Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 09 May at 15:22 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «microcosm»:


Total: 22 results - 0.069 seconds

vibrio 100%

IMPACT OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ON THE VIBRIO COMMUNITY......................................................................................................30 3.1 Purpose and Hypotheses..............................................................................................30 3.2 Materials and Methods................................................................................................30 3.2.1 Water Collection...........................................................................................30 iii 3.2.1.1 Sample Locations...........................................................................30 3.2.2 Microcosm Preparation and Experimentation..............................................32 3.2.3 Syringe Filtration..........................................................................................33 3.2.4 DNA Extraction............................................................................................34 3.2.5 PCR Amplification........................................................................................35 3.2.6 Agarose Gel Electrophoresis.........................................................................35 3.2.7 Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) Analysis.......................36 3.2.8 ImageJ Software Quantification...................................................................38 3.2.9 Statistical Analysis........................................................................................39 3.3 Results..........................................................................................................................40 3.3.1 Diversity Indices...........................................................................................40 3.3.1.1 Shannon Index...............................................................................40 3.3.1.2 Simpson Index...............................................................................40 3.3.1.3 Species Evenness...........................................................................40 3.3.1.4 Species Richness............................................................................41 3.3.2 Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus Band Intensities......................................................................................................41 3.3.3 Microcosm Experiments...............................................................................41 3.3.3.1 Experiment One.............................................................................41 3.3.3.2 Experiment Two.............................................................................45 3.3.3.3 Experiment Three...........................................................................49 3.3.3.4 Experiment Four............................................................................53 3.3.3.5 Experiment Five.............................................................................57 3.3.4 Statistical Results..........................................................................................61 3.4 Discussion and Future Research..................................................................................62 3.4.1 Discussion.....................................................................................................62 3.4.2 Future Research............................................................................................64 CHAPTER 4:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/26/vibrio/

26/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CVOnline 84%

    RECOGNITION Fellowships Margaret L. Whitford Fellowship, Full Tuition­Remission, 2015­17, Chatham University.    Green Scholar: Research & Teaching Assistantship 2014­15, University of Pittsburgh.    Awards Gerald Stern Poetry Prize, 2015, University of Pittsburgh.    Scholarship to Chautauqua Writers Festival, 2015, Chautauqua, NY.    First Place, Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Poetry Contest, 2013, Jim Daniels.          2  APPEARANCES Featured Readings   Classic Lines Bookstore, Nov 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    Pittsburgh Poetry Review ​ Launch Party, Nov 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    Word Circus, Most Wanted Fine Arts Gallery, Sept 2015, Pittsburgh, PA.    The Rectangle​  Launch Party, Mar 2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Pitt­Greensburg Writers Festival, with Sheila Squillante, Apr 2015, Greensburg, PA.    Conferences Presenter: Original Poetry, Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Presenter: Original Poetry, Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2014, Savannah, GA.    Panels Panelist, “Minority Feminisms and Fiction Post­1970,” Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar   2015, Albuquerque, NM.    Panelist, “We the Animals, We the Archetypes,” Sigma Tau Delta Conference, Mar 2014,   Savannah, GA.    PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES Editing Editor, (Moore, Caroline) ​ Punk Rock Entrepreneur: Running a Business Without Losing   Your Values. ​ Portland: Microcosm, 2016. Print. Forthcoming.    Guest Editor, ​ Pittsburgh Poetry Review,​  Winter 2016. Print. Forthcoming.    Editor­in­Chief, ​ Pendulum Literary Magazine,​  2013­15. Print. Greensburg, PA.    Copy Editor, ​ The Insider​ , Jan 2015­Apr 2015. Print. Greensburg, PA.  Copywriting Copywriter & Digital Media Strategist, Inventionland, 2015­present, Pittsburgh, PA.  3  Freelance Copywriter, ​ ShannonSankey.com​ , 2012­present, Pittsburgh, PA.  Copywriter, Carney+Co., 2012­15, Greensburg, PA.    COMMUNITY Writing Instructor, Words Without Walls, Allegheny County Jail, Jun­Jul 2016.    Host, Word Circus Reading Series, Most Wanted Fine Arts Gallery, 2015­17,   Pittsburgh, PA.    Certified Adult Literacy Instructor, YWCA USA, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Writing Instructor, GED Prep, YWCA USA, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Panelist, Social Media Advisory Group, Blackburn Center Against Domestic and Sexual   Violence, 2013­15, Greensburg, PA.    Host, Spread the Word! Reading Series, University of Pittsburgh, 2011­15,   Greensburg, PA.    CREATIVE PROJECTS Poetry Collection Working Title: ​ Body, Autoimmune.  Poems access the experience and language of disease through several selves:   the disembodied self, the ill body, the mother’s body, the child, the woman.   Personas confront and empathize with one another in a fractured, lyric dialogue   of chronic illness.    REFERENCES Available upon request.   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/01/cvonline/

01/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

art-in-embassies 76%

This presentation is a microcosm of what we seek to achieve in our embassies and residences around the world.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/11/art-in-embassies/

11/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

RationalReligion 75%

The macrocosm and the microcosm are ultimately one and the same.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/25/rationalreligion/

25/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

goingforawalk 71%

In her essay entitled ‘The Solitary Stroller and the City’, Rebecca Solnit says that ‘Walking the streets is what links up reading the map with living one’s life, the personal microcosm with the public macrocosm;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/06/goingforawalk/

06/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

MagazineSpring12(2) 70%

In the microcosm of the CSU-Pueblo campus, we are encouraged in our education to be critical of our surroundings, to ask questions and to never follow anything blindly.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/08/05/magazinespring12-2/

05/08/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

ReformEssay1 63%

Reform Essay #1    It is nearly uncontested that the national legislature of the United  States is massively flawed. Seldom is it contested, specifically,  that many of these flaws originate in the structure of the  government. Armchair political theorists the world over note problems  and generate solutions, although it must be said that no two  theorists concur on either the nature of the problems or the optimal  solutions thereof. That said, as an armchair political theorist, it  seems incumbent upon me to spew my ideas across the land.  Before we start, it must be made clear that among the more common  objections to any proposed reform is that the Founders of the United  States did not intend it. Leaving aside the hagiographic  interpretation of American history necessary to believe that they  were infallible and the many successful amendments showing that such  changes as these have had a good track record, so to speak, the  governance available for a largely­agricultural nation of fewer than  four million residents, where the fastest transportation was the  horse and the fastest calculator the abacus, is not the same as the  optimal governance for the present United States, nor will either it  or this be optimal in the America of nearly two and a half centuries  hence.  There seem to be two major schools of thought regarding the purpose  of a legislator. The first, of which the First­Past­The­Post system  is the brainchild, suggests that a legislator’s responsibility is to  the area that elected that representative, and that a legislature  ought to be the meeting­place of the voices chosen to speak for  various communities. The other theory, which begat Proportional  Representation, contends that each representative represents an  ideologically­bound swathe of the population ­ say, one­fourth of one  percent of all voters ­ that votes for a certain ideology shared by  that representative, and that a legislature ought to be the political  views of the nation in a microcosm.   Both schools of thought have their positives and negatives. The  former means that it is possible for beliefs that are common but do  not prevail in any particular community to be silenced. The latter  means that no one legislator is tied to a community, and thus that  the interests of that community go without support. The former means  that a plurality interest or view in individual communities can  become the sole interest or view represented, even if the other views  are similar enough that, banded together, they would outnumber them.  The latter means that legislators who do badly can only be easily  removed by their parties. The former means that interests bound to a  particular area, even if they are despised by the country at large,  can be represented. The latter necessitates large parties and  disadvantages non­partisan but popular candidates. And so on, and so  forth...  It seems likely that no system of government yet designed will both  perfectly represent the political views of the populace and produce  the optimal results for the purposes of good governance, even when  the two are in concord ­ indeed, it is unlikely that any system will  successfully do either one. That said, there are nevertheless  improvements to be made to the present system.  While the former view ­ the view of FPTP ­ is massively prevalent in  the United States government, the alternative also makes good points  and deserves a seat at the table. And what better place than the  Senate, that great Proteus of the government ­ first the voice of the  state legislatures, then that of the people of the various states,  with its elections arrhythmically staggered in an odd 2/3 time  signature. In truth, the states are strange choices for electoral  districts ­ except for a few examples, too small for a viable  regional identity, yet too large for a local one, usually too  heterogenous to represent a specific community or type of community  yet too homogenous to be reasonably competitive, and nowhere near  proportional, with the residents of Wyoming having more than sixty  times the electoral power of an equivalent quantity of Californians.  What better solution than to replace the entire thing with a system  which represents all Americans equally, is founded on a national  identity rather than any smaller one (or, perhaps, if necessary, a  number of regional interests that elect national representatives),  and is exactly as heterogenous or homogenous as the country? Granted,  such a system would be ill­fitting for the end­all and be­all of the  legislature ­ but its consistency of results make it nearly­ideal as  an upper house.  And what of the lower house?  Political factions are fractal. There are two schools of thought  regarding how a district ought to be designed ­ that a district ought  to reflect some kind of natural community, and that a district ought  to be designed so that it changes with the nation. The extent of the  former would be a district filled with homogenous electors, seldom  changing its political affiliation ­ only when the mass views or  party loyalty of the public changed, as in the American South between  1960 and 1972. The latter suggests a legislature that vacillates from  one supermajority to another, according to the vicissitudes of the  electorate amplified to staggering crests and troughs.  The former, it seems self­evident, is a better model for a  legislature founded on representing the wills of individual  constituencies. But while the United States House of Representatives  intends to represent individual constituencies, it is subverted by  gerrymandering and single­member districts, which split natural  communities.  Granted, single­member districts have their advantages. Notably, it  improves minority representation ­ when the Texas House of  Representatives switched over in 1972, African­American members were  elected for the first time since Reconstruction. But that minority  candidates are disadvantaged is not solely the fault of  multiple­member districts ­ after all, they remain disproportionally  uncommon in single­member legislatures. That minority candidates have  been forced to obviate representative democracy means that the forces  that oppose them should be tackled first, but it does not in and of  itself present a reason not to use multi­member districts.  Where, in multi­member and fairly apportioned districts, it could  honestly be said that there are five national representatives for  Houston (or perhaps three from South Houston and two from North  Houston, or some other scheme), in this present system, it can only  be said that there is one district for a swathe of Houston stretching  from Atascocita to Montrose by way of Spring, another for a vaguely  horse­shaped zone between Bush Intercontinental and Downtown Houston,  &c...  But why should representation be dependent on where someone lives ­  in many ways, the least important thing about a person? What common  interests bind a Channelview longshoreman and an affluent Downtown  lawyer, more than they are bound to their compatriots in, say, Los  Angeles? Why should the vote of a company executive in River Oaks  determine who represents a teacher in Bellaire, or vice versa? In  this new world of the Internet ­ of, as one might say, e­democracy ­  why must we be bound to the districts of the past, which divert  untold billions into porkbarrel spending? True, local affairs such as  roads bind them ­ but shouldn’t those be handled by local authorities  anyway? 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/06/reformessay1/

06/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

senior essay smaldonado 60%

3), and it represents a microcosm of higher education’s exclusivity functioning under goals of inclusivity and accessibility.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/01/02/senior-essay-smaldonado/

02/01/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Dakash 56%

Microcosm (spell); Mind Thrust I (spell);

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/04/21/dakash/

21/04/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

TWS Emerald Link Report Web(5) 49%

The area is a microcosm of how Victoria looked prior to European arrival—a connected puzzle of special places and icons that form an unbroken corridor from the coast to the alpine regions.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/06/tws-emerald-link-report-web-5/

06/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

CERN Rebuilding a Quantum Tower of Babel 47%

It is a quantum leap into the microcosm, a place where the laws of physics have no jurisdiction and where predictability is a giant roulette wheel.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/09/09/cern-rebuilding-a-quantum-tower-of-babel/

09/09/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

The Front Range Voluntaryist Issue #7 44%

Issue​ ​#7​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​September,​ ​2017 Making​ ​An​ ​Example​ ​Promoting​ ​Liberty​,​ ​by​ ​Non​ ​Facies​ ​Furtum​ ​(p.​ ​2) Policing​ ​as​ ​a​ ​Private​ ​Affair,​ ​Article​ ​by​ ​J.​ ​Allen​ ​Barnaby​ ​(p.​ ​3-4) Give​ ​Anarchy​ ​a​ ​Chance​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Noah​ ​Leed​ ​(p.​ ​4-7) Communism​ ​Kills,​ ​pt.​ ​1:​ ​Monumental​ ​Social​ ​Closure​ ​and​ ​Left-progressive​ ​Bias, Libertarian​ ​Sociology​ ​101​ ​column,​ ​By​ ​Richard​ ​G.​ ​Ellefritz,​ ​PhD​ ​(p.​ ​7,​ ​11) Violence​ ​and​ ​Politics​ ​Are​ ​Inseparable,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Sean​ ​O'Ceallaigh​ ​(p.​ ​8) Why​ ​Homeschooling​ ​Works​,​ ​by​ ​Amelia​ ​Morris​ ​ ​(p.​ ​8) Ruby​ ​Ridge:​ ​25​ ​years​ ​later.​ ​A​ ​Summary​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Next​ ​Generation​, article​ ​by​ ​Jason​ ​Boothe​ ​(p.​ ​9-10​) So​ ​You​ ​Want​ ​to​ ​Privatize​ ​Everything?​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Matthew​ ​Dewey​ ​(p.​ ​11-13) Inflating​ ​Away​ ​Our​ ​Technological​ ​Gains​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​James​ ​Butcher​ ​(p.​ ​13-15) Going​ ​Anti-State​ ​and​ ​Abandoning​ ​Politics​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Mike​ ​Morris​ ​(p.​ ​15,​ ​21) Your​ ​Dog,​ ​Lawful​ ​Plunder​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Regulatory​ ​State,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Nick​ ​Weber​ ​(p.​ ​21-​ ​24) What​ ​If​ ​You​ ​Were​ ​A​ ​White​ ​Nationalist?​,​ ​submission​ ​by​ ​“Orthobro”​ ​(p.​ ​24​ ​-​ ​28) 1 Making​ ​An​ ​Example​ ​Promoting Liberty​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Non​ ​Facies​ ​Furtum ...harmful  ideas  or  act  immorally.  Make  it  uncomfortable  to  be  evil,  and  to support evil.  This  can  manifest  itself  in  ways  such  as  telling  a  companion  that  you’re  going to stop  spending  time  with  him  if  doesn’t  stop  watching  CNN,  arguing  diligently  and  impolitely  with  your  cousin  who always says  “I’m  just  a  centrist,  bro.”  and  “  Obamacare  saves  lives!”.  If  some  attractive  woman  asks  you  out  on  a  date  wearing  a  “thin  blue  line”  t-shirt,​ ​deny​ ​her.    Of  course  this  ability  to  shun  people  with  foolish  or  unhelpful  ideologies  does  not  preclude  one  from  also  doing  positive  work  to  support  those  who  are  actively  changing  things for the better in the world. If you know  someone  who  is  passionate  about  liberty  and  could  inspire  people  with  their  talent  for  writing,  speaking,  or organization, encourage  them  to  create  something.  Donate  or  volunteer  with  people  at  some  sort  of  local  charity  event  which  would  decrease  dependence​ ​on​ ​the​ ​state​ ​for​ ​some​ ​people.    In  general,  I  encourage  everyone  reading  this  to  make  a  credible  difference  in  their  social  circle  by  living  in  a  way  that  sets  an  example.  Inspire  people  with  your  positivity  and  passion  for  valuable  social  change,  and  do  not  waste  your  time  on  people  who  will  work  against  you  and  will  not  listen  to  the  reason  of  your  arguments.  Be  clear with your  arguments,  accurate  with  your  evidence,  passionate  about  your  lifestyle,  and  deliberate  with  how  you  spend  your  time.  This​ ​will​ ​help​ ​us​ ​secure​ ​a​ ​free​ ​future.      Voluntaryism  is  still  a  new  ideology  to  many,  even  though  its  principles  are  simple  and  already  nearly  universally  valued  in  many  ways.  It  is  important  work  to  spread  the  word  about  its  immense  value  and moral  correctness,  but  this  will  not  be  sufficient  to  bring  about  a  truly  free  society.  When  the  people  who  do  not  change  things  and  who  just  go  through  life  living  at  the  level  of  the  least  common  denominator  or  an average life  see  new  styles  of  life  that  work  better  than  others,  they will gradually change their ways.  Until  then,  they  will  live  a  “path  of  least  resistance”  lifestyle.  It  is  important  for  those  of  us  who  have  arrived  at the objective moral  truth  of  voluntaryism  to  set  an  example  of  just  how  much  freedom  and  respect  for  property  rights  and  self-ownership  can  lead  to​ ​a​ ​successful​ ​and​ ​joyful​ ​life.    What  many  voluntaryists  spend  most  of  their  time  doing  is  spreading  knowledge  of  the  arguments,  reason,  and  evidence  that  support  voluntaryism,  non-aggression,  and  liberty  as  the  most  useful and morally correct  principles.  This  is  incredibly  important  and  necessary  work,  but  often  it  is  not  enough  to  get  most people to change their ways, or even  consider  accepting  the  arguments.  Living  by  example  opens  those  around  you  up  to  new  ideas,  and  inspires  many  people  more  than  do​ ​valid​ ​logic​ ​and​ ​clear​ ​evidence.    One  important  aspect  of  living  a  voluntaryist  lifestyle  is  remembering  that  non-aggression  is  not  synonymous  with  tolerance.  One  of  the  most  powerful  moral  tools  that  one  has  is  their  ability  to  decide  with  whom  one  spends  their  time.  By  this  I  mean  that  in  the  same  way  shop-owners  can  refuse  to  do  business  with  people  who  are  known  to  have  been  thieves  or  people  who  have  aggressive  tendencies,  every  individual  can​ ​and​ ​ought​ ​to​ ​shun​ ​those​ ​who​ ​have...    Resilientways.net Resilientways.net Resilientways.net Resilientways.net Resilientways.net 2 Policing​ ​as​ ​a​ ​Private​ ​Affair,​ ​Article​ ​by J.​ ​Allen​ ​Barnaby​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Free Association​ ​Center   Policing,  the  protection  of  person  and  property,  can  and  should  be  handled  privately  for  reasons  both  ethical  and  prudential.  This  simple truth is often hard for  most  to  swallow,  especially  those  looking  to  rationalize  the  various  forms  of  centralized  control  they'd  like  to  continue  exerting  over  the  entire  populace  within  a  certain  geographic​ ​area.    Decentralized  policing  services  can  and  should  be  provided  by  the  individual  landowners  or  users  who  truly  find  any  particular  protection  service  more  valuable  than  its  cost.  The  competitive  pressure  made  possible  by  decentralizing  decision-making  aligns  the  incentives  of  security  providers  much  more closely with those of the marginal  customer  relative  to  a  centralized  political  system  where some fraction of the population  enforces  their  preferences  upon  the  whole.  A  political process allows those holding its reins  to  externalize  the  costs  of  services  onto  unwilling  dissenters  who  may  have  better  options​ ​on​ ​the​ ​table​ ​in​ ​its​ ​absence.    But  what  about  the  poor,  you  ask?  The  working  poor  almost  invariably  rent  homes  and  travel  on  roads  owned  by  others.  Those  owners  make  their livings providing low-cost  services  to  the  poor  and  have  strong  incentives  to  pay  for  cost-effective  crime  deterrence  on  their  properties  in  order  to  prevent  damage  and  provide  their  customers  relatively  safe  passage  to  and  from  their  businesses  in  order  to  continue  making  their  living.  Insurance  companies  (think  homeowners'  and  life  insurance)  can  and  would  discriminate  between  customers  who  take  various  deterrence  measures  and  those  who  don't,  charging  owners  and  individuals  higher  premiums  depending  upon  their  varying  risk  profiles.  By  making  assets  more  profitable​ ​year​ ​in​ ​and​ ​year​ ​out,​ ​the​ ​benefits​ ​of protection  services  become  capitalized  into  the  value  of  the  properties  themselves.  We  must  acknowledge,  however,  that  we  do  not  have  Utopia  on  the  table  from  which  to  choose,  so  we  must  make  a  comparative  judgment  between  centralized  and  decentralized  provision  of  protection.  Centralization  poses grave risks of abuse, and  as  will  be  explained  below,  offers  little  relative  benefit  to  the  poor  and  powerless  in  practice.     Regime  economists  of  course,  even  those  espousing  free  market  rhetoric  across  any  number  of  other  areas,  readily  object  to  the  proposition  that  policing  can  be  provided  without  centralizing  said  service  by  force.  They  teach  us  that  policing  is  a  prototypical  "public  good,"  and  that  the  "optimal amount"  of  policing  services can't be provided without  some​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​forced​ ​centralization.    The  first  problem  with  this  approach  generally  is  that,  while  positing  that  decentralized  decision-making  might  lead  to  the  under-provision  of  a  service,  it  completely  ignores  that  centralization  is even  more  likely  to  lead  to  an  over-production  in  terms  of  cost  while  offering  little  assurance  against  under-production  in  terms  of  the  actual service quality enjoyed by those unable  to  wield  political  power  for  themselves.  What's  worse  is  that  those  who  advance  this  position  usually offer the pretext that without  centralization,  the  poor  and  ostensibly  powerless  would  lack  access  to  quality  service,  even  as  their  proposed solution often  fails​ ​to​ ​serve​ ​this​ ​very​ ​group.    The  second  problem  with  the  public  goods  rationalization  is  that  "prototypical"  services  like  policing  don't  even  obviously  meet  the  theoretical  requirements  of  a  public  good  on  their  own  terms.  We're  told  policing  is  non-excludable,  meaning  that  the  cost  of  keeping  non-payers  from  enjoying  the  benefits  of the protection service prohibits the  optimal​ ​level​ ​of​ ​protection​ ​from​ ​ ​(cont.​ ​4)  3 being​ ​provided​ ​to​ ​paying​ ​subscribers​ ​as​ ​well.    However  as  a  practical  matter,  policing  is  clearly  excludable.  Among  other  strategies,  police  agencies  can  simply  publish  the  properties  for  which they intend to defend by  force,  allowing  even  relatively  short-sighted  criminals  to  avoid  their  subscribers  and  incentivizing  them  to  case  unprotected  non-payers  instead.  Within  most  political  jurisdictions  currently,  county  and  city  jurisdictions  haphazardly  perform  this  function  already,  but  as  we  have  seen  above,  flexible  police  jurisdictions  determined  by  market  demand  would  better  serve  individuals  living  amongst  a  diverse  local  population  by  most  closely  aligning  incentives.    Private, decentralized policing is also largely  rivalrous  in  consumption,  in  stark  contradiction  with  the  second  requirement  of  a  public  good.  While  defending  one  house  in  a  neighborhood  from  the  threat  of  a  ballistic  missile  would  generally  require  defending  the  whole  neighborhood  from  the  same  threat,  thereby  rendering  the  defense  of  each  additional  house  in  the  neighborhood  essentially  cost-less  once  the  first  is  adequately  defended,  providing  a  deterrent  from  most  crimes,  as  well  as  investigation  and  restitution  services,  are  generally  costly  to  extend  to  each  additional  person  or  property.    It's  up  to  those  that  value  their  freedom  to  resist all who would employ the mere force of  arms  to  centralize  decision-making  within  a  privileged  political class. This goes double for  the  seemingly  fundamental  State  services  of  policing  and  dispute  resolution.  As  a  practical  matter,  subjecting  service  providers  of  all  kinds  to  competition  and  holding  them  to  principles  of  natural  justice  will  place  significant  limits  on  centralization  of  all  kinds.  Such  restraints  also  hinder  the  growth  of  political  power,  a  force  to  be  resisted  at all  costs​ ​by​ ​the​ ​true​ ​friends​ ​of​ ​man​ ​and​ ​liberty.  Give​ ​Anarchy​ ​a​ ​Chance​,​ ​article​ ​by​ ​Noah Leed   Many  of  us  were  heartened  by  the  recent  story  of  how  a  human  chain  was  formed  to  save  nine  struggling  swimmers  caught  in  a  rip  current  off  the  Panama  City  Beach  on  the  Florida  coast. Two boys had become stranded  offshore,  and  as  other  members  of  the  family  swam  out  to  their  aid,  those  swimmers  also  struggled  in  vain  to  get  to  shore.  Others  on  the  beach went from being onlookers to being  "on  duty"  as  they  linked  arms  to  form  an  eighty-person  human  lifeline,  pulling  those  stranded​ ​in​ ​the​ ​current​ ​back​ ​to​ ​safety.    Words  like  "heroic"  and  "miraculous"  come  to  mind  as  apt  descriptions of what occurred,  but  there  is  one  word  most  people  wouldn't  consider  using  here,  a  word  that  in  fact  perfectly  describes  how  this  family  was  saved:  they  were  saved  by  anarchy.  Most  tend  to  use  that word as a synonym for chaos  and  lack  of  structure  or  organization,  but  in  the  political  sense  it  simply  means  lack  of  a  formal  or  mandated  authoritative  hierarchy.  It  means  self-organization  rather  than  centrally​ ​planned​ ​organization.    ​It is immediately important to note that such  self-organization  necessarily  rests  on  whatever  moral  foundation might underlie it.  People  will  organize  themselves,  or  not,  according  to  the  system  of  values  they  have  in  common.  So  in  that  sense,  there  is  indeed  an  important  hierarchy  at  play  in  anarchy,  the  hierarchy  of  values  and  morals  that  has  evolved  over  the  countless  generations  that  preceded  ours.  Some  might  differ  in  what  constitutes  that  foundation  (using  terms such  as  "The  Enlightenment"  or  "Judeo-Christian")  but  there  can  be  no  doubt  that  beneficial  forms of anarchy are deeply rooted in history.  We​ ​don't​ ​make​ ​up​ ​values​ ​on​ ​the​ ​fly.     ​To  be  sure,  this  human  chain  didn't  just  magically  materialize  and  arise  spontaneously​ ​without​ ​any​ ​inputs​ ​of​ ​(cont.​ ​5)  4 of  leadership.  It  required  someone  to  first  have  an  idea  for  the  chain,  and  then  for  that  person  and  others  to  communicate  the  idea  and  to  facilitate  its  realization  by  recruiting  and  coordinating  willing  volunteers.  But  the  point  is,  the  manifestation  of  this  life-saving  team  required  no  pre-existing  hierarchy  or  formal  organizational  structure  or  authority,  and  required  no  threat  of  punishment  or  other  enforcement  mechanisms  to  make  it  work.  Those  who  wanted  to  participate  simply  did  so,  and  those  who  didn't,  didn't.  Whatever  minimal  elements  of  leadership  and  hierarchy  (i.e.,  non-swimmers  closest  to  shore/stronger  swimmers  in  deeper  ​waters)  That were needed had to arise in the moment,  voluntarily​ ​and​ ​organically.​ ​And​ ​they​ ​did.    It's  a  shame  that  the  word  "anarchy"  has  never  been  given  a  chance  to  gain  more  popular  use  in  contexts  that  actually  reflect  this  true  definition.  As  thinking  adults,  the  moment  we  hear  that  word  we  are  likely  to  not  really  think  about  what  it  might  mean.  Instead,  by  default,  we  give  it  the  emotional  weight  and  negative  connotations  that  were  likely  loaded  into our heads the few times we  heard  the  word  in  common  use  as  children:  anarchy  is  what  results  when  people  riot,  or  when  tornadoes  tear  up  towns,  or  when  nobody  does  the  dishes  (or  cleans  his  bedroom​ ​right​ ​now!).    So we are used to seeing the word "anarchy"  incorrectly  thrown  around  to  describe  things  like  the  gang-rule  and  barbarism  that  overtakes  failed  states  like  Somalia.  That  is  not  anarchy.  Rarely  is  the  word  used  in  any  but  negative  and  unappealing  contexts.  Perhaps,  though,  the  word  deserves  equal  time  in  getting  fair  use  to  describe  the  positive  voluntary  social  organization  and  human  cooperation  that  arises  almost  instantaneously  in  group  scenarios  such  as  the  Panama  City  Beach  rescue  (or,  say,  United  Flight  93).  And  further,  perhaps  we  should  consider  the  potential  negative  outcomes​ ​that​ ​might​ ​have​ ​resulted​ ​if​ ​anarchy   had  been  suppressed  in  the  case  of  this  rescue,​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​in​ ​other​ ​situations.    Representative  democracy  is highly thought  of  as  a  way  to  structure  the  governing  institutions  that  help  order  our  society  and  address  its  problems.  How  well  would  a  microcosm  of  political  democracy  have  worked  on  that  Panama  City  Beach?  In  the  name  of  "fairness"  we might want to consider  all  reasonable  alternatives  to  the  human-chain  idea,  and  we  might  want  to  vote  on  which  idea  to  deploy  and  on  who  should  lead  the  group,  and we might want to  consider  potential  costs  as  well  as  benefits  of  our​ ​options,​ ​and​ ​we​ ​might​ ​want​ ​to​ ​consult​ ​or   defer  to  authorities  and  experts  and  public  servants  on  the  details  of  executing  the  plan...after  another  vote,  of  course.  But  by  taking  time  to  formalize  the  life-saving  process  and  make  it  soundly democratic, that  democracy  would  probably  have  failed  the  nine​ ​people​ ​that​ ​anarchy​ ​managed​ ​to​ ​save.    In  case  anyone  thinks  I'm  just  bashing  government  here,  imagine  the  utter  failure  that  might  result  from  assigning  the  task  to a  meeting  of  middle-managers  mired  in  the  typical  bureaucracy  of  a  huge  corporation!  Direct  and  efficient (and risky) action and full  accountability  can  get  stifled  in  the  hierarchies  of  any  large  and  complex  organization,  whether  public  or  private,  because  large  organizations  commonly  breed  a  certain  amount  of  ass-kissing  and  ass-covering  (not  to  mention  foot-dragging,  finger-pointing  and  thumb-sucking).  It's  just  the​ ​nature​ ​of​ ​large​ ​organizations.    The  large  organization  will  have  many  structures,  rules  and  policies  that  have  evolved  to  "safely"  (ass-covering,  again)  give  guidance  in  most  situations,  but  not  in  all.  A  bureaucracy  is  always  obedient  first  and  foremost  to  itself,  at  the  risk  of  sacrificing  those  stray  few  who  might  be  in  situations  that  fall  outside  its  rigid  regulatory  regimes.  To  best  respond to certain situations -- like an  entire family stuck in a rip current -- agents of  larger​ ​organizations​ ​must​ ​be​ ​given​ ​(cont.​ ​6)  5

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/11/the-front-range-voluntaryist-issue-7/

11/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Ele'Thias Background 41%

Local rule is a microcosm of the national government with each city being ruled by a Town Master, Local Assembly, and a Justice.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/28/ele-thias-background/

28/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

GeekyBugle09 39%

What we are seeing in comics is perhaps a microcosm of that.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/10/01/geekybugle09/

01/10/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

The Dartmouth Review 10.3.2008 Volume 28, Issue 2 24%

I think the ideal university would be radically pluralistic, a microcosm of the whole world.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/04/19/the-dartmouth-review-10-3-2008-volume-28-issue-2/

18/04/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

The Dartmouth Review 3.13.2009 Volume 28, Issue 14 22%

Frost’s attitude As Stanlis demonstrates, Frost’s dualism tends to lead to toward Darwinism is a microcosm of his view of science in a Burkean worldview.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/04/19/the-dartmouth-review-3-13-2009-volume-28-issue-14/

18/04/2014 www.pdf-archive.com