings_3a.html​.  The inserted  black box shows the location where Thrinaxodon fossils were found and where it likely  lived during the Late Permian and Early Triassic periods.    Thrinaxodon was 30 to 50 cm in length, 10 cm tall, had a large, flat head and  legs somewhat characteristic of fossorial animals that splayed out slightly from the  torso, creating a 15 cm wide stance.  Indentations in fossils of its skull provide strong  evidence that Thrinaxodon had whiskers.  Whiskers are a very beneficial adaptation for  predators at night because it would allow the animal to better sense its surroundings in  low light conditions, giving it a competitive advantage over its prey and other predators  that compete for similar resources.  If it had whiskers then there may have been fur as  well, indicating that it was homeothermic since fur functions to insulate the animal from  the outside conditions, so the animal’s temperature is being driven more by internal  processes.  Being one of the earliest mammal­like organisms with fur, it was most likely  less dense than the fur modern mammals have (prehistoric­wildlife.com, 2011).    Thrinaxodon had many mammalian­like adaptations that in ways allowed it to  function in similar ways as modern day mammals, suggesting it was a distant ancestor  of mammals.  Key morphological innovations allowed for increased metabolic rates and  its survival through the Permian­Triassic extinction event.  These included features in  Thrinaxodon’s skeleton such as the addition of lumbar vertebrae on the spine and the  shortening of thoracic vertebrae, one additional occipital condyle, the presence of a  masseteric fossa, and a hardened secondary palate.  The segmentation of the spine  allowed for increased weight bearing and movement in the lower back.  Segmentation,  in combination with the absence of ribs in the lower abdomen, suggests the presence of  a diaphragm.  The ribs now form a chest cavity that houses the lungs and provides an  attachment surface for the diaphragm, which allows for increased respiration efficiency  and minimum energy expenditure due to breathing (Cowen, 2000).  The addition of an  occipital condyle functioned to increase articulation with the atlas vertebrae and  permitted more movement, which allowed it to be more aware of its surroundings and  potential predators. The masseteric fossa presented a larger surface area for muscle  attachment on the dentary bone to make chewing and processing food more efficient,  which in turn leads to a faster metabolism.  One of the most important adaptations,  especially for carnivores, is the presence of the hardened secondary palate that allowed  for breathing through the nose while chewing, which is important in order to take down  struggling prey or chew for a longer period of time while still maintaining the ability to  breathe (prehistoric­wildlife.com, 2011).  Thrinaxodon also possesses the beginnings of  a brain case, which is shown by the epipterygoid bone expanding to alisphenoid­like  proportions, as well as nasal turbinates, which are “convoluted bones in the nasal cavity  that are covered by olfactory sense organs” (Cynodontia).  The teeth of Thrinaxodon  display the mammalian traits of thecodontia (teeth present in the socket of the dentary)  and differentiated teeth.  In its tooth differentiation, the three cusped post canines that  Thrinaxodon was named after were important so it could thoroughly chew its food and  decrease the time of digestion.  This also suggests a faster metabolism that was more  like modern mammals, as well as an important evolutionary step towards the  tribosphenic molar (Estes, 1961).  Due to this increased metabolism, Thrinaxodon was  eurythermic, meaning it was able to function in a broad range of temperatures, and was  essentially homeothermic.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/02/thrinaxodonfinal/

02/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

kanto 83%

$ 104 019 027 Rattata♂ Sandshrew♂ Lv.2 Lv.2 No item No item Team Rocket Grunt [Micro Boss] – talks about reviving ancient pokemon from fossils.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/06/kanto/

06/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

REASON FOR CHOOSING THE TOPIC.PDF 70%

CONCLUSION My Personal Account with Climate Change The Distress.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/12/reason-for-choosing-the-topic/

12/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

globalwarming1.3 68%

Manmade CO2:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/12/17/globalwarming13/

17/12/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

globalwarming1.3.2 68%

Manmade CO2:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/01/20/globalwarming132/

20/01/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

2006 March 66%

During the February meeting, John Lobota provided details about a canoe trip up the Peace River and back to hunt for fossils.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/05/2006-march/

05/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

letter 64%

Greetings from AUSI, Australien Universal Space Industries.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/20/letter/

20/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com