PDF Archive

Easily share your PDF documents with your contacts, on the Web and Social Networks.

Share a file Manage my documents Convert Recover PDF Search Help Contact


Search


PDF Archive search engine
Last database update: 06 August at 17:39 - Around 220000 files indexed.

Show results per page

Results for «patriarchates»:


Total: 100 results - 0.144 seconds

Feast-of-Lucifer 97%

Great Register Pactum De Singularis Caelum Trust Reg.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/27/feast-of-lucifer/

27/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

Germanus1935OldCalendaristEcumenismEng 87%

The Bishop Who Consecrated Bishop Matthew of  Bresthena Was An “Old Calendarist Ecumenist”      Metropolitan  Germanus  of  Demetrias,  who  consecrated  Bishop  Matthew of Bresthena in 1935, did not have the Gkoutzidis‐style ecclesiology.  On the contrary, Metropolitan Germanus of Demetrias believed that all of the  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  that  continued  to  retain  the  Patristic  Calendar  were  still  canonical  and  Orthodox,  even  if  they  had  not  severed  communion  with  the  New  Calendarists.  Accordingly  to  this  quite  moderate  ecclesiology,  Metropolitan  Germanus  of  Demetrias  published  a  Pastoral Encyclical in 1935, in which he writes that the very PURPOSE of the  Church of the Genuine Orthodox Christians of Greece was to CO‐OPERATE  with  the  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  that  kept  the  Old  Calendar! In the said Encyclical we read:       “…Remaining faithful to the tradition of the Seven Ecumenical Councils, the  ordinances  of  which  our  Church  respects  and  unwaveringly  retains,  we  shall  collaborate  [Greek:  synergazometha]  with  the  Orthodox  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch, Mt. Sinai, Mt. Athos, Russia, Poland, Serbia and the remaining Orthodox  Churches  that  keep  the  Patristic  Old  Festal  Calendar,  not  acquiescing  to  remain  under  the  curses  and  anathemas  of  the  Holy  Fathers  and  the  Orthodox  Patriarchs,  who in Ecumenical and Regional Councils, appointed what is befitting…”    The original text in Greek reads:       «...Ἐμμένοντες  πιστοὶ  εἰς  τὰς  παραδόσεις  τῶν  ἑπτὰ  Οἰκουμενικῶν  Συνόδων, τῶν ὁποῖων τὰς διατάξεις σέβεται καὶ διακρατεῖ ἀπαρασαλεύτως  ἡ  ἡμετέρα  Ἐκκλησία  [τῶν  Γ.Ο.Χ.  Ἑλλάδος],  θὰ  ΣΥΝΕΡΓΑΖΟΜΕΘΑ  μετὰ  τῶν  ΟΡΘΟΔΟΞΩΝ  Ἐκκλησιῶν  Ἱεροσολύμων,  Ἀντιοχείας,  Ὄρους  Σινᾶ,  Ἁγ.  Ὅρους, Ρωσσίας, Πολωνίας, Σερβίας καὶ λοιπῶν ΟΡΘΟΔΟΞΩΝ Ἐκκλησιῶν,  αἴτηνες  κρατοῦσι  τὸ  πάτριον  παλαιὸν  ἑορτολόγιον,  μὴ  στέργοντες  νὰ  διατελῶμεν  ὑπὸ  τὰς  ἀρὰς  καὶ  τὰ  ἀναθέματα  τῶν  Ἁγίων  Πατέρων  καὶ  τῶν  Ὀρθοδόξων  Πατριαρχῶν,  οἴτινες  ἐν  Οἰκουμενικαῖς  καὶ  Τοπικαῖς  Συνόδοις  ὡρισαν τὰ συμφέροντα...»      Since  Metropolitan  Germanus  of  Demetrias  believed  that  the  Patriarchates of Jerusalem, Antioch, Russia, Serbia, etc, were valid Orthodox  Churches, and that the role of the G.O.C. was to collaborate with them, does  this not make him an “Old Calendarist Ecumenist” according to the extremist  Gkoutzidian ecclesiology? If so, then that would make Germanus a graceless  heretic  even  at  this  time  that  he  was  consecrating  Bishop  Matthew.  So  then,  with which grace did he perform the consecration?    Behold the original document in Greek, as it was found in the archive  of Bp. Kirykos Kontogiannis, and criminally hidden for all of these years:   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/germanus1935oldcalendaristecumenismeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Cult formations - acquisti 84%

Core 1-6 Brood Cycle PUNTI EURO ???

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/09/27/cult-formations-acquisti/

27/09/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

livingsynodofbishops 81%

HERESIES, SCHISMS AND UNCANONICAL ACTS  REQUIRE A LIVING SYNODICAL JUDGMENT    An Introduction to Councils and Canon Law      The  Orthodox  Church,  since  the  time  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  has  resolved  quarrels  or  problems  by  convening  Councils.  Thus,  when  the  issue  arose regarding circumcision and the Laws of Moses, the Holy Apostles met  in Jerusalem, as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (Chapter 15). The Holy  Fathers  thus  imitated  the  Apostles  by  convening  Councils,  whether  general,  regional,  provincial  or  diocesan,  in  order  to  resolve  issues  of  practice.  These  Councils  discussed  and  resolved  matters  of  Faith,  affirming  Orthodoxy  (correct  doctrine)  while  condemning  heresies  (false  teachings).  The  Councils  also  formulated  ecclesiastical  laws  called  Canons,  which  either  define  good  conduct  or  prescribe  the  level  of  punishment  for  bad  conduct.  Some  canons  apply  only  to  bishops,  others  to  priests  and  deacons,  and  others  to  lower  clergy and laymen. Many canons apply to all ranks of the clergy collectively.  Several canons apply to the clergy and the laity alike.      The level of authority that a Canon holds is discerned by the authority  of  the  Council  that  affirmed  the  Canon.  Some  Canons  are  universal  and  binding on the entire Church, while others are only binding on a local scale.  Also, a Canon is only an article of the law, and is not the execution of the law.  For a Canon to be executed, the proper authority must put the Canon in force.  The authority differs depending on the rank of the person accused. According  to the Canons themselves, a bishop requires twelve bishops to be put on trial  and  for  the  canons  to  be  applied  towards  his  condemnation.  A  presbyter  requires six bishops to be put on trial and condemned, and a deacon requires  three bishops. The lower clergy and the laymen require at least one bishop to  place them on ecclesiastical trial or to punish them by applying the canons to  them. But in the case of laymen, a single presbyter may execute the Canon if  he  has  been  granted  the  rank  of  pneumatikos,  and  therefore  has  the  bishop’s  authority  to  remit  sins  and  apply  penances.  However,  until  this  competent  ecclesiastical authority has convened and officially applied the Canons to the  individual  of  whatever  rank,  that  individual  is  only  “liable”  to  punishment,  but has not yet been punished. For the Canons do not execute themselves, but  they must be executed by the entity with authority to apply the Canons.      The  Canons  themselves  offer  three  forms  of  punishment,  namely,  deposition, excommunication and anathematization. Deposition is applied to  clergy. Excommunication is applied to laity. Anathematization can be applied  to either clergy or laity. Deposition does not remove the priestly rank, but is  simply a prohibition from the clergyman to perform priestly functions. If the  deposition  is  later  revoked,  the  clergyman  does  not  require  reordination.  In  the same way, excommunication does not remove a layman’s baptism. It only  prohibits the layman to commune. If the excommunication is later lifted, the  layman  does  not  require  rebaptism.  Anathematization  causes  the  clergyman  or layman to be cut off from the Church and assigned to the devil. But even  anathematizations can be revoked if the clergyman or layman repents.     There Is a Hierarchy of Authority in Canon Law      The authority of one Canon over another  is determined by the  power  of the Council the Canons were ratified by. For example, a canon ratified by  an  Ecumenical  Council  overruled  any  canon  ratified  by  a  local  Council.  The  hierarchy of authority, from most binding Canons to least, is as follows:      Apostolic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  compiled  by  the  Holy  Apostles  and  their  immediate  successors.  These  Canons  were  approved  and  confirmed by the First Ecumenical Council and again by the Quinisext Council.  Not  even  an  Ecumenical  Council  can  overrule  or  overthrow  an  Apostolic  Canon.  There  are  only  very  few  cases  where  Ecumenical  Councils  have  amended  the  command  of  an  Apostolic  Canon  by  either  strengthening  or  weakening  it.  But  by  no  means  were  any  Apostolic  Canons  overruled  or  abolished.  For  instance,  the  1st  Apostolic  Canon  which  states  that  a  bishop  must  be  ordained  by  two  or  three  other  bishops.  Several  Canons  of  the  Ecumenical Councils declare that even two bishops do not suffice, but that a  bishop must be ordained by the consent of all the bishops in the province, and  the ordination itself must take place by no less than three bishops. This does  not abolish nor does it overrule the 1st Apostolic Canon, but rather it confirms  and  reinforces  the  “spirit  of  the  law”  behind  that  original  Canon.  Another  example is the 5th Apostolic Canon which states that Bishops, Presbyters and  Deacons are not permitted to put away their wives by force, on the pretext of  reverence.  Meanwhile,  the  12th  Canon  of  Quinisext  advises  a  bishop  (or  presbyters who has been elected as a bishop) to first receive his wife’s consent  to separate and for both of them to become celibate. This does not oppose the  Apostolic  Canon  because  it  is  not  a  separation  by  force  but  by  consent.  The  13th  Canon  of  Quinisext  confirms  the  5th  Apostolic  Canon  by  prohibiting  a  presbyters or deacons to separate from his wife. Thus the 5th Apostolic Canon  is not abolished, but amended by an Ecumenical Council for the good of the  Church.  After  all,  the  laws  exist  to  serve  the  Church  and  not  to  enslave  the  Church. In the same way, Christ declared: “The sabbath was made for man, and  not man for the sabbath (Mark 2:27).”    Ecumenical  Canons  (Universal)  are  those  pronounced  by  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils.  These  Councils  received  this  name  because  they  were  convened  by  Roman  Emperors  who  were  regarded  to  rule  the  Ecumene  (i.e.,  “the  known  world”).  Ecumenical  Councils  all  took  place  in  or  around  Constantinople,  also  known  as  New  Rome,  the  Reigning  City,  or  the  Universal  City. The president was always the hierarch in attendance that happened to be  the first‐among‐equals. Ecumenical Councils cannot abolish Apostolic Canons,  nor  can  they  abolish  the  Canons  of  previous  Ecumenical  Councils.  But  they  can overrule Regional and Patristic Canons.      Regional  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Regional  Councils that were later confirmed by an Ecumenical Council. This approval  gave these Regional Canons a universal authority, almost equal to Ecumenical  Canons.  These  Canons  are  not  only  valid  within  the  Regional  Church  in  which  the  Council  took  place,  but  are  valid  for  all  Orthodox  Christians.  For  this  reason  the  Canons  of  these  approved  Regional  Councils  cannot  be  abolished, but must be treated as those of Ecumenical Councils.       Patristic  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  the  Canons  of  individual  Holy  Fathers  that  were  confirmed  by  an  Ecumenical  Council.  Their  authority  is  only  lesser  than  the  Apostolic  Canons,  Ecumenical  Canons  and  Universal  Regional Canons. But because they were approved by an Ecumenical Council,  these Patristic Canons binding on all Orthodox Christians.      Pan‐Orthodox  Canons  (Universal)  refer  to  those  ratified  by  Pan‐ Orthodox Councils. Since Constantinople had fallen to the Ottomans in 1453,  there  could  no  longer  be  Imperial  or  Ecumenical  Councils,  since  there  was  no  longer a ruling Emperor of the Ecumene (the Roman or Byzantine Empire). But  the Ottoman Sultan appointed the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople as  both  the  political  and  religious  leader  of  the  enslaved  Roman  Nation  (all  Orthodox  Christians  within  the  Roman  Empire,  regardless  of  language  or  ethnic origin). In this capacity, having replaced the Roman Emperor as leader  of  the  Roman  Orthodox  Christians,  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  took  the  responsibility  of  convening  General  Councils  which  were  not  called  Ecumenical Councils (since there was no longer an Ecumene), but instead were  called  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils.  Since  the  Ecumenical  Patriarch  was  also  the  first‐among‐equals  of  Orthodox  hierarchs,  he  would  also  preside  over  these  Councils. Thus he became both the convener and the president. The Primates  of  the  other  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous  Churches  were  also  invited,  along with their Synods of Bishops. If the Ecumenical Patriarch was absent or  the one accused, the Patriarch of Alexandria would preside over the Synod. If  he too could not attend in person, then the Patriarchs of Antioch or Jerusalem  would  preside.  If  no  Patriarchs  could  attend,  but  only  send  their  representatives,  these  representatives  would  not  preside  over  the  Council.  Instead, whichever bishop present who held the highest see would preside. In  several  chronologies,  the  Pan‐Orthodox  Councils  are  referred  to  as  Ecumenical. In any case, the Canons pertaining to these Councils are regarded  to be universally binding for all Orthodox Christians.       National  Canons  (Local)  are  those  valid  only  within  a  particular  National Church. The Canons of these National Councils are only accepted if  they  are  in  agreement  with  the  Canons  ratified  by  the  above  Apostolic,  Ecumenical, Regional, Patristic and Pan‐Orthodox Councils.      Provincial  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  Metropolitan  and  his  suffragan  bishops.  They  are  only  binding  within  that  Metropolis.      Prefectural  Canons  are  those  ratified  by  Councils  called  by  a  single  bishop and his subordinate clergy. They are only valid within that Diocese.       Parochial  Canons  are  the  by‐laws  of  a  local  Parish  or  Mission,  which  are  chartered  and  endorsed  by  the  Rector  or  Founder  of  a  Parish  and  the  Parish Council. These by‐laws are only applicable within that Parish.      Monastic Canons are the rules of a local Monastery or Monastic Order,  which  are  chartered  by  the  Abbot  or  Founder  of  the  Skete  or  Monastery.  These by‐laws are only applicable within that Monastery.      Sometimes  Canons  are  only  recommendations  explaining  how  clergy  and laity are to conduct themselves. Other times they are actually penalties to  be  executed  upon  laity  and  clergy  for  their  misdeeds.  But  the  penalties  contained  within  Canons  are  simply  recommendations  and  not  the  actual  executions of the penalties themselves. The recommendation of the law is one  thing and the execution of the law is another.     Canon Law Can Only Be Executed By Those With Authority       For  the  execution  of  the  law  to  take  place  it  requires  a  competent  authority  to  execute  the  law.  A  competent  authority  is  reckoned  by  the  principle  of  “the  greater  judges  the  lesser.”  Thus,  there  are  Canons  that  explain who has the authority to judge individuals according to the Canons.      A  layman  can  only  be  judged,  excommunicated  or  anathematized  by  his own bishop, or by his own priest, provided the priest has the permission  of  his own  bishop (i.e., a priest who  is  a pneumatikos).  This law  is ratified  by  the 6th Canon of Carthage, which has been made universal by the authority of  the Sixth Ecumenical Council. The Canon states: “The application of chrism and  the  consecration  of  virgin  girls  shall  not  be  done  by  Presbyters;  nor  shall  it  be  permissible for a Presbyter to reconcile anyone at a public liturgy. This is the  decision  of  all  of  us.”  St.  Nicodemus’  interprets  the  Canon  as  follows:  “The  present  Canon  prohibits  a  priest  from  doing  three  things…  and  remission  of  the  penalty for a sin to a penitent, and thereafter through communion of the Mysteries the  reconciliation  of  him  with  God,  to  whom  he  had  become  an  enemy  through  sin,  making  him  stand  with  the  faithful,  and  celebrating  the  Liturgy  openly…  For  these  three functions have to be exercised by a bishop…. By permission of the bishop even a  presbyter can reconcile penitents, though. And read Ap. c. XXXIX, and c. XIX of the  First EC. C.” Thus the only authority competent to judge a layman is a bishop  or a presbyter who has the permission of his bishop to do so. However, those  who are among the low rank of clergy (readers, subdeacons, etc) require their  own local bishop to try them, because a presbyter cannot depose them.      A  deacon  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  three  other  bishops,  and  a  presbyter  can  only  be  judged  by  his  own  local  bishop  together  with  six  other  bishops.  The  28th  Canon  of  Carthage  thus  states:  “If  Presbyters  or  Deacons  be  accused,  the  legal  number  of  Bishops  selected  from the nearby locality, whom the accused demand, shall be empaneled — that is, in  the case of a Presbyter six, of a Deacon three, together with the Bishop of the accused  — to investigate their causes; the same form being observed in respect of days, and of  postponements,  and  of  examinations,  and  of  persons,  as  between  accusers  and  accused. As for the rest of the Clerics, the local Bishop alone shall hear and conclude  their  causes.”  Thus,  one  bishop  is  insufficient  to  submit  a  priest  or  deacon  to  trial or deposition. This can only be done by a Synod of Bishops with enough  bishops present to validly apply the canons. The amount of bishops necessary  to  judge  and  depose  a  priest  are  seven  (one  local  plus  six  others),  and  for  a  deacon the minimum amount of bishops is four (one local plus three others).      A  bishop  must  be  judged  by  his  own  metropolitan  together  with  at  least twelve other bishops. If the province does not have twelve bishops, they  must  invite  bishops  from  other  provinces  to  take  part  in  the  trial  and  deposition. Thus the 12th Canon of Carthage states: “If any Bishop fall liable to  any charges, which is to be deprecated, and an emergency arises due to the fact that  not many can convene, lest he be left exposed to such charges, these may be heard by  twelve Bishops, or in the case of a Presbyter, by six Bishops besides his own; or in the  case  of  a  Deacon,  by  three.”  Notice  that  the  amount  of  twelve  bishops  is  the  minimum  requirement  and  not  the  maximum.  The  maximum  is  for  all  the  bishops, even if they are over one hundred in number, to convene for the sake  of  deposing  a  bishop.  But  if  this  cannot  take  place,  twelve  bishops  assisting 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/livingsynodofbishops/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

MetaxakisAnglicans1918 79%

Project Canterbury  The Episcopal and Greek Churches  Report of an Unofficial Conference on Unity  Between Members of the Episcopal Church in America and  His Grace, Meletios Metaxakis, Metropolitan of Athens,  And His Advisers.  October 26, 1918.  New York: Department of Missions, 1920    PREFACE  THE desire for closer communion between the Eastern Orthodox Church and  the various branches of the Anglican Church is by no means confined to the  Anglican  Communion.  Many  interesting  efforts  have  been  made  during  the  past two centuries, a resume of which may be found in the recent publication  of  the  Department  of  Missions  of  the  Episcopal  Church  entitled  Historical  Contact Between the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches.  The most significant approaches of recent times have been those between the  Anglican  and  the  Russian  and  the  Greek  Churches;  and  of  late  the  Syrian  Church of India which claims foundation by the Apostle Saint Thomas.  Evdokim, the last Archbishop sent to America by the Holy Governing Synod  of Russia in the year 1915, brought with him instructions that he should work  for a closer understanding with the Episcopal Church in America. As a result,  a series of conferences were held in the Spring of 1916. At these conferences  the  question  of  Anglican  Orders,  the  Apostolical  Canons  and  the  Seventh  Oecumenical Council were discussed. The Russians were willing to accept the  conclusions  of  Professor  Sokoloff,  as  set  forth  in  his  thesis  for  the  degree  of  Doctor of Divinity, approved by the Holy Governing Synod of Russia. In this  thesis  he  proved  the  historical  continuity  of  Anglican  Orders,  and  the  intention to conform to the practice of the ancient Church. He expressed some  suspicion concerning the belief of part of the Anglican Church in the nature of  the sacraments, but maintained that this could not be of sufficient magnitude  to prevent the free operation of the Holy Spirit. The Russian members of the  conference,  while  accepting  this  conclusion,  pointed  out  that  further  steps  toward inter‐communion could only be made by an oecumenical council. The  following is quoted from the above‐mentioned publication:  The  Apostolical  Canons  were  considered  one  by  one.  With  explanations  on  both sides, the two Churches were found to be in substantial agreement.  In  connection  with  canon  forty‐six,  the  Archbishop  stated  that  the  Russian  Church  would  accept  any  Anglican  Baptism  or  any  other  Catholic  Baptism.  Difficulties  concerning  the  frequent  so‐called  ʺperiods  of  fastingʺ  were  removed by rendering the word ʺfastingʺ as ʺabstinence.ʺ Both Anglicans and  Russians  agreed  that  only  two  fast‐days  were  enjoined  on  their  members‐‐ Ash‐Wednesday and Good Friday.  The  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council  was  fully  discussed.  Satisfactory  explanations  were  given  by  both  sides,  but  no  final  decision  was  reached.  Before  the  conference  could  be  reconvened,  the  Archbishop  was  summoned  to a General Conference of the Orthodox Church at Moscow.  During  the  past  year  the  Syrian  Church  and  the  Anglican  Church  in  India  have  been  giving  very  full  and  careful  consideration  to  the  question  of  Reunion and it is hoped that some working basis may be speedily established.  As  a  preliminary  to  this  present  conference,  the  writer  addressed,  with  the  approval  of  the  members  of  the  conference  representing  the  Episcopal  Church,  a  letter  to  the  Metropolitan  which  became  the  basis  of  discussion.  This letter has been published as one of the pamphlets of this series under the  title, An Anglican Programme for Reunion. These conferences were followed by  a series of other conferences in England which took up the thoughts contained  in the American programme, as is shown in the following quotation from the  preface to the above‐mentioned letter:  At  the  first  conference  the  American  position  was  reviewed  and  it  was  mutually agreed that the present aim of such conference was not for union in  the  sense  of  ʺcorporate  solidarityʺ  based  on  the  restoration  of  intercommunion,  but  through  clear  understanding  of  each  otherʹs  position.  The  general  understanding  was  that  there  was  no  real  bar  to  communion  between  the  two  Churches  and  it  was  desirable  that  it  should  be  permitted,  but that such permission could only be given through the action of a General  Council.  The  third  of  these  series  of  conferences  was  held  at  Oxford.  About  forty  representatives  of  the  Anglican  Church  attended.  The  questions  of  Baptism  and  Confirmation  were  considered  by  this  conference.  It  was  shown  that,  until  the  eighteenth  century,  re‐baptism  of  non‐Orthodox  was  never  practiced. It was then introduced as a protest against the custom in the Latin  Church  of  baptizing,  not  only  living  Orthodox,  but  in  many  cases,  even  the  dead.  Under  order  of  Patriarch  Joachim  III,  it  has  become  the  Greek  custom  not to re‐baptize Anglicans who have been baptized by English priests. In the  matter  of  Confirmation  it  was  shown  that  in  the  cases  of  the  Orthodox,  the  custom of anointing with oil, called Holy Chrism, differs to some extent from  our  Confirmation.  It  is  regarded  as  a  seal  of  orthodoxy  and  should  not  be  viewed  as  repetition  of  Confirmation.  Even  in  the  Orthodox  Church  lapsed  communicants must receive Chrism again before restoration.  The  fourth  conference  was  held  in  the  Jerusalem  Chapel  of  Westminster  Abbey, under the presidency of the Bishop of Winchester. This discussion was  confined  to  the  consideration  of  the  Seventh  Oecumenical  Council.  It  is  not  felt by the Greeks that the number of differences on this point touch doctrinal  or  even  disciplinary  principles.  The  Metropolitan  stated  that  there  was  no  difficulty  tin  the  subject.  From  what  he  had  seen  of  Anglican  Churches,  he  was  assured  as  to  our  practice.  He  further  stated  that  he  was  strongly  opposed  to  the  practice  of  ascribing  certain  virtues  and  power  to  particular  icons, and that he himself had written strongly against this practice, and that  the Holy Synod of Greece had issued directions against it.ʺ  Those  brought  in  contact  with  the  Metropolitan  of  Athens,  and  those  who  followed  the  work  of  the  Commission  on  Faith  and  Order  can  testify  to  the  evident desire of the authorities of the East for closer union with the Anglican  Church as soon as conditions permit.  This  report  is  submitted  because  there  is  much  loose  thinking  and  careless  utterance on every side concerning the position of the Orthodox Church and  the  relation  of  the  Episcopal  Church  to  her  sister  Churches  of  the  East.  It  seems  not  merely  wise,  but  necessary,  to  place  before  Church  people  a  document showing how the minds of leading thinkers of both Episcopal and  Orthodox  Churches  are  approaching  this  most  momentous  problem  of  Intercommunion and Church Unity.    THE CONFERENCE  BY  common  agreement,  representatives  of  the  Greek  Orthodox  Church  and  delegates from the American Branch of the Anglican and Eastern Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation  of  the  Episcopal  Church,  met  in  the  Bible  Room  of  the  Library  of  the  General  Theological  Seminary,  Saturday,  October 26, 1918, at ten oʹclock. There were present as representing the Greek  Orthodox  Church:  His  Grace,  the  Most  Reverend  Meletios  Metaxakis,  Metropolitan  of  Greece;  the  Very  Reverend  Chrysostomos  Papadopoulos,  D.D.,  Professor  of  the  University  of  Athens  and  Director  of  the  Theological  Seminary  ʺRizariosʺ;  Hamilcar  Alivisatos,  D.D.,  Director  of  the  Ecclesiastical  Department  of  the  Ministry  of  Religion  and  Education,  Athens,  and  Mr.  Tsolainos,  who  acted  as  interpreter.  The  Episcopal  Church  was  represented  by  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney;  the  Right  Reverend  Frederick  J.  Kinsman, Bishop of Delaware; the Right Reverend James H. Darlington, D.D.,  Bishop  of  Harrisburg;  the  Very  Reverend  Hughell  Fosbroke,  Dean  of  the  General Theological Seminary; the Reverend Francis J. Hall, D.D., Professor of  Dogmatic  Theology  in  the  General  Theological  Seminary;  the  Reverend  Rockland T. Homans, the Reverend William Chauncey Emhardt, Secretary of  the  American  Branch  of  the  Anglican  and  Eastern  Association  and  of  the  Christian  Unity  Foundation;  Robert  H.  Gardiner,  Esquire,  Secretary  of  the  Commission  for  a  World  Conference  on  Faith  and  Order;  and  Seraphim  G.  Canoutas, Esquire. The Right Reverend Edward M. Parker, D.D.,  Bishop of New Hampshire, telegraphed his inability to be present. His Grace  the Metropolitan presided over the Greek delegation and Dr. Alivisatos acted  as  secretary.  The  Right  Reverend  Frederick  Courtney  presided  over  the  American delegation and the Reverend W. C. Emhardt acted as secretary.  Bishop Courtney opened the conference with prayer and made the following  remarks:  ʺOur  brethren  of  the  Greek  Church,  as  well  as  the  Anglican,  have  received copies of the letter to His Grace which our secretary has drawn up;  and which lies before us this morning. It is clear to all those who have taken  active  part  in  efforts  to  draw  together,  that  it  is  of  no  use  any  longer  to  congratulate each  other  upon points on  which  we agree, so  long as we hold  back those things on which we differ. The points on which we agree are not  those which have caused the separation, but the things concerning which we  differ.  So  long  as  we  assume  that  the  conditions  which  separate  us  now  are  the same as those which have held us apart, we are in line for removing those  things  which  separate  us.  We  are  making  the  valleys  to  be  filled  and  the  mountains  to  be  brought  low  and  making  possible  a  revival  of  the  spirit  of  unity.  It  is  in  the  hope  of  effecting  this  that  we  are  gathered  together.  Doctrinal differences underlie the things that differentiate us from each other.  The  proper  way  to  begin  this  conference  would  be  to  ask  the  Greeks  what  they think of some of the propositions laid down in the letter, beginning first  with the question of the Validity of Anglican Orders, and then proceeding to  the ʺFilioque Clauseʺ in the Creed and other topics suggested.  ʺWill  His  Grace  kindly  state  what  is  his  view  concerning  the  Validity  of  Anglican Orders?ʺ  The Metropolitan: ʺI am greatly moved indeed, and it is with feelings of great  emotion  that  I  come  to  this  conference  around  the  table  with  such  learned  theologians  of  the  Episcopal  Church.  Because  it  is  the  first  time  I  have  been  given the opportunity to express, not only my personal desire, but the desire  of  my  Church,  that  we  may  all  be  one.  I  understand  that  this  conference  is  unofficial.  Neither  our  Episcopal  brethren,  nor  the  Orthodox,  officially  represent  their  Churches.  The  fact,  however,  that  we  have  come  together  in  the spirit of prayer and love to discuss these questions, is a clear and eloquent  proof  that  we  are  on  the  desired  road  to  unity.  I  would  wish,  that  in  discussing these questions of ecclesiastical importance in the presence of such  theological experts,  that I were  as  well equipped  for  the  undertaking  as you  are.  Unfortunately,  however,  from  the  day  that  I  graduated  from  the  Theological Seminary at Jerusalem, I have been absorbed in the great question  of the day, which has been the salvation of Christians from the sword of the  invader of the Orient.  ʺUnfortunately, because  we  have  been confronted  in  the  Near East with this  problem of paramount importance, we leaders have not had the opportunity  to  think  of  these  equally  important  questions.  The  occupants  of  three  of  the  ancient thrones of Christendom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, the Patriarch  of  Antioch  and  the  Patriarch  of  Jerusalem,  have  been  constantly  confronted  with  the  question  of  how  to  save  their  own  fold  from  extermination.  These  patriarchates represent a great number of Orthodox and their influence would  be  of  prime  importance  in  any  deliberation.  But  they  have  not  had  time  to  send their bishops to a round‐table conference to deliberate on the questions  of  doctrine.  A  general  synod,  such  as  is  so  profitably  held  in  your  Church  when you come together every three years, would have the same result, if we  could  hold  the  same  sort  of  synod  in  the  Near  East.  A  conference  similar  to  the one held by your Church was planned by the Patriarch of Constantinople  in  September,  1911,  but  he  did  not  take  place,  owing  to  command  of  the  Sultan that the bishops who attended would be subject to penalty of death.  ʺIn 1906, when the Olympic games took place in Athens, the Metropolitan of  Drama, now of Smyrna, passed through Athens. That was sufficient to cause  an  imperative  demand  of  the  Patriarch  of  Constantinople  that  the  Metropolitan  be  punished,  and  in  consequence  he  was  transferred  from  Drama  to  Smyrna.  From  these  facts  you  can  see  under  what  conditions  the  evolution of the Greek Church has been taking place.  ʺAs I have stated in former conversations with my brethren of the Episcopal  Church, we hope that, by the Grace of God, freedom and liberty will come to  our race, and our bishops will be free to attend such conferences as we desire.  I assure you that a great spirit of revival will be inaugurated and give proof of  the revival of Grecian life of former times.  ʺThe question of the freedom of the territory to be occupied in the Near East is  not merely a question of the liberty of the people and the individual, but also 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/metaxakisanglicans1918/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

cyprus 75%

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/cyprus/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

GOC1935DiangelmaBeng 74%

The Second Public Communication of the Holy  Synod of the G.O.C. in 1935 Recognizes the  Patriarchates of Jerusalem, Antioch, Serbia, etc    In  the  below  Encyclical  by  the  three  GOC  hierarchs,  the  statement is  made  that the  reason why the New Calendarists are schismatic is because they separated themselves  liturgically from the Churches of Jerusalem, Antioch, Serbia, etc, who chose to remain  with the old calendar. In saying this, it means that the three hierarch still considered  the above Old Calendarist Patriarchates to be part of the Church. Far removed is this  from the false theory of Bp. Kirykos who claims that the Old Calendarist Patriarchates  all fell in 1924 even if they retained the old calendar. Bp. Kirykos refers to anything  opposing such a belief as “Old Calendarist Ecumenism.” But if this is the case, then  Bp. Kirykos himself has his consecration from the hands of Bishop Matthew, who had  no  problem  receiving  consecration  from  the  hands  of  these  three  hierarchs,  despite  their clearly open “Old Calendarist Ecumenism” exemplified in the below Encyclical  they published in May, 1935, as their official communication to the Orthodox people.    PASTORAL ENCYCLICAL  of the Most Eminent Metropolitans  of the Autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church,  Germanus of Demetrias, Chrysostom formerly  of Florina, and Chrysostom of Zacynth    .

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/goc1935diangelmabeng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

CND SPCD notes 71%

Integrity initiative:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/11/28/cnd-spcd-notes/

28/11/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

OrthodoxAnglicanUnity1914to1921 66%

Project Canterbury The Anglican and Eastern Churches:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/orthodoxanglicanunity1914to1921/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

GOCDemetrias1935eng 63%

ENCYCLICAL OF METROPOLITAN GERMANUS OF  DEMETRIAS, PUBLISHED AND DISTRIBUTED IN MAY 1935    The  following  flyer  was  published  and  distributed  throughout  the  Metropolis  of  Demetrias  in  May,  1935,  after  Metropolitan  Germanus  of Demetrias  and  two  other  hierarchs had officially returned to the old calendar. The section has been emphasized  in bold print where Metropolitan Germanus describes that he and his fellow hierarchs  have  the  purpose  of  collaborating  with  the  Old  Calendarist  Patriarchates  and  Autocephalous Churches. This proves that although the three hierarchs did denounce  the  State  Church  of  Greece  as  schismatic,  they  did  not  regard  the  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Mt.  Sinai,  Mt.  Athos,  Russia,  Poland,  Serbia,  etc,  to  be  schismatic, but on the contrary, they viewed them as “collaborators.” Bishop Matthew  accepted  consecration at their hands  despite  this, and  he was also fully  aware of  the  fulfilment  of  this  obligation  when  the  Holy  GOC  Synod  (to  which  Bishop  Matthew  belonged)  decided  to  send  Metropolitan  Chrysostom  of  Florina  to  Jerusalem  and  Antioch for this very purpose in 1936. Is this not “Old Calendarist Ecumenism” as  described in the mind of Bp. Kirykos Kontogiannis? The below document was taken  from  Bp.  Kirykos’  own  archive  at  Koropi.  This  document  has  been  hidden  in  this  archive for several decades. It cannot be said that Bp. Kirykos is unaware of it, because  together with the original document there was also a photocopy of the same document,  upon  which the controversial  statement  is underlined with  a pen.  Whose pen might  that be? For it to be underlined it means it was not only read but attention was also  drawn  towards  it.  So  the  question  remains:  Why  has  Bp.  Kirykos  failed  to  publish  such  an  important  document?  What  could  be  his  excuse  other  than  the  fact  that  he  hides such documents on purpose in order to get away with falsifying GOC history to  suite his fanatic one‐sided positions? A true Orthodox bishop does not hide the truth  from  his  flock  by  choosing  to  reveal  only  the  documents  that  suit  him.  A  true  Orthodox bishop reveals the truth, be it in his favour or not. Thus, Bp. Kirykos proves  to be a false bishop. His own archive betrays him. The original document in Greek is  available as a scanned image, while the below is an English translation:    HELLENIC REPUBLIC    METROPOLITAN OF DEMETRIAS    Pious  priests,  honourable  wardens  of  the  Churches,  and  remaining  blessed  Christians of our most holy Metropolis.    A  qualification  sine  qua  non  for  every  pastor  is  to  have  love  towards  our  Saviour and Lord, Jesus Christ. “Do you love me?” our Saviour asked Peter,  “Tend my sheep.” Love and faith towards the Saviour and towards the one,  holy,  catholic  and  apostolic  Church  that  He  founded,  is  what  we  bishops  confess  officially  before  God  and  men  when  we  take  up  the  hierarchical  dignity,  certifying  that  we  desire,  by  divine  succour  and  confidence,  to  unwaveringly  retain  the  faith  of  Christ  and  the  holy  traditions  completely  spotless.  Upon  reaching  a  thirty‐year  period  of  shepherding  the  God‐saved  eparchy  of  Demetrias,  we  retained,  with  fear  of  God,  the  holy  traditions,  protecting the flock of Christ from every opposing attack, becoming a faithful  witness  of  the  divine  and  holy  canons  and  traditions  of  our  Church.  Unfortunately,  men  speaking  perversely  received  the  succession  of  the  Holy  Church of Greece, and, perverting the truth, they substituted it with falsehood  and  deceit,  disregarded  the  Holy  Canons  and  the  Holy  Traditions,  causing  obvious spiritual damage. Our objections were in vain. Our protests were to  no  avail.  Not  considering  even  one  of  all  of  these  [objections  and  protests],  they  disregarded  the  Festal  Calendar  [Greek:  Heortologion]  of  our  Church,  which is inextricably linked to the Paschal Rule [Paschalios Canon], the Sunday  Cycle  [Kyriakodromion],  the  fast  of  the  Holy  Apostles,  and  the  worship  in  general,  introducing  instead  of  the  Orthodox  Festal  Calendar  (Julian),  the  Gregorian  (Frankish)  calendar.  We,  due  to  love  for  the  Church,  for  twelve  entire  years  did  not  cease  to  advise  and  admonish  the  innovators,  pointing  out  the  downhill  direction  the  Church  had  taken  leading  to  the  future  severing  of  the  unity  of  the  One  Holy  Church  of  Christ,  and  the  arising  discords, attitudes and riots, but unfortunately we were not listened to. With  great sorrow and contrition of heart we were compelled, together with other  hierarchs, to overthrow and expel the Gregorian calendar, keeping it only for  the  daily  life  and  political  necessities  of  the  Christians,  while  embracing  the  Festal  Calendar  of  our  Church,  based  on  the  Julian  Calendar  which  was  adopted  for  use  by  our  Church  at  the  Ecumenical  Council  of  Nicea.  Remaining  faithful  to  the  tradition  of  the  Seven  Ecumenical  Councils,  the  ordinances of which our Church respects and unwaveringly retains, we shall  collaborate  [Greek:  synergazometha]  with  the  Orthodox  Churches  of  Jerusalem,  Antioch,  Mt.  Sinai,  Mt.  Athos,  Russia,  Poland,  Serbia  and  the  remaining Orthodox  Churches  that  keep the  Patristic Old Festal  Calendar,  not  acquiescing  to  remain  under  the  curses  and  anathemas  of  the  Holy  Fathers  and  the  Orthodox  Patriarchs,  who  in  Ecumenical  and  Regional  Councils, appointed what is befitting.     We  are  convinced  that  you  shall  follow  us  to  the  fields  of  evangelical  grace,  just as the shepherd treads before the sheep and the sheep follow him, and do  not  follow,  but  rather  flee,  from  anything  alien.  For  about  150  years,  emperors, hierarchs and mighty men upon the earth were expelling the holy  icons  from  the  churches,  but  the  Faith  of  the  Christians  proved  to  be  victorious, triumphantly restoring [the icons] to the churches, because “this is  the victory that has conquered the world,  namely, our Faith.” Whenever the  people  felt  their  faith  being  disgraced,  they  supported  and  retained  [their  faith]  unscathed  and  unfalsified  throughout  the  centuries.  Therefore  stand  fast  and  hold  the  Orthodox  Traditions,  keep  the  Patristic  Festal  Calendar,  namely, the Julian. Hold fast what you have, so that no one may deprive you  of your crown, namely, Orthodoxy.    In Athens, May, 1935.    Your fervent supplicant to Christ,    + Metropolitan Germanus of Demetrias 

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/09/23/gocdemetrias1935eng/

23/09/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Balkans Trip Report SBL 60%

Montenegro, Serbia, Greece: Podgorica, 11-13/12/17:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/11/28/balkans-trip-report-sbl/

28/11/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Copy of Unit 5 vocabs 60%

Latin Patriarchate High School Al-Jubeiha Full Name:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/02/copy-of-unit-5-vocabs/

02/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com