Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 30 December at 19:12 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «liturgy»:


Total: 60 results - 0.121 seconds

January-Calendar 100%

Basil New Year’s Day January 2017 Mon 2 Tue 3 Wed 4 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy No Sunday School 11:30am Coffee Hour 8 Parish Council Oath of Office 9 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School Resumes 11:30am Coffee Hour 6:30pm Parish Council 15 Food Pantry Collection 16 Martin Luther King 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School (20 min.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-calendar/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

calendar 97%

Nicholas 7 8 8:45am Orthros 10:00am Divine Liturgy Sunday School 11:30am Coffee Hour 6:30pm St.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/27/calendar/

27/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii09 96%

ARE CHRISTIANS MEANT TO COMMUNE ONLY ON  A SATURDAY AND NEVER ON A SUNDAY?    In  the  second  paragraph  of  his  first  letter  to  Fr.  Pedro,  Bp.  Kirykos  writes: “Also, all Christians, when they are going to commune, know that they must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday  (since  it  is  preceded  by  the  fast  of  Friday)  and on Sunday only by economia, so that they are not compelled to break the fast of  Saturday and violate the relevant Holy Canon [sic: here he accidentally speaks of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means  observing  a  fast  on  Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].”    The first striking remark is “All Christians.” Does Bp. Kirykos consider  himself to be a Christian? If so, why does he commune every Sunday without  exception, seeing as though “all Christians” are supposed to “know” that they  are only allowed to commune on a Saturday, and never on Sunday, except by  “economia.”  Or  perhaps  Bp.  Kirykos  does  not  consider  himself  a  Christian,  and  for  this  reason  he  is  exempt  of  this  rule  for  “all  Christians.”  It  makes  perfect sense that he excludes himself from those called Christians because his  very ideas and practices are not Christian at all.     Is  communion  on  Saturdays  alone,  and  never  on  Sundays,  really  a  Christian  practice?  Is  this  what  Christians  have  always  believed?  Was  Saturday the day that the early Christians ʺbroke breadʺ (i.e., communed)? Let  us look at what the Holy Scriptures have to say.     St.  Luke  the  Evangelist  (+18  October,  86),  in  the  Acts  of  the  Holy  Apostles, writes: “And on the first day of the week, when we were assembled to  break bread, Paul discoursed with them, being to depart on the morrow (Acts 20:7).”  Thus the Holy Apostle Paul would meet with the faithful on the first day of  the  week,  to  wit,  Sunday,  and  on  this  day  he  would  break  bread,  that  is,  he  would serve Holy Communion.     St. Paul the Apostle (+29 June, 67) also advises in his first epistle to the  Corinthians:  “On  the  first  day  of  the  week,  let  every  one  of  you  put  apart  with  himself, laying up what it shall well please him: that when I come, the collections be  not  then  to  be  made  (1  Corinthians  16:2).”  Thus  St.  Paul  indicates  that  the  Christians would meet with one another on the first day of the week, that is,  Sunday, not only for Liturgy, but also for collection of goods for the poor.     The reason why the Christians would meet for prayer and breaking of  bread on Sunday is because our Lord Jesus Christ arose from the dead on one  day after the Sabbath, on the first day of the week, that is, the Lordʹs Day or Sunday  (Matt. 28:1‐7; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1).     Another  reason  for  the  Christians  meeting  together  on  Sundays  is  because the Holy Spirit was delivered to the Apostles on the day of Pentecost,  which was a Sunday, and this event signified the beginning of the Christian  community.  That  Pentecost  took  place  on  a  Sunday  is  clear  from  Godʹs  command in the Old Testament Scriptures: “You shall count fifty days to the day  after  the  seventh  Sabbath;  then  you  shall  present  a  new  grain  offering  to  the  Lord  (Leviticus 23:16).” The reference to “fifty days” and “seventh Sabbath” refers to  counting fifty days from the first Sabbath, or seven weeks plus one day; while  “the day after the seventh Sabbath” clearly refers to a Sunday, since the day after  the Sabbath day (Saturday) is always the Lord’s Day (Sunday).    It was on the Sunday of Pentecost that the Holy Spirit descended upon  the Apostles. Thus we read:  “When the day of Pentecost  had  come, they  were  all  together  in  one  place.  And  suddenly  there  came  from  heaven  a  noise  like  a  violent  rushing  wind,  and  it  filled  the  whole  house  where  they  were  sitting.  And  there  appeared to them tongues as of fire distributing themselves, and they rested on each  one  of  them.  And  they  were  all  filled  with  the  Holy  Spirit  and  began  to  speak  with  other tongues, as the Spirit was giving them utterance (Acts 2:1‐4).”     A  final  reason  for  Sunday  being  the  day  that  the  Christians  met  for  prayer and breaking of bread was in order to remember the promised Second  Coming or rather Second Appearance (Δευτέρα Παρουσία) of the Lord. The  reference  to  Sunday  is  found  in  the  Book  of  Revelation,  in  which  Christ  appeared and delivered the prophecy to St. John the Theologian on “Kyriake”  (Κυριακή),  which  means  “the  main  day,”  or  “the  first  day,”  but  more  correctly means “the Lordʹs Day.” (Revelation 1:10).     For the above three reasons (that Sunday is the day of the Resurrection,  the  Pentecost  and  the  Second  Appearance)  the  Apostles  themselves,  and  the  early Christians immediately made Sunday the new Sabbath, the new day of  rest,  and  the  new  day  for  Godʹs  people  to  gather  together  for  prayer  (i.e.,  Liturgy)  and  breaking of bread (i.e.,  Holy Communion) Thus we read  in  the  Didache of the Holy Apostles: “On the Lordʹs Day (i.e., Kyriake) come together  and break bread. And give thanks (i.e., offer the Eucharist), after confessing your  sins  that  your  sacrifice  may  be  pure  (Didache  14).”  Thus  the  Christians  met  together  on  the  Lord’s  Day,  that  is,  Sunday,  for  the  breaking  of  bread  and  giving of thanks, to wit, the Divine Liturgy and Holy Eucharist.     St.  Barnabas  the  Apostle  (+11  June,  61),  First  Bishop  of  Salamis  in  Cyprus, in the Epistle of Barnabas, writes: “Wherefore, also, we keep the eighth  day  with  joyfulness,  the  day  also  on  which  Jesus  rose  again  from  the  dead  (Barnabas  15).”  The  eighth  day  is  a  reference  to  Sunday,  which  is  known  as  the first as well as the eighth day of the week. How more appropriate to keep  the eighth day with joyfulness other than by communing of the joyous Gifts?     St. Ignatius the God‐bearer (+20 December, 108), Bishop of Antioch, in  his  Epistle  to  the  Magnesians,  insists  that  the  Jews  who  became  Christian  should  be  “no  longer  observing  the  Sabbath,  but  living  in  the  observance  of  the  Lord’s  Day,  on  which  also  our  Life  rose  again  (Magnesians  9).”  What  could commemorate the Lord’s Day as the day Life rose again, other than by  receiving Life incarnate,  to  wit, that  precious  Body and  Blood of  Christ? For  he who partakes of it shall never die but live forever!    St. Clemes, also known as St. Clement (+24 November, 101), Bishop of  Rome,  in  the  Apostolic  Constitutions,  also  declares  that  Divine  Liturgy  is  especially for Sundays more than any other day. Thus we read: “On the day  of  the  resurrection  of  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord’s  day,  assemble  yourselves  together,  without  fail,  giving  thanks  to  God,  and  praising  Him  for  those  mercies  God  has  bestowed  upon  you  through  Christ,  and  has  delivered  you  from  ignorance,  error, and bondage, that your sacrifice may be unspotted, and acceptable to God, who  has  said  concerning  His  universal  Church:  In  every  place  shall  incense  and  a  pure  sacrifice be offered unto me; for I am a great King, saith the Lord Almighty, and my  name  is  wonderful  among  the  nations  (Apostolic  Constitutions,  ch.  30).”  The  reference to “pure sacrifice” is the oblation of Christ’s Body and Blood; “giving  thanks to God” is the celebration of the Eucharist (εὐχαριστία = giving thanks).    The  Apostolic  Constitutions  also  state  clearly  that  Sunday  is  not  only  the most important day for Divine Liturgy, but that it is also the ideal day for  receiving  Holy  Communion.  It  is  written:  “And  on  the  day  of  our  Lord’s  resurrection,  which  is  the  Lord’s  day,  meet  more  diligently,  sending  praise  to  God  that  made  the  universe  by  Jesus,  and  sent  Him  to  us,  and  condescended  to  let  Him suffer, and raised Him from the dead. Otherwise what apology will he make to  God  who  does  not  assemble  on  that  day  to  hear  the  saving  word  concerning  the  resurrection, on which we pray thrice standing in memory of Him who arose in three  days, in which is performed the reading of the prophets, the preaching of the Gospel,  the  oblation  of  the  sacrifice,  the  gift  of  the  holy  food?  (Apostolic  Constitutions, ch. 59).” The “gift of the holy food” refers to Holy Communion.    The Holy Canons of the Orthodox Church also distinguish Sunday as  the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. The 19th Canon of the Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  mentions  the  importance  of  Sunday  as  a  day  for  gathering  and  preaching  the  Gospel  sermon:  “We  declare  that  the  deans  of  churches, on every day, but more especially on Sundays, must teach all the clergy  and the laity words of truth out of the Holy Bible…”    The  80th  Canon  of  the  Sixth  Ecumenical  Council  states  that  all  clergy  and laity are forbidden to be absent from Divine Liturgy for three consecutive  Sundays: “In case any bishop or presbyter or deacon or anyone else on the list of the  clergy,  or  any  layman,  without  any  grave  necessity  or  any  particular  difficulty  compelling him to absent himself from his own church for a very long time, fails to  attend church on Sundays for three consecutive weeks, while living in the city, if  he  be  a  clergyman,  let  him  be  deposed  from  office;  but  if  he  be  a  layman,  let  him  be  removed  from  communion.”  Take  note  that  if  one  attends  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  consecutive  Saturdays,  but  not  on  the  Sundays,  he  still  falls  under  the  penalty  of  this  canon  because  it  does  not  reprimand  someone  who  simply  doesn’t  attend  Divine  Liturgy  for  three  weeks,  but  rather  one  who  “fails  to  attend  church  on  Sundays.”  The  reference  to  “church”  must  refer  to  a  parish  where Holy Communion is offered every Sunday, for an individual who does  not  attend  for  three  consecutive  Sundays  cannot  be  punished  by  being  “removed from  communion” if this is  not  even  offered  to begin with. Also, the  fact  that  this  is  the  penalty  must  mean  that  the  norm  is  for  the  faithful  to  commune every Sunday, or at least every third Sunday.    The 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares that: “All those faithful who  enter  and  listen  to  the  Scriptures,  but  do  not  stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  they  are  causing  the  Church a breach of order.” The 2nd Canon of the Council of Antioch states: “As  for all those persons who enter the church and listen to the sacred Scriptures, but who  fail  to  commune  in  prayer  together  and  at  the  same  time  with  the  laity,  or  who  shun  the  participation  of  the  Eucharist,  in  accordance  with  some  irregularity,  we  decree  that  these  persons  be  outcasts  from  the  Church  until,  after  going to confession and exhibiting fruits of repentance and begging forgiveness, they  succeed  in  obtaining  a  pardon…”  Both  of  these  canons  prove  quite  clearly  that  all faithful who attend Divine Liturgy and are not under any kind of penance  or excommunication, must partake of Holy Communion. Thus, if clergy and  laity are equally expected to attend Divine Liturgy every Sunday, or at least  every third Sunday, they are equally expected to Commune every Sunday, or  at least every third Sunday. Should they fail, they are to be excommunicated.    St.  Timothy  of  Alexandria  (+20  July,  384),  in  his  Questions  and  Answers, and specifically in the 3rd Canon, writes: “Question: If anyone who is a  believer is possessed of a demon, ought he to partake of the Holy Mysteries, or not?  Answer: If he does not repudiate the Mystery, nor otherwise in any way blaspheme,  let him have communion, not, however, every day in the week, for it is sufficient for  him  on  the  Lord’s  Day  only.”  So  then,  if  even  those  who  are  possessed  with  demons  are  permitted  to  commune  on  every  Sunday,  how  is  it  that  Bp.  Kirykos  advises  that  all  Christians  are  only  permitted  to  commune  on  a  Saturday,  and  never  on  a  Sunday  except  by  extreme  economia?  Are  today’s  healthy,  faithful  and  practicing  Orthodox  Christians,  who  do  not  have  a  canon  of  penance  or  any  excommunication,  and  who  desire  communion  every Sunday, forbidden this, despite the fact that of old even those possessed  of demons were permitted it?    The  above  Holy  Canons  of  the  Orthodox  Church  are  the  Law  of  God  that the Church abides to in order to prevent scandal or discord. Let us now  compare  this  Law  of  God  to  the  “traditions  of  men,”  namely,  the  Sabbatian,  Pharisaic statement found in Bp. Kirykos’s first letter to Fr. Pedro: “… I request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess  to  you,  that  in  order  to  approach  Holy  Communion,  they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday and not Sunday.“ Clearly, Bp. Kirykos has turned the whole world  upside down, and has made the Holy Canons and the Law of the Church of  God  as  a matter  of  “discord  and  scandal,”  and  instead  insists  upon  his  own  self‐invented “tradition” which is nowhere to be found in the writings of the  Holy Fathers, in the Holy Canons, or in the Holy Tradition of Orthodoxy.    The  truth  is  that  Bp.  Kirykos  himself  is  the  one  who  introduced  “disorder  and  scandal”  when  he  trampled  all  over  the  Holy  Canons  and  insisted that his priest, Fr. Pedro, and other laymen do likewise! The truth is  that Fr. Pedro and the laymen supporting him are not at all causing “disorder  and  scandal”  in  the  Church,  but  they  are  the  ones  preventing  disorder  and  scandal by objecting to the unorthodox demands of Bp. Kirykos.    Throughout  the  history  of  the  Orthodox  Church,  Sunday  has  always  been the day of Divine Liturgy and Holy Communion. This was declared so  by  the  Holy  Apostles  themselves,  was  also  maintained  in  the  post‐apostolic  era, and continues even until our day. Nowhere in the doctrines, practices or  history  of  Orthodox  Christianity  is  there  ever  a  teaching  that  laymen  are  supposedly only to commune on a Saturday and never on a Sunday. The only  day of the week throughout the year upon which Liturgy is guaranteed to be  celebrated is on a Sunday. The Liturgy is only performed on a few Saturdays  per  year  in  most  parishes,  and  mostly  only  during  the  Great  Fast  or  on  the  Saturday  of  Souls.  Liturgy  is  more  seldom  on  weekdays  as  the  Liturgies  of  Wednesday  and Friday nights have been made  Pre‐sanctified  and  limited  to  only within the Great Fast. Liturgy is now only performed on weekdays if it is  a  feastday  of  a  major  saint.  But  Liturgy  is  always  performed  on  a  Sunday  without  fail,  in  every  city,  village  and  countryside,  because  it  is  the  Lord’s  Day. The purpose of Liturgy is to receive Holy Communion, and the reason  for it being celebrated on the Lord’s Day without fail is because this is the day  of salvation, and therefore the most important day of the week, especially for  receiving Holy Communion. For, “This is the day that the Lord hath made, let us  rejoice  and  be  glad  in  it  (Psalm  118:24).”  What  greater  way  to  rejoice  on  the  Lord’s Day than to commune of the very Lord Himself?    The  theory  of  diminishing  Sunday  as  the  day  of  salvation  and  communion,  and  instead  opting  for  Saturday,  is  actually  a  heresy  known  as 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii09/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii06 93%

FROM THE ANAPHORAE OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH  REGARDING “WORTHINESS” OF HOLY COMMUNION    This  can  also  be  demonstrated  by  the  secret  prayers  within  Divine  Liturgy.  From  the  early  Apostolic  Liturgies,  right  down  to  the  various  Liturgies  of  the  Local  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Alexandria,  Constantinople,  Rome,  Gallia,  Hispania,  Britannia,  Cappadocia,  Armenia,  Persia, India and Ethiopia, in Liturgies that were once vibrant in the Orthodox  Church,  prior  to  the  Nestorian,  Monophysite  and  Papist  schisms,  as  well  as  those  Liturgies  still  in  common  use  today  among  the  Orthodox  Christians  (namely,  the  Liturgies  of  St.  John  Chrysostom,  St.  Basil  the  Great  and  the  Presanctified Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist), the message is quite clear  in all the mystic prayers that the clergy and the laity are referred to as entirely  unworthy, and truly they are to believe they are unworthy, and that no action  of  their  own can make them worthy  (i.e.  not  even  fasting), but  that  only the  Lord’s  mercy  and  grace  through  the  Gifts  themselves  will  allow  them  to  receive communion without condemnation. To demonstrate this, let us begin  with the early Apostolic Liturgies, and from there work our way through as  many of the oblations used throughout history, as have been found in ancient  manuscripts, among them those still offered within Orthodoxy today.    St.  James  the  Brother‐of‐God  (+23  October,  62),  First  Bishop  of  Jerusalem, begins his anaphora as follows: “O Sovereign Lord our God, condemn  me  not,  defiled with a multitude  of sins: for,  behold, I  have  come to  this Thy divine  and heavenly mystery, not as being worthy; but looking only to Thy goodness, I direct  my voice to Thee: God be merciful to me, a sinner; I have sinned against Heaven,  and before Thee, and am unworthy to come into the presence of this Thy holy  and spiritual table, upon which Thy only‐begotten Son, and our Lord Jesus Christ,  is mystically set forth as a sacrifice for me, a sinner, and stained with every spot.”     Following the creed, the following prayer is read: “God and Sovereign of  all, make us, who are unworthy, worthy of this hour, lover of mankind; that  being  pure  from  all  deceit  and  all  hypocrisy,  we  may  be  united  with  one  another  by  the  bond  of  peace  and  love,  being  confirmed  by  the  sanctification  of  Thy divine knowledge through Thine only‐begotten Son, our Lord and Saviour Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Then  right  before  the  clergy  are  to  partake  of  Communion,  the  following is recited: “O Lord our God, the heavenly bread, the life of the universe, I  have  sinned  against  Heaven,  and  before  Thee,  and  am  not  worthy  to  partake  of  Thy  pure  Mysteries;  but  as  a  merciful  God,  make  me  worthy  by  Thy  grace,  without  condemnation  to  partake  of  Thy  holy  body  and  precious  blood,  for  the  remission of sins, and life everlasting.”     After all the clergy and laity have received Communion, this prayer is  read: “O God, who through Thy great and unspeakable love didst condescend  to  the  weakness  of  Thy  servants,  and  hast  counted  us  worthy  to  partake  of  this heavenly table, condemn not us sinners for the participation of Thy pure  Mysteries;  but  keep  us,  O  good  One,  in  the  sanctification  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  being made holy, we may find part and inheritance with all Thy saints that have been  well‐pleasing to Thee since the world began, in the light of Thy countenance, through  the  mercy  of  Thy  only‐begotten  Son,  our  Lord  and  God  and  Saviour  Jesus  Christ,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  together  with  Thy  all‐holy,  and  good,  and  quickening  Spirit:  for  blessed  and  glorified  is  Thy  all‐precious  and  glorious  name,  Father,  Son,  and Holy Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages.”     From  these  prayers  is  it  not  clear  that  no  one  is  worthy  of  Holy  Communion, whether they have fasted or not, but that it is God’s mercy that  bestows  worthiness  upon  mankind  through  participation  in  the  Mystery  of  Confession  and  receiving  Holy  Communion?  This  was  most  certainly  the  belief  of  the  early  Christians  of  Jerusalem,  quite  contrary  to  Bp.  Kirykos’  ideology of early Christians supposedly being “worthy of communion” because  they supposedly “fasted in the finer and broader sense.”    St. Mark the Evangelist (+25 April, 63), First Bishop of Alexandria, in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “O  Sovereign  and  Almighty  Lord,  look  down  from  heaven  on  Thy  Church,  on  all  Thy  people,  and  on  all  Thy  flock.  Save  us  all,  Thine  unworthy  servants,  the  sheep  of  Thy  fold.  Give  us  Thy  peace,  Thy  help,  and  Thy  love,  and  send  to  us  the  gift  of  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  that  with  a  pure  heart  and  a  good  conscience  we  may  salute  one  another  with  an  holy  kiss,  without  hypocrisy,  and  with no hostile purpose, but guileless and pure in one spirit, in the bond of peace  and love, one body and one spirit, in one faith, even as we have been called in one hope  of our calling, that we may all meet in the divine and boundless love, in Christ Jesus  our  Lord,  with  whom  Thou  art  blessed,  with  Thine  all‐holy,  good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Later in the Liturgy the following is read: “Be mindful also of us, O Lord,  Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servants,  and  blot  out  our  sins  in  Thy  goodness  and  mercy.” Again we read: “O holy, highest, awe‐inspiring God, who dwellest among  the saints, sanctify us by the word of Thy grace and by the inspiration of Thy all‐ holy Spirit; for Thou hast said, O Lord our God, Be ye holy; for I am holy. O Word  of God, past finding out, consubstantial and co‐eternal with the Father and the Holy  Spirit,  and  sharer  of  their  sovereignty,  accept  the  pure  song  which  cherubim  and  seraphim, and the unworthy lips of Thy sinful and unworthy servant, sing aloud.”     Thus  it  is  clear  that  whether  he  had  fasted  or  not,  St.  Mark  and  his  clergy and flock still considered themselves unworthy. By no means did they  ever entertain the theory that “they fasted in the finer and broader sense, that is,  they were worthy of communion,” as Bp. Kirykos dares to say. On the contrary,  St. Mark and the early Christians of Alexandria believed any worthiness they  could achieve would be through partaking of the Holy Mysteries themselves.     Thus, St. Mark wrote the following prayer to be read immediately after  Communion: “O Sovereign Lord our God, we thank Thee that we have partaken of  Thy  holy,  pure,  immortal,  and  heavenly  Mysteries,  which  Thou  hast  given  for  our  good,  and  for  the  sanctification  and  salvation  of  our  souls  and  bodies.  We  pray  and  beseech Thee, O Lord, to grant in Thy good mercy, that by partaking of the holy  body and precious blood of Thine only‐begotten Son, we may have faith that  is not ashamed, love that is unfeigned, fullness of holiness, power to eschew  evil  and  keep  Thy  commandments,  provision  for  eternal  life,  and  an  acceptable defense before the awful tribunal of Thy Christ: Through whom and  with  whom be glory and power to Thee, with Thine  all‐holy, good,  and  life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”    St. Peter the Apostle (+29 June, 67), First Bishop of Antioch, and later  Bishop  of  Old  Rome,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “For  unto  Thee  do  I  draw  nigh, and, bowing my neck, I pray Thee: Turn not Thy countenance away from me,  neither cast me out from among Thy children, but graciously vouchsafe that I, Thy  sinful  and  unworthy  servant,  may  offer  unto  Thee  these  Holy  Gifts.”  Again  we  read:  “With  soul  defiled  and  lips  unclean,  with  base  hands  and  earthen  tongue,  wholly  in  sins,  mean  and  unrepentant,  I  beseech  Thee,  O  Lover  of  mankind, Saviour of the hopeless and Haven of those in danger, Who callest sinners  to repentance, O Lord God, loose, remit, forgive me a sinner my transgressions,  whether deliberate or unintentional, whether of word or deed, whether committed in  knowledge or in ignorance.”    St.  Thomas  the  Apostle  (+6  October,  72),  Enlightener  of  Edessa,  Mesopotamia, Persia, Bactria, Parthia and India, and First Bishop of Maliapor  in India, in his Divine Liturgy, conveyed through his disciples, St. Thaddeus  (+21  August,  66),  St.  Haggai  (+23  December,  87),  and  St.  Maris  (+5  August,  120), delivered the following prayer in the anaphora which is to be read while  kneeling: “O our Lord and God, look not on the multitude of our sins, and let  not  Thy  dignity  be  turned  away  on  account  of  the  heinousness  of  our  iniquities; but through Thine unspeakable grace sanctify this sacrifice of Thine,  and grant through it power and capability, so that Thou mayest forget our many  sins, and be merciful when Thou shalt appear at the end of time, in the man whom  Thou  hast  assumed  from  among  us,  and  we  may  find  before  Thee  grace  and  mercy,  and be rendered worthy to praise Thee with spiritual assemblies.”     Upon  standing,  the  following  is  read:  “We  thank  Thee,  O  our  Lord  and  God, for the abundant riches of Thy grace to us: we who were sinful and degraded,  on account of the multitude of Thy clemency, Thou hast made worthy to celebrate  the holy Mysteries of the body and blood of Thy Christ. We beg aid from Thee for the  strengthening of our souls, that in perfect love and true faith we may administer Thy  gift  to  us.”  And  again:  “O  our  Lord  and  God,  restrain  our  thoughts,  that  they  wander  not  amid  the  vanities  of  this  world.  O  Lord  our  God,  grant  that  I  may  be  united to the affection of Thy love, unworthy though I be. Glory to Thee, O Christ.”     The priest then reads this prayer on behalf of the faithful: “O Lord God  Almighty,  accept  this  oblation  for  the  whole  Holy  Catholic  Church,  and  for  all  the  pious and righteous fathers who have been pleasing to Thee, and for all the prophets  and apostles, and for all the martyrs and confessors, and for all that mourn, that are  in straits, and are sick, and for all that are under difficulties and trials, and for all the  weak and the oppressed, and for all the dead that have gone from amongst us; then for  all that ask a prayer from our weakness, and for me, a degraded and feeble sinner.  O  Lord  our  God,  according  to  Thy  mercies  and  the  multitude  of  Thy  favours,  look  upon  Thy  people,  and  on  me,  a  feeble  man,  not  according  to  my  sins  and  my  follies,  but  that  they  may  become  worthy  of  the  forgiveness  of  their  sins  through  this  holy  body,  which  they  receive  with  faith,  through  the  grace  of  Thy mercy, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     The  following  prayer  also  indicates  that  the  officiators  consider  themselves unworthy but look for the reception of the Holy Mysteries to give  them remission of sins: “We, Thy degraded, weak, and feeble servants who are  congregated in Thy name, and now stand before Thee, and have received with joy the  form  which  is  from  Thee,  praising,  glorifying,  and  exalting,  commemorate  and  celebrate this great, awful, holy, and divine mystery of the passion, death, burial, and  resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. And may Thy Holy Spirit come, O  Lord,  and  rest  upon  this  oblation  of  Thy  servants  which  they  offer,  and  bless  and  sanctify it; and may it be unto us, O Lord, for the propitiation of our offences and  the forgiveness of our sins, and for a grand hope of resurrection from the dead, and  for a new life in the Kingdom of the heavens, with all who have been pleasing before  Him.  And  on  account  of  the  whole  of  Thy  wonderful  dispensation  towards  us,  we  shall  render  thanks  unto  Thee,  and  glorify  Thee  without  ceasing  in  Thy  Church,  redeemed  by  the  precious  blood  of  Thy  Christ,  with  open  mouths  and  joyful  countenances:  Ascribing  praise,  honour,  thanksgiving,  and  adoration  to  Thy  holy,  loving, and life‐creating name, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.”     Finally, the following petition indicates quite clearly the belief that the  officiators  and  entire  congregation  are  unworthy  of  receiving  the  Mysteries:  “The  clemency  of  Thy  grace,  O  our  Lord  and  God,  gives  us  access  to  these  renowned, holy, life‐creating, and Divine Mysteries, unworthy though we be.”    St. Luke the Evangelist (+18 October, 86), Bishop of Thebes in Greece,  in  his  Divine  Liturgy,  writes:  “Bless,  O  Lord,  Thy  faithful  people  who  are  bowed  down  before  Thee;  deliver  us  from  injuries  and  temptations;  make  us  worthy  to  receive  these  Holy  Mysteries  in  purity  and  virtue,  and  may  we  be  absolved  and sanctified by them. We offer Thee praise and thanksgiving and to Thine Only‐ begotten  Son  and  to  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  now  and  ever,  and  unto  the  ages  of  ages.  Amen.”     St. Dionysius the Areopagite (+3 October, 96), Bishop of Athens, in his  Divine Liturgy, writes: “Giver of Holiness, and distributor of every good, O Lord,  Who  sanctifiest  every  rational  creature with  sanctification,  which  is from Thee;  sanctify,  through  Thy  Holy  Spirit,  us  Thy  servants,  who  bow  before  Thee;  free  us  from all servile passions of sin, from envy, treachery, deceit, hatred, enmities,  and  from  him,  who  works  the  same,  that  we  may  be  worthy,  holily  to  complete  the  ministry  of  these  life‐giving  Mysteries,  through  the  heavenly  Master, Jesus Christ, Thine Only‐begotten Son, through Whom, and with Whom, is  due to Thee, glory and honour, together with Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating  Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of ages. Amen.” Thus, it is God that offers  sanctification  to  mankind,  purifies  mankind  from  sins,  and  makes  mankind  worthy of the Mysteries. This worthiness is not achieved by fasting.    In  the  same  Anaphora  we  read:  “Essentially  existing,  and  from  all  ages;  Whose  nature  is  incomprehensible,  Who  art  near  and  present  to  all,  without  any  change of Thy sublimity; Whose goodness every existing thing longs for and desires;  the intelligible indeed, and creature endowed with intelligence, through intelligence;  those  endowed  with  sense,  through  their  senses;  Who,  although  Thou  art  One  essentially, nevertheless art present with us, and amongst us, in this hour, in which  Thou  hast  called  and  led  us  to  these  Thy  holy  Mysteries;  and  hast  made  us  worthy to stand before the sublime throne of Thy majesty, and to handle the sacred  vessels  of  Thy  ministry  with  our  impure  hands:  take  away  from  us,  O  Lord,  the  cloak of iniquity in which we are enfolded, as from Jesus, the son of Josedec the  High  Priest,  thou  didst  take  away  the  filthy  garments,  and  adorn  us  with  piety  and  justice,  as  Thou  didst  adorn  him  with  a  vestment  of  glory;  that  clothed  with  Thee  alone,  as  it  were  with  a  garment,  and  being  like  temples  crowned  with  glory, we may see Thee unveiled with a mind divinely illuminated, and may feast,  whilst  we,  by  communicating  therein,  enjoy  this  sacrifice  set  before  us;  and  that we may render to Thee glory and praise, together with Thine Only‐begotten Son,  and Thine All‐holy, Good and Life‐creating Spirit, now and ever, and unto the ages of  ages. Amen.” Once again, worthiness derives from God and not from fasting.    In the same Liturgy we read: “I invoke Thee, O God the Father, have mercy  upon us, and wash away, through Thy grace, the uncleanness of my evil deeds;  destroy, through Thy  mercy, what I have done, worthy of wrath; for I do not 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii06/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

PDF Letter 90%

I wish to make you aware of these things, not to slander or harm our priest, but in order that he may be sanctified and brought into understanding of the Church’s Liturgy and Doctrine.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/05/04/pdf-letter/

04/05/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

pamphlet2eng 89%

SPIRITUAL PATH  REMEMBERING SACRED TRADITION AND  REFERRING TO THE HOLY FATHERS OF THE  ORTHODOX CHURCH    Canons of the Holy Apostles  8.  If  any  Bishop,  or  Presbyter,  or  Deacon,  or  anyone  else  in  the  sacerdotal  list, fail to partake of communion when the oblation has been offered, he must  tell  the  reason,  and  if  it  is  good  excuse,  he  shall  receive  a  pardon.  But  if  he  refuses  to  tell  it,  he  shall  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that  he  has  become a cause of harm to the laity and has instilled a suspicion as against the  offerer of it that the latter has failed to present it in a sound manner.    Interpretation.  It  is  the  intention  of  the  present  Canon  that  all,  and  especially  those  in  holy  orders,  should  be  prepared  beforehand  and  worthy  to  partake  of  the  divine  mysteries when the oblation is offered, or what amounts to the sacred service  of the body of Christ. In case any one of them fail to partake when present at  the  divine  liturgy,  or  communion,  he  is  required  to  tell  the  reason  or  cause  why he did not partake:  then if it is a just and righteous and reasonable one,  he is to receive a pardon, or be excused; but if he refuses to tell it, he is to be  excommunicated,  since  he  also  becomes  a  cause  of  harm  to  the  laity  by  leading the multitude to suspect that that priest who officiated at liturgy was  not worthy and that it was on this account that the person in question refused  to communicate from him.      9.  All those faithful who enter and listen to the Scriptures, but do not stay  for  prayer  and  Holy  Communion  must  be  excommunicated,  on  the  ground  that they are causing the Church a breach of order.    (Canon LXVI of the 6th; c. II of Antioch; cc. Ill, XIII of Tim.).    Interpretation.  Both  exegetes of the sacred Canons — Zonaras,  I mean,  and Balsamon  —  in  interpreting the present Apostolical Canon agree in saying that all Christians  who  enter  the  church  when  the  divine  liturgy  is  being  celebrated,  and  who  listen to the divine Scriptures, but do not remain to the end nor partake, must  be excommunicated, as causing a disorder to  the  church. Thus  Zonaras says  verbatim: “The present Canon demands that all those who are in the church  when the  holy sacrifice is being performed shall patiently remain to the end  for  prayer  and  holy  communion.”  For  even  the  laity  then  were  required  to  partake continually. Balsamon says: “The ordainment of the present Canon is  very  acrid;  for  it  excommunicates  those  attending  church  but  not  staying  to  the end nor partaking.”    Concord.  Agreeably with the present Canon c. II of Antioch ordains that all those who  enter the church during the time of divine liturgy and listen to the Scriptures,  but  turn  away  and  avoid  (which  is  the  same  as  to  say,  on  account  of  pretended  reverence  and  humility  they  shun,  according  to  interpretation  of  the  best  interpreter,  Zonaras)  divine  communion  in  a  disorderly  manner  are  to be excommunicated. The continuity of communion is confirmed also by c.  LXVI  of  the  6th,  which  commands  Christians  throughout  Novational  Week  (i.e.,  Easter  Week)  to  take  time  off  for  psalms  and  hymns,  and  to  indulge  in  the  divine  mysteries  to  their  hearts’  content.  But  indeed  even  from  the  third  canon of St. Timothy the continuity of communion can be inferred. For if he  permits  one  possessed  by  demons  to  partake,  not  however  every  day,  but  only on Sunday (though in other copies it is written, on occasions only), it is  likely  that  those  riot  possessed  by  demons  are  permitted  to  communicate  even more frequently. Some contend that for this reason it was that the same  Timothy,  in  c.  Ill,  ordains  that  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  that  a  man  and  his  wife  should  not  have  mutual  intercourse,  in  order,  that  is,  that  they  might  partake, since in that period it was only on those days, as we have said, that  the  divine  liturgy  was  celebrated.  This  opinion  of  theirs  is  confirmed  by  divine Justin, who says in his second apology that “on the day of the sun” —  meaning, Sunday — all Christians used to assemble in the churches (which on  this account were also called “Kyriaka,” i.e., places of the Lord) and partook of  the divine mysteries. That, on the other hand, all Christians ought to frequent  divine communion is confirmed from the West by divine Ambrose, who says  thus:  “We  see  many  brethren  coming  to  church  negligently,  and  indeed  on  Sundays  not  even  being  present  at  the  mysteries.”  And  again,  in  blaming  those who fail to partake continually, the same saint says of the mystic bread:  “God  gave  us  this  bread  as  a  daily  affair,  and  we  make  it  a  yearly  affair.”  From Asia, on the other hand, divine Chrysostom demands this of Christians,  and, indeed, par excellence. And see in his preamble to his commentary of the  Epistle to the Romans, discourse VIII, and to the Hebrews, discourse XVIII, on  the Acts, and Sermon V on the First Epistle to Timothy, and Sermon XVII on  the  Epistle  to  the  Hebrews,  and  his  discourse  on  those  at  first  fasting  on  Easter,  Sermon  III  to  the  Ephesians,  discourse  addressed  to  those  who  leave  the  divine  assemblies  (synaxeis),  Sermon  XXVIII  on  the  First  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians,  a  discourse  addressed  to  blissful  Philogonius,  and  a  discourse  about  fasting.  Therein  you  can  see  how  that  goodly  tongue  strives  and  how  many  exhortations  it  rhetorically  urges  in  order  to  induce  Christians  to  partake at the same time, and worthily, and continually. But see also Basil the  Great,  in  his  epistle  to  Caesaria  Patricia  and  in  his  first  discourse  about  baptism.  But  then  how can it  be  thought  that whoever pays any  attention  to  the  prayers  of  all  the  divine  liturgy  can  fail  to  see  plainly  enough  that  all  of  these are aimed at having it arranged that Christians assembled at the divine  liturgy should partake — as many, that is to say, as are worthy?      10.  If anyone pray in company with one who has been excommunicated, he  shall be excommunicated himself.    Interpretation.  The  noun  akoinonetos  has  three  significations:  for,  either  it  denotes  one  standing  in  church  and  praying  in  company  with  the  rest  of  the  Christians,  but not communing with the divine mysteries; or it denotes one who neither  communes nor stands and prays with the faithful in the church, but who has  been excommunicated from them and is excluded from church and prayer; or  finally it may denote any clergyman who becomes excommunicated from the  clergy,  as,  say,  a  bishop  from  his  fellow  bishops,  or  a  presbyter  from  his  fellow  presbyters,  or  a  deacon  from  his  fellow  deacons,  and  so  on.  Accordingly,  every  akoinonetos  is  the  same  as  saying  excommunicated  from  the  faithful  who  are  in  the  church;  and  he  is  at  the  same  time  also  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries.  But  not  everyone  that  is  excommunicated  from  the  Mysteries  is  also  excommunicated  from  the  congregation  of  the  faithful,  as  are  deposed  clergymen;  and  from  the  peni‐ tents those who stand together and who neither commune nor stay out of the  church  like  catechumens,  as  we  have  said.  In  the  present  Canon  the  word  akoinonetos is taken in the second sense of the word. That is why it says that  whoever prays in company with one who has been excommunicated because  of sin from the congregation and prayer of the faithful, even though he should  not  pray  along  with  them  in  church,  but  in  a  house,  whether  he  be  in  holy  orders  or  a  layman,  he  is  to  be  excommunicated  in  the  same way  as  he  was  from church and prayer with Christians: because that common engagement in  prayer  which  he  performs  in  conjunction  with  a  person  that  has  been  excommunicated,  wittingly  and  knowingly  him  to  be  such,  is  aimed  at  dishonoring  and  condemning  the  excommunicator,  and  traduces  him  as  having excommunicated him wrongly and unjustly. 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/pamphlet2eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

communionpachomioseng 86%

THE FREQUENCY OF HOLY COMMUNION        By Elder Pachomius of Chios      Who  would  not  weep  at  the  ignorance  and  wretched  state  of  our  contemporary clergy?  Where has it ever been heard, that the Christians should  go to Church, seeking to receive Holy Communion, and the priests hinder them,  saying  to  them,  “Is  Communion  soup?    Forty  days  have  not  passed  since  you  received Holy Communion, and you come to receive again?”      In like manner, regarding the first week of the Great Lent, I know of many  men  and  women  who  keep  the  three‐day  fast  [an  optional  tradition  of  fasting  from  food  and  water],  and  they  go  to  church  on  Wednesday  for  the  Liturgy  of  the  Presanctified  Gifts,  and  the  clergy  do  not  allow  them  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  saying,  “Just  the  other  day  you  were  eating  meat,  and  today  you  come to receive Communion?”      “And secondly,” they say, “the Presanctified is for the priests, and not for  the  laity.”    Fie!    on  our  ignorance  and  lack  of  understanding!    You,  on  the  one  hand, O ordained man, are eating meat the night before, and many times you are  even  drunk,  and  perhaps  also  irreverent,  and  you  go  to  serve  the  Liturgy,  and  you  hinder  the  one  who  has  been  fasting  with  so  much  reverence?    And  you  deprive him of so much benefit and sanctification?      Do  you  see  what  lack  of  learning  our  priests  have?    “The  Presanctified,”  say they, “is for the priests, and not for the laypeople.”  St. Basil the Great says, “I  commune  my  parishioners  four  times  a  week.”    St.  John  Chrysostom  and  the  entire Church of Christ do likewise.  They had this custom of Communion four  times a week.  And since the Liturgy is not served during the weekdays in Great  Lent, the Holy Fathers in their wisdom devised to have the Presanctified, only so  that  the  Christians  might  have  the  opportunity  to  commune  during  the  week;  and you say the Presanctified is only for the ordained?      And  observe,  O  reader,  that  as  long  as  this  discipline  prevailed,  and  the  Christians communed frequently, their hearts were warmed by the grace of Holy  Communion, and they ran to martyrdom like sheep.      Therefore,  the  priests  who  hinder  the  Christians  from  receiving  the  Immaculate  Communion  should  know  well  that  they  sin  greatly.    I  do  not  say  that  the  people  should  commune  simply  and  indiscriminately,  but  that  they  should approach with the fitting preparation.      However, I heard what some priests say: “I” (say they) “am a priest and I  serve the Liturgy frequently, and I commune, but the layman does not have this  permission.”    In  this  matter,  O  priest,  my  brother,  you  are  greatly  mistaken.   Because, in the matter of Holy Communion, the priest differs in nothing from the  layman.  You, O priest, are a minister of the Mystery, but this does not mean that  you have the right to receive frequently, and the layman does not.  In this matter  I can bring you many proofs from the Saints, demonstrating that it is permitted  equally to bishops and priests and laypeople, both men and women, to partake  of  the  Immaculate  Mysteries  continuously  –  unless  they  have  been  married  a  third time.  As many as have married three times commune three times a year.      I  have  myriads  of  proofs  concerning  this  issue,  but  which  one  should  I  present to you first?  Chrysostom, Clement, Symeon of Thessalonica, David?  As  I said, which one should I mention first?  In this matter, I can bring you so many  proofs, I could fill a whole book!  For this cause, I cut short what I am saying and  tell  you  only  this  in  brief.    If  you  don’t  want  the  Christians  to  commune  frequently, why do you hold the Holy Chalice, and  display it to the Christians,  and  cry  out  from  the  Holy  Bema,  “With  the  fear  of  God,  faith,  and  love,  draw  near, and approach the Mysteries that you may commune?”  And yet again, you  yourselves  hinder  them,  and  you  lie  openly?    Why,  on  the  one  hand,  do  you  invite them, and, on the other, do you push them away?... 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/communionpachomioseng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

January-Newsletter 85%

Divine Liturgy - 10:00 am.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/01/14/january-newsletter/

14/01/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

newsletter (1) 80%

Divine Liturgy - 9:00 am.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/12/27/newsletter-1/

27/12/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

OrthodoxAnglicanUnity1914to1921 64%

In 1919, the Bishop of Southern Rhodesia, with Bishops Gaul and Smyth, attended a celebration of the Orthodox Liturgy, at which Professor Norton, of Capetown University, read the Epistle and Creed in Greek.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/orthodoxanglicanunity1914to1921/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

contracerycii12 62%

ARE THE HOLY CANONS ONLY VALID FOR THE  APOSTOLIC PERIOD AND NOT FOR OUR TIMES?      In his first letter to Fr. Pedro, Bp. Kirykos writes: “After this, I request of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend to those who confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion,  they must prepare by fasting, and to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday.  Regarding  the  Canon,  which  some  people  refer  to  in  order  to  commune  without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be interpreted correctly  and  applied  to  everybody.  Namely,  we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians  were  ascetics  and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy  and  communed.  They  fasted  in  the  fine  and  broader  sense,  that  is,  they  were  worthy  to  commune. The  rest did not remain until  the end and  withdrew  together with  the catechumens. As for those who were in repentance, they remained outside  the gates of the church. If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only knew  how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”      From  the  above  explanation  by  Bp.  Kirykos,  one  is  given  the  impression that he believes and commands:     a) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  forbid  laymen  to  commune  on  Sundays  during  Great  Lent  in  order  to  ensure  “the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  canons  declare  that  it  is  those who do not commune on Sundays that are causers of disorder, as  the 9th Canon of the Holy Apostles declares: “All the faithful who come to  Church and hear the Scriptures, but do not stay for the prayers and the Holy  Communion, are to be excommunicated as causing disorder in the Church;”  b) that  Fr.  Pedro  is  to  advise  his  flock  “to prefer approaching on Saturday and not Sunday,” thereby commanding his flock to become Sabbatians;  c) that  the  Canon  which  advises  people  to  receive  Holy  Communion  every  day  even  outside  of  fasting  periods  is  “correct”  but  must  be  “interpreted correctly and applied to everybody,” which, in the solution that  Bp. Kirykos offers, amounts to a complete annulment of the Canon in  regards to laymen, while enforcing the Canon liberally upon the clergy;  d) that  “we  must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,”  as  if  the  Orthodox  Church  today  is  not  still  the  unchanged  and  unadulterated  Apostolic  Church as confessed in the Symbol of the Faith, “In One, Holy, Catholic  and  Apostolic  Church,”  with  the  same  Head,  the  same  Body,  and  the  e) f) g) h) same requirement to abide by the Canons, but that we are supposedly  some kind of fallen Church in need of “return” to a former status;  that supposedly in apostolic times “all of the Christians were ascetics and  temperate  and  fasters,  and  only  they  remained  until  the  end  of  the  Divine  Liturgy and communed,” meaning that Communion is annulled for later  generations supposedly due to a lack of celibacy and vegetarianism;  that  supposedly  only  the  celibate  and  vegetarians  communed  in  the  early Church, and that “the rest did not remain until the end and withdrew  together with the catechumens,” as if marriage and eating meat amounted  to  a  renunciation  of  one’s  baptism  and  a  reversion  to  the  status  of  catechumen,  which  is  actually  the  teaching  and  practice  of  the  Manicheans, Paulicians and Bogomils and not of the Apostolic Church,  and  the  9th  Apostolic  Canon  declares  that  if  any  layman  departs  with  the catechumens and does not remain until the end of Liturgy and does  not commune, such a layman is to be excommunicated, yet Bp. Kirykos  promotes this practice as something pious, patristic and acceptable;  that Christians who have confessed their sins and prepared themselves  and  their  spiritual  father  has  deemed  them  able  to  receive  Holy  Communion,  are  supposedly  still  in  the  rank  of  the  penitents  either  due to being married or due to being meat‐eaters, as can be seen from  Bp. Kirykos’ words: “If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would  have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain inside until the end to commune. And if the Christians of today only  knew how unworthy they are, who would remain inside the church?”  that  we  are  not  to  interpret  and  implement  the  Holy  Canons  the  way  they  are  written  and  the  way  the  Holy  Orthodox  Church  has  always  historically interpreted and implemented them, but that these Canons  supposedly need to be reinterpreted in Bp. Kirykos’s own way, or as he  says,  “interpreted  correctly  and  applied  to  everybody,”  and  that  “if  we  implemented this Canon today, everyone would have to go out of the church.”      All of the above notions held by Bp. Kirykos can be summed up by the  statement that he believes the Canons only apply for the apostolic era or the  time of the early Christians, but that these Canons are now to be reinterpreted  or nullified because today’s Christians are not worthy to be treated according  to  the  Holy  Canons.  He  also  believes  that  to  follow  the  advice  of  the  Holy  Canons  is  a  cause  of  “disorder  and  scandal,”  despite  the  fact  that  the  very  purpose of the Holy Canons is to prevent disorder and scandal. These notions  held by Bp. Kirykos are entirely erroneous, and they are another variant of the  same blasphemies preached by the Modernists and Ecumenists who desire to  set the Holy Canons aside by claiming that they are not suitable for our times.      Bp.  Kirykos’  incorrect  notions  regarding  the  supposed  inapplicability  of the Holy Canons in our times are notions that the Rudder itself condemns.  For  in  the  Holy  Rudder  (published  in  the  17th  century),  St.  Nicodemus  of  Athos  included  an  excellent  introductory  note  regarding  the  importance  of  the  Holy  Canons,  and  that  they  are  applicable  for  all  times,  and  must  be  adhered to faithfully by all Orthodox Christians. This introductory note by St.  Nicodemus, as contained in the Holy Rudder, is provided below.    PROLEGOMENA IN GENERAL TO THE SACRED CANONS    What Is a Canon?      A canon, according to Zonaras (in his interpretation of the 39th letter of  Athansius the Great), properly speaking and in the main sense of the word, is  a piece of wood, commonly called a rule, which artisans use to get the wood  and  stone  they  are  working  on  straight.  For,  when  they  place  this  rule  (or  straightedge) against their work, if this be crooked, inwards or outwards, they  make  it  straight  and  right.  From  this,  by  metaphorical  extension,  votes  and  decisions  are  also  called  canons,  whether  they  be  of  the  Apostles  or  of  the  ecumenical  and  regional  Councils  or  those  of  the  individual  Fathers,  which  are contained in the present Handbook: for they too, like so many straight and  right rules, rid men in holy orders, clergymen and laymen, of every disorder  and  obliquity  of  manners,  and  cause  them  to  have  every  normality  and  equality of ecclesiastical and Christian condition and virtue.    That the divine Canons must be kept rigidly by all;   for those who fail to keep them are made liable to horrible penances      “These instructions regarding Canons have been enjoined upon you by us, O  Bishops. If you adhere to them, you shall be saved, and shall have peace; but if  you  disobey  them,  you  shall  be  sorely  punished,  and  shall  have  perpetual  war  with one another, thus paying the penalty deserved for heedlessness.” (The Apostles  in their epilogue to the Canons)      “We have decided that it is right and just that the canons promulgated by  the holy Fathers at each council hitherto should remain in force.” (1st Canon  of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It  has  seemed  best  to  this  holy  Council  that  the  85  Canons  accepted  and  validated by the holy and blissful Fathers before us, and handed down to us, moreover,  in the name of the holy and glorious Apostles, should remain henceforth certified  and  secured  for  the  correction  of  souls  and  cure  of  diseases…  [of  the  four  ecumenical councils according to name, of the regional councils by name, and of the  individual Fathers by name]… And that no one should be allowed to counterfeit  or tamper with the aforementioned Canons or to set them aside.” (2nd Canon  of the Sixth Ecumenical Council)      “If anyone be caught innovating or undertaking to subvert any of the  said Canons, he shall be responsible with respect to such Canon and undergo  the penance therein specified in order to be corrected thereby of that very thing in  which he is at fault.” (2nd Canon of the Second Ecumenical Council)      “Rejoicing  in  them  like  one  who  has  found  a  lot  of  spoils,  we  gladly  embosom the divine Canons, and we uphold their entire tenor and strengthen  them  all  the  more,  so  far  as  concerns  those  promulgated  by  the  trumpets  of  the  Spirit  of  the  renowned  Apostles,  of  the  holy  ecumenical  councils,  and  of  those  convened  regionally…  And  of  our  holy  Fathers…  And  as  for  those  whom  they  consign to anathema, we anathematize them, too; as for those whom they consign to  deposition  or  degradation,  we  too  depose  or  degrade  them;  as  for  those  whom  they  consign  to  excommunication,  we  too  excommunicate  them;  and  as  for  those  whom  they condemn to a penance, we too subject them thereto likewise.” (1st Canon of the  Seventh Ecumenical Council)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the four holy councils, namely, that held in Nicaea, and  that  held  in  Constantinople,  and  the  first  one  held  in  Ephesus,  and  that  held  in  Chalcedon, shall take the rank of laws.” (Novel 131 of Emperor Justinian)      “We  therefore  decree  that  the  ecclesiastical  Canons  which  have  been  promulgated or confirmed by the seven holy councils shall take the rank of laws.”  (Ed.  note—The  word  “confirmed”  alludes  to  the  canons  of  the  regional  councils  and  of  the  individual  Fathers  which  had  been  confirmed  by  the  ecumenical councils, according to Balsamon.)      “For we accept the dogmas of the aforesaid holy councils precisely as we do the  divine Scriptures, and we keep their Canons as laws.” (Basilica, Book 5, Title 3,  Chapter 2)      “The  third  provision  of  Title  2  of  the  Novels  commands  the  Canons  of  the  seven  councils  and  their  dogmas  to  remain  in  force,  in  the  same  way  as  the  divine Scriptures.” (In Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “I accept the seven councils and their dogmas to remain in force, in the  same way as the divine Scriptures.” (Emperor Leo the Wise in Basilica, Book  5, Title 3, Chapter 1)    “It has been prescribed by the holy Fathers that even after death those men  must  be  anathematized  who  have  sinned  against  the  faith  or  against  the  Canons.”  (Fifth  Ecumenical  Council  in  the  epistle  of  Justinian,  page  392  of  Volume 2 of the Conciliars)      “Anathema on those who hold in scorn the sacred and divine Canons of  our sacred Fathers, who prop up the holy Church and adorn all the Christian polity,  and  guide  men  to  divine  reverence.”  (Council  held  in  Constantinople  after  Constantine Porphyrogenitus, page 977 of Volume 2 of the Conciliars)    That the divine Canons override the imperial laws      “It  pleased  the  most  divine  Despot  of  the  inhabited  earth  (i.e.  Emperor  Marcian)  not  to  proceed  in  accordance  with  the  divine  letters  or  pragmatic  forms  of  the  most  devout  bishops,  but  in  accordance  with  the  Canons  laid  down as laws by the holy Fathers. The council said: As against the Canons, no  pragmatic sanction is effective.  Let the Canons of the Fathers remain in force.  And  again:  We  pray  that  the  pragmatic  sanctions  enacted  for  some  in  every  province  to  the  detriment  of  the  Canons  may  be  held  in  abeyance  incontrovertibly; and that the Canons may come into force through all… all of us  say  the  same  things.  All  the  pragmatic  sanctions  shall  be  held  in  abeyance.  Let  the  Canons  come  into  force…  In  accordance  with  the  vote  of  the  holy  council,  let  the  injunctions of Canons come into force also in all the other provinces.” (In Act  5 of the Fourth Ecumenical Council)      “It has  seemed  best to all the holy  ecumenical council  that if  anyone  offers  any  form  conflicting  with  those  now  prescribed,  let  that  form  be  void.”  (8th  Canon of the Third Ecumenical Council)      “Pragmatic  forms  opposed  to  the  Canons  are  void.”  (Book  1,  Title  2,  Ordinances 12, Photius, Title 1, Chapter 2)      “For those Canons which have been promulgated, and supported, that  is  to  say,  by  emperors  and  holy  Fathers,  are  accepted  like  the  divine  Scriptures. But the laws have been accepted or composed only by the emperors; and  for  this  reason  they  do  not  prevail  over  and  against  the  divine  Scriptures  nor  the  Canons.” (Balsamon, comment on the above chapter 2 of Photius)      “Do  not  talk  to  me  of  external  laws.  For  even  the  publican  fulfills  the  outer  law,  yet  nevertheless  he  is  sorely  punished.”  (Chrysostom,  Sermon  57  on  the  Gospel of Matthew)   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/contracerycii12/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Memory zur GS Bischof 62%

Memory zur Gruppenstunde "Hoher Besuch:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/01/13/memory-zur-gs-bischof/

13/01/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

LGBT History Month PDF 62%

He is the author/editor of The Stonewall Seder liturgy (info at www.stonewallseder.com).

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/10/27/lgbt-history-month-pdf/

26/10/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

kirykos1eng 58%

Translation from the Greek:  [Letterhead symbol of double‐headed eagle] GENUINE ORTHODOX CHURCH OF GREECE  HOLY METROPOLIS OF MESOGAEA AND LAUREOTICA  EPISCOPAL HOUSE OF ST. CATHERINE, KOROPI, ATTICA 19400  P.O. 54 KOROPI, ATTICA, TEL: 2106020176, TEL+FAX: 2106021467  Protocol No. 535.  Sunday of Cross‐veneration [22 Feb/7 Mar], 2010.  To  the Most Reverend Priest Fr. Pedro  Rector of the Holy Church of Saint Spyridon  Karea [Athens, Greece]    By  my  present  Hierarchical  letter,  I  notify  you  also  in  writing, that according to the tradition of our Fathers (and that of  Bishop  Matthew  of  Bresthena),  all  Christians,  who  approach  to  receive Holy Communion, must be suitably prepared, in order  to  worthily receive the body and blood of the Lord.    This preparation indispensably includes fasting according to  one’s  strength.   Also,  all  Christians,  when  they  are  going  to  commune,  know  that  they  must  approach  Holy  Communion  on  Saturday (since it is preceded by the fast of Friday) and on Sunday  only by economy, so that they are not compelled to break the fast  of  Saturday  and  violate  the  relevant  Holy  Canon  [sic:  here  he  accidentally  speaks  of  breaking  the  fast  of  Saturday,  but  he  most  likely  means fasting on Saturday, because that is what violates the canons].    After  this,  I  request  of  you  the  avoidance  of  disorder  and  scandal  regarding  this  issue,  and  to  recommend  to  those  who  confess to you, that in order to approach Holy Communion, they  must  prepare  by  fasting,  and  to  prefer  approaching  on  Saturday  and not Sunday.      Regarding the Canon, which some people refer to in order to  commune without fasting beforehand, it is correct, but it must be  interpreted correctly and applied to everybody.  Namely, we must  return  to  those  early  apostolic  times,  during  which  all  of  the  Christians were ascetics and temperate and fasters, and only they  remained   [Page 2]  until the end of the Divine Liturgy and communed.  They fasted in  the fine and broader sense, that is, they were worthy to commune.   The rest did not remain until the end and withdrew together with  the  catechumens.   As  for  those  who  were  in  repentance,  they  remained outside the gates of the church.      If we implemented this Canon today, everyone would have  to  go  out  of  the  church  and  only  two  or  three  worthy  people  would  remain  inside  until  the  end  to  commune.   And  if  the  Christians  of  today  only  knew  how  unworthy  they  are,  who  would remain inside the church?    In short I write these things to you to advise you beforehand  and I will come back to it, after you translate the present letter and  come to discuss with me any problems you may happen to have.  With prayers  The Metropolitan  of Mesogaea and Laureotica  + KIRYKOS  [Signature] 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/kirykos1eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Portfolio 57%

The Liturgy of the Word Please be seated.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/12/portfolio/

12/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Program Guide 0410 57%

Table of Contents Program Overview …  Continuing to Shape the RMC  Grand Schedule  Banquet Invitation  Family Day  Book Sale  Who to Contact To Prepare for the Meeting …  Registration  Lodging  What to Bring  Liturgy &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/10/program-guide-0410/

10/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Church Calender 2018 (1) 56%

Benediction 26 27 28 29Maundy Thursday 30 Good Friday 7pm Said Mass 7pm Said Mass 7pm Said Mass 8pm Sung Mass with Vigil 24 31Holy Sat 12noon Good Friday Liturgy 8pm Easter Vigil April 2018 Sunday 1 Easter Day 8am Said Mass 10am Sung Mass Monday 2 Tuesday 3 9 2nd Sunday of Easter 8am Said Mass 10am Sung Mass 11.40am Buildings &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/20/church-calender-2018-1/

20/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Infobrief zur Werbung K&O 2016 54%

Arbeitsstelle für Jugendpastoral Max-Josef-Metzger-Straße 1, 39104 Magdeburg Tel.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/18/infobrief-zur-werbung-k-o-2016-1/

18/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Muzak 2011 53%

 Lee Noble – “No Becoming”  Liturgy – “Aesthethica”  Los Campesinos!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/07/muzak-2011/

06/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

2 june newsletter w 53%

37 John Street South Laidley QLD 4341 Children’s Liturgy Jan Maltry Jan Maltry Parish Secretary:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2019/06/01/2junenewsletterw/

01/06/2019 www.pdf-archive.com