Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 17 May at 11:24 - Around 76000 files indexed.


Show results per page

Results for «outcast»:


Total: 40 results - 0.034 seconds

Fallout 3 Wasteland Checklist 100%

Sierra Petrovita   Murphy’s Bombing Run The Outcast Collection Agent Location:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/21/fallout-3-wasteland-checklist/

21/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Fallout 3 Wasteland Checklist v2.1 99%

Sierra Petrovita   Murphy’s Bombing Run The Outcast Collection Agent Location:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/22/fallout-3-wasteland-checklist-v2-1/

22/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

CV 88%

GREGOR ROZANSKI born 1 May 1988 in Wroclaw, Poland.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/06/18/cv/

18/06/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Regulamento 84%

Regulamento do Passatempo “BANDA DESENHADA OUTCAST” FOX NETWORKS GROUP PORTUGAL, Lda.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/06/02/regulamento/

02/06/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Volume2Issue06 73%

I struggled most of my youth with being an outcast.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/10/14/volume2issue06/

14/10/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

Denizen - Rainbow of Vengeance 67%

DENIZEN THE ADVENTURES OF AN AUTISTIC OUTCAST AND HIS FIGHT AGAINST AUTHORITARIAN POWERS WORLDWIDE R AINBOW OF V ENGEANCE Stefano Pavone Denizen:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/10/31/denizen-rainbow-of-vengeance/

31/10/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

Unclaus 66%

organizations Unclaus is an infamous outcast of a remote Magic Academy.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/01/unclaus/

01/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Using Kenpom to predict 66%

2016 Nova was the outcast at 243.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/14/using-kenpom-to-predict/

14/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Box Man 63%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/11/07/box-man/

07/11/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

The Compilatoin of Bonwell Rodgers Poems (1) 58%

Their cocktail parties cannot be attended by an outcast like me, without titles in the military...' 'Friend, times have changed, things have fallen apart, and we are no longer one.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/26/the-compilatoin-of-bonwell-rodgers-poems-1/

26/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

EllenRohlfsVmord2006k.PDF 56%

(„Prophets outcast“) Pablo Regalsky (USA) sagt:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/09/13/ellenrohlfsvmord2006k/

13/09/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Benign Flame- Saga of Love 53%

Or could he be an outcast, unfamiliar with the niceties of society?‟ Ramaiah looked at him intently as though for a clue.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/09/08/benign-flame-saga-of-love/

08/09/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

OWN Brochure 52%

I was afraid of becoming an outcast.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/08/own-brochure/

08/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

WUXIA 48%

              WUXIA​ : A CINEMATIC RECONFIGURATION OF KUNG FU FIGHTING   IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION            Lawson Jiang  Film 132B: International Cinema, 1960­present  March 8, 2016  TA: Isabelle Carbonell  Section D        Wuxia​ , sometimes commonly known as ​ kung fu​ , has been a distinctive genre in the  history of Chinese cinema. Actors such as Bruce Lee, Jet Li, and Donnie Yen have become  noticeable figures in popularizing this genre internationally for the past couple decades. While  the eye­catching action choreographies provide the major enjoyment, the reading of the  ideas—which are usually hidden beneath the fights and are often culturally associated—is  critical to understand ​ wuxia​ ; the stunning fight scenes are always the vehicles that carry these  important messages. The ideas of a ​ wuxia ​ film should not be only read textually but also  contextually—one to scrutinize any hidden ideas as a character of the film, and as a spectator to  associate the acquired ideas with the context of the film. One would then think about “what  makes up the Chineseness of the film?” “Any ideology the director trying to convey?” And,  ultimately, “does every ​ wuxia ​ film necessarily functions the exact same way?” After the  worldwide success of Ang Lee’s ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon ​ in 2000, the film has  intrigued many scholars around the globe in developing new—cultural and political—readings of  the text. As of the nature that it is a very cultural product, the different perceptions of Western  and local Chinese audience, and the accelerating globalization has led to a cinematic  reconfiguration of ​ wuxia​  from its original form of fiction. Therefore, a contextual analysis of the  genre is crucial to understand what ​ wuxia ​ really is beyond a synonym of action, how has it been  interpreted and what has it been reconfigured to be.  First, it is important to define ​ wuxia​  and its associated terms ​ jiang hu ​ before an in­depth  analysis of the genre. The two terms do not simply outline the visual elements, but also implying  the core ideas of the genre. The title of this essay should be treated as a play on words, because  the meaning of the two terms does not necessarily interweave. The action genre with ​ kung fu  involved—such as the ​ Rush Hour ​ series starring Jackie Chan—does not equal to ​ wuxia​ . ​ Wuxia  itself is consist of ​ wu ​ and ​ xia ​ in its Chinese context, in which ​ wu​  equates to martial arts, and the  latter bears a more complex meaning. ​ Xia​ , as Ken­fang Lee notes, is “seen as a heroic figure who  possesses the martial arts skills to conduct his/her righteous and loyal acts;” a figure that is  “similar to the character Robin Hood in the western popular imagination. Both aiming to fight  against social injustice and right wrongs in a feudal society.1” The world where the ​ xia ​ live, act  and fight is called ​ jiang hu​ , a term that can hardly be translated, yet it refers to the ancient  outcast world that exists as an alternative universe in opposition to the disciplined reality;2 a  world where the government or the authoritative figures are underrepresented, weaken or even  omitted.  Wuxia ​ can thus be seen as a genre that provides a “Cultural China” where “different  schools of martial arts, weaponry, period costumes and significant cultural references are  portrayed in great detail to satisfy the Chinese popular imagination and to some degree represent  Chineseness;3” an idealised and glorified alternate history that reflects and criticizes the present  through its heroic proxy. The Chineseness here should not be read as a self­Orientalist product as  wuxia​  had been a very specific genre in Chinese popular culture that originated in the form of  fiction (and had later developed to comics or other visual entertainments such as TV series4)  before entering the international market with Ang Lee’s ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon​  in the  form of cinema. Ang Lee’s cultural masterpiece can be seen as an adaptation of the  contemporary ​ wuxia ​ fiction that later inspires many productions including Zhang Yimou’s ​ Hero  1  Ken­fang Lee, “Far away, so close: cultural translation in Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” ​ Inter­Asia  Cultural Studies​  4, no. 2 (2003): 284.  2  Ibid.  3  Ibid., 282.  4  Ibid.  (2002). Although the first ​ wuxia​  fiction, ​ The Water Margin​ , was written by Shih Nai’an  (1296­1372) roughly 650 years ago in the Ming dynasty, it was not until the post­war era from  1950s to 1970s had the genre reached its maturity. Since then, the contemporary fiction has  become popular in Hong Kong and Taiwan with notable authors such as Louis Cha and Gu  Long, respectively.5 The two authors has reshaped and defined the contemporary ​ wuxia ​ to their  Chinese­speaking readers and audience till today.6​  ​ The original ​ wuxia ​ as a form of fiction was  male­centric. The ​ xia​  were mostly male that a great heroine was rarely featured as the sole  protagonist in the story; female characters were usually the wives or sidekicks of the protagonists  in Louis Cha’s various novels, or sometimes appeared as femme fatale. Although most of the  female characters were richly developed and positively portrayed, it is inevitable to see such a  fact that the nature of ​ wuxia ​ is masculine. Like ​ hero ​ and ​ heroine ​ in the English context, ​ xia  refers to hero while the equivalence of heroine is ​ xia­nü ​ (​ nü ​ suggests female; the female hero).  It was not until Ang Lee’s worldwide success of ​ Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon​ , had  the global audience—casual moviegoer, film theorists and scholars—noticed the rise of the genre  since the film “was the first foreign language film ever to make more than $127.2 million in  North America.7 ” Apart from being a huge success in Taiwan, ​ Crouching Tiger ​ is a hit from  Thailand and Singapore to Korea but not in mainland China or Hong Kong. Ken­fang Lee  observes that “many viewers in Hong Kong consider this film boring, slow and without much  action” in which “nothing new compared to other movies in the ​ wuxia ​ tradition in the Hong  5  Ibid., 284.   The contemporary fiction written by the two authors mentioned previously have also provided the fundamental  sites to many film and TV adaptations, such as Wong Kar­wai’s ​ Ashes of Time​  (Hong Kong, 1994), an art film that  is loosely based on the popular novel ​ Eagle­shooting Heroes​ , and the TV series ​ The Return of the Condor Heroes  (Mainland China, 2006) is based on ​ The Legend of the Condor Heroes​ . Both novel were authored by Louis Cha.  7  Lee, “Far away, so close: cultural translation in Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” 282.  6 Kong film industry… [they] claimed that seeing people running across roofs and trees might be  novel for Americans, but they have seen it all before.8” Moreover, some of them rebuke the film  for “pandering to the Western audience” in which “the success of this film results from its appeal  to a taste for cultural diversity that mainly satisfies the craving for the exotic;” denouncing the  film as a self­Orientalist work that “most foreign audiences are attracted by the improbable  martial art skills and the romances between the two pairs of lovers.9 ” Lee concludes that the  exoticized Chineseness and romantic elements “betray the tradition of ​ wuxia ​ movies and become  Hollywoodized;10 ” that is, ​ Crouching Tiger ​ represents an inauthentic China.   Kenneth Chan considers such negative reactions toward the film as an “ambivalence” that  is “marked by a nationalist/anti­Orientalist framework” in which the Chinese and Hong Kong  audience’s claims of inauthenticity “reveal a cultural anxiety about identity and Chineseness in a  globalized, postcolonial, and postmodern world order.11” Such an ambivalence and anxiety  toward the inauthenticity are caused by the production itself as ​ Crouching Tiger ​ is funded mostly  by Hollywood.12 Through studying Fredric Jameson’s investigations of the postmodernism, Chan  declares that “postmodernist aesthetics and cultural production are implicated and shaped by the  global forces of late capitalist logic. By extension, one could presumably argue that popular  cinema can be considered postmodern by virtue of its aesthetic configurations.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/06/wuxia/

06/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Netflix Excerpt 46%

instead of rising above these challenges, she is an outcast, and she is often bullied by her mother and her classmates.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/09/18/netflix-excerpt/

18/09/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Simbul Tempus 46%

2 Milestone / / / Paragon (11-20) Milestone / / / Epic (21-30) Milestone / / / OTHER EQUIPMENT RITUALS / ALCHEMY Adventurer's Kit Arcane Mark Crystal orb (E) Magic Mouth CHARACTER BACKGROUND Half-Elf - Outcast You were born in circumstances that made you unwelcome —in a community of elves where humans were hated, for example, or vice versa.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/02/14/simbul-tempus/

14/02/2011 www.pdf-archive.com

Time to Think - Google Docs 44%

    Time to Think  Sam Noyes  February 2015    I don’t remember where I was when I heard the news.  Come to think about it, I don’t remember  anything at all about Thursday.  All I remember was lying awake that night.  Because life slows down at night.  At this point it’s the only time I really get to think.  I also remember the first thing I did the next morning.  Every pill, every needle, everything, in  the garbage.  This isn’t high school anymore. To hell with withdrawal.  I walked out onto Swasey Parkway and looked up at the sky. It seemed particularly bright that  morning, a deep shade of blue that made me dizzy as I stared into it. I remember feeling a tremendous  sense of calm at that moment, an inexplicable serenity.   I should be in high school. I'm eighteen and would be just finishing my senior year, but I dropped  out. I was failing anyway. Not like I had any friends either. Oh, I wasn't bullied, I wasn't an outcast. I was  just forgotten. I was the kid who sat in the back corner, head in his hands, wishing he was somewhere  else, knowing that place wasn't home, either.  I could have done well in school, too. There was nothing stopping me. I was bright ever since I  was an infant. The problem was that I never got invested.  I just didn't care, and now it's too late. I  squandered my chance at a normal high school education, and I can't get it back.  Failing wasn’t my only problem.  During sophomore year I tried heroin for the first time, sitting  alone in the backseat of my mom’s crappy ‘97 Honda Accord. I'm not going to tell you that I was hooked  immediately – that's not how it works. You don't try it once and get addicted. But I do know I liked it that  first time. I liked it a lot. It's a slippery slope.  1  Where do I go now that it's all over?  That was the question I asked myself, time and time again.  My mother. She was the first person who came to mind.  The Exeter Cemetery looked exactly as it had when I last saw it, back in the sixth grade when it  happened. I remember seeing her white, cold body for the last time, seeing the coffin being shut and  lowered into the ground. All I can remember was a sense of awe, that my mother would be in the  ground, unmoving, for eternity.  With those memories came back even more upsetting ones. The nightly sobbing, the screaming,  the fights. That day in June, when I found her hanging from a branch in the backyard. God knows what  she was on when she did it. All that I know is that it was inevitable.  After that, my stepfather was less reserved. He had no one to impress, no one who cared about  me to keep his temper in check. Because my mother cared. She had problems, plenty of them, but I  know that she cared about me.  From then on, he was drunk every night. I'd go to bed with a black eye if I was lucky. At that  point, I was still hoping for a normal life.  The time I spent with my mother was the happiest time of my  life.  So I didn’t run from him.  I resolved to keep going, to make it through high school, to hang on.  But it got hard.  By the time I was in the eighth grade, he had lost his job and was broke.  That’s  when the kids at school started to see the effects.  Because I had friends in middle school.  I had a good  time back then.  But by the eighth grade I had grown quiet.  My stepfather would keep me up until the  early morning with his drunken bouts of anger and violence.  I spent an hour in the cemetery, first gathering flowers for my mother and then walking slowly  down each row, looking at the graves and wondering about the stories.  I always loved stories, and even  though I didn’t do well in school I liked to read.  The graveyard was where the storyteller in me could go  wild.  Who were all these people?  Does anyone remember them?  2  From the cemetery, I directed my steps to the banks of the Exeter River.  I remembered the way  perfectly – snake through my backyard, duck under the willow tree to avoid the view of the neighbors,  scramble down a small, steep hill, dash across a clearing, and there it was, just as I left it a few years ago.  The rock was there, too, its rounded top poking above the white, calm ripples of the rushing water.  I  used to sit on it for hours whenever I wanted to get away, skipping rocks absent‐mindedly or grabbing at  small minnows, only to have them dart away as soon as my hand broke the surface of the water.  The  rock still holds a special significance for me, even though I don’t need to escape anymore, not since my  stepfather left me last year.  Just up and left.  I woke up one day in late May, and his clothes, wallet, car,  everything, just gone.  I’ve been living alone ever since.  I have no relatives, at least none I ever met.  I  don’t know what else to do.  So, I got a job.  I’m working at the Sunoco on Portsmouth Ave from nine to five, and starting at  six I head to McDonald’s, just down the road.  I barely sleep, but at least I’m getting by.  I really should  be there now, not that it matters anymore.  I was planning on attending community college once I saved  up some money, but that was a pipe dream anyway.  I leaned down and picked up a rock.  It was shiny, smooth against the rough skin of my hand.  And I nodded with satisfaction as it skipped over the glassy water, four, five, six, seven times before  coming to a rest on the bank where the river curved.  **  I woke up this morning and I knew exactly where I was going.  Out the door, take a left, right at  the library, left on Linden, ten houses down.  It was just as I remembered it – gray, slightly sagging,  shingles coming detached from the roof.  I had never been inside, but I passed it every day for years  back when I was in middle school.  I walked up the gravel pathway and knocked.  And in a minute, there  was Vinnie, looking just as he did when I left him, albeit with some wisps of gray hair starting to come  3  through.  Same slightly crooked nose, hardened skin, huge hands.  The bastard even had on the same  torn, navy sweatshirt he wore every day on the bus.  It took him a second, I think, to realize who I was and why he recognized me.  He opened the  door with the same uninterested, slightly condescending expression with which one might greet a  Jehovah’s Witness or a door‐to‐door salesman.  But before I had time to react, my hand was being  crushed and I was being pulled inside by his powerful grip.  He was clapping me on the back, smiling,  telling me how great it was to see me.  I couldn’t keep up with the onslaught.  Finally, I was inside, sitting  at the counter, and he poured me a glass of water.  “How you been, man?” was the first thing he could think of to say.  “I’ve been good.  I’m working down at the Sunoco now.”  “Since when you got time for that?”  I smirked, and took a drink of water before answering.  “Since I dropped out.”  He put down the beer that he had been holding since I entered.  Beer bottles acted as a sort of  hand decoration for him.  “Now what the hell’d you go and do that for?”  “Hey, we both know I was failing anyway.”  He grunted and looked out the window, so I continued.  “You still driving buses?”  “Yeah, still at it.  One day I’m gonna quit, though.  One of these days, just wait and see.  Those  brats in the administration, I’m done with ‘em.  Soon as the wife lets me, I’m gone.”  “How is she?”  “She’s fine, man, she’s gettin by.  Still working at the preschool.”  “Nice.”  He nodded.  I sighed.  One of the many things I liked about Vinnie was that he wasn’t afraid of  silence.  Some people, they have to be talking, all day, every day.  Vinnie wasn’t afraid of a little silence.  Gives you time to think.  Finally, he spoke.  “What made you come by? Just felt like checkin in?”  4  “Well, It’s been a big couple days for me.  Real big couple days.”  “Why? What’s been goin on?”  “Well, Thursday I went cold turkey.”  The thought of it made my head pound.  “Been clean three  days now.  Threw it all right in the trash.  Feel like shit, but I’m glad to be done with it.”  Vinnie was no stranger to my drug habits.  I’ve known him since the sixth grade, when he first  became my bus driver.  I live far from school, so I was always the last one on the bus, and I would sit up  front and talk with him until we got to my house.  Then, when I was in the eighth grade, he took on the  role of janitor as well to pick up some extra money.  He became something of a class treasure.  Everyone  in the school wanted to talk to him for his gruff humor and his good‐naturedness.  I always felt lucky to  know him.  “Hey, congrats, man!  Shit, wish I could stop drinking.  How’d you do it?”  “Well, I, uh… I had some motivation.  I just, uh… I found out on Thursday that I –” I tried to think  of the best way to say it.  The letter from the hospital was so impersonal.  It made me feel like a mark on  a piece of paper.  “What is it?”  “It’s… I'm dying, Vinnie.  Acute leukemia, stage four.  They gave me four weeks.”  5 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/22/time-to-think-google-docs/

22/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Time to Think, JF 44%

    Time to Think  John Farkerson  February 2015    I don’t remember where I was when I heard the news.  Come to think about it, I don’t remember  anything at all about Thursday.  All I remember was lying awake that night.  Because life slows down at night.  At this point it’s the only time I really get to think.  I also remember the first thing I did the next morning.  Every pill, every needle, everything, in  the garbage.  This isn’t high school anymore. To hell with withdrawal.  I walked out onto Swasey Parkway and looked up at the sky. It seemed particularly bright that  morning, a deep shade of blue that made me dizzy as I stared into it. I remember feeling a tremendous  sense of calm at that moment, an inexplicable serenity.   I should be in high school. I'm eighteen and would be just finishing my senior year, but I dropped  out. I was failing anyway. Not like I had any friends either. Oh, I wasn't bullied, I wasn't an outcast. I was  just forgotten. I was the kid who sat in the back corner, head in his hands, wishing he was somewhere  else, knowing that place wasn't home, either.  I could have done well in school, too. There was nothing stopping me. I was bright ever since I  was an infant. The problem was that I never got invested.  I just didn't care, and now it's too late. I  squandered my chance at a normal high school education, and I can't get it back.  Failing wasn’t my only problem.  During sophomore year I tried heroin for the first time, sitting  alone in the backseat of my mom’s crappy ‘97 Honda Accord. I'm not going to tell you that I was hooked  immediately – that's not how it works. You don't try it once and get addicted. But I do know I liked it that  first time. I liked it a lot. It's a slippery slope.  1  Where do I go now that it's all over?  That was the question I asked myself, time and time again.  My mother. She was the first person who came to mind.  The Exeter Cemetery looked exactly as it had when I last saw it, back in the sixth grade when it  happened. I remember seeing her white, cold body for the last time, seeing the coffin being shut and  lowered into the ground. All I can remember was a sense of awe, that my mother would be in the  ground, unmoving, for eternity.  With those memories came back even more upsetting ones. The nightly sobbing, the screaming,  the fights. That day in June, when I found her hanging from a branch in the backyard. God knows what  she was on when she did it. All that I know is that it was inevitable.  After that, my stepfather was less reserved. He had no one to impress, no one who cared about  me to keep his temper in check. Because my mother cared. She had problems, plenty of them, but I  know that she cared about me.  From then on, he was drunk every night. I'd go to bed with a black eye if I was lucky. At that  point, I was still hoping for a normal life.  The time I spent with my mother was the happiest time of my  life.  So I didn’t run from him.  I resolved to keep going, to make it through high school, to hang on.  But it got hard.  By the time I was in the eighth grade, he had lost his job and was broke.  That’s  when the kids at school started to see the effects.  Because I had friends in middle school.  I had a good  time back then.  But by the eighth grade I had grown quiet.  My stepfather would keep me up until the  early morning with his drunken bouts of anger and violence.  I spent an hour in the cemetery, first gathering flowers for my mother and then walking slowly  down each row, looking at the graves and wondering about the stories.  I always loved stories, and even  though I didn’t do well in school I liked to read.  The graveyard was where the storyteller in me could go  wild.  Who were all these people?  Does anyone remember them?  2  From the cemetery, I directed my steps to the banks of the Exeter River.  I remembered the way  perfectly – snake through my backyard, duck under the willow tree to avoid the view of the neighbors,  scramble down a small, steep hill, dash across a clearing, and there it was, just as I left it a few years ago.  The rock was there, too, its rounded top poking above the white, calm ripples of the rushing water.  I  used to sit on it for hours whenever I wanted to get away, skipping rocks absent‐mindedly or grabbing at  small minnows, only to have them dart away as soon as my hand broke the surface of the water.  The  rock still holds a special significance for me, even though I don’t need to escape anymore, not since my  stepfather left me last year.  Just up and left.  I woke up one day in late May, and his clothes, wallet, car,  everything, just gone.  I’ve been living alone ever since.  I have no relatives, at least none I ever met.  I  don’t know what else to do.  So, I got a job.  I’m working at the Sunoco on Portsmouth Ave from nine to five, and starting at  six I head to McDonald’s, just down the road.  I barely sleep, but at least I’m getting by.  I really should  be there now, not that it matters anymore.  I was planning on attending community college once I saved  up some money, but that was a pipe dream anyway.  I leaned down and picked up a rock.  It was shiny, smooth against the rough skin of my hand.  And I nodded with satisfaction as it skipped over the glassy water, four, five, six, seven times before  coming to a rest on the bank where the river curved.  **  I woke up this morning and I knew exactly where I was going.  Out the door, take a left, right at  the library, left on Linden, ten houses down.  It was just as I remembered it – gray, slightly sagging,  shingles coming detached from the roof.  I had never been inside, but I passed it every day for years  back when I was in middle school.  I walked up the gravel pathway and knocked.  And in a minute, there  was Vinnie, looking just as he did when I left him, albeit with some wisps of gray hair starting to come  3  through.  Same slightly crooked nose, hardened skin, huge hands.  The bastard even had on the same  torn, navy sweatshirt he wore every day on the bus.  It took him a second, I think, to realize who I was and why he recognized me.  He opened the  door with the same uninterested, slightly condescending expression with which one might greet a  Jehovah’s Witness or a door‐to‐door salesman.  But before I had time to react, my hand was being  crushed and I was being pulled inside by his powerful grip.  He was clapping me on the back, smiling,  telling me how great it was to see me.  I couldn’t keep up with the onslaught.  Finally, I was inside, sitting  at the counter, and he poured me a glass of water.  “How you been, man?” was the first thing he could think of to say.  “I’ve been good.  I’m working down at the Sunoco now.”  “Since when you got time for that?”  I smirked, and took a drink of water before answering.  “Since I dropped out.”  He put down the beer that he had been holding since I entered.  Beer bottles acted as a sort of  hand decoration for him.  “Now what the hell’d you go and do that for?”  “Hey, we both know I was failing anyway.”  He grunted and looked out the window, so I continued.  “You still driving buses?”  “Yeah, still at it.  One day I’m gonna quit, though.  One of these days, just wait and see.  Those  brats in the administration, I’m done with ‘em.  Soon as the wife lets me, I’m gone.”  “How is she?”  “She’s fine, man, she’s gettin by.  Still working at the preschool.”  “Nice.”  He nodded.  I sighed.  One of the many things I liked about Vinnie was that he wasn’t afraid of  silence.  Some people, they have to be talking, all day, every day.  Vinnie wasn’t afraid of a little silence.  Gives you time to think.  Finally, he spoke.  “What made you come by? Just felt like checkin in?”  4  “Well, It’s been a big couple days for me.  Real big couple days.”  “Why? What’s been goin on?”  “Well, Thursday I went cold turkey.”  The thought of it made my head pound.  “Been clean three  days now.  Threw it all right in the trash.  Feel like shit, but I’m glad to be done with it.”  Vinnie was no stranger to my drug habits.  I’ve known him since the sixth grade, when he first  became my bus driver.  I live far from school, so I was always the last one on the bus, and I would sit up  front and talk with him until we got to my house.  Then, when I was in the eighth grade, he took on the  role of janitor as well to pick up some extra money.  He became something of a class treasure.  Everyone  in the school wanted to talk to him for his gruff humor and his good‐naturedness.  I always felt lucky to  know him.  “Hey, congrats, man!  Shit, wish I could stop drinking.  How’d you do it?”  “Well, I, uh… I had some motivation.  I just, uh… I found out on Thursday that I –” I tried to think  of the best way to say it.  The letter from the hospital was so impersonal.  It made me feel like a mark on  a piece of paper.  “What is it?”  “It’s… I'm dying, Vinnie.  Acute leukemia, stage four.  They gave me four weeks.”  5 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/02/22/time-to-think-jf/

22/02/2016 www.pdf-archive.com