PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 24 November at 13:04 - Around 100000 files indexed.

Show results per page

Results for «graveyard»:


Total: 38 results - 0.118 seconds

ubturns 100%

I’ve also seen incredibly graveyard heavy lists, enlisting the help of Azcanta, Jace VP, and Thought Scour to power up Snapcaster and more easily cast Temporal Trespass.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/13/ubturns/

13/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

YGO Tag Team Rules 92%

Extra Deck Zone Each Duelist has their own Deck (2 Decks per team) Each Duelist has their own Graveyard (Duelists may use their teammate’s Graveyard as if it was their own.) Each Duelist has their own Extra Deck.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/14/ygo-tag-team-rules/

14/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Game Rules - Second Draft 86%

Shuffle the main deck and set it face­down. This is now the spoils pile. Distribute five  cards face­down from the top of the main deck to each player; these are each player’s  hands. Save space next to the spoils pile for the discard pile, which is called the  graveyard.  5.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/12/game-rules-second-draft/

12/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Druid'sRestLandscape 77%

The Petrified Graveyard:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/05/03/druid-srestlandscape/

03/05/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Lanterns' Eve 69%

Lanterns’ Eve By Nikos Gaitanopoulos Lanterns’ Eve, it’s here again Don’t forget to treat the dead Lantern’s Eve, night of dread Lest they will trick you instead Time’s now to spare some sweets For the little specters seek treats But there is another task A most important – if you ask In the streets the little ones rush Faces hidden under masks Jacks o’ Lanterns meet scarecrows Witches gather bands of trows On each door they do knock On each doorstep will they flock But expect to see none out When it’s nearing midnight hour Tick – tack – flows time No one sings the well-known rhyme Shut the door and slam its latch Something else is on the march Every year in such a night The moon fades, the soil feels light And be sure that until dawn You’ll offer what the dead want Drapes of mist the trees engulf Eerie cries, unworldly laughs From the graveyard they do soar In the moonlight, ghostly horde The undertaker starts to drink Closes eyes, tries not to think On his doorstep lies a mask For he knows what the dead ask Nothing pierces the night’s gown The lost kids flood into town Like an ocean fill the streets The wind moans and with them weeps And inside every house Silence reigns from man to mouse They just pray and only hope That there’s no knock on the door From the window shades Dare only peek the brave Listening to the song That the faceless sing along “Hollow night, lantern’s eve Let’s visit those who live Trick them or claim their treat Into memory we won’t drift” Lanterns’ Eve, it’s here again Don’t forget to treat the dead Lantern’s Eve, night of dread Lest they will trick you instead

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/25/lanterns-eve/

25/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

All-of-a-Winters-Night 68%

‘Not that there will be soon if the graveyard goes 6 on expanding.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/26/all-of-a-winters-night/

26/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

January Addition 2016 66%

Guys and Gals, I am currently on Graveyard shift while we do some tough projects at work.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/01/13/january-addition-2016/

13/01/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

mody 63%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/07/mody/

07/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Investigation 2 62%

“What’d you want?” He asks “You found my card in the Graveyard?” She irritably in a reedy, cracked voice.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/07/investigation-2/

07/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

ways to taken care of1403 62%

Staff members that deal with graveyard shift have likewise the right to ask for cost-free health evaluations, paid for by their employer.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/22/ways-to-taken-care-of1403/

22/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Requiem 62%

Requiem Mortem Divitias Requiem Requiem dødsrige.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/01/requiem/

01/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Persecution Report 16 61%

Uttar Pradesh, February 19, 2016 Anoop Masih was beaten by Hindu extremists after he protested against desecration of a Christian graveyard Punjab, May 25, 2016 CHURCH VANDALIZED Church vandalized by Bajrang Dal mob Chhattisgarh, March 9, 2016

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/persecution-report-16/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Requiem 59%

Requiem The last rites Mortem Divitias Requiem Requiem dødsriger.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/05/requiem/

05/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Before Sunrise Religion 56%

For instance, we seen in any moment when confronted with the vaguely supernatural (when visiting the graveyard, when having her palm read, when hearing about Quaker weddings, and simply when entering the church) Céline's demeanor shifts toward the romantic.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/08/before-sunrise-religion/

08/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Night Drives by Ryan Dunford 55%

It's going to be a long night for you graveyard shifters out there and we got the hits.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/20/night-drives-by-ryan-dunford/

20/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Word-Co-Occurrence-Literature 54%

This collection of word pairs ranges from words which are not similar at all (roostervoyage or noon-string, for instance) to word pairs that are 1 2 http://www.merriam-webster.com http://books.google.com/ngrams WordA rooster noon glass chord coast lad monk shore forest coast food cementery monk car brother crane brother implement bird bird food furnace midday magician asylum coast boy journey gem automobile WordB voyage string magician smile forest wizard slave woodland graveyard hill rooster woodland oracle journey lad implement monk tool crane cock fruit stove noon wizard madhouse shore lad voyage jewel car Human 0.08 0.08 0.11 0.13 0.42 0.42 0.55 0.63 0.84 0.87 0.89 0.95 1.10 1.16 1.66 1.68 2.82 2.95 2.97 3.05 3.08 3.11 3.42 3.50 3.61 3.70 3.76 3.84 3.84 3.92 Table 1:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/05/28/word-co-occurrence-literature/

28/05/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

FutureIsWild 52%

42 The Graveyard Desert ..................................................................... 4 Section 1:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/29/futureiswild/

29/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

HollowCreek 51%

Hollow Creek High School  Episode 1          Nicholas Guenther  Diamond Stingily      Ron Barnes Matt Grady Jade Highgarden Vanessa Mariano Jason McMaster Kyle Jackson Rose Jarrett Crystal Johnson Shaun Lalowski Caitlyn Novak Carlos Reyes Maddy Szymkowicz   Hollow Creek  Village in Illinois  Hollow Creek is a village in Will County, Illinois, United States.   The population was 31,410 at the 2010 census. ​ Wikipedia  Weather​ : 73°F (23°C), Wind N at 1 mph (2 km/h), 72% Humidity  Hotels​ : 3­star averaging $90.​  View hotels  Population​ :​  31,410 (2010)  Local time​ : Monday 08:12 AM  Unemployment rate​ :​  8.3% (Apr 2013)    There’s not much to be said about Hollow Creek that hasn’t been said about other small towns.  Depending on who you ask, there’s not too much to do. There’s a few subdivisions, plans to  build a Wal Mart, and rumors of a mall.     A few high schoolers who live in the subdivisions across town go to Hollow Creek High with the  kids who live in the old part of town.     Most people in the town have lived here all their lives, but there’s no town pride, and the natives  don’t care about outsiders coming in to change things.   The high school sport teams are decent, not enough to ever win State, but the seasons revolve  around Friday night games.     Hollow Creek has had a large heroin problem, but a person wouldn’t notice from the highway.   A few people in Hollow Creek have grown up together, there’s nothing wholesome about it. It’s  common.                         Vanessa (Freshman), Maddy (Freshman), Jade (Alumni), Carlos  (Alumni)    “Yeah, I can’t think about anything else.  Idk haha like it’s crazy man all there is is sadness and  darkness but at the same time it just like overpowers you so much that you know nothing else  can really affect you.  Like nothing can touch you and like it’s funny walking around in school or  seeing people u know and like wondering if they know or trying to see if they’re acting weird.  Usually it’s obvious when they know something, but hahah people act so weird around me  anyway.  People are so weird and annoying here, like especially at Hollow Creek.  And it’s in  this stupid, normal way.  But you can watch them be uncomfortable and laugh at their  discomfort like what the fuck you do know, like imagine if they felt the kind of pain we feel, and  it’s just funny.  To just know they could never handle it.  Their lives would fall apart, and we are  just stronger and better in every way, ”  I said    “Ya I mean idc.  Idc about anything,” she said.    I put the phone down.  Both of our dads had died in the same month like 2 months ago.  I  remember her at my dad’s funeral.  Her and like 4 other friends.  I didn’t invite any of them, but  they came, and I cried when I saw them.  I cried a lot besides that, but we talked about normal  stuff too, and it felt better.  It would feel better for like 30 seconds until it felt like shit again.  Sometimes this cycle felt pointless, but sometimes it felt like the feeling better parts were  starting to last longer and the feeling awful parts were starting to get shorter, and eventually I  would just feel ok all day with maybe a couple moments of feeling awful.      It didn’t really seem to be working.  I thought talking to Maddy would be helpful, but she didn’t  really wanna talk about that stuff.  It was hard for me to talk about too.  Like when I found out  about her dad, I just said “I’m sorry.  This sucks.  I’m sorry,” and hugged her.  This was the most  we had talked about it since and she didn’t seem into it.  We talked about other stuff, though.      I picked my phone back up, and she had said, “That guy is talkn to me again.”    It was this fucking freak guy.  He was into what I thought was some really dumb shit, plus he  was 19 which made it even dumber.      She sent me a picture he had sent her.  It was heavily edited, but beneath the filters and the  shifted colors was what looked like a skinny, shirtless kid covered in blood, licking a gloved  finger.     I said, “Jesus Christ” in my head and said, “lol...” back to her.     She said, “Come on hes hot haha”     I asked what she sent back and she responded with a pic of herself.     “Idk im just like smiling and surprised like ooo wow thats cool haha”     She didn’t look surprised.  She looked sad, and I instantly felt self conscious, like fuck am I so  unaware of how miserable I look, but I didn’t look in my front cam or open a mirror. I just stared  at the phone then said, “Cuuute.”     “He said he wants to chill with us,” she said.      I knew his name was like “Jade Highgarden” or some other made up thing, and I searched him.  He had posted bunch of pics with even more blood and more editing than what he had sent  Maddy.  He had written “ThE KOVeNant” in a metal band type font in the back of some of the  pictures, and tagged “#ThEKOVeNant” in any picture with other weird looking boys.      I clicked “ThE KOVeNant” and it was a private page with Jade Hightower listed as an admin,  and a picture of him and four other boys in a graveyard as the profile pic.      “What is ThE KOVeNant?” I said, typing it stupidly like Jade had done to kind of draw attention  to the whole thing being really stupid.      “Oh haha,” she said, “It’s just like his gang like his friends.”      I looked back through his pictures. There was a guy he was with in a lot of the pictures who was  pretty hot and looked a lot more normal.  I wished Maddy would like that guy.  I felt protective of  her cuz, come on, we were going through the same shit, and it really sucked.     “Gang?” I said.  Obviously they weren’t some tough street gang.  They were weird scene kids  into some kind of weird devil stuff or something.  I just wanted her to say it, like really say it to  realize how stupid it sounded.      “Theyre into vampires and spirits and healing and shit,” she said.     “Godddd really maddy???” I said.  Being into vampires was like middle school stuff, and we  were in high school now, and this guy like wasn’t even in school at all.    “Will u come?” she said. “Please lol he can bring his friend.”    I thought about it, automatically assuming it was the hot guy in Jade’s pictures.  What reason  did a cute guy have to believe in this dumb shit?  I could talk to him, I thought. I could see how  crazy Jade really was, and maybe I could tell the guy that Jjade was freaky and that this was a  hard time for Maddy, like really hard.  Like her and I had real shit going on.  We had 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/07/06/hollowcreek/

06/07/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

staufken 49%

He works the graveyard shift at the bowling alley, cleaning, after the place closes.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/04/staufken/

04/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Now-We-Are-Dead 49%

A pause in the street, marked by a short row of black iron railings, a small gap, then a sort of fake two-storey-high neo-classical frontage thing, with a graveyard lurking behind its Corinthian pillars.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/26/now-we-are-dead/

26/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Schulzeitung Ausgabe 5 47%

1 Dem neuen Album, Graveyard Shift, kann man durchaus eine Chance geben.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/02/schulzeitung-ausgabe-5/

02/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Writing Samples 45%

ANASTASIA MIARI Writing Samples Hi!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/17/writing-samples/

17/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Time to Think - Google Docs 44%

    Time to Think  Sam Noyes  February 2015    I don’t remember where I was when I heard the news.  Come to think about it, I don’t remember  anything at all about Thursday.  All I remember was lying awake that night.  Because life slows down at night.  At this point it’s the only time I really get to think.  I also remember the first thing I did the next morning.  Every pill, every needle, everything, in  the garbage.  This isn’t high school anymore. To hell with withdrawal.  I walked out onto Swasey Parkway and looked up at the sky. It seemed particularly bright that  morning, a deep shade of blue that made me dizzy as I stared into it. I remember feeling a tremendous  sense of calm at that moment, an inexplicable serenity.   I should be in high school. I'm eighteen and would be just finishing my senior year, but I dropped  out. I was failing anyway. Not like I had any friends either. Oh, I wasn't bullied, I wasn't an outcast. I was  just forgotten. I was the kid who sat in the back corner, head in his hands, wishing he was somewhere  else, knowing that place wasn't home, either.  I could have done well in school, too. There was nothing stopping me. I was bright ever since I  was an infant. The problem was that I never got invested.  I just didn't care, and now it's too late. I  squandered my chance at a normal high school education, and I can't get it back.  Failing wasn’t my only problem.  During sophomore year I tried heroin for the first time, sitting  alone in the backseat of my mom’s crappy ‘97 Honda Accord. I'm not going to tell you that I was hooked  immediately – that's not how it works. You don't try it once and get addicted. But I do know I liked it that  first time. I liked it a lot. It's a slippery slope.  1  Where do I go now that it's all over?  That was the question I asked myself, time and time again.  My mother. She was the first person who came to mind.  The Exeter Cemetery looked exactly as it had when I last saw it, back in the sixth grade when it  happened. I remember seeing her white, cold body for the last time, seeing the coffin being shut and  lowered into the ground. All I can remember was a sense of awe, that my mother would be in the  ground, unmoving, for eternity.  With those memories came back even more upsetting ones. The nightly sobbing, the screaming,  the fights. That day in June, when I found her hanging from a branch in the backyard. God knows what  she was on when she did it. All that I know is that it was inevitable.  After that, my stepfather was less reserved. He had no one to impress, no one who cared about  me to keep his temper in check. Because my mother cared. She had problems, plenty of them, but I  know that she cared about me.  From then on, he was drunk every night. I'd go to bed with a black eye if I was lucky. At that  point, I was still hoping for a normal life.  The time I spent with my mother was the happiest time of my  life.  So I didn’t run from him.  I resolved to keep going, to make it through high school, to hang on.  But it got hard.  By the time I was in the eighth grade, he had lost his job and was broke.  That’s  when the kids at school started to see the effects.  Because I had friends in middle school.  I had a good  time back then.  But by the eighth grade I had grown quiet.  My stepfather would keep me up until the  early morning with his drunken bouts of anger and violence.  I spent an hour in the cemetery, first gathering flowers for my mother and then walking slowly  down each row, looking at the graves and wondering about the stories.  I always loved stories, and even  though I didn’t do well in school I liked to read.  The graveyard was where the storyteller in me could go  wild.  Who were all these people?  Does anyone remember them?  2  From the cemetery, I directed my steps to the banks of the Exeter River.  I remembered the way  perfectly – snake through my backyard, duck under the willow tree to avoid the view of the neighbors,  scramble down a small, steep hill, dash across a clearing, and there it was, just as I left it a few years ago.  The rock was there, too, its rounded top poking above the white, calm ripples of the rushing water.  I  used to sit on it for hours whenever I wanted to get away, skipping rocks absent‐mindedly or grabbing at  small minnows, only to have them dart away as soon as my hand broke the surface of the water.  The  rock still holds a special significance for me, even though I don’t need to escape anymore, not since my  stepfather left me last year.  Just up and left.  I woke up one day in late May, and his clothes, wallet, car,  everything, just gone.  I’ve been living alone ever since.  I have no relatives, at least none I ever met.  I  don’t know what else to do.  So, I got a job.  I’m working at the Sunoco on Portsmouth Ave from nine to five, and starting at  six I head to McDonald’s, just down the road.  I barely sleep, but at least I’m getting by.  I really should  be there now, not that it matters anymore.  I was planning on attending community college once I saved  up some money, but that was a pipe dream anyway.  I leaned down and picked up a rock.  It was shiny, smooth against the rough skin of my hand.  And I nodded with satisfaction as it skipped over the glassy water, four, five, six, seven times before  coming to a rest on the bank where the river curved.  **  I woke up this morning and I knew exactly where I was going.  Out the door, take a left, right at  the library, left on Linden, ten houses down.  It was just as I remembered it – gray, slightly sagging,  shingles coming detached from the roof.  I had never been inside, but I passed it every day for years  back when I was in middle school.  I walked up the gravel pathway and knocked.  And in a minute, there  was Vinnie, looking just as he did when I left him, albeit with some wisps of gray hair starting to come  3  through.  Same slightly crooked nose, hardened skin, huge hands.  The bastard even had on the same  torn, navy sweatshirt he wore every day on the bus.  It took him a second, I think, to realize who I was and why he recognized me.  He opened the  door with the same uninterested, slightly condescending expression with which one might greet a  Jehovah’s Witness or a door‐to‐door salesman.  But before I had time to react, my hand was being  crushed and I was being pulled inside by his powerful grip.  He was clapping me on the back, smiling,  telling me how great it was to see me.  I couldn’t keep up with the onslaught.  Finally, I was inside, sitting  at the counter, and he poured me a glass of water.  “How you been, man?” was the first thing he could think of to say.  “I’ve been good.  I’m working down at the Sunoco now.”  “Since when you got time for that?”  I smirked, and took a drink of water before answering.  “Since I dropped out.”  He put down the beer that he had been holding since I entered.  Beer bottles acted as a sort of  hand decoration for him.  “Now what the hell’d you go and do that for?”  “Hey, we both know I was failing anyway.”  He grunted and looked out the window, so I continued.  “You still driving buses?”  “Yeah, still at it.  One day I’m gonna quit, though.  One of these days, just wait and see.  Those  brats in the administration, I’m done with ‘em.  Soon as the wife lets me, I’m gone.”  “How is she?”  “She’s fine, man, she’s gettin by.  Still working at the preschool.”  “Nice.”  He nodded.  I sighed.  One of the many things I liked about Vinnie was that he wasn’t afraid of  silence.  Some people, they have to be talking, all day, every day.  Vinnie wasn’t afraid of a little silence.  Gives you time to think.  Finally, he spoke.  “What made you come by? Just felt like checkin in?”  4  “Well, It’s been a big couple days for me.  Real big couple days.”  “Why? What’s been goin on?”  “Well, Thursday I went cold turkey.”  The thought of it made my head pound.  “Been clean three  days now.  Threw it all right in the trash.  Feel like shit, but I’m glad to be done with it.”  Vinnie was no stranger to my drug habits.  I’ve known him since the sixth grade, when he first  became my bus driver.  I live far from school, so I was always the last one on the bus, and I would sit up  front and talk with him until we got to my house.  Then, when I was in the eighth grade, he took on the  role of janitor as well to pick up some extra money.  He became something of a class treasure.  Everyone  in the school wanted to talk to him for his gruff humor and his good‐naturedness.  I always felt lucky to  know him.  “Hey, congrats, man!  Shit, wish I could stop drinking.  How’d you do it?”  “Well, I, uh… I had some motivation.  I just, uh… I found out on Thursday that I –” I tried to think  of the best way to say it.  The letter from the hospital was so impersonal.  It made me feel like a mark on  a piece of paper.  “What is it?”  “It’s… I'm dying, Vinnie.  Acute leukemia, stage four.  They gave me four weeks.”  5 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/22/time-to-think-google-docs/

22/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Time to Think, JF 44%

    Time to Think  John Farkerson  February 2015    I don’t remember where I was when I heard the news.  Come to think about it, I don’t remember  anything at all about Thursday.  All I remember was lying awake that night.  Because life slows down at night.  At this point it’s the only time I really get to think.  I also remember the first thing I did the next morning.  Every pill, every needle, everything, in  the garbage.  This isn’t high school anymore. To hell with withdrawal.  I walked out onto Swasey Parkway and looked up at the sky. It seemed particularly bright that  morning, a deep shade of blue that made me dizzy as I stared into it. I remember feeling a tremendous  sense of calm at that moment, an inexplicable serenity.   I should be in high school. I'm eighteen and would be just finishing my senior year, but I dropped  out. I was failing anyway. Not like I had any friends either. Oh, I wasn't bullied, I wasn't an outcast. I was  just forgotten. I was the kid who sat in the back corner, head in his hands, wishing he was somewhere  else, knowing that place wasn't home, either.  I could have done well in school, too. There was nothing stopping me. I was bright ever since I  was an infant. The problem was that I never got invested.  I just didn't care, and now it's too late. I  squandered my chance at a normal high school education, and I can't get it back.  Failing wasn’t my only problem.  During sophomore year I tried heroin for the first time, sitting  alone in the backseat of my mom’s crappy ‘97 Honda Accord. I'm not going to tell you that I was hooked  immediately – that's not how it works. You don't try it once and get addicted. But I do know I liked it that  first time. I liked it a lot. It's a slippery slope.  1  Where do I go now that it's all over?  That was the question I asked myself, time and time again.  My mother. She was the first person who came to mind.  The Exeter Cemetery looked exactly as it had when I last saw it, back in the sixth grade when it  happened. I remember seeing her white, cold body for the last time, seeing the coffin being shut and  lowered into the ground. All I can remember was a sense of awe, that my mother would be in the  ground, unmoving, for eternity.  With those memories came back even more upsetting ones. The nightly sobbing, the screaming,  the fights. That day in June, when I found her hanging from a branch in the backyard. God knows what  she was on when she did it. All that I know is that it was inevitable.  After that, my stepfather was less reserved. He had no one to impress, no one who cared about  me to keep his temper in check. Because my mother cared. She had problems, plenty of them, but I  know that she cared about me.  From then on, he was drunk every night. I'd go to bed with a black eye if I was lucky. At that  point, I was still hoping for a normal life.  The time I spent with my mother was the happiest time of my  life.  So I didn’t run from him.  I resolved to keep going, to make it through high school, to hang on.  But it got hard.  By the time I was in the eighth grade, he had lost his job and was broke.  That’s  when the kids at school started to see the effects.  Because I had friends in middle school.  I had a good  time back then.  But by the eighth grade I had grown quiet.  My stepfather would keep me up until the  early morning with his drunken bouts of anger and violence.  I spent an hour in the cemetery, first gathering flowers for my mother and then walking slowly  down each row, looking at the graves and wondering about the stories.  I always loved stories, and even  though I didn’t do well in school I liked to read.  The graveyard was where the storyteller in me could go  wild.  Who were all these people?  Does anyone remember them?  2  From the cemetery, I directed my steps to the banks of the Exeter River.  I remembered the way  perfectly – snake through my backyard, duck under the willow tree to avoid the view of the neighbors,  scramble down a small, steep hill, dash across a clearing, and there it was, just as I left it a few years ago.  The rock was there, too, its rounded top poking above the white, calm ripples of the rushing water.  I  used to sit on it for hours whenever I wanted to get away, skipping rocks absent‐mindedly or grabbing at  small minnows, only to have them dart away as soon as my hand broke the surface of the water.  The  rock still holds a special significance for me, even though I don’t need to escape anymore, not since my  stepfather left me last year.  Just up and left.  I woke up one day in late May, and his clothes, wallet, car,  everything, just gone.  I’ve been living alone ever since.  I have no relatives, at least none I ever met.  I  don’t know what else to do.  So, I got a job.  I’m working at the Sunoco on Portsmouth Ave from nine to five, and starting at  six I head to McDonald’s, just down the road.  I barely sleep, but at least I’m getting by.  I really should  be there now, not that it matters anymore.  I was planning on attending community college once I saved  up some money, but that was a pipe dream anyway.  I leaned down and picked up a rock.  It was shiny, smooth against the rough skin of my hand.  And I nodded with satisfaction as it skipped over the glassy water, four, five, six, seven times before  coming to a rest on the bank where the river curved.  **  I woke up this morning and I knew exactly where I was going.  Out the door, take a left, right at  the library, left on Linden, ten houses down.  It was just as I remembered it – gray, slightly sagging,  shingles coming detached from the roof.  I had never been inside, but I passed it every day for years  back when I was in middle school.  I walked up the gravel pathway and knocked.  And in a minute, there  was Vinnie, looking just as he did when I left him, albeit with some wisps of gray hair starting to come  3  through.  Same slightly crooked nose, hardened skin, huge hands.  The bastard even had on the same  torn, navy sweatshirt he wore every day on the bus.  It took him a second, I think, to realize who I was and why he recognized me.  He opened the  door with the same uninterested, slightly condescending expression with which one might greet a  Jehovah’s Witness or a door‐to‐door salesman.  But before I had time to react, my hand was being  crushed and I was being pulled inside by his powerful grip.  He was clapping me on the back, smiling,  telling me how great it was to see me.  I couldn’t keep up with the onslaught.  Finally, I was inside, sitting  at the counter, and he poured me a glass of water.  “How you been, man?” was the first thing he could think of to say.  “I’ve been good.  I’m working down at the Sunoco now.”  “Since when you got time for that?”  I smirked, and took a drink of water before answering.  “Since I dropped out.”  He put down the beer that he had been holding since I entered.  Beer bottles acted as a sort of  hand decoration for him.  “Now what the hell’d you go and do that for?”  “Hey, we both know I was failing anyway.”  He grunted and looked out the window, so I continued.  “You still driving buses?”  “Yeah, still at it.  One day I’m gonna quit, though.  One of these days, just wait and see.  Those  brats in the administration, I’m done with ‘em.  Soon as the wife lets me, I’m gone.”  “How is she?”  “She’s fine, man, she’s gettin by.  Still working at the preschool.”  “Nice.”  He nodded.  I sighed.  One of the many things I liked about Vinnie was that he wasn’t afraid of  silence.  Some people, they have to be talking, all day, every day.  Vinnie wasn’t afraid of a little silence.  Gives you time to think.  Finally, he spoke.  “What made you come by? Just felt like checkin in?”  4  “Well, It’s been a big couple days for me.  Real big couple days.”  “Why? What’s been goin on?”  “Well, Thursday I went cold turkey.”  The thought of it made my head pound.  “Been clean three  days now.  Threw it all right in the trash.  Feel like shit, but I’m glad to be done with it.”  Vinnie was no stranger to my drug habits.  I’ve known him since the sixth grade, when he first  became my bus driver.  I live far from school, so I was always the last one on the bus, and I would sit up  front and talk with him until we got to my house.  Then, when I was in the eighth grade, he took on the  role of janitor as well to pick up some extra money.  He became something of a class treasure.  Everyone  in the school wanted to talk to him for his gruff humor and his good‐naturedness.  I always felt lucky to  know him.  “Hey, congrats, man!  Shit, wish I could stop drinking.  How’d you do it?”  “Well, I, uh… I had some motivation.  I just, uh… I found out on Thursday that I –” I tried to think  of the best way to say it.  The letter from the hospital was so impersonal.  It made me feel like a mark on  a piece of paper.  “What is it?”  “It’s… I'm dying, Vinnie.  Acute leukemia, stage four.  They gave me four weeks.”  5 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/22/time-to-think-jf/

22/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

ktk morph and instants 41%

When that creature dies this turn, exile all cards from its controller’s graveyard.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/17/ktk-morph-and-instants/

17/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com