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IFLA Brochure (Low Res) 100%

This vision reinforces the importance of landscape architecture, in partnership with other disciplines, in the continuous shaping of our living environment.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/18/ifla-brochure-low-res/

18/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

research statement 98%

A probabilistic model for the landscape described by the function is developed which both allows relatively simple computation of the expected number of queries and conveys intuitive notions of the ’complexity’ of a landscape.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/03/09/research-statement/

09/03/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

ImageOrientation 97%

 For example, the mounting device for canvas  wraps is installed on top of the wrap and  on  its left  side. So in order to print your image correctly, the top side of your image should be turned upwards or to  the left.      In the table below, you will find the orientation requirements per product:  Product  Acrylic Prints  The top of the image should be turned upwards.  Image should be submitted in landscape orientation.  Canvas Wraps, Canvas Minis  The top of the image should be turned upwards or to  the left. Image should be submitted in landscape  orientation.  Framed Canvases  The top of the image should be turned upwards or to  the left. Image should be submitted in landscape  orientation.  Framed Prints  The top of the image should be turned upwards or to  the left. Image should be submitted in landscape  orientation. (Portrait Framed prints can be mounted  that way only if it is obvious that the image should be  mounted as a portrait. If the image is abstract, it will  be mounted as landscape.)  Flat and Folded Cards  For portrait cards ­ Image should be uploaded as a  portrait with the top turned upwards.  For landscape cards ­ Image should be uploaded as a  landscape with the top turned upwards.  Mousepads  Posters, Canvas Posters  T­Shirts, Hoodies    Orientation  No required orientation.  The top of the image should be turned upwards or to  the left. Image should be submitted in landscape  orientation.  The top of the image should be turned upwards.  Image should be submitted in portrait orientation. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/26/imageorientation/

26/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

2017 DesignAwards CFE SubmissionInformationPacket 96%

Columbia Cascade/Timberform Steve Kirn /// 503-223-1157 stevek@timberform.com www.timberform.com Call for Entries The ASLA Oregon Design Awards program celebrates professional and student excellence by recognizing the firms, individuals, and agencies responsible for outstanding works of landscape architecture and environmental planning that promote an enhanced quality of life in Oregon and beyond.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/28/2017-designawards-cfe-submissioninformationpacket/

28/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

MusicConsumptionTheOverallLandscapeAudienceNet 96%

Music Consumption | The Overall Landscape 2017 Music Consumption_ The Overall Landscape 1_Introduction Music Consumption | The Overall Landscape 2017 01 Music Consumption | The Overall Landscape Introduction_ In addition to this, on a granular level, As a result, all working in music, whether it music listening:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/30/musicconsumptiontheoveralllandscapeaudiencenet/

30/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Harmansah Borderlands FINAL 95%

Since 2010, the Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Landscape Research Project has investigated the landscapes surrounding the Yalburt monument.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/10/harmansah-borderlands-final/

10/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

BOD and Assoc Accomplishments in 2014 2015 Term-2 95%

Re-established and empowered volunteer Landscape Committee and initiated significant improvements to entrances, monuments, park, trees and slopes.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/09/bod-and-assoc-accomplishments-in-2014-2015-term-2/

09/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Top 10 Custom Video Brochures from Suppliers in China 93%

funtekservice —— INNOVATIVE B2B MARKETING IDEAS —— Top 10 Custom Video Brochures Increase Brand Awareness Model # Product Image Short Description Weight Packing Info 312PCS/Box 66*36*30CM Video Business Card (90*50 mm), landscape or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 2.4'' TFT LCD color screen 320*240 pixels (4:3) 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB) 350mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (3.5hrs playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or one button play single video or multi-videos support AVI format (use our software to convert the format) 1 x micro-USB cable for charging battery and uploading video(s) 0.06KG/unit VBC-024P ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Video Business Card (90*50 mm), landscape or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 2.4'' TFT LCD color screen 320*240 pixels (4:3) 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB) 350mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (3.5hrs playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or one button play single video or multi-videos support AVI format (use our software to convert the format) 1 x micro-USB cable for charging battery and uploading video(s) 0.09KG/unit 312PCS/Box 66*36*30CM VGC-024 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Video Brochure A5 landscape (210*148.5 mm) or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 2.4'' TFT LCD color screen 320*240 pixels 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB-32GB) 350mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (3.5hrs playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or multi-buttons (max.12) play single video or multi-videos support AVI format (use our software to convert the format) 1 x micro-USB cable for charging battery and uploading video(s) 0.15KG/unit 85PCS/Box 66*36*30CM VGC-028 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Video Brochure A5 landscape (210*148.5 mm) or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 2.8'' TFT LCD color screen 320*240 pixels (4:3) 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB-32GB) 350mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (3.5hrs playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or multi-buttons (max.12) play single video or multi-videos support AVI format (use our software to convert the format) 1 x micro-USB cable for charging battery and uploading video(s) 0.15KG/unit 85PCS/Box 66*36*30CM ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Video Brochure A5 landscape (210*148.5 mm) or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 4.3'' TFT LCD color screen 480*272 pixels (16:9) 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB-32GB) 500mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (1hr playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or multi-buttons (max.12) play single video or multi-videos support AVI, MOV, MKV, MPEG, WMV, MP4, ASF, 3GP formats 1 x micro-USB cable for charging battery and uploading video(s) 0.20KG/unit 85PCS/Box 66*36*30CM ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Video Brochure A5 landscape (210*148.5 mm) or customized CMYK printed on 350GSM coated paper, matte/glossy lamination 5'' TFT LCD color screen 480*272 pixels (16:9) 128MB flash memory (optional 256MB-32GB) 500mAh rechargeable 3.7V lithium battery (1hr playback) magnetic switch or power on/off activation non-button or multi-buttons (max.12) play single video or multi-videos support AVI, MOV, MKV, MPEG, WMV, MP4, ASF,3GP formats 1 x micro-cable for charging and uploading 0.25KG/unit 85PCS/Box 66*36*30CM VGC-050 ht VGC-043 m co k.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/05/08/top-10-custom-video-brochures-from-suppliers-in-china/

08/05/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

150216 4450 StMartinsGreen LandscapeConcept 90%

S E R V I C E S Landscape strip to driveway, refer to sheet 6 for tree species.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/25/150216-4450-stmartinsgreen-landscapeconcept/

25/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Shaping-Landscapes-and-Building-Expertise-2013 89%

history and present of the technoscience of slum intervention in the Portuguese-speaking landscape Eduardo Ascensao B re a k f o r L u n c h 13:00 14:30 S9 :

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/01/15/shaping-landscapes-and-building-expertise-2013/

15/01/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 88%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

2014 Newburgh OpenStudios MAP 87%

Kate Ferriter (Painting) klfdesigns.biz Urban landscape paintings in oil, watercolor and gouache.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/26/2014-newburgh-openstudios-map/

26/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

CLLP Hearing Statement-Matter 15 G-Wedges,OS,GI,Sports&Rec 87%

A landscape review (Influence Report INF_N0352-C R01 – May 2016) has been produced and previously submitted, concluding that the site (and adjacent Academy land) does not contribute to the purpose of the GW due to the content and context of the land’s urban character.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/19/cllp-hearing-statement-matter-15-g-wedges-os-gi-sports-rec/

19/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

SNews-Oct-v2 87%

God bless, Adam Contents 4 6 8 10 15 16 Keynote Vicar’s Voice Cross Section Scouts Scribble Puzzle and Cartoons Wildlife News 18 20 22 32 Worship in our Parish View from the Doghouse Advertisers From the Registers and Parish Contacts 34 Featured Letter Sprowston News Sprowston News 3 St Mary and St Margaret, Church the Lane Doghouse St Cuthbert’s, Wroxham Road View from Keynote - Listening to the Landscape On a recent trip to my home country of Australia I enjoyed a bushwalk to Sassafras Gully in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/09/30/snews-oct-v2/

30/09/2019 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 07.07.17 87%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/07/figures-07-07-17/

07/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 12.07.17 85%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/12/figures-12-07-17/

12/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

NØF 120117 85%

siri.haugum@uib.no The case study A major winter drought in 2014 led to massive heather dieback in coastal heathlands, as well as consecutive landscape fires.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/27/n-f-120117/

27/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

pangea 2016 85%

At the end of 2000 we moved all our facilities to our new stockyard of 20,000 m2 in Agios Vasilios near the city of Thessaloniki and in 2007 we also started a new garden landscape exhibition measuring over 1,500 m2 on the other side of the city and close to the airport.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/27/pangea-2016/

27/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 19.07.17 85%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/19/figures-19-07-17/

19/07/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 10.08.17 85%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/08/10/figures-10-08-17/

10/08/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 29.05.17 updated 85%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/29/figures-29-05-17-updated/

29/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

4 Figures 26.4.17 0-11 84%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/26/4-figures-26-4-17-0-11/

26/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Figures 29.05.17 84%

Mary would paint the landscape but a landscape that was animated by people.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/29/figures-29-05-17/

29/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Linda eBook 84%

The State of the Global VC Landscape Ahead of the June vote last year on whether the United Kingdom should leave the European Union, the betting markets and pollsters all​ ​predicted the “Remain” side would win​.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/21/linda-ebook/

21/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com