Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 18 January at 21:10 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «glorified»:


Total: 100 results - 0.065 seconds

At The Resurrection 100%

In What Body Shall We Resurrect In, Mortal Or Glorified?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/02/25/at-the-resurrection/

25/02/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Ramadaan-Shawwal 14-5 91%

An-Nahj al-Asma Fii Sharh Asma’-u-AllaahilHusna by Shaikh Muhammad al-Humood an-Najdi As- ubbooh (The Perfect, Who is praised and glorified extensively) This Noble Name is mentioned in a Hadeeth reported by Muslim on the authority of ‘Aishah (Radia-Allaahu ‘anha), who said:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/22/ramadaan-shawwal-14-5/

22/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Ashurbanipal's Hymn to Marduk 78%

They glorified his lordship, prepared battle, [......] A[nu]!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/07/23/ashurbanipal-s-hymn-to-marduk/

23/07/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

03-17B 76%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/11/03-17b/

11/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

2018 63%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/04/2018/

04/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

MyCityShortStories 63%

Yes, Lord Fudlegh is glorified in our papers.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/09/mycityshortstories/

09/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

consecrationserviceeng 62%

The Prayer of Episcopal Consecration    The  consecration  prayer  itself  proves  the  fact  that  other  bishops  must  be present and lay their hands on the ordinand during the rite consecration:  Hierarch:  Master,  Lord,  our  God,  Thou  who  legislated  unto  us  through  Thine  All‐ famed  Apostle  Paul,  regarding  the  order  of  degrees  and  orders,  for  the  purpose  of  serving  and  liturgizing  Thy  venerable  and  immaculate  Mysteries  in  Thy  Holy  Sanctuary: first Apostles, second Prophets, third Teachers. Likewise, O Master of All,  this here elected one who has been granted worthy to carry the Evangelical yoke, and  the  High  Priestly  rank,  by  the  hand  of  sinful  me,  and  by  those  of  the  witnessing  Concelebrants  and  Co‐Bishops,  by  the  inspiration  and  power  and  grace of Thy Holy Spirit, strengthen, as Though strengthened the Holy Apostles and  Prophets,  as  Thou  anointed  the  Kings,  as  Though  sanctified  the  High  Priests,  and  grant  unto  him  the  High  Priesthood  without  reproach,  and  adorning  him  with  all  piety, elect him holy and make him worthy, that he may intercede for the salvation of  the people, and that they may obey Thee through him. For sanctified is Thy Name and  glorified is Thy Kingdom, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now  and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    The original Greek is as follows:   Ἀρχιερεὺς:   Δέσποτα  Κύριε,  ὁ  Θεὸς  ἡμῶν,  ὁ  νομοθετήσας  ἡμῖν  διὰ  τοῦ  πανευφήμου  σου  Ἀποστόλου  Παύλου,  βαθμῶν  καὶ  ταγμάτων  τάξιν,  εἰς  τὸ  ἐξυπηρετεῖσθαι,  καὶ  λειτουργεῖν  τοῖς  σεπτοῖς,  καὶ  ἀχράντοις  σου  Μυστηρίοις  ἐν  τῶ  ἁγίω  σου  Θυσιαστηρίω,  πρῶτον  Ἀποστόλους,  δεύτερον  Προφήτας, τρίτον Διδασκάλους.  Αὐτός, Δέσποτα τῶν ἁπάντων, καὶ τοῦτον  τὸν  ψηφισθέντα,  καὶ  ἀξιωθέντα  ὑπεισελθεῖν  τὸν  Εὐαγγελικὸν  ζυγόν,  καὶ  τὴν  Ἀρχιερατικὴν  ἀξίαν,  διὰ  τῆς  χειρὸς  ἐμοῦ  τοῦ  ἁμαρτωλοῦ,  καὶ  τῶν  συμπαρόντων  Λειτουργῶν  καὶ  Συνεπισκόπων,  τῆ  ἐπιφοιτήσει  καὶ  δυνάμει, καὶ χάριτι τοῦ Ἁγίου σου Πνεύματος, ἐνίσχυσον, ὡς ἐνίσχυσας τοὺς  ἁγῖους  σου  Ἀποστόλους,  καὶ  Προφήτας,  ὡς  ἔχρισας  τοὺς  Βασιλεῖς  ,  ὡς  ἡγίασας  τοὺς  Ἀρχιερεῖς,  καὶ  ἀνεπίληπτον  αὐτοῦ  τὴν  Ἀρχιερωσύνην  ἀπόδειξον,  καὶ  πάση  σεμνότητι  κατακοσμῶν,  ἅγιον  ἀνάδειξον,  εἰς  τὸ  ἄξιον  γενέσθαι,  τοῦ  αἰτεῖν  αὐτὸν  τὰ  πρὸς  σωτηρίαν  τοῦ  λαοῦ,  καὶ  ἐπακούειν  σε  αὐτοῦ.   Ὄτι  ἡγίασταί  σου  τὸ  ὄνομα  καὶ  δεδόξασταί  σου  ἡ  Βασιλεία,  τοῦ  Πατρός,  καὶ  τοῦ  Υἱοῦ,  καὶ  τοῦ  ἁγίου  Πνεύματος,  νῦν  καὶ  ἀεί,  καὶ  εἰς  τοὺς  αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/consecrationserviceeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Easter 3- Jubilate (Final) 61%

And I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord and giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son, who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified, who spoke by the prophets.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2020/05/03/easter-3--jubilate-final/

03/05/2020 www.pdf-archive.com

VantagePoint 61%

A Change in Vantage Points  Harmony Lowe    Picture this: lots of rowdy people dressing up as other people and painting their faces  with odd colors. They go to bars to eat and scream at TV’s with other fans when something  supposedly important happens, or when they gather in giant stadiums to scream at the players  live with thousands of others. Bosses let these people off work early so that they can go to the  bars and shout, they understand the excitement of grown men tossing a ball back and forth  intricately and sometimes using their feet. This is completely normal here in America, when you  think about football.  Now picture people watching a TV show or movie, reading books, and wanting to know  more about this other universe, the fictional world. They go to meetups and conventions (which  are like football games for geeks but with less screaming and more excited talking about intricate  details). They will dress up as characters they love, choosing based on interest and love for the  person (exactly like wearing the jersey of your favorite football star).   But for this love of complex fictional worlds these people are name­called: dorks, geeks,  nerds, crazy­obsessed fans. They are laughed at when they dress up as fictional people, mocked  when they go to meetups and cons, bullied for their love of wonderful worlds where they escape  to, and god forbid they ask their boss for time off of work without a humorous laugh and a shake  of the head, as if it were a joke. In America it is more natural to be over­invested in a glorified  version of catch than it is to be over­invested in a fictional universe with story arcs and plot or  character development.   Fans of sports are accepted, it is manly, macho, real. Fans of TV shows and those sorts of  things are not accepted, it is wimpy, dorky, fake. In football a ball only goes back and forth on a  field, moved by various muscled men. In fiction, in fantasy, people go on adventures, overcome  evil, save people, deal with the problems of morally grey conflicts, sometimes they fall in love,  learning and changing, maybe becoming the villain. So why is it that the society we live in  worships the macho men playing catch while it scorns those who fall in love with the  complexities created by others? 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/03/12/vantagepoint/

12/03/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

WORKING FOR FOOD THAT ENDURES TO ETERNAL LIFE 60%

This food could only be given by the glorified Jesus.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/02/working-for-food-that-endures-to-eternal-life/

02/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 59%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Prayers for Finances 59%

Let many give testimony and Jesus be glorified as a result of this prayer.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/21/prayers-for-finances/

21/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

STRIVE TO ENTER 59%

those he justified, he also glorified.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/11/10/strive-to-enter/

10/11/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Temple Article 2 59%

Constructed in the Dravidian style of architecture, this temple is glorified in the ThiviyaPirabandham, the early medieval Tamil literature canon of the Alvar saints from the 6th to 9th centuries AD and is counted among the 108 DivyaDesams dedicated to Vishnu.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/25/temple-article-2/

25/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

eliaseen 57%

(Table4) Allahu Akbar!!! GOD is glorified!!!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/06/02/eliaseen/

02/06/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

2019-01-13 Leader Guide 57%

whoever serves, as one who serves by the strength that God  supplies—in order that in everything God may be glorified through Jesus  Christ.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/01/13/2019-01-13-leader-guide/

13/01/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

PhilaretBiographyByVM 57%

A Life of Metropolitan  Philaret of New York    Written by Vladimir Moss              Early Years      Metropolitan Philaret, in the world George Nikolayevich Voznesensky,  was born in the city of Kursk on March 22 / April 4, 1903, into the family of  Protopriest  Nicholas.  In  1909  the  family  moved  to  Blagoveschensk‐on‐Amur  in the Far East, where the future hierarch finished high school.      In  a  sermon  at  his  nomination  as  Bishop  of  Brisbane,  the  future  metropolitan said:  “There is hardly anything specially worthy  of  note  in  my  life, in its childhood and young years, except, perhaps, a recollection from my  early  childhood  years,  when  I  as  a  small  child  of  six  or  seven  years  in  a  childishly  naïve  way  loved  to  ‘play  service’  –  I  made  myself  a  likeness  of  a  Church vestment and ‘served’. And when my parents began to forbid me to  do  this,  Vladyka  Evgeny,  the  Bishop  of  Blagoveschensk,  after  watching  this  ‘service’  of  mine  at  home,  to  their  amazement  firmly  stopped  them:  ‘Leave  him, let the boy “serve” in his own way. It is good that he loves the service of  God.’” In this way was the saint’s future service in the Church foretold in a  hidden way already in his childhood.      In  1920  the  family  was  forced  to  flee  from  the  revolution  into  Manchuria,  to  the  city  of  Harbin.  There,  in  1921,  George’s  mother,  Lydia  Vasilievna,  died,  after  which  his  father,  Fr.  Nicholas,  took  the  monastic  tonsure with the name Demetrius and became Archbishop of Hailar. Vladyka  Demetrius  was  a  learned  theologian,  the  author  of  a  series  of  books  on  the  history of the Church and other subjects.      In  1927  George  graduated  from  the  Russo‐Chinese  Polytechnical  institute  and  received  a  specialist  qualification  as  an  engineer‐electrical  mechanic.  Later,  when  he  was  already  First  Hierarch  of  the  Russian  Church  Outside  Russia  (ROCOR),  he  did  not  forget  his  friends  at  the  institute.  All  those  who  had  known  him,  both  at  school  and  in  the  institute,  remembered  him  as  a  kind,  affectionate  comrade.  He  was  distinguished  by  his  great  abilities and was always ready to help.      After  the  institute he got  a job  as a teacher;  he  was  a good instructor,  and  his  pupils  loved  and  valued  him.  But  his  instructions  for  the  young  people  went  beyond  the  bounds  of  the  school  programme  and  penetrated  every  aspect  of  human  life.  Many  of  his  former  pupils  and  colleagues  after  meeting him retained a high estimate of him for the rest of their lives.      Living  in  the  family  of  a  priest,  the  future  metropolitan  naturally  became  accustomed,  from  his  early  years,  to  the  church  and  the  Divine  services.  But,  as  he  himself  said  later,  at  the  beginning  there  was  in  this  “almost nothing deep, inwardly apprehended and consciously accepted”.      “But the Lord knows how to touch the human soul!” he recalled. “And  I  undoubtedly  see  this  caring  touch  of  the  Father’s  right  hand  in  the  way  in  which,  during  my  student  years  in  Harbin,  I  was  struck  as  if  with  a  thunderclap  by  the  words  of  the  Hierarch  Ignatius  Brianchaninov  which  I  read in his works: ‘My grave! Why do I forget you? You are waiting for me,  waiting, and I will certainly be your inhabitant; why then do I forget you and  behave  as  if  the  grave  were  the  lot  only  of  other  men,  and  not  of  myself?’  Only  he  who  has  lived  through  this  ‘spiritual  blow’,  if  I  can  express  myself  thus, will understand me now! There began to shine before the young student  as it were a blinding light, the light of a true, real Christian understanding of  life and death, of the meaning of life and the significance of death – and new  inner life began… Everything secular, everything ‘worldly’ lost its interest in  my eyes, it disappeared somewhere and  was replaced by a different content  of  life.  And  the  final  result  of  this  inner  change  was  my  acceptance  of  monasticism…”       In 1931 George completed his studies in Pastoral Theology in what was  later renamed the theological faculty of the Holy Prince Vladimir Institute. In  this faculty he became a teacher of the New Testament, pastoral theology and  homiletics.  In  1936  his  book,  Outline  of  the  Law  of  God,  was  published  in  Harbin.      In  1930  he  was  ordained  to  the  diaconate,  and  in  1931  –  to  the  priesthood,  serving  as  the  priest  George.  In  the  same  year  he  was  tonsured  into monasticism with the name Philaret in honour of Righteous Philaret the  Merciful.  In  1933  he  was  raised  to  the  rank  of  igumen,  and  in  1937  ‐  to  the  rank of archimandrite.      “Man  thinks  much,  he  dreams  about  much  and  he  strives  for  much,”  he said in one of his sermons, “and nearly always he achieves nothing in his  life.      But  nobody  will  escape  the  Terrible  Judgement  of  Christ.  Not  in  vain  did the Wise man once say: ‘Remember your last days, and you will not sin to  the  ages!’  If  we  remember  how  our  earthly  life  will  end  and  what  will  be  demanded  of  it  after  that,  we  shall  always  live  as  a  Christian  should  live.  A  pupil  who  is  faced  with  a  difficult  and  critical  examination  will  not  forget  about  it  but  will  remember  it  all  the  time  and  will  try  to  prepare  him‐  or  herself  for  it.  But  this  examination  will  be  terrible  because  it  will  be  an  examination  of  our  whole  life,  both  inner  and  outer.  Moreover,  after  this  examination  there  will  be  no  re‐examination.  This  is  that  terrible  reply  by  which the lot of man will be determined for immeasurable eternity…      Although  the  Lord  Jesus  Christ  is  very  merciful,  He  is  also  just.  Of  course,  the  Spirit  of  Christ  overflows  with  love,  which  came  down  to  earth  and  gave  itself  completely  for  the  salvation  of  man.  But  it  will  be  terrible  at  the Terrible Judgement for those who will see that they have not made use of  the  Great  Sacrifice  of  Love  incarnate,  but  have  rejected  it.  Remember  your  end, man, and you will not sin to the ages.”      In  his  early  years  as  a  priest,  Fr.  Philaret  was  greatly  helped  by  the  advice  of  the  then  First‐Hierarch  of  ROCOR,  Metropolitan  Anthony  (+1936),  with whom he corresponded for several years.      He also studied the writings of the holy fathers, and learned by heart  all  four  Gospels.  One  of  his  favourite  passages  of  Scripture  was  the  passage  from  the  Apocalypse  reproaching  the  lukewarmness  of  men,  their  indifference  to  the  truth.  Thus  in  a  sermon  on  the  Sunday  of  All  Saints  he  said:      “The  Orthodox  Church  is  now  glorifying  all  those  who  have  pleased  God, all the saints…, who accepted the holy word of Christ not as something  written somewhere to someone for somebody, but as written to himself; they  accepted  it,  took  it  as  the  guide  for  the  whole  of  their  life  and  fulfilled  the  commandments of Christ.      “…  Of  course,  their  life  and  exploit  is  for  us  edification,  they  are  an  example  for  us,  but  you  yourselves  know  with  what  examples  life  is  now  filled!  Do  we  now  see  many  good  examples  of  the  Christian  life?!….  When  you see what is happening in the world,… you involuntarily think that a man  with a real Orthodox Christian intention is as it were in a desert in the midst  of the earth’s teeming millions. They all live differently… Do you they think  about  what  awaits  them?  Do  they  think  that  Christ  has  given  us  commandments,  not  in  order  that  we  should  ignore  them,  but  in  order  that  we should try to live as the Church teaches.      “…. We have brought forward here one passage from the Apocalypse,  in  which  the  Lord  says  to  one  of  the  servers  of  the  Church:  ‘I  know  your  works:  you  are  neither  cold  nor  hot.  Oh  if  only  you  were  cold  or  hot!”  We  must not only be hot, but must at least follow the promptings of the soul and  fulfil the law of God.      “But  there  are  those  who  go  against  it…  But  if  a  man  is  not  sleeping  spiritually,  is  not  dozing,  but  is  experiencing  something  spiritual  somehow,  and  if  he  does  not  believe  in  what  people  are  now  doing  in  life,  and  is  sorrowful  about  this,  but  is  in  any  case  not  dozing,  not  sleeping  –  there  is  hope that he will come to the Church. Do we not see quite a few examples of  enemies and deniers of God turning to the way of truth? Beginning with the  Apostle Paul…      “In  the  Apocalypse  the  Lord  says:  ‘Oh  if  only  thou  wast  cold  or  hot,  but since thou art neither cold nor hot (but lukewarm), I will spew thee out of  My  mouth’…  This  is  what  the  Lord  says  about  those  who  are  indifferent  to  His holy work. Now,  in actual fact, they do not even think about this. What  are people now not interested in, what do they not stuff into their heads – but  they have forgotten the law of God. Sometimes they say beautiful words. But  what can words do when they are from a person of abominable falsehood?!…      It is necessary to beseech the Lord God that the Lord teach us His holy  law, as it behoves us, and teach us to imitate the example of those people have  accepted this law, have fulfilled it and have, here on earth, glorified Almighty  God.”      Fr.  Philaret  was  very  active  in  ecclesiastical  and  pastoral‐preaching  work.  Already  in  the  first  years  of  his  priesthood  he  attracted  many  people  seeking  the  spiritual  path.  The  Divine  services  which  he  performed  with  burning  faith,  and  his  inspired  sermons  brought  together  worshippers  and  filled the churches. Multitudes pressed to the church in which Fr. Philaret was  serving.      All sections of the population of Harbin loved him; his name was also  known  far  beyond  the  boundaries  of  the  Harbin  diocese.  He  was  kind  and  accessible to all  those  who  turned to  him.  Queues of people thirsting to  talk  with him stood at the doors of his humble cell; on going to him, people knew  that they would receive correct advice, consolation and help.      Fr. Philaret immediately understood the condition of a man’s soul, and,  in  giving  advice,  consoled  the  suffering,  strengthened  the  despondent  and  cheered up the despairing with an innocent joke. He loved to say: “Do not be  despondent, Christian soul! There is no place for despondency in a believer!  Look  ahead  –  there  is  the  mercy  of  God!”  People  went  away  from  him  pacified and strengthened by his strong faith.      In  imitation  of  his  name‐saint,  Fr.  Philaret  was  generous  not  only  in  spiritual, but also in material alms, and secretly gave help to the needy. Many 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/philaretbiographybyvm/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com