Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 October at 15:17 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «metaphor»:


Total: 140 results - 0.064 seconds

Metaphor Flatland ST 100%

In this paper, I will investigate the metaphor systems that Edwin Abbott uses in Flatland to satirize Victorian culture.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/13/metaphor-flatland-st/

12/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

JDIT-2017-0503-029 97%

Moreover, the squaryl metaphor is a precursor to complex organic molecules involving functional group interchange (FGI) and rearrangements.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/05/30/jdit-2017-0503-029/

29/05/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

6. Revelations 96%

WITHIN LIES FACT AND FANCY, TRUTH AND METAPHOR.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/06/6-revelations/

06/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

11. Bloodlines Three 94%

Bloodlines Volume Three Selected Articles from Lifeforce 2008 - 2010 Table of Contents Within lies fact and fancy, truth and metaphor.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/06/11-bloodlines-three/

06/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

uncle fritz 84%

first metaphor. ... second metaphor.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/23/uncle-fritz/

23/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

H07 8310 SkepticismStoicismandtheJeffersonianModel AIKEN 82%

Using as his metaphor Plato’s problematic framings of the Socratic dialectic, which is traditionally interpreted as an ideal educational model for young Athenians, Professor Aiken argues that Thomas Jefferson provides a defensible ‘American’ response to the crisis in the humanities that could serve to revitalize the area.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/10/14/h07-8310-skepticismstoicismandthejeffersonianmodel-aiken/

14/10/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

freedom 82%

The Book of Life.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/25/freedom/

25/06/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

EST635 Painting-Participation-A-full-spectrum-guide 81%

Public Participation and Decision-Making (EST 635) @ SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry Table of Contents Introduction Directory of Tools, Methods, Approaches (alphabetized) Public Participation and the Art of Embracing Complex Problems The Metaphor of a Palette Process Planning:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/07/est635-painting-participation-a-full-spectrum-guide/

07/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Metaphor Proposers Day Brief 77%

UNCLASSIFIED Metaphor Program Proposers’ Day Office of Incisive Analysis Dr.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/01/20/metaphor-proposers-day-brief/

20/01/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

writing to learn 77%

Could you give me an illustration, analogy or metaphor to help me see what you mean?

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/12/19/writing-to-learn/

19/12/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Translingua conference programme (1) 76%

The Case of Proper Names in the Philosophy of Language Chloe Fagan (Trinity College Dublin) Translation as Metaphor:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/07/10/translingua-conference-programme-1/

10/07/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

CM-Littérature-S2 73%

The word conceit has come to denote in elaborate figurative devise, which often incorporate metaphor (=comparison), simile, hyperbole (=exaggeration) or oxymora .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/09/cm-litterature-s2/

08/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

God of the Machine Meditation 73%

Eventually, when you reach Keter, you will know God… not as a concept, not as a metaphor, but as a real experience.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/01/god-of-the-machine-meditation/

01/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

8. Tome of Dayside Mastery 71%

Tome of Dayside Mastery Within lies fact and fancy, truth and metaphor.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/06/8-tome-of-dayside-mastery/

06/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

GadamerHermeneia 2007 71%

Likewise, the Greek concept of the well-fortuned or successful man, which is clearly endowed with a certain quality of lightness, is yet far removed from the lightness-through-absence metaphor that shall characterize the descriptions of philosophical hermeneutics.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/10/14/gadamerhermeneia-2007/

14/10/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

jdm15923a 67%

Judgment and Decision Making, Vol.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/04/jdm15923a/

04/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

The Network, The Graft and the Zabaleen 66%

In this metaphor, preexisting infrastructures, such as the rail network, are like rootstock, while the newer fiber-optic cables resemble the uppermost portion, known in horticulture as the scion.” The graft provides us with a model for understanding how networks become enfolded.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/12/10/the-network-the-graft-and-the-zabaleen/

10/12/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 66%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Low-Tech Weaving HANDOUT 1-20-18 63%

Working with movement, metaphor, and meaning.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/01/13/low-tech-weaving-handout-1-20-18/

13/01/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Big Bang Fallacy. 61%

The Big Bang Theory was formulated and propounded by the Jesuit Priest Georges Lemaitre, not actually based on any scientific, or logical principle, or assumption or presumption, but on the notion that the universe came into being from the breaking of a giant cosmic egg, which thought was not his own, but which is actually a metaphor originally existing in our Ancient Indian Scriptures such as the Vedas and the Puranas to explain the origin and evolution of metaphysics in thought.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/09/17/big-bang-fallacy/

17/09/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

deck 2.1.compressed 60%

Here is a simple metaphor:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/02/05/deck-2-1-compressed/

05/02/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

LiberationanditsLimitsArthurTress1977SupermanFantasy 60%

Liberation and its Limits: Negotiating Queer Male Sexuality in Arthur Tress’ 1977  Superman Fantasy.      Adding to multiple 1960s and 70s American ‘liberation narratives’, Gay Liberation mobilized  social progress through essentialized representation. Shot in industrial ruins of Manhattan’s  Chelsea piers ­ historic gay cruising sites ­ Arthur Tress’ 1977 photograph, ​ Superman Fantasy​ ,  features a white male poking his penis through a cardboard Superman cut­out. The merging of  Tress’ male model with Superman’s artifice produces multiple readings of an incorporated  double body. Examining the secret identity archetype as queer metaphor, oblique relations to  masculine myths like Superman highlight broader negotiations with nationalism ­ neocolonial  orderings of the “American way” are bound to Gay Liberation itself, recuperated as a  homonationalism​ . A black and white photograph excluding Persons of Color, ​ Superman Fantasy  chromatically fuses the ​ whiteness ​ of its characters, exposing a gendered racism in neoliberal  imaginaries: queer cis white males are displaced by heterosexist matrices, but remain “gay  figureheads” from privileges of race and ‘biological’ sex. Branding the queer white male body,  Superman acquires new genitals, physically co­opting ‘Othered’ sexuality into flat construction:  fantasy becomes a vehicle for control and domination. However, penetrating the cut­out is a  symbolic act of queer vigilantism, echoing Superman’s heroic acts outside the law through  post­Stonewall illegalities of same­sex relations. Viewing identity as a tenet of capitalism,  Superman Fantasy’s ​ penetration​  ​ models ​ accelerationist​  liberation when paired with time: the  only way out is through. This latter point locates current possibility and tension for liberation,  ‘speeding up’ global capital toward imminent rupture through cybernetic projection. Virtualities  like social media mutate agency, complicating liberation in a superpowered patriarchy.                                                                    Arthur Tress ­ ​ Superman Fantasy ​ ­ Fiber Print ­ 1977 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/03/liberationanditslimitsarthurtress1977supermanfantasy/

03/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

1. The Vampire Bible 60%

The Vampire Bible Within lies fact and fancy, truth and metaphor.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/06/1-the-vampire-bible/

06/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com