Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «kollyvades»:


Total: 6 results - 0.041 seconds

communiontombroseng 100%

Fr. Eugene Tombros “Regarding Frequent Communion” in 1966      In  1966,  Fr.  Eugene  Tombros,  the  arch‐chancellor  of  the  Matthewite  Synod, published a Prayer Book in Greek. On the last page, he provides a quote  from the book “Regarding Continuous Communion” by St. Macarius Notaras of  Corinth. This means that Fr. Eugene Tombros, the most influential person in the  Matthewite Synod between 1940 and 1974, knew about this book and respected  its contents enough to desire to quote from it. The quote is as follows:        A QUOTE FROM THE BOOK   “REGARDING CONTINUOUS COMMUNION”      If  you  like  the  kindle  in  your  heart  divine  love  and  to  acquire love towards Christ and with this to also acquire all  the  rest  of  the  virtues,  regularly  attend  Holy  Communion  and  you  will  enjoy  that  which  you  desire.  Because  it  is  absolutely impossible for somebody not to love Christ, when  he  conscientiously  and  continually  communes  of  His  Holy  Body and drinks His Precious Blood.”    - St. Macarius Notaras          It is clear, therefore, that Fr. Eugene Tombros was aware of the Kollyvades  movement and in favour of it. The quote below advocates frequent communion.  This  falls  perfectly  in  place  with  an  earlier  work  by  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  published in 1933, which also was written in the spirit of the Kollyvades Fathers.       This  makes  one  ask  the  question:  If  the  most  important  Matthewite  leaders, namely, Bishop Matthew of Bresthena in 1933 and Fr. Eugene Tombros  in  1966,  published  works  regarding  Frequent  Holy  Communion  that  clearly  reflected  the  beliefs  of  the  Kollyvades  Fathers  such  as  St.  Macarius  Notaras,  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos,  St.  Athanasius  of  Paros,  St.  Pachomius  of  Chios,  St.  Nectarius of Aegina, etc, how did this all change in the Matthewite Synod? Why  did their practices become so anti‐Kollyvadic from the 1970s onwards?       The  answer  is  that  in  1979  during  a  week‐long  “clergy  synaxis”  at  Kouvara  Monastery,  all  of  the  bishops  and  priests  were  trained  to  demand  laymen to adhere to a strict fast for a week, and the last three days without oil,  while  making  this  exempt  from  clergy.  The  people  who  led  this  course  at  Kouvara were the laymen theologians, Mr. Gkoutzidis and Mr. Kontogiannis, the  latter of whom lated became Bp. Kirykos.       Just  as  usual,  the  same  people  who  “systematized”  (changed)  the  ecclesiology, the same people who re‐wrote Matthewite history “their own way,”  are the same people who removed the spirit of the Kollyvades Fathers from the  Matthewites.  After  over  three  decades  of  this,  the  majority  of  Matthewites  now  think  their  practices  are  normal,  and  if  they  read  the  book  of  St.  Macarius  Notaras or of St. Nicodemus of Athos regarding Frequent Holy Communion they  would shudder. But it is time for the brainwashing to end and for truth to shine.       May the prayers of the Holy Kollyvades Fathers enlighten us all. Amen. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communiontombroseng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii01 48%

CAN FASTING MAKE ONE “WORTHY” TO COMMUNE?    In the first paragraph of his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes:  “...  according  to  the  tradition  of  our  Fathers  (and  that  of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  must  be  suitably prepared, in order to worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord. This  preparation indispensably includes fasting according to one’s strength.” To further  prove that he interprets this worthiness as being based on fasting, Metropolitan  Kirykos  continues  further  down  in  reference  to  his  unhistorical  understanding  about the  early  Christians:  “They fasted  in the fine and  broader  sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.”    Here Bp. Kirykos tries to fool the reader by stating the absolutely false  notion  that  the  Holy  Fathers  (among  them  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena)  supposedly agree with his unorthodox views. The truth is that not one single  Holy Father of the Orthodox Church agrees with Bp. Kirykosʹs views, but in  fact, many of them condemn these views as heretical. And as for referring to  St.  Matthew  of  Bresthena,  this  is  extremely  misleading,  which  is  why  Bp.  Kirykos  was  unable  to  provide  a  quote.  In  reality,  St.  Matthew’s  five‐page‐ long treatise on Holy Communion, published in 1933, repeatedly stresses the  importance  of  receiving  Holy  Communion  frequently  and  does  not  mention  any  such  pre‐communion  fast  at  all.  He  only  mentions  that  one  must  go  to  confession,  and  that  confession  is  like  a  second  baptism  which  washes  the  soul and prepares it for communion. If St. Matthew really thought a standard  week‐long  pre‐communion  fast  for  all  laymen  was  paramount,  he  certainly  would have mentioned it somewhere in his writings. But in the hundreds of  pages  of  writings  by  St.  Matthew  that  have  been  collected,  no  mention  is  made of such a fast. The reason for this is because St. Matthew was a Kollyvas  Father  just  as  was  his  mentor,  St.  Nectarius  of  Aegina.  Also,  the  fact  St.  Matthew left Athos and preached throughout Greece and Asia Minor during  his earlier life, is another example of his imitation of the Kollyvades Fathers.    As  much  as  Bp.  Kirykos  would  like  us  to  think  that  the  Holy  Fathers  preach that a Christian, simply by fasting, can somehow “worthily receive the  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,”  the  Holy  Fathers  of  the  Orthodox  Church  actually  teach  quite  clearly  that  NO  ONE  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion,  except by the grace of God Himself. Whether someone eats oil on a Saturday  or  doesnʹt  eat  oil,  cannot  be  the  deciding  point  of  a  person’s  supposed  “worthiness.”  In  fact,  even  fasting,  confession,  prayer,  and  all  other  things  donʹt  come  to  their  fulfillment  in  the  human  soul  until  one  actually  receives  Holy  Communion.  All  of  these  things  such  as  fasting,  prayers,  prostrations,  repentance,  etc,  do  indeed  help  one  quench  his  passions,  but  they  by  no  means make him “worthy.” Yes, we confess our sins to the priest. But the sins  aren’t loosened from our soul until the priest reads the prayer of pardon, and  the  sins  are  still  not  utterly  crushed  until  He  who  conquered  death  enters  inside the human soul through the Mystery of Holy Communion. That is why  Christ  said  that  His  Body  and  Blood  are  shed  “for  the  remission  of  sins.”  (Matthew 26:28).     Fasting  is  there  to  quench  our  passions  and  prevent  us  from  sinning,  confession is there so that we can recall our sins and repent of them, but it is  the  Mysteries  of  the  Church  that  operate  on  the  soul  and  grant  to  it  the  “worthiness” that the human soul can by no means attain by itself. Thus, the  Mystery  of  Pardon  loosens  the  sins,  and  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion  remits  the  sins.  For  of  the  many  Mysteries  of  the  Church,  the  seven  highest  mysteries have this very purpose, namely, to remit the sins of mankind by the  Divine  Economy.  Thus,  Baptism  washes  away  the  sins  from  the  soul,  while  Chrism  heals  anything  ailing  and  fills  all  voids.  Thus,  Absolution  washes  away the sins, while Communion heals the soul and body and fills it with the  grace of God. Thus, Unction cures the maladies of soul and body, causing the  body  and  soul  to  no  longer  be  divided  but  united  towards  a  life  in  Christ;  while Marriage (or Monasticism) confirms the plurality of persons or sense of  community that God desired when he said of old “Be fruitful and multiply”  (or in the case of Monasticism, “Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for  brethren  to  dwell  together  in  unity!”).  Finally,  the  Mystery  of  Priesthood  is  the  authority  given  by  Christ  for  all  of  these  Mysteries  to  be  administered.  Certainly, it is an Apostolic Tradition for mankind to be prepared by fasting  before  receiving  any  of  the  above  Mysteries,  be  it  Baptism,  Chrism,  Absolution,  Communion,  Unction,  Marriage  or  Priesthood.  But  this  act  of  fasting itself does not make anyone “worthy!”    If  someone  thinks  they  are  “worthy”  before  approaching  Holy  Communion,  then  the  Holy  Communion  would  be  of  no  positive  affect  to  them.  In  actuality,  they  will  consume  fire  and  punishment.  For  if  anyone  thinks  that  their  own  works  make  themselves  “worthy”  before  the  eyes  of  God, then surely Christ would have died in vain. Christ’s suffering, passion,  death  and  Resurrection would have  been  completely unnecessary.  As Christ  said,  “They  that  be  whole  need  not  a  physician,  but  they  that  are  sick  (Matthew 9:12).” If a person truly thinks that by not partaking of oil/wine on  Saturday,  in  order  to  commune  on  Sunday,  that  this  has  made  them  “worthy,”  then  by  merely  thinking  such  a  thing  they  have  already  proved  themselves unworthy of Holy Communion. In fact, they are deniers of Christ,  deniers  of  the  Cross  of  Christ,  and  deniers  of  their  own  salvation  in  Christ.  They  rather  believe  in  themselves  as  their  own  saviors.  They  are  thus  no  longer Christians but humanists.     But  is  humanism  a  modern  notion,  or  has  it  existed  before  in  the  history  of  the  Church?  In  reality,  the  devil  has  hurled  so  many  heresies  against  the  Church  that  he  has  run  out  of  creativity.  Thus,  the  traps  and  snares he sets are but fancy recreations of ancient heresies already condemned  by the Church. The humanist notions entertained by Bp. Kirykos are actually  an offshoot of an ancient heresy known as Pelagianism. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii01/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

padrepedro 02 eng 41%

In reference to the Mystery of Holy Communion    The  Orthodox  Church,  guarding  the  ancient  Apostolic  tradition,  does  not  only  urge  the  participation  in  the  preeminent  Mystery,  but  requires, by the 8th and 9th Apostolic Canons, the 66th and the 80th canons of  the 6th Ecumenical Council and the 2nd canon of the Council in Antioch, all  of  the  faithful  in  church,  laypeople  and  clergymen  to  partake  of  the  common Chalice, under the penalty of excommunication and deposition.      Only  the  prohibited,  those  who  have  fallen  into  mortal  sins,  are  excluded  from  this  Eucharistic  participation,  by  the  suggestion  of  their  spiritual  father  and  confessor,  as  the  102nd  canon  of  the  6th  Ecumenical  Council dictates.    The  philokalic  fathers,  who  were  mockingly  called  Kollyvades  by  everyone, from their adversaries to their mortal enemies, were attempting  to revive and teach this ancient, revered Apostolic Tradition on the Holy  Mountain  and  were  criticized  and  slandered  and  sent  away  from  Athos  and some of them were killed.      So  it  is  a  valid  apprehension  as  to  why  Your  Eminence  remains  completely  silent  and  openly  ignores  the  now  known  book  of  the  philokalic fathers, which is the book of Saints Makarios Notaras, formerly  of  Corinth,  and  Nikodemos  of  the  Holy  Mountain,  Concerning  the  Continuous  Communion  of  the  Immaculate  Mysteries  of  Christ,  which  constitutes a summary and recapitulation of the teachings of the Holy and  God‐bearing Fathers about the Mystery of Holy Communion, and as such  proclaims  both  the  synodal  decision  of  Patriarch  Neophytos  of  Constantinople from Maroneia, and the synodal decision of the Church of  Greece in 1886.    It  is  strange  that  this  very  well  known  book  is  absent  from  the  sources  and  references  about  Holy  Communion  in  the  above  mentioned  book by Archbishop Andrew of the G.O.C., Concerning Holy Communion.    The  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  Gregory  V  also  invokes  this  ancient Apostolic Tradition by his synodal decision in the year 1819 which  says that “the pious have the duty to approach and receive the life‐giving Body,  for this reason they are called by the priest.”    But  also  the  Church  of  Greece,  by  its  synodal  decision  in  the  year  1878, condemns the different teachings of Makrakis, among which are the  abolition  of  the  Mystery  of  Confession,  and  appeals  to  this  ancient  Apostolic Tradition by saying that “but not only does the Church by no means  forbid  the  truly  worthy  to  present  themselves  more  frequently  to  Holy  Communion,  but  indeed  in  every  liturgy,  by  the  sounding  of  ‘with  the  fear  of  God,  faith  and  love  draw  near’  She  calls  them  to  present  themselves  to  Holy  Communion.”    The  previously  mentioned  bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena  also  invokes  this  Apostolic  Tradition  concerning  frequent  Communion  in  his  book “The Mystery of Confession,” (Concerning Holy Communion, pp. 107‐ 111,  Hieromonk  Matthew,  Spiritual  Father,  Pilgrim  to  the  All‐holy  and  Life‐giving Tomb, Athonite, Cretan, Lavriotan, Athens 1933).    All  Holy  Tradition  speaks  about  the  necessary  preparation  before  Holy Communion, which concerns clergymen and laypeople, and consists  of  the  continual  cleansing  of  the  heart  and  mind,  by  Repentance  and  Confession, by the obligatory complete fast from midnight and  after and  by  the  Pre‐Communion  fast  according  to  one’s  strength,  in  accordance  with the opinion of one’s spiritual father and confessor.      Your  Eminence,  however,  writes  that  the  only  necessary  preparation  and  obligatory  prerequisite  for  Holy  Communion  is  fasting  and nothing else.    But  the  question  easily  arises  of  why  the  clergymen  do  not  fast  before  Holy  Communion,  maybe  because,  according  to  Your  view  they  have some privilege over laypeople?      Why does Your Eminence completely  silence the basic criterion of  Holy  Communion,  which  is  the  clean  conscience,  as  the  Church  has  believed from the beginning, and impose objective criteria for those who  will receive Communion in the future?  Who will inspect these, forbidding  and allowing Holy Communion?  Will someone give us a reference?  Did the God‐bearing Holy Fathers, who did not establish a canon of  obligatory  fasting  before  Holy  Communion,  do  this  by  oversight  or  mistake?      By  Your  Eminence  setting  and  imposing  new  canons  and  morals,  under the pretext of devoutness and ascetic piety, do You consider that it  is necessary to cover the void of what was unforeseen and omitted by the  God‐bearing Holy Fathers?    Does  Your  Eminence  believe  that  the  Holy  God‐bearing  Fathers  have erred and that You are able to make an examination and correction  of them?    In  Your  Eminence’s  reference  to  the  unworthiness  of  the  faithful,  do  You  consider  that  we  the  clergymen  and  shepherds  are  worthy  and  holy and above any censure and criticism?    Truly,  if  as  You  write,  due  to  their  unworthiness  none  of  the  faithful  should  remain  in  the  church,  then  this  means  two  things,  either  the  congregation  is  not  baptized  Orthodox  or  we  the  clergymen  and  shepherds  are  unworthy  of  the  Master’s  calling  and  have  no  concern  for  the salvation of the logical sheep, which the Master Christ has entrusted to  us,  because we  have not  made them  worthy of the grace  of  the  All‐Holy  Spirit  so  that  they  may  continuously  receive  the  life‐giving  body  and  blood  of  the  Lord,  and  rather  the  absence  of  our  spiritual  guidance  will  end up in our sure condemnation on the day of the just judgment.      Therefore the faithful have every right not to call us shepherds and  spiritual fathers, but oppressive wolves and stepfathers, because the total  absence  of  love,  indifference  and  contempt  for  the  flock  is  what  characterizes  us.    We,  whose  chief  characteristics  are  lack  of  feeling  and  the strict observance of the letter of the law, as we exclusively understand  it,  present  ourselves  as  managers  of  the  power  of  Christ.    We  are  only  concerned  with  our  personal  interests  and  we  offer  the  logical  sheep  of  Christ as prey to the noetic wolf who is the ruler of this world, that is, the  devil.      Truly, which of us clergymen and shepherds, moved by pure love,  and  without  ulterior  motives  and  expedience,  as  our  Lord,  literally  ran 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/padrepedro-02-eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii03 34%

ANCIENT AND CONTEMPORARY FATHERS REGARDING  SO‐CALLED “WORTHINESS” OF THE HOLY MYSTERIES    St. John Cassian (+29 February, 435) totally disagrees with the notion  of  Bp.  Kirykos  that  the  early  Christians  communed  frequently  supposedly  because  “they  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune.”  Blessed  Cassian  does  not  approve  of  Christians  shunning  communion  because  they  think  of  themselves  as  unworthy,  and  supposedly  different  to  the  early  Christians.  Thus  whichever  side  one  takes  in  this  supposed dispute of Semipelagianism, be it the side of Blessed Augustine or  that of Blessed Cassian, the truth is that both of these Holy Fathers condemn  the notions held by Bp. Kirykos.    Blessed Cassian writes: “We must not avoid communion because we deem  ourselves to be sinful. We must approach it more often for the healing of the soul and  the  purification  of  the  spirit,  but  with  such  humility  and  faith  that  considering  ourselves  unworthy,  we  would  desire  even  more  the  medicine  for  our  wounds.  Otherwise  it  is  impossible  to  receive  communion  once  a  year,  as  certain  people  do,  considering the sanctification of heavenly Mysteries as available only to saints. It is  better to think that by giving us grace, the sacrament makes us pure and holy.  Such people [who commune rarely] manifest more pride than humility, for when  they receive, they think of themselves as worthy. It is much better if, in humility  of  heart,  knowing  that  we  are  never  worthy  of  the  Holy  Mysteries  we  would  receive  them  every  Sunday  for  the  healing  of  our  diseases,  rather  than,  blinded  by  pride, think that after one year we become worthy of receiving them.” (John  Cassian, Conference 23, Chapter 21)    Now, as for those who may think the above notion  is only applicable  for the Christians living at the time of St. John Cassian (5th century), and that  the  people  at  that  time  were  justified  in  confessing  their  sins  frequently  and  also communing frequently, throughout the year, while that supposedly this  does not apply to contemporary Orthodox Christians, such a notion does not  hold  any  validity,  because  contemporary  Holy  Fathers,  among  them  the  Hesychastic  Fathers  and  Kollyvades  Fathers,  have  taught  exactly  the  same  thing  as  we  have  read  above  in  the  writings  of  Blessed  Cassian.  Thus  St.  Gregory  Palamas,  St.  Symeon  the  New  Theologian,  St.  Macarius  Notaras  of  Corinth,  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos,  St.  Arsenius  of  Paros,  St.  Pachomius  of  Chios, St. Nectarius of Aegina, St. Matthew of Bresthena, St. Moses of Athikia,  and so many other contemporary Orthodox Saints agree with the positions of  the  Blessed  Cassian.  The  various  quotes  from  these  Holy  Fathers  are  to  be  provided in another study regarding the letter of Bp. Kirykos to Fr. Pedro. In  any  case,  not  only  contemporary  Greek  Fathers,  but  even  contemporary  Syrian, Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Romanian Fathers concur.     St.  Arsenius  the  Russian  of  Stavronikita  (+24  March,  1846),  for  example, writes: “One can sometimes hear people say that they avoid approaching  the Holy Mysteries because they consider themselves unworthy. But who is worthy  of it? No one on earth is worthy of it, but whoever confesses his sins with heartfelt  contrition  and  approaches  the  Chalice  of  Christ  with  consciousness  of  his  unworthiness  the  Lord  will  not  reject,  in  accordance  with  His  words,  Him  that  cometh to Me I shall in no wise cast out (John 6:37).” (Athonite Monastery of St.  Panteleimon, Athonite Leaflets, No. 105, published in 1905)    St. John Chrysostom (+14 September, 407), Archbishop of the Imperial  City  of  Constantinople  New  Rome,  speaks  very  much  against  the  idea  of  making fasting and communing a mere custom. He instead insists on making  true repentance of tears and communion with God a daily ritual. For no one  passes a single day without sinning at least in thought if not also in word and  deed. Likewise, no one can live a true life in Christ without daily repentance  and  frequent  Communion.  But  in  fact,  the  greatest  method  to  abstain  from  sins  is  by  the  fear  of  communing  unworthily.  Thus,  through  frequent  Communion one is guided towards abstinence from sins. Of course, the grace  of the Mysteries themselves are essential in this process of cleansing the brain,  heart and bowel of the body, as well as cleansing the mind, spirit and word of  the soul. But the fear of hellfire as experienced in the partaking of communion  unworthily is most definitely a means of preventing sins.     But  if  one  thinks  that  fasting  for  seven  days  without  meat,  five  days  without  dairy,  three  days  without  oil,  and  one  day  without  anything  but  xerophagy,  is  a  means  to  make  one  “worthy”  of  Communion,  whereas  the  communicant  then  returns  to  his  life  of  sin  until  the  next  year  when  he  decides  to  commune  again,  then  not  only  was  this  one  week  of  fasting  worthless, not only would 40 days of lent be unprofitable, but even an entire  lifetime  of  fasting  will  be  useless.  For  such  a  person  makes  fasting  and  Communion a mere custom, rather than a way of Life in Christ.    Blessed  Chrysostom  writes:  “But  since  I  have  mentioned  this  sacrifice,  I  wish to say a little in reference to you who have been initiated; little in quantity, but  possessing great force and profit, for it is not our own, but the words of Divine Spirit.  What then is it? Many partake of this sacrifice once in the whole year; others twice;  others  many  times.  Our  word  then  is  to  all;  not  to  those  only  who  are  here,  but  to  those also who are settled in the desert. For they partake once in the year, and often  indeed  at  intervals  of  two  years.  What  then?  Which  shall  we  approve?  Those  [who  receive] once [in the year]? Those who [receive] many times? Those who [receive] few  times?  Neither  those  [who  receive]  once,  nor  those  [who  receive]  often,  nor  those  [who  receive]  seldom,  but  those  [who  come]  with  a  pure  conscience,  from  a  pure  heart,  with  an  irreproachable  life.  Let  such  draw  near  continually;  but  those  who  are  not  such,  not  even  once.  Why,  you  will  ask?  Because  they  receive  to  themselves  judgment,  yea  and  condemnation,  and  punishment, and vengeance. And do not wonder. For as food, nourishing by nature, if  received  by  a  person  without  appetite,  ruins  and  corrupts  all  [the  system],  and  becomes an occasion of disease, so surely is it also with respect to the awful mysteries.  Do  you  feast  at  a  spiritual  table,  a  royal  table,  and  again  pollute  your  mouth  with  mire?  Do  you  anoint  yourself  with  sweet  ointment,  and  again  fill  yourself  with  ill  savors?  Tell  me,  I  beseech  you,  when  after  a  year  you  partake  of  the  Communion, do you think that the Forty Days are sufficient for you for the  purifying of the sins of all that time? And again, when a week has passed, do  you  give  yourself  up  to  the  former  things?  Tell  me  now,  if  when  you  have  been  well for forty days after a long illness, you should again give yourself up to the food  which  caused  the  sickness,  have  you  not  lost  your  former  labor  too?  For  if  natural  things  are  changed,  much  more  those  which  depend  on  choice.  As  for  instance,  by  nature we see, and naturally we have healthy eyes; but oftentimes from a bad habit [of  body] our power of vision is injured. If then natural things are changed, much more  those of choice. Thou assignest forty days for the health of the soul, or perhaps  not  even  forty,  and  do  you  expect  to  propitiate  God?  Tell  me,  are  you  in  sport? These things I say, not as forbidding you the one and annual coming,  but as wishing you to draw near continually.” (John Chrysostom, Homily 17,  on Hebrews 10:2‐9)    The Holy Fathers also stress the importance of confession of sins as the  ultimate  prerequisite  for  Holy  Communion,  while  remaining  completely  silent  about  any  specific  fast  that  is  somehow  generally  applicable  to  all  laymen equally. It is true that the spiritual father (who hears the confession of  the  penitent  Orthodox  Christian  layman)  does  have  the  authority  to  require  his spiritual son to fulfill a fast of repentance before communion. But the local  bishop (who is not  the layman’s spiritual father but  only a  distant  observer)  most certainly does not have the authority to demand the priests to enforce a  single method of preparation common to all laymen without distinction, such  as what Bp. Kirykos does in his letter to Fr. Pedro. For man cannot be made  “worthy”  due  to  such  a  pharisaic  fast  that  is  conducted  for  mere  custom’s  sake rather than serving as a true form of repentance. Indeed it is possible for  mankind  to  become  worthy  of  Holy  Communion.  But  this  worthiness  is  derived from the grace of God which directs the soul away from sins, and it is  derived  from  the  Mysteries  themselves,  particularly  the  Mystery  of  Repentance  (also  called  Confession  or  Absolution)  and  the  Mystery  of  the  Body and Blood of Christ (also called the Eucharist or Holy Communion).    St.  Nicholas  Cabasilas  (+20  June,  1391),  Archbishop  of  Thessalonica,  writes: “The Bread which truly strengthens the heart of man will obtain this for us; it  will enkindle in us ardor for contemplation, destroying the torpor that weighs down  our  soul;  it  is  the  Bread  which  has  come  down  from  heaven  to  bring  Life;  it  is  the  Bread  that  we  must  seek  in  every  way.  We  must  be  continually  occupied  with  this  Eucharistic banquet lest we suffer famine. We must guard against allowing our soul  to grow anemic and sickly, keeping away from this food under the pretext of reverence  for the sacrament. On the contrary, after telling our sins to the priest, we must  drink of the expiating Blood.” (St. Nicholas Cabasilas, The Life in Christ).    St.  Matthew  Carpathaces  (+14  May,  1950),  Archbishop  of  Athens,  while still an Archimandrite, published a book in 1933 in which he wrote five  pages  regarding  the  Mystery  of  Holy  Communion.  In  these  five  pages  he  addresses  the  issue  of  Holy  Communion,  worthiness  and  preparation.  Nowhere  in  it  does  he  speak  of  any  particular  pre‐communion  fast.  On  the  contrary, in the rest of the book he speaks only about the fasts of Wednesday  and  Friday  throughout  the  year,  and  the  four  Lenten  seasons  of  Nativity,  Pascha,  Apostles  and  Dormition.  He  also  mentions  that  married  couples  should  avoid  marital  relations  on  Wednesdays,  Fridays,  Saturdays  and  Sundays.  Aside  from  these  fasts  and  abstaining,  he  mentions  no  such  thing  about a pre‐communion fast anywhere in the book, and the book is over 300  pages long.     In  the  section  where  he  speaks  specifically  regarding  Holy  Communion,  Blessed  Matthew  speaks  only  of  confession  of  sins  as  a  prerequisite  to  Holy  Communion,  and  he  mentions  the  importance  of  abstaining from sins. Nowhere does he suggest that partaking of foods on the  days  the  Orthodox  Church  permits  is  supposedly  a  sin.  For  to  claim  such  a  thing is a product of Manicheanism and is anathematized by several councils.  But  Blessed  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  no  Manichean,  he  was  a  Genuine  Orthodox Christian, a preserver of Orthodoxy in its fullness. The fact he had  600 nuns and 200 monks flock around him during his episcopate in Greece is  proof of his spiritual heights and that he was an Orthodox Christian not only  in  thought  and  word,  but  also  in  deed.  Yet  Bp.  Kirykos,  who  in  his  thirty  years  as  a  pastor  has  not  managed  to  produce  a  single  spiritual  offspring,  dares to claim that Blessed Matthew of Bresthena is the source of his corrupt  and heretical views. But nothing could be further from the truth.     In  Blessed  Matthew’s  written  works,  which  are  manifold  and  well‐ preserved,  nowhere  does  he  suggest  that  clergy  can  simply  follow  the  common  fasting  rules  of  the  Orthodox  Church  and  commune  several  times  per week, while if laymen follow the same Orthodox rules of fasting just as do  the priests, they are supposedly not free to commune but must undergo some  kind  of  extra  fast.  Nowhere  does  he  demand  this  fast  that  is  not  as  a  punishment  for  laymen’s  sins,  but  is  implemented  merely  because  they  are  laymen, since this fast is being demanded irrespective of the outcome of their  confession to the priest. Yet despite all of this, Bp. Kirykos arbitrarily uses the  name  of  Bishop  Matthew  as  supposedly  agreeing  with  his  positions.  The  following  quote  from  the  works  of  Blessed  Matthew  will  shatter  Kirykos’s  notion that “fasting in the finer and broader sense” can make a Christian “worthy  to  commune,”  without  mentioning  the  Holy  Mysteries  of  Confession  and  Communion themselves as the source of that worthiness.     The following quote will shatter Bp. Kirykos’ attempt to misrepresent  the  positions  of  Blessed  Matthew,  which  is  something  that  Bp.  Kirykos  is  guilty of doing for the past 30 years, tarnishing the name of Blessed Matthew,  and  causing  division  and  self‐destruction  within  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church of Greece, while at the same time boasting of somehow being Bishop  Matthew’s  only  real  follower.  It  is  time  for  Bp.  Kirykos’  three‐decades‐long  façade  to  be  shattered.  This  shattering  shall  not  only  apply  to  the  façade  regarding the pharisaic‐style fast, but even the façade regarding the post‐1976  ecclesiology  held  by  Bp.  Kirykos  and  his  associate,  Mr.  Gkoutzidis—an  ecclesiology  which  is  found  nowhere  in  the  encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  from  1935  until  the  1970s.  That  was  the  time  that  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  the  then  layman  Mr.  Kontogiannis  (now  Bp.  Kirykos)  began  controlling the Matthewite Synod. On the contrary, many historic encyclicals  of  the  Genuine  Orthodox  Church  contradict  this  post‐1976  Gkoutzidian‐ Kontogiannian  ecclesiology,  for  which  reason  the  duo  has  kept  these  documents hidden in the Synodal archives for three decades. But let us begin  the  shattering  of  the  façade  with  the  position  of  Blessed  Matthew  regarding  frequent  Communion.  For  God  has  willed  that  this  be  the  first  article  by  Bishop Matthew to be translated into English that is not of an ecclesiological  nature,  but  a  work  in  regards  to  Orthopraxia,  something  rarely  spoken  and  seldom found in the endlessly repetitive periodicals of the Kirykite faction.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii03/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii11 33%

IS IT SINFUL TO EAT MEAT?   ARE MARITAL RELATIONS IMPURE?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “Regarding the Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without  fasting  beforehand,  it  is  correct,  but  it  must  be  interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics and temperate and fasters, and only they remained until the end of the Divine  Liturgy and communed. They fasted in the fine and broader sense, that is, they were  worthy to commune.”      In  the  above  quote,  Bp.  Kirykos  displays  the  notion  that  early  Christians  supposedly  abstained  from  meat  and  from  marriage,  and  were  thus all supposedly “ascetics and temperate and fasters,” and that this is what  gave them the right to commune daily. But the truth of the matter is that the  majority of Christians were not ascetics, yet they did commune every day. In  fact, the ascetics were the ones who lived far away from cities where Liturgy  would  have  been  available,  and  it  was  these  ascetics  who  would  commune  rarely.  This  can  be  ascertained  from  studying  the  Patrologia  and  the  ecclesiastical histories written by Holy Fathers.      The  theories  that  Bp.  Kirykos  entertains  are  also  followed  by  those  immediately  surrounding  him.  His  sister,  the  nun  Vincentia,  for  instance,  actually believes that people that eat meat or married couples that engaged in  legal nuptial relations are supposedly sinning! She actually believes that meat  and  marriage  are  sinful  and  should  be  avoided.  This  theory  appears  much  more extreme in the person of the nun Vincentia, but this notion is also found  in the teachings of Bp. Kirykos, and the spirit of this error can also be found in  the  above  quote,  where  he  believes  that  only  people  who  are  “ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters”  are  “worthy  of  communion,”  as  if  a  man  who  eats  meat or has marital relations with his own wife is “sinful” and “unworthy.”      But is this the teaching of the Orthodox Church? Certainly  not! These  teachings  are  actually  found  in  Gnosticism,  Manichaeism,  Paulicianism,  Bogomilism, and various “New Age” movements which arise from a mixture  of Christianity with Hinduism or Buddhism, religions that consider meat and  marriage to be sinful due to their erroneous belief in reincarnation.      The  Holy  Apostle  Paul  warns  us  against  these  heresies.  In  the  First  Epistle to Timothy, the Apostle to the Nations writes: “Now the Spirit speaketh  expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to  seducing  spirits,  and  doctrines  of  devils;  speaking  lies  in  hypocrisy;  having  their  conscience  seared  with  a  hot  iron;  Forbidding  to  marry,  and  commanding to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with  thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth. For every creature of God is  good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving: For it is sanctified  by  the  word  of  God  and  prayer.”  If  all  of  the  early  Christians  abstained  from  meat  and  marriage,  as  Bp.  Kirykos  dares  to  say,  how  is  it  that  the  Apostle  Paul warns his disciple, Timothy, that in the future people shall “depart from  the faith,” shall preach “doctrines of demons,” shall “speak lies in hypocrisy,” shall  “forbid marriage” and shall “command to abstain from meats?”      The heresy that the Holy Apostle Paul was prophesying about is most  likely  that  called  Manichaeism.  This  heresy  finds  its  origins  in  a  Babylonian  man called Shuraik, son of Fatak Babak. Shuraik became a Mandaean Gnostic,  and was thus referred to as Rabban Mana (Teacher of the Light‐Spirit). For this  reason, Shuraik became commonly‐known throughout the world as Mani. His  followers became known as Manicheans in order to distinguish them from the  Mandaeans, and the religion he founded became known as Manichaeism. The  basic doctrines and principles of this religion were as follows:      The  Manicheans  believed  that  there  was  no  omnipotent  God.  Instead  they believed that there were two equal powers, one good and one evil. The  good power was ruled by the “Prince of Light” while the evil power was led  by  the  “Prince  of  Darkness.”  They  believed  that  the  material  world  was  inherently evil from its very creation, and that it was created by the Prince of  Darkness.  This  explains  why  they  held  meat  and  marriage  to  be  evil,  since  anything  material  was  considered  evil  from  its  very  foundation.  They  also  believed  that  each  human  consisted  of  a  battleground  between  these  two  opposing  powers  of  light  and  darkness,  where  the  soul  endlessly  battles  against the body, respectively. They divided their followers into four groups:  1)  monks,  2)  nuns,  3)  laymen,  4)  laywomen.  The  monks  and  nuns  abstained  from  meat  and  marriage  and  were  therefore  considered  “elect”  or  “holy,”  whereas  the  laymen  and  laywomen  were  considered  only  “hearers”  and  “observers”  but  not  real  “bearers  of  the  light”  due  to  their  “sin”  of  eating  meat and engaging in marital relations.       The above principles of the Manichean religion are entirely opposed to  the Orthodox Faith, on account of the following reasons:        The  Orthodox  Church  believes  in  one  God  who  is  eternal,  uncreated,  without beginning  and without  end, and  forever good and  omnipotent.  Evil  has  never  existed  in  the  uncreated  Godhead,  and  it  shall  never  exist  in  the  uncreated Godhead.       The  power  of  evil  is  not  uncreated  but  it  has  a  beginning  in  creation.  Yet the power of evil was not created by God. Evil exists because the prince of  the  angels  abused  his  free  will,  which  caused  him  to  fall  and  take  followers  with him. He became the devil and his followers became demons. Prior to this  event there was no evil in the created world.       The material world was not created by the devil, but by God Himself.  By  no  means  is  the  material  world  evil.  God  looked  upon  the  world  he  created and said “it was very good.” For this reason partaking of meat is not  evil, but God blessed Noah and all of his successors to partake of meat. For all  material things in the world exist to serve man, and man exists to serve God.       If  there  is  any  evil  in  the  created  world  it  derives  from  mankind’s  abuse of his free will, which took place in Eden, due to the enticement of the  devil. The history of mankind, both good and bad, is not a product of good or  evil forces fighting one another, but every event in the history of mankind is  part  of  God’s  plan  for  mankind’s  salvation.  The  devil  has  power  over  this  world  only  forasmuch  as  mankind  is  enslaved  by  his  own  egocentrism  and  his desire to sin. Once mankind denies his ego and submits to the will of God,  and ceases relying on his own  works but rather places his hope and trust in  God,  mankind  shall  no  longer  follow  or  practice  evil.  But  man  is  inherently  incapable of achieving this on his own because no man is perfect or sinless.       For this reason, God sent his only‐begotten Son, the Word of God, who  became  incarnate  and  was  born  and  grew  into  the  man  known  as  Jesus  of  Nazareth. By his virginal conception; his nativity; his baptism; his fast (which  he underwent himself but never forced upon his disciples); his miracles (the  first of which he performed at a wedding); his teaching (which was contrary  to the Pharisees); his gift of his immaculate Body and precious Blood for the  eternal life of mankind; his betrayal; his crucifixion; his death; his defeating of  death and hades; his Resurrection from the tomb (by which he also raised the  whole  human  nature);  his  ascension  and  heavenly  enthronement;  and  his  sending down of the Holy Spirit which proceeds from the Father—our  Lord,  God and Savior, Jesus Christ, accomplished the salvation of mankind.       Among the followers of Christ are people who are married as well as  people  who  live  monastic  lives.  Both  of  these  kinds  of  people,  however,  are  sinners,  each  in  their  own  way,  and  their  actions,  no  matter  how  good  they  may be, are nothing but a menstruous rag in the eyes of God, according to the  Prophet Isaiah. Whether married or unmarried, they can accomplish nothing  without the saving grace of the crucified and third‐day Risen Lord. Although  being a monastic allows one to spend more time devoted to prayer and with  less responsibilities and earthly cares, nevertheless, being married is not at all  sinful, but rather it is a blessing. Marital relations between a lawfully married  couple, in moderation and at the appointed times (i.e., not on Sundays, not on  Great  Feasts,  and  outside  of  fasting  periods)  are  not  sinful  but  are  rather  an  expression  of  God’s  love  and  grace  which  He  has  bestowed  upon  each  married man and woman, through the Mystery of Holy Matrimony.      The  Orthodox  Church  went  through  great  extremes  to  oppose  the  heresy  of  Manichaeism,  especially  because  this  false  religion’s  devotion  to  fasting and monasticism enticed many people to think it was a good religion.  In reality though, Manichaeism is a satanic folly. Yet over the years this folly  began  to  seep  into  the  fold  of  the  faithful.  Manichaeism  spread  wildly  throughout the Middle East, and throughout Asia as far as southern China. It  also  spread  into  Africa,  and  even  St.  Aurelius  Augustinus,  also  known  as  Blessed Augustine of Hippo (+28 August, 430), happened to be a Manichaean  before  he  became  an  Orthodox  Christian.  The  heresy  began  to  spread  into  Western Europe, which is why various pockets in the Western Church began  enforcing  the  celibacy  of  all  clergy.  They  also  began  reconstructing  the  meaning of fasting. Instead of demanding laymen to only fast on Wednesday  and  Friday  during  a  normal  week,  they  began  enforcing  a  strict  fast  on  Saturday as well. The reason for this is because they no longer viewed fasting  as  a  spiritual  exercise  for  the  sake  of  remembering  Christ’s  betrayal  and  his  crucifixion. Instead they began viewing fasting as a method of purifying one’s  body from “evil foods.” Thus they adopted the Manichean heresy that meat,  dairy  or  eggs  are  supposedly  evil.  Thinking  that  these  foods  were  evil,  they  demanded laymen to  fast on Saturday  so as  to  be  “pure”  when they  receive  Holy Communion on Sunday. In so doing, they cast aside the Holy Canons of  the All‐famed Apostles, for the sake of following their newly‐found “tradition  of men,” which is nothing but the heresy of Manichaeism.      The  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council,  in  its  55th  Canon,  strongly  admonishes  the Church of Rome to abandon this practice. St. Photius the Great, Patriarch  of  Constantinople  New  Rome  (+6  February,  893),  in  his  Encyclical  to  the  Eastern  Patriarchs,  in  his  countless  writings  against  Papism  and  his  work  against  Manichaeism,  clearly  explains  that  the  Roman  Catholic  Church  has  fallen  into  Manichaeism  by  demanding  the  fast  on  Saturdays  and  by  enforcing  all  clergy  to  be  celibate.  Thanks  to  these  works  of  St.  Photius  the  Great,  the  heretical  practices  of  the  Manicheans  did  not  prevail  in  the  East,  and the mainstream Orthodox Christians did not adopt this Manichaeism.      However,  the  Manicheans  did  manage  to  set  up  their  own  false  churches in Armenia and Bulgaria. The Manicheans in Armenia were referred  to as Paulicians. Those in Bulgaria were called Bogomils. They flourished from  the 9th century even until the 15th century, until the majority of them converted  to  Islam  under  Ottoman  Rule.  Today’s  Muslim  Azerbaijanis,  Kurds,  and  various  Caucasian  nationalities  are  descendants  of  those  who  were  once  Paulicians.  Today’s  Muslim  Albanians,  Bosnians  and  Pomaks  descend  from  those  who  were  once  Bogomils.  Some  Bogomils  migrated  to  France  where  they  established  the  sect  known  as  the  Albigenses,  Cathars  or  Puritans.  But  several Bogomils did not convert to Islam, nor did they leave the realm of the  Ottoman Empire, but instead they converted to Orthodoxy. The sad thing is,  though,  that  they  brought  their  Manichaeism  with  them.  Thus  from  the  15th  century  onwards,  Manichaeism  began  to  infiltrate  the  Church,  and  this  is  what  led  to  the  outrageous  practices  of  the  17th  and  18th  centuries,  wherein  hardly  any  laymen  would  ever  commune,  except  for  once,  twice  or  three  times per year. It is this error that the Holy Kollyvades Fathers fought.      Various  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  condemn  the  notions  that it is “sinful” or “impure” for one to eat meat or engage in lawful marital  relations. Some of these Holy Canons and Decisions are presented below:      The 51st Canon of the Holy Apostles reads: “If any bishop, or presbyter, or  deacon,  or  anyone  at  all  on  the  sacerdotal  list,  abstains  from  marriage,  or  meat,  or  wine, not as a matter of mortification, but out of abhorrence thereof, forgetting that all  things are exceedingly good, and that God made male and female, and blasphemously  misinterpreting  God’s  work  of  creation,  either  let  him  mend  his  ways  or  let  him  be  deposed from office and expelled from the Church. Let a layman be treated similarly.”  Thus, clergy and  laymen are only permitted to abstain from these things for  reasons  of mortification,  and such mortification is what one  should apply to  himself  and  not  to  others.  By  no  means  are  they  permitted  to  abstain  from  these things out of abhorrence towards them, in other words, out of belief that  these things are disgusting, sinful or impure, or that they cause unworthiness.      The 1st Canon of the Holy Council of Gangra reads: “If anyone disparages  marriage,  or  abominates  or  disparages  a  woman  sleeping  with  her  husband,  notwithstanding  that  she  is  faithful and reverent,  as though she  could not enter the  Kingdom,  let  him  be  anathema.”  Here  the  Holy  Council  anathematizes  those  who  believe  that  a  lawfully  married  husband  and  wife  supposedly  sin  whenever  they  have  nuptial  relations.  Note  that  the  reference  “as  though  she  could  not  enter  the  Kingdom”  can  also  have  the  interpretation  “as  though  she  could  not  receive  Communion.”  For  according  to  the  Holy  Fathers,  receiving  Communion  is  an  entry  into  the  Kingdom.  This  is  why  when  we  are  approaching  Communion  we  chant  “Remember  me,  O  Lord,  in  Thy  Kingdom.”  Therefore, anyone who believes that a woman who lawfully sleeps with  her  own  husband,  or  that  a  man  who  lawfully  sleeps  with  his  own  wife,  is  somehow  “impure,”  “sinful,”  or  “evil,”  is  entertaining  notions  that  are  not  Orthodox but rather Manichaean. Such a person is anathematized. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii11/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

WitnessStavros1 33%

First Witness of Stavros (Letter to Joseph Suaiden)    Dear Joseph Suaiden,    Thank  you  for  your  inquiry.  I  will  give  you  a  brief  explanation  about  the  Matthewite archives themselves, about my  trip in Greece in 2009, and about  my  current  understanding  of  the  ʺsystematizedʺ  ecclesiology  observed  by  Matthewites  post‐1976,  and  my  current  opinion  regarding  the  Kirykite  faction.    The Matthewite archive is the richest archive for GOC research because it is in  fact  the  original  archive  since  1924,  and  documents  had  continuously  been  added  to  it  since  then.  The  archive  was  owned  by  Fr.  Eugene  Tombros,  secretary of the Matthewite Synod, until as late as 1974, when he was forced  to retire. It was at this time that the two laymen theologians, Mr. Eleutherios  Gkoutzidis  and  Mr.  Menas  Kontogiannis  were  appointed  secretaries  and  spokesmen  for  the  Synod,  and  they  were  given  complete  access  to  this  archive.  They  then  began  writing  historical  treatises  and  ecclesiological  treatises, in order  to  boost the position  of  the  Matthewite Synod.  It  was  also  they who prompted the Synod to sign a document (written by them) in which  they  sever  communion  with  the  ROCOR  Synod.  The  document  was  composed and signed in 1975, but the hierarchs demanded that this document  not  be  published  until  all  agree  for  its  publication.  But  then  the  two  laymen  theologians opened up the new official Matthewite periodical with the name  ʺHerald  of  the  Genuine  Orthodoxʺ  in  1976,  and  published  the  severing  of  communion  in  the  second  issue,  namely,  the  February  issue.  This  prompted  Bishops  Kallistos,  Epiphanios,  and  several  others  to  protest  against  the  publication of the document, since it was done contrary to the decision of the  hierarchy to wait until they all agree with it before publishing.    From  1976  onwards,  the  Matthewite  Synod’s  polemics  and  apologetics  were  largely  controlled  by  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  Mr.  Kontogiannis.  They  re‐ constructed the history of the GOC in their own way, deliberately leaving out  several documents that didn’t suit their mindset. They also ʺsystematizedʺ the  Matthewite  ecclesiology,  to  apply  a  word  that  Gkoutzidis  and  Kontogiannis  use  in  their  new  periodical,  ʺOrthodox  Breathʺ  (Quote:  ʺὁ  κ.  Γκουτζίδης...  ΕΣΥΣΤΗΜΑΤΟΠΟΙΗΣΕΝ τὴν ὁμολογίανʺ). The latter of these theologians,  Mr.  Menas  Kontogiannis,  was  ordained  to  the  diaconate  and  priesthood  in  1981, and eventually became a bishop in 1995. From 1983 until 2001 he served  as  the  official  chief‐secretary  and  arch‐chancellor  of  the  Matthewite  Synod.  But when Archbishop Andrew and his fellow bishops unanimously voted to  dismiss  Met.  Kirykos  from  his  duties  in  2001,  Met.  Kirykos  took  the  vast  majority of archives with him to his Monastery at Koropi. This was confirmed  to  me  when  I  asked  if  documents  were  available  at  the  Matthewite  Synodal  Headquarters  at  Peristeri,  but  was  informed  that  none  of  the  archives  had  remained, since Met. Kirykos had taken them all when he was dismissed.    During the four months I was in Greece (from the last week of August until  the last week of December, 2009), fires had swept throughout the entire Attica  region, and I was informed that a few days before my arrival a fire had raged  just outside the Koropi Monastery itself. The adjacent hill was blackened from  the fire, and the atmosphere was smoky, making it difficult to breathe. I was  also bitten by a mosquito that had been infected by an animal burned in the  fires, which caused my whole body to become almost paralyzed. I thank God  daily  that  Fr.  Pedro  was  able  to  take  me  to  the  hospital,  where  I  was  given  cortisone  and  antibiotics  to  get  rid  of  the  numbness  my  whole  body  had  suffered,  but  it  took  weeks  for  the  swelling  in  my  legs  to  disappear.  I  am  perfectly fine now, but I must say that my first week in the Koropi Monastery  was possibly the most frightening week of my life.    But I did not care so much for my own health, for any suffering I receive is a  punishment  for  my  sins.  The  destruction  of  my  health  was  the  least  of  my  worries,  for  seeing  the  fires  in  close  proximity  to  the  Koropi  Monastery  prompted me to fear another kind of destruction. I was horrified by the idea  that  perhaps  one  day  a  fire  will  burn  Met.  Kirykos’  office  and  destroy  all  of  these important Synodal documents from 1924 onwards, which are nowhere  else to be found in their entirety. This would cause an immensely important  spiritual  treasure  to  be  lost  forever.  I  then  requested  the  blessing  from  Met.  Kirykos  to  scan  documents  from  the  archive  at  Koropi  for  the  purpose  of  apologetics,  and  so  as  to  create  an  electronic  database  of  documents,  which  could  be  saved  on  flash  drives  or  computers  at  different  locations,  thereby  ensuring that nothing hazardous (such as a fire, theft, etc) could cause the loss  of these documents to future generations. Met. Kirykos gave me this blessing,  thinking that I would become lazy and only scan a few documents here and  there. Little did he know that I am a diligent worker, and that I hardly slept,  night  or  day,  but  spent  most  of  the  time  in  my  cell,  photographing  documents, to make sure I complete the task in its entirety before the time  I  would have to fly back home.    While  in  Greece  for  four  months,  I  spent  the  majority  of  time  residing  at  Koropi  Monastery,  except  for  various  trips to  other  parts  of  Greece.  I  took  a  three‐week  road  trip  to  Northern  Greece  to  venerate  relics  and  visit  Metropolitan Tarasios. I also took a one‐week trip to Crete to serve as chanter  for an important feast day and to visit the village of Panethymo where Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena  was  born,  as  well  as  Mt.  Kophinas,  where  the  miraculous appearance of the cross had occurred in the sky above the chapel  of the Holy Cross in 1937. I also spent a week on the island of Andros, where I  have  relatives,  and  spent  most  of  the  time  at  St.  Nicholas  of  Vounena  Monastery, where I was able to venerate several holy relics, including those of  many  of  the  Kollyvades  Fathers  who  I  have  always  had  a  great  reverence  towards. So if all of this time I was on road‐trips is taken into account, it adds  up to five weeks of absence, meaning that I was only in Koropi Monastery for  eleven  weeks,  which  is  one  week  short  of  three  months.  I  also  spent  three  weeks  traveling  to  Athens  every  morning  so  as  to  photograph  books  and  documents  at  the  National  Library,  as  there  is  much  information  there  concerning ecclesiastical history and biographies of hierarchs and clergy from  the 1920s, which would help give us a clue as to how the schism of 1924 was  allowed to happen in the first place. Thus, if these three weeks are also taken  into account, it means that I only spent eight weeks (two months) of working  around the clock, day and night, to complete the task of photographing every  document  in  the  archive  that  pertained  to  GOC  history  and  ecclesiology.  There were several folders that I didn’t bother scanning as they were entirely  of  a  local  nature  to  the  Monastery  and  Diocese  itself,  which  were  of  little  interest  to  me,  or  anyone  seeking  the  true  history  of  the  GOC.  Although  residing  at  Koropi,  I  was  seldom  seen  by  anyone,  except  for  Fr.  Pedro,  Matushka Lucia, and their little baby daughter. Theoharis was also residing in  the monastery, but he was never there because he was fulfilling his army duty  that  whole  time.  So  I  spent  most  of  the  time  practically  alone,  because  I  wanted  to  get  this  work  done  as  soon  as  possible.  I  had  to  reschedule  my  flight twice, because the task had not been completed, and then I even had to  allow  my  return  flight  to  expire.  When  I  completed  scanning  all  the  documents, I booked and paid for a new return flight.     During my time in the Monastery I had become sick from the food in the first  week,  so  I  stopped  eating  and  began  to  purchase  my  own  food,  which  I  would  also  share  with  others.  I  would  also  assist  Fr.  Pedro  and  Matushka  Lucia  with  their  shopping,  and  with  various  of  their  chores  wherever  I  was  able.  For  the  most  part  I  was  under  the  spiritual  guidance  of  Fr.  Pedro,  because Met. Kirykos was never present at Koropi Monastery (supposedly his  ʺresidenceʺ  and  ʺdiocesan  houseʺ).  Fr.  Pedro  was  an  exceptional  spiritual  father,  and  I  still  consider  him  to  be  a  spiritual  father  even  today,  although  since the beginning of Great Lent of 2010 I have been confessing to a priest of  the Russian True Orthodox Church, and receiving communion in that parish.     My  decision  to  depart  the  omophorion  of  Met.  Kirykos  is  based  on  several  reasons. But the most important reason is the fact that when I returned home,  I  began  reading  through  all  of  the  documents  I  had  collected  in  the  archive,  and  I  began  to  realize  that  the  ʺstoryʺ  Met.  Kirykos  has  been  giving  us  was  quite different from what the fullness of the documents portrayed. It seems as  though from 1976 onwards, that the two laymen theologians, Mr. Gkoutzidis  and Mr. Kontogiannis (the latter of whom is now known as Met. Kirykos) did  not just ʺsystematizeʺ the Matthewite ecclesiology, but they slightly changed  the  ecclesiology,  taking  it  towards  the  ultra‐right  extreme.  The  documents  also  prove  that  today’s  Matthewite  super‐correctness  and  their  refusal  to  allow  any  union  with  the  Florinites,  their  fanatic  mentality  that  led  to  their  current  factionalism  into  four  rival  groups,  and  their  gradual  disappearance  into  the  realm  of  obscurity,  is  a  product  of  the  Gkoutzidian‐Kontogiannian  dictatorship over the Matthewite Synod from 1976 until they were thrown out  of  the  Synodal  headquarters  in  2001,  in  which  period  the  two  laymen  theologians  through  their  publications  brainwashed  the  Matthewites  into  a  certain  mindset  which  is  based  only  on  the  documents  they  chose  to  reveal,  deliberately  hiding  the  plethora  of  documents  that  prove  otherwise,  and  conditioned  the  Matthewites  to  an  ecclesiology  that  at  first  glance  appears  completely sound and logical, and yet in light of all  the missing documents,  proves  itself  to  be  self‐refuting,  utterly  illogical,  and  certainly  not  the  ecclesiology of the original GOC, and not even the ecclesiology of St. Matthew  himself, whose hundreds of writings I have now compiled.    What  all  of  the  documents  in  this  archive  prove  is  that  although  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  Mr.  Kontogiannis  (Met.  Kirykos)  thought  of  themselves  as  ʺsaving the Matthewites,ʺ they proved to be the very ones who destroyed the  Matthewites  from  within.  The  unfortunate  truth  is  that  each  of  the  four  current  groups  in  which  the  Matthewites  exist  are  victims  of  this  brainwashing  for  over  30  years  now,  and  their  current  positions  reflect  the  Goutzidian‐Kontogiannian  influence  on  their  understanding.  Surprisingly,  even  the  Nicholaitan  Synod,  which  appears  to  be  antagonistic  towards  Met.  Kirykos  and  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  more  than  any  other,  is  in  fact  tainted  by  this  same  Gkoutzidian‐Kontigiannian  ecclesiological  unsoundness,  which  can  be  clearly  expressed  by  their  2007  ʺencyclicalʺ  in  which  they  ʺcondemnʺ  the  ʺcheirothesia.ʺ The truth is that this is all simply a product of the 30‐year long  brainwashing  process,  beginning  with  the  premature  departure  from  the  ROCOR in 1976, and resulting in the ensuing schisms of 1995, 2003, 2005, and  the departure of clergy and laity in 2009.    The  first  people  to  bring  up  the  charges  of  ʺiconoclasmʺ  in  the  official  Matthewite  periodical  were  Mr.  Gkoutzidis  and  Mr.  Kontogiannis  themselves,  as  they  were  using  it  as  a  means  to  slander  the  clairvoyant  Metropolitan  Kallistos  for  his  refusal  to  accept  the  uncanonical  method  in  which  the  Synod  was  being  run  by  two  lay  theologians,  namely  Gkoutzides  and Kontogiannis, and that these two had opened the new periodical ʺHerald  of  the  Genuine  Orthodoxʺ  and  had  published  the  severing  of  communion  with  ROCOR  in  its  second  issue  (February,  1976)  despite  the  fact  the  Synod  had  agreed  not  to  publish  it  until  all  were  in  agreement  with  it.  It  was  also  Gkoutzidis and Kontogiannis that sent the copy to the ROCOR headquarters,  again without complete Synodal approval. The version they sent contains the  typed  form  of  the  signatures,  without  possessing  the  signatures  of  all  the  bishops themselves, since four of the hierarchs were not in agreement with it.  Of  those  four  hierarchs,  two  of  them  (Demetrios  and  Kallistos)  were  among  the very bishops that St. Matthew himself had ordained. Meanwhile the third  hierarch  (Epiphanios)  was  also  the  first‐hierarch  of  his  own  Local  Church  (Cyprus),  while  the  fourth  hierarch  was  Bishop  Pachomios  of  Corinth  (still  living today and serving as the vice‐president of the Nicholaitan faction). Yet  Gkoutzidis  and  Kontogiannis  published  their  printed  version  of  the  document  and  sent  it  off  to  the  ROCOR,  as  well  as  in  the  new  official  Matthewite  periodical  they  were  in  charge  of,  with  the  names  of  all  the  bishops  included  as  having  signed,  yet  without  signatures,  but  rather  with  their  typed  names.  When  Kallistos,  Epiphanios  and  Pachomios  protested  against this, while Demetrios could not as  he reposed within months of that  time, their protests were ignored.     After Kallistos departed the Matthewite Synod, the two lay theologians were  responsible for ʺdepositionʺ of Kallistos, in which the first and most important  charge and reason for deposition is given as ʺiconoclasm against the [western]  icon of the Holy Trinity.ʺ Thus it is from this pact that we see for the first time  the use of so‐called ʺneo‐iconoclasmʺ to judge hierarchs as ʺheretics.ʺ Together  with  this  was  coupled  the  charge  of  ʺcheirothesia,ʺ  as  if  the  cheirothesia  received by Kallistos was a consecration, when in reality all of the documents  in the archive, both from ROCOR as well as Matthewite and Florinite sources,  prove  that  the  cheirothesia  was  not  real  at  all.  This  was  just  a  rumor  spread  among  the  Florinites  themselves,  and  also  falsely  spread  by  Holy  Transfiguration  Monastery,  in  order  to  convince  Greek  parishes  in  ROCOR  not to follow the Matthewites into breaking communion with the ROCOR in  1976. Recently the HOCNA made similar comments, but that was at request  of the Nicholaitan faction, with whom they sympathized at the time.    The  schism  among  the  Matthewites  in  1995  over  so‐called  ʺiconoclasmʺ  and  so‐called  ʺcheirothesiaʺ  is  also  a  direct  product  of  the  Gkoutzidian‐ Kontogiannian brainwashing from 1976 onwards. After all it was Gkoutzidis  and Kontogiannis who were first to accuse Met. Kallistos of ʺiconoclasmʺ and  even  published  an  article  in  their  official  periodical  ʺHerald  of  the  Genuine  Orthodoxʺ  at  this  time,  regarding  this  same  issue.  If  my  memory  serves  me  correctly, the article has the title of ʺWhy do they war against the icon of the  Holy Trinity?ʺ The author of the article is Mr. Eleutherios Gkoutzidis. In 1983,  1986,  1989,  1991  and  1992  the  Matthewite  Synod  also  published  official 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/witnessstavros1/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com