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August 2015 1-1 100%

Design By PULKIT MOHAN SINGLA, 2015 HALL OF POETS ISSUE 04, AUGUST 2015 NOT FOR SALE Copyright © 2015 by Hall Of Poets All rights reserved.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/08/22/august-2015-1-1/

22/08/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

EVENT (3) 99%

JULY 2015 HALL OF POETS NOT FOR SALE Powered By Lavita Palace © Cover Photo &

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/07/18/event-3/

18/07/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

HALL OF POETS 99%

JUNE 2015 NOT FOR SALE HALL OF POETS http://hallofpoets.weebly.com © Design By PULKIT MOHAN SINGLA, 2015 Powered By:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/06/26/hall-of-poets/

26/06/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

hall of poets 1-1 99%

HALL OF POETS Issue:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/03/hall-of-poets-1-1/

03/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

MAY 2015 1-2 95%

© Photography By DAIPAYAN NAIR, 2015 © Design By PULKIT MOHAN SINGLA, 2015 HALL ISSUE 01(2) MAY 2015 OF POETS Not For Sale O Cinderella!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/05/20/may-2015-1-2/

20/05/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

CM-Littérature-S2 95%

the age was suited for stimulating the imagination of the poets and this mainly because their patron who were noble men encouraged them to write poetry and masque for the court.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/03/09/cm-litterature-s2/

08/03/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Programfolder 95%

The word goes around Four poets at a coffee table.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2013/05/23/programfolder/

23/05/2013 www.pdf-archive.com

literature 2 92%

The End Lecture Handout 8 Early Nineteenth-Century Poets Eighteenth Century Poetry 1- Called the Age of Reason.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/05/literature-2/

05/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

SlayonWords-PressRelease 87%

Slay on Words will take place on Saturday the 19th November at 7pm, where the poets will perform in two competitive rounds followed by a DJ set to round off the evening.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/11/14/slayonwords-pressrelease/

14/11/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

IM - Artist 87%

7 FEBRUARY, 1991 | imaad.majeed@gmail.com | 0094766696489 | imaadmajeed.com curatorial artist residencies EDUCATION Kacha Kacha (August 2015 - present) Director, curator and organizer Curating poets, rappers and singer-songwriters in Sinhala, Tamil and English, through a socially conscious lens.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/31/im-artist/

31/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

O'Hara Surface reading 86%

He explains, “we decide, we like Don Allen we don’t like / Henry James so much we like Herman Melville / we don’t want to be in a poets’ walk in / San Francisco even we just want to be rich / and walk on girders in our silver hats.”5 The influence of others often calls for poetic allusion and a poet, in referencing an older more distinguished poet, engages a multi-referential gesture.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/04/01/o-hara-surface-reading/

01/04/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

ASPECTS OF GAELIC POETRY 85%

A land in which Gaelic poets were once forbidden to utter their country’s name and so over two hundred names for Ireland evolved.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/27/aspects-of-gaelic-poetry/

27/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

Windharp ENGLISH TRANSLATION 83%

What the 1916 poets envisioned – a spiritual, cultural, linguistic and economic revival, an equal cherishing of all citizens – is not a vision which this anthologist has warmed to;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/03/27/windharp-english-translation/

27/03/2017 www.pdf-archive.com

thesublimecity 80%

  Towards an Urban Sublime: Expressing the Inexpressible in Urban Romantic Poetry  As the industrial revolution brought about the rapid urbanization of cities throughout  Europe, writers who were previously concerned with the aesthetics of nature and the countryside  found themselves grappling with an entirely new set of poetic and philosophical concerns. The  teeming crowds, towering structures and spectacular sights that they encountered in the novel  environment of the city incited in them feelings of overwhelming terror and awe akin to those  typically associated with the romantic “sublime.” However, as we look more closely at the  city­focused works of poets like Baillie, Wordsworth and Hood, we begin to see that there is a  fundamental difference between the “natural” sublime of earlier romantic poetry and the “urban”  sublime of the city poem. Whereas the poet’s sublime experience in nature is typically associated  with some sort of catharsis or transcendence, forcing man to come to terms with the limitations  of his own humanity, the urban sublime instead incites a feelings of wonder and disgust at the  incredible potential of that humanity itself, or—as Anne Janowitz put it in her essay ​ The  Artifactual Sublime​ —it forces man to confront “the self as if it were not the self; to experience  the madeness of the human world as if it were different stuff than the labour of persons.”   While it is true that, as Janowitz notes, this “mis­recognition” of the sublime object often  resulted in the experience of “romantic alienation,” I argue that the use of sublime language and  natural imagery also acted as a sort of coping mechanism for their writers. Through the  experience of the “urban” sublime is of course intrinsically linked to feelings of terror and  isolation, the fact that these poets were describing particularly urban experiences in terms of  something formerly associated with nature helped them to bridge the gap between the urban  world and the natural one. This technique, therefore, served the dual purpose of expressing the        unfamiliarity of this new landscape and familiarizing it, allowing these poets to discover, as  Wordsworth put it, that the underlying “spirit of Nature” was still upon them, even in this “vast  receptacle.”   In Thomas Hood’s delightfully erratic ​ Moral Reflections on the Cross of Saint Paul’s​ , we  find a perfect example of the struggle many poets faced to familiarize the sublimely  overwhelming urban environment. Hood’s speaker—who is presumably a tourist visiting  London for the first time—is hilariously unable to produce any original or insightful  “reflections” about the complex cityscape he sees spread out before him, and resorts instead to  stringing together a bizarre collection of references and metaphors that don’t seem to fit together  into a cohesive vision.   The speaker’s numerous allusions to “classic” works of literature suggest that he feels a  longing to express the “profound” nature of the landscape he is viewing, but even these  references come off as disjointed and confused. In the poem’s first stanza, the speaker compares  the ball of Saint Paul’s cathedral to Mount Olympus, the home of the gods in Greek mythology.  He then immediately moves on to reference a figure from Roman mythology, when he proclaims  that he is sitting “Among the gods, by Jupiter!” The speaker’s thoughts turn again towards the  literary in the third stanza, when—looking down at the city crowds beneath him—the speaker  feels the need to question the nature of man. “What is life?” He asks himself, and answers with  an apparent reference to a now cliche line from William Shakespeare's ​ As You Like it​ : “And what  is life? And all its ages— / There’s seven stages!” Before he is able to offer any sort of “real”  philosophical inquiry into what he means by this, however, the speaker distracts himself by  naming off the seven neighborhoods of London, and never returns to the subject.         While this random misfiring of half­baked references helps develop the speaker’s  delightfully zany personality, it also gestures at the bewilderment he feels upon taking in the  sprawling landscape of London from above. Though the speaker cannot adequately express the  profound emotional impact of this landscape in his own words—and it is clear that he does not  have the educational background to substantiate even an insightful literary comparison—he still  feels the urge to grasp for images and analogies that he associates with grandiosity and power.  This attempt—and failure—to express the inexpressible is a common struggle in the literature of  the sublime, and in Joanna Baillie’s poem ​ London​ —which was written around the same time as  Hood’s piece—we are introduced to yet another speaker who cannot quite find the right words to  describe the overwhelming urban landscape. The difference here is that Baillie’s speaker is more  familiar with the concept of the natural sublime, and she uses the language associated with it to  explore the ways that the experience of urban sublime is both related to and separate from the  experience of the sublime in nature.  The poem’s initial description of the city—in which we find the city viewed again from  above, from the hills of Hampstead “through the clear air”—presents the urban space as a rather  innocuous, almost quaint vision. The London skyline seems to the speaker a “goodly sight,” and  its structures are rendered in relation to familiar human figures. The spires of St. Paul’s cathedral  flank the structure “in kindred grace, like twain of sisters dear,” the “ridgy roofs” of the city’s  buildings sit amicably “side by side.” The entire vision is “softly tinted” by the distance of the  viewer, _____. However, as the air begins to grow denser, and “moistened winds” prevail, the  city’s landscape transfigures into something far more menacing. The “thin soft haze” of the  poem’s first section becomes a “grand panoply of smoke arrayed,” and the dome of St. Paul’s        Cathedral—which is now surrounded not by quaint spires, but by “heavy” clouds that sail around  its imposing dome—seems “a curtain gloom / Connecting heaven and earth,—a threatening sign  of doom.” The shifting weather strips the humanity from the city’s landscape, and the language  of the speaker quickly shifts to the language that references the natural sublime. The combination  of almost ethereal    However, this use of sublime language also allows the speaker to articulate the  differences between the urban world and the natural one. Though the speaker seems compelled  to compare the structure to prodigious natural figures (she states that the cathedral “might some  lofty alpine peak be deemed”) it becomes apparent that these metaphors are not quite sufficient  to describe the sight she is witnessing. Because its form reveals “man’s artful structure,” (and by  extension the “artful structure” of man’s society), the cathedral cannot be viewed as totally  natural. Instead, it is referred to as “more than natural,” and seems to transcend the boundaries of  both humanity and nature as it first “connects heaven and hearth” and then, a few lines later  seems “far removed from Earth.”   This somewhat confused description demonstrates the speaker’s complex feelings about  the urban landscape. Though she knows one thing for certain about this cathedral—“She is  sublime”—the speaker cannot quite find the language she needs to describe the sense of the  particularly “urban” sublime she is experiencing. She knows the cathedral is a product of  mankind, and that the power that it is imbued with is intrinsically linked with the oppressive  church that it represents and the often corrupt society that it is a part of. Part of the reason that  the church looks seems to her so terrifying is certainly the fact that entering the streets of the city  means succumbing to the dominance of the church, the government, and society as a whole.         Language has always failed to fully express the sublime experience, however, and the  speaker’s attempts to conflate the urban sublime of the city with the natural sublime simply  demonstrates a desire to give a recognizable form to the terror she is experiencing—in order to  truly become what Lyotard calls an “expressive witness to the inexpressible,” the speaker must  carry thought and rationality to their logical conclusions, and for a romantic poet the world can  best be rationalized and understood in terms of the rural. In contrast to Hood’s speaker, whose  manic metaphor­hopping was a symptom of a mind unprepared to grapple with the urban  landscape’s complexities, Baillie’s speaker logically considers the unfamiliar in terms of her own  experience, and makes the urban feel, in a way, like an extension of nature.   This blending of the natural and the urban is epitomized in the final portion of Baillie’s  poem, when the viewpoint shifts to the perspective of a “distant traveller.” From afar, this  traveller is able to view the London in its entirety, and finds himself awestruck by the stars in the  “luminous canopy” above the city that seem to be “cast up from myriads of lamps that shine /  Along her streets in many a starry line.” The “flood of human life in motion” creates a noise that  sounds to the traveller like the “voice of a tempestuous ocean,” and he finds his soul filled with a  “sad but pleasing awe” upon hearing it. These magnificent sights, which seem at once human  and natural, express the rich suggest that the city is capable of igniting in the human soul the  same complex emotions that a sublime natural splendor might.  Wordsworth took this idea to its ultimate conclusion as he navigated the ​ bacchanalian  chaos that is St. Bartholomew’s fair at the conclusion of ​ The Prelude, Book Seven. ​ In  Wordsworth’s poem, we are not viewing London from above, but from the very trenches of the  city, and the sublimity he is experiencing comes not from the contemplation of the urban   

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/20/thesublimecity/

20/04/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Sonnets and The Queen 79%

These by definition must not be English, poets or painters, as these could link us back to the cult idea and prove it true.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/10/01/sonnets-and-the-queen/

01/10/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

parody 2.2 77%

______ 23 Sarah Cerullo For Aspiring Poets!

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/26/parody-2-2/

25/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Mind Map Dates 75%

William Wordsworth Daniel Defoe 1770-1850 1661-1731 Ann Radcliffe Richard Steele Joseph Addison 1764-1823 John Keats Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1795-1821 1772-1834 Early 19th Century Poets th 18 Century Prose Henry Fielding Jonathan Swift 1707-1754 1667-1745 Percy Shelley Lord Byron E.M.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2015/12/05/mind-map-dates/

05/12/2015 www.pdf-archive.com

The Last Poet by Peco Kolchkoski 75%

Beyond Beyond the stary sky, there's a place poets go, to fulfill their fate, unselfishly reaching, toward the people, and silent they remain, as they share, poems in red blood, and paper, and bits and bytes, tears on the face, shivering cold, rotten soul, rusted body, no longer, face in the crowd, wondering smile, mad look, and heart of a lion.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/07/25/the-last-poet-by-peco-kolchkoski/

25/07/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

CV Nella Monge Inglés [Actualizado Oct 2016] 75%

Work Experience 2011 - 2012 6 months 2014 -2016 SYKES MORAVIA Costumer service agent for AT&T HABITAT FOR HUMANITY COSTA RICA Ocasional design of printed and digital material 2014 VOZUCR Publication of a short story in the VozUCR magazine 2014 EDITORIAL EVA Publication of three short stories in the book titled “La Cazadora de Historias” 2014 INTERNATIONAL POETRY FESTIVAL 2014 Participation in the recital of young poets called “La Juventud tiene la palabra” 2016 PET MORAVIA Brand Book Design 2016 CASA DE POESÍA Participation in the recital of costarrican young poets in the International poetry festival and publication of three poems in the book “Sub - 30” 2016 HOGAR JIMENA Web design + compossition and correction of the text.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/10/15/cv-nella-monge-ingles-actualizado-oct-2016/

14/10/2016 www.pdf-archive.com

Parody 2.1 75%

Pa ro Nothing truly beautiful is of any use;

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2014/03/26/parody-2-1/

25/03/2014 www.pdf-archive.com

Comparison between Purpura and Kay 74%

While some poets, such as Walt Whitman, utilize long lines to really create a visual scene.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/02/15/comparison-between-purpura-and-kay/

15/02/2018 www.pdf-archive.com

Scouseology Press Pack PDF 1 74%

Along with Adrian Henri and Brian Patten, with whom he published two best-selling volumes of verse, McGough won fame as one of the "Mersey Poets".

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2012/03/02/scouseology-press-pack-pdf-1/

02/03/2012 www.pdf-archive.com

CUMULUS 1 74%

First published in December 2017 by Edited and designed by Dominic Hale, Katy Lewis Hood, Jonathan Coward, and Figgy Guyver Poems by All rights reserved CUMULUS 2017 With thanks to our contributors Copyright of the poems rests with the poets www.cumulusjournal.com @cumulusjournal Denise Riley Imogen Cassels Pratyusha Daisy Lafarge Alex Grafen Lila Matsumoto Peter Manson Dan Eltringham Sarah Crewe William Fuller 5 6 8 10 13 14 18 22 24 32 DENISE RILEY Tick tock A formal structure generates your thought.

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2018/03/17/cumulus-1/

16/03/2018 www.pdf-archive.com